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Water and Weight Loss

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Water and Weight Loss

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									Water and Weight Loss
Fitness Water, Inc., H2Ultra Website Article #1 Heather King April 23, 2007

What if weight loss really did come in a bottle? Not in the form of a magic pill or powder, but something much more basic than that. It’s already a big part of you at this very moment. I’m talking water. Those two hydrogen’s and one oxygen that make up over 70% of us. Turns out that water is a crucial part of your health plan and the key to keeping you lean, healthy and able to best control your appetite. The fact is that many of us walk around chronically dehydrated. We don’t take the time to drink, often because the tap water in our homes just isn’t that tasty or exciting. So when we do grab a beverage, it’s usually sweetened or caffeinated, which doesn’t hydrate you like pure water does. The result of this dehydration is that the cells in your body send signals to your brain that they are not getting everything they need. The part of our brain designed to seek out our basic needs often interprets these signals as hunger. We are actually thirsty, but this need is perceived as hunger. As a result, we grab food when all our cells truly need is water. Thus, chronic dehydration can lead to overeating and a slow steady weight gain. One recent study out of Virginia Polytechnic Institute gives us some insight into how well water can work to control appetite. Healthy, non-obese older adults were split into two groups; one group was given between 350-500mL of water before their meals, and the other group received no water before their meals. The group that drank water before their meals consistently ate fewer calories before they felt full and satisfied. Why? Because their bodies had a need for water as well as food; by satisfying their hydration needs, the water-drinkers no longer received signals from their cells telling them to consume more of anything, including food. There are a few key tips to including water in your weight loss plan: • Make sure that you enjoy the water you drink…that way you’ll drink it! Plain tap water or lightly filtered bottled waters may not do the trick. Clean pure bottled water such as H2Ultra, which uses a complex filtering process and adds minerals for taste, may encourage you to chug more of the stuff that you need! Drink before you get thirsty. The thirst mechanism is on a slight delay, and does not kick in until we are already dehydrated. Or, we may misinterpret these signals as hunger. To keep yourself hydrated and your cells at ease, put yourself on a sipping schedule. Keep a bottle of clean water with you at all times, and take sips every 15 to 20 minutes. The goal for the average individual is 11 – 12 cups of total fluid per day (including fluids from food and non-water sources), including 5 – 6 cups of PURE water each day. Numerous studies support the fact that drinking those 5 – 6 cups of water every day has a multitude of positive health effects for the brain and body. Water needs increase when you exercise, especially in hot weather. Aim to drink about 24 ounces of water during every hour of heavy exercise, and more before and afterwards to ensure recovery. Convenience and taste are key here. Purified ultra hydrating water with trace

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minerals, such as H2Ultra, comes in convenient 16.9-ounce bottles for grab-and-go exercise hydration. Go ahead, give it a try. Next time you’re feeling hungry, chug a bottle of H2Ultra instead, and wait a few minutes. You may be surprised at how satisfied you feel, and how your desire for food has vanished. Keep clean pure water in your weight loss plan, and you’ll be on your way to a leaner healthier you!
References: Balch JF, Balch PS. Prescription for Nutritional Healing. Avery Publishing Group, Inc: Garden City Park, NY. 1990. Kleiner S. Power Eating, 3rd Edition. Human Kinetics. 2007. Van Walleghen EL, Orr JS, Gentile CL, Davy BM. Pre-meal water consumption reduced meal energy intake in older but not younger subjects. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Jan;15(1):93-9.


								
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