Name Jennie Crum by fjzhxb

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									Name: Jennie Crum Unit Title/ Theme: Drawing with Scissors with Henri Matisse/ Study of Movement in Artworks Grade Level: Third Grade Length: Five Days- 45 minute periods Description This lesson is meant to reinforce the big idea of movement. First, students will be asked to show the different kinds of movements they can do, such as jumping dancing, and stomping. Then, I will explain that artists show this kind of movement in artworks. In addition, movement can be categorized as how the image leads your eyes throughout the picture plane, creating an illusion of movement. Certain elements such as color, shape, and repetition cause active movement throughout the piece of art. With a solid information base about movement, I will introduce the paper cut-out reproduction, Icarus by Henri Matisse. I will give background information about Matisse, such as how he was a famous French painter, but as he got older, it was hard for him to stand and paint, so he developed the technique of the paper cut-out. The class will then complete a criticism activity regarding Matisse’s Icarus. I will show how Matisse used pure colors and complementary colors, shapes, and repetition, to move your eye from the main focal point to around the picture plane. In addition, I will reinforce that all of Matisse’s figures are active, and that helps reinforces movement in the artwork. The students will be creating their own paper cut out designs using complementary colors. The students will paint with acrylics on paper first, and then cut out specified shapes. The students will then glue them down on either white. As a post-studio activity, the students fill out a worksheet regarding their studio work, and what they learned of Henri Matisse. Objectives  Students will become familiar with the paper cut-outs of Henri Matisse.  Students will create paper cut-out using complementary color shapes that show activity, and movement.  Students will identify relationships between selected art elements and principals such as color, shape, repetition and movement. (Creative Expression and Communication-benchmark 4).  Students will explore and describe how art principals are used by artists to create visual effects such as contrasting colors, and repetition to create movement throughout the piece. (Analyzing and Responding – benchmark 2). Resources In order to complete research of Henri Matisse, I referenced the books Getting to Know the Artist: Henri Matisse by Mike Venezia. I also referenced Matisse’s book Jazz. For the one reproduction I am using Matisse’s Icarus, 1943. Materials Non-consumables  Reproduction- Icarus  Book- Getting to Know the Artist: Henri Matisse by Mike Venezia

 Brushes  Scissors  Map of Matisse’s birthplace  Picture of Henri Matisse  White Board Consumables  Paper  Acrylic paints  Glue  Pencils  Butcher paper  One dry erase marker  Foam plates  Plastic bags  Modeling clay (supplementary activity) Vocabulary Movement- the illusion or suggestion of motion in a work of art Illusion- something that tricks you into seeing things that might not be there Repetition- the act of repeating the same element throughout an artwork, such as shape Complementary colors- red and green, orange and blue, purple and yellow/ colors that neutralize each other Preparation Day One- Introducing Big Idea and Artist teacher supplies (non-consumable) – reproduction of Icarus, book, Getting to Know the Artist: Henri Matisse by Mike Venezia, white board, map of Matisse’s home town, picture of Matisse student supplies (non-consumable) – none teacher supplies (consumable) - dry–erase marker student supplies (consumable) - none Day Two- Studio- teacher supplies (non-consumable) reproduction of Icarus, brushes, white board student supplies (non-consumable) - brushes teacher supplies (consumable) - white paper, acrylic paint, butcher paper student supplies (consumable) - white paper, acrylic paint, foam plates Day Three- Studio- teacher supplies (non-consumable) - white board, scissors, reproduction student supplies (non-consumable) - scissors teacher supplies (consumable) – check its list, white paper, pencil, dry-erase marker, plastic baggies student supplies (consumable) – white paper, pencil

Day Four- Studio- teacher supplies (non-consumable) student supplies (non-consumable) teacher supplies (consumable) - glue, white paper, teacher example student supplies (consumable) – glue, white paper Day Five- Post Studio Activity- teacher supplies (non-consumable) white board student supplies (non-consumable)- none teacher supplies (consumable) - dry–erase marker, modeling clay (if needed) student supplies (consumable) – paper, and pencil, glue if needed Getting the Classroom Ready Before each class I will make sure that all chairs are pushed in and the room is neat and tidy. On day one, I will make sure to place out the Matisse reproduction of Icarus, the book, Getting to Know the Artist: Henri Matisse by Mike Venezia, the map of Matisse’s home town, and the picture of Matisse. These will provide great references for the students, and help them relate more to Matisse as a person. In addition, I will make sure the room is in order, and the children have enough room to move, due to the introduction of the big idea. On the white board I will write “What makes movement in an artwork?” On day two, the students are working with paint, so I must line the tables with butcher paper before class. I will set out only the primary colors, and the can of brushes. On day three, I will remind students where the scissors are, which is in the cupboard, and also set out a stack of white paper for sketches. I will purchase plastic bags for storage of their cut-outs. Day four is another studio work day, so I will remind students that the glue is in the cupboard. Day five consists of a post- studio activity, so I will be setting out the worksheet on my desk. I will also set out the balls of modeling clay for the supplementary activity.

Procedures Day One- Introducing Big Idea and Artist  When the students first walk in, I let them sit in their seats. They are aware that in order to show me that they are listening and ready to work, they fix their eyes on me and sit quietly. I complement their behavior and begin the lesson when all eyes are on me. This should take around two minutes.  I will introduce the topic of the day, which is movement. I will ask all students to stand up and push in their chairs. I will then ask to show me jumping, then stomping, then dancing. The students should react to each statement with a type of movement. I will explain that what they just did is called movement, and they were being active. This should take about eight minutes.  I will then explain that artists show this kind of movement in their art. They show people waving their arms and legs, or whole bodies even. When artists draw this it creates an illusion of movement. (I will define what illusion is.) In addition, movement can be categorized as how the image leads your eyes throughout the picture plane, creating an illusion of

movement. Certain elements, such as a focal point, color, shape, and repetition cause active movement throughout the piece of art. I will answer any questions about the concept of movement. This should take about ten minutes.  With a solid information base about movement, I will introduce the paper cut-out reproduction of Henri Matisse. I will tell them the name of the artist and title. Then the students take part in a criticism activity in which we will describe the artwork through key questions asked by me. These include: o What do you see regarding color, shape, line, pattern, and repetition? o How does this make you feel o What is the main character doing? o What do you think the artist used to make this artwork? This should take around ten minutes.  I will then give information about Matisse. Henri Matisse is often regarded as one of the most important French painters of the 20th century. Matisse loved using bright colors. Matisse continued creating art even in his 80's although he was bedridden. One creative activity that he could do while in bed was to cut paper into compositions ("drawing with scissors"). He selected 20 of these cut and paste pictures and made a book called "Jazz". Icarus is one image out of “Jazz”. Matisse’s cut-outs are very active and show lots of movement. They can do this because of the color contrasts, active shapes, and repetition of shapes. It makes our eyes follow a path throughout the picture. If I have time I will read a section of Getting to Know the Artist: Henri Matisse by Mike Venezia. This will give the student’s a better understanding of Henri Matisse. o I will then tell them that they will be creating their own paper cutout compositions in this lesson. This should take ten minutes. At the end of class I will dismiss the tables. The quietest table gets to line up first, and so on. The line must remain quiet, until the teacher comes to get the class.

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Day Two- Studio  When the students first walk in, I let them sit in their seats. They are aware that in order to show me that they are listening and ready to work, they fix their eyes on me and sit quietly. I complement their behavior and begin the lesson when all eyes are on me. This should take around two minutes.  I start the class out by asking who remembers what we talked about in the last class together. I will wait for the answers about movement and Matisse’s paper cut-outs. I will remind them that artists can make the illusion of movement happen by using active subject matter, contrasting colors, shapes, and repetition of elements. I then tell them Matisse just did not use colored construction paper in his pictures, he actually painted colors on plain paper, and then he cut shapes.

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o Today we are going to paint complementary colors on sheets of white paper. Who can tell me what complementary colors are? (The students should have prior knowledge of complementary colors, for they learned of them last year, and have been implementing them throughout this year.) o What are the three sets of complementary colors? Yes, they are red and green, yellow and purple, and blue and orange. o Red, yellow, and blue are what kind of colors? The answer is primary colors because they are pure colors. o Orange, purple, and green are secondary colors. They are made by mixing two primary colors together. This should take ten minutes.  On the board I write three equations on the board o red + yellow =? o blue + red =? o Yellow + blue =? I will have three volunteers come to the board to solve the equations. I will complement them and then say that we are ready to start painting with acrylics. The rules are that you must pick one set of complementary colors, and those are the colors you will be painting and using for your compositions. I will regain attention at the front of the classroom. I will tell them that we are only painting with red, yellow and blue, so in order to get our secondary color, we must mix paints. I will show them the amount of acrylic paint needed for mixing by demonstrating. I will explain that it does not take globs of paint, but only a little bit. This should take five minutes. Students are instructed to pick up four sheets of 11in x 18in white paper, and a paint brush. Two for the primary color and two for the secondary color. I will be standing by the paints, and distributing paint on the foam plates. The students are required to tell me which complementary color scheme they are using, and I will give them the appropriate colors. The students will then go back to their seat and first paint on two pages of their primary color, and next two pages of their complement secondary color. The student’s will then paint. This will take twenty-two minutes. Cleanup begins five minutes before the class leaves. I will announce that it is time for clean-up, and call on quiet tables to clean off the plates, brushes, and to put pages on drying rack, if they have not already done so. The student’s will line up afterwards. This takes five minutes.

Day Three- Studio  When the students first walk in, I let them sit in their seats. They are aware that in order to show me that they are listening and ready to work, they fix their eyes on me and sit quietly. I complement their behavior and begin the lesson when all eyes are on me. This should take around two minutes.  I start the class out by asking who remembers what the big idea of this lesson. I will wait for the answers about movement and Matisse’s paper

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cut-outs. I will remind them that artists can make the illusion of movement happen by using active subject matter, contrasting colors, shapes, and repetition of elements. Today the students will be sketching their desired image, and cutting their paper according to the sketch. Students will be asked to collect their colored pages from their portfolio. ( I placed them in the class portfolio after they dried, students were required to write their names on the back) I dismiss one table at a time to collect their scissors, and one piece of 11in x 18 in white paper. This should take about eight minutes. Once students are seated and quiet, I will show them an example of a sketch that I completed. I explain that I want my white paper to show through the red paper, so I cut my dancing contour image out of the red paper. I explain that movement is our big idea, so you want your figures to be doing something active, like we did in the first class. Your image can be dancing, running, jumping or even playing ball. Also keep in mind that repetition of the same shape can create an illusion of movement. I ask if there are any questions, and then tell them to start their sketches on the sheet of paper. This should take five minutes. I allow about ten to fifteen minutes for sketching, and the prompt students to start cutting their shapes. I will walk around the class to observe if students understand the concept of showing movement in their images. This will last for thirty minutes. Clean-up begins five minutes until the end of class. Students will throw away any useless scraps. I have provided a plastic bag, and paper clips, if needed for larger cut-outs, for each student in storing their shapes. Students will put away scissors, and put their baggies into the class portfolio.

Day Four- Studio  When the students first walk in, I let them sit in their seats. They are aware that in order to show me that they are listening and ready to work, they fix their eyes on me and sit quietly. I complement their behavior and begin the lesson when all eyes are on me. This should take around two minutes.  Students will be completing their composition by gluing images onto their base paper, which is a piece of 11in x 18in white paper. I release the tables to get glue, and a piece of the white paper. Once, seated, I will show the students my final example. I will explain that I glued the red image first, and then I glued the green shapes on next. I will demonstrate how much glue needs to be applied on the back of the sheets of colored paper. This should take about fifteen minutes.  Students will then work on gluing. In addition, if they did not get all of their shapes cut out, they may do so today. The image is urged to be completed today, although they have some time the following class to complete the gluing. Students will put their name, and class on the back of the image? This will occur for the next twenty minutes

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Cleanup will consist of putting images on the drying racks, putting away glue bottles, throwing away scraps, and washing down tables. Students will be asked to line up according to the quietest table. This should take eight or nine minutes.

Day Five- Post Studio Activity  When the students first walk in, I let them sit in their seats. They are aware that in order to show me that they are listening and ready to work, they fix their eyes on me and sit quietly. I complement their behavior and begin the lesson when all eyes are on me. This should take around two minutes.  I will first ask which artist are we talking about. I will remind them by showing the reproduction of Icarus. I will ask each student to hang up their image on our Gallery Wall, with the provided tacks. I want the students to view everyone’s creations while they are working on their post-studio activity. I will complement the great efforts of all of the students. This should take ten minutes.  As the students sit back down I will tell them to pick up the worksheet on my desk. The student’s will be working on this worksheet for the remainder of the class period. I will help guide students through the questions if needed. The worksheet is attached to this lesson. This will take twenty-five to thirty minutes.  If students complete the worksheet early, they may take part in the supplementary activity.  Clean-up, if needed, will begin. Students will be asked to turn in worksheets and line up according to the quietest table. This should take five minutes. Supplementary Activity If students finish their assignments early I will have them work with modeling clay. I want the students to take what they learned about showing movement in 2-D art, and translate that knowledge into 3-D art. I want them to work with molding images that show some kind of active movement. They do not think about color, but more about contour line and shape. They can think about dancing, falling, playing, or any other kind of active movement. The student’s enjoy the modeling clay, so this should be a nice way of transitioning their thought processes. The student’s will be using the sphere, slab, and coil techniques to mold their figures. Safety Considerations I will always keep the room neat and tidy before each class comes in. At the beginning of the year, the students were given rules on clean-up. The students understand how to put supplies away neatly, and not to ingest any liquid materials. In addition, the students know if they get water on the floor they must clean it up so nobody falls. I will assist any students who are struggling with cleaning brushes. Also, I will instruct students that tacks are not meant to handled in a bad way, such as poking yourself or others. If the tacks become a problem, I will use tape. In addition; students know that before they can line up, they must push in their chairs. I do not tolerate any

horseplay with any material. I will give the students three chances, but if he or she is then causing harm to themselves, I find it necessary to send them to the office.

Formative Assessment I assess whether the student is able to focus and follow direction for each individual activity. Also, I assess whether they are paying attention during demonstrations. If I see anyone who looks confused I will repeat the statement again. I look for eye contact, and participation. Summative Assessment I will use a rating scale as the grading tool for this project. The rating scale is attached.


								
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