Ben Bane Dulaney edited the Jour by fjzhxb

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									AN ANNOTATED INDEX TO THE JOURNALS OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF SOUTHWESTERN VIRGINIA
Prepared by William M. Hackworth Chair, Publications Committee August 2009 ―Amor montium nos movet‖ ( The love of the mountains inspires us) - motto of the Society. About the Society. An Historical Society was formed in the City in 1923, but it did not survive. What is now the Historical Society of Western Virginia was organized August 23, 1957, as an outgrowth of the observance of Roanoke‘s 75th anniversary. About the Journal. Ben Bane Dulaney edited the Journal from the first issue in the summer of 1964 until his death November 2, 1967. Dulaney was public relations director of the Norfolk & Western Railway. George Kegley (president of the Society 1963-1966) was appointed to succeed him, and has continued to serve as its indefatigable editor since. Kegley has authored a dozen signed articles in the Journal and numerous notes, and probably has authored most of the many unsigned articles which have appeared in the Journal. The Journal was originally called the Journal of the Roanoke Historical Society. On February 15, 1972, the Society changed its name to the Roanoke Valley Historical Society, and the Journal accordingly changed its name thereafter to the Journal of the Roanoke Valley Historical Society. In 1997, the Society again changed its name, to the History Museum and Historical Society of Western Virginia, and the Journal became the Journal of the History Museum and Historical Society of Western Virginia with publication of the 1999 Journal. With publication of the 2006-2007 issue, the Journal became the Journal of the Historical Society of Western Virginia, reflecting a change in the name of the Society. The Journal has been published regularly since 1964 on an irregular schedule; thirty-four issues have been published to date. Purchase information. Journal of the Roanoke Historical Society Vol. 1, No. 1, Summer 1964 Kegley, George. ―A Note from the President.‖ photo. 1, 32. Jefferson, Thomas. ―Letter from Mr. Tom.‖ 2. Letter from Thomas Jefferson at Poplar Forest dated November 18, 1815, about a five day trip he took to the Peaks of Otter.

Barnes, Raymond. ―Treasure Trove.‖ illus. 3-7. Western Virginia yarns about hidden gold and silver mines and treasures. Wilson, Goodridge. ―Some Phases of the Civil War in the Roanoke Area.‖ illus.. 6-17. A paper delivered by Dr. Wilson to the Society May 8, 1964. Stoner, R. D. ―The Case of the Warrantless Prisoners.‖ illus. 18-20. Three letters written in 1861 concerning the disposition of prisoners held in the Roanoke County jail suspected of being spies, dissidents, or conspirators; one is from Gen. R. E. Lee. -------. ―Two Ladies of the Museum.‖ photo. 21. Photograph of two mannequins wearing clothing from the Civil War and WWI eras on display in the Society’s new museum in the Roanoke College Library, Salem. --------. ―Newspaper Days: 1790.‖ illus. 22-23. Advertisements from the Richmond Independent Chronicle of May 19, 1790. Hildebrand, J. R. ―The Borden Patent.‖ 24-26. A brief description of a study done by Walter Curtis Ayers of Roanoke and donated to the Society by his widow, of the 1739 Borden Patent, which included parts of Western Virginia. --------. ―From a Son after Cold Harbor.‖ 27-29. Letter dated July 10, 1862, from Newton Curry, a soldier fighting on the Peninsula, to his father in Montgomery County. -------. ―Museum Piece.‖ photo 30-31. Describes some of the displays at the Society’s new museum in the Roanoke College Library, Salem. Journal of the Roanoke Historical Society Vol. 1, No. 2, Winter 1964-1965 Hildebrand, J. R. ―Forgotten Graveyards of Roanoke [Valley].‖ photo. 1-3 White, Jean M. ―Three-Layer Cake of Prehistoric Virginia.‖ photo. 4-6. Reprinted from the Washington Post; discusses archeological finds during excavations for the lake (later named Lake Abbott) that was created at the Peaks of Otter Lodge. Niederer, Frances J. ―Fincastle Springs: Resort of the ‗80s.‖ photos. 7-14, 22. A chapter from Dr. Niederer’s book, The Town of Fincastle, Virginia, published by the University of Virginia Press. Boyd, Jane C. ―Civil War Comes to Buchanan: An Eyewitness Story.‖ 15-18.

Mrs. Boyd’s husband was William W. Boyd, who represented Botetourt County in the “Secession Convention” of February 13, 1861. Anderson, Ellen Graham. ―Civil War Comes to Buchanan: The Burning of Mount Joy.‖ illus. 19-21. Mount Joy, home of the Andersons, stood a mile or so west of Buchanan, and was burned during Hunter’s raid. It was built before 1810. Montgomery, Anne. ―Buena Vista – Roanoke Plantation.‖ photo.; illus. 23-25, 30. Construction of Buena Vista by George P. Tayloe began around 1833. The house has been owned by the City of Roanoke since 1937 and used for recreation and other purposes. Goodwin, Edmund P. ―William Fleming‘s Surgical Instruments.‖ photo. 26-27. Describes gift of Col. Fleming’s 18th century medical instruments to the Society. Ragland, R. Holman. ―Roanoke‘s Company ‗F‘ Alive after 70 Years.‖ photo. 28-30. Organized in Roanoke in the early 1890s, Company F saw service against Spain in the Mexican border incident, and in France during WWI. It was disbanded in 1919, but continued to have annual reunions for years thereafter. --------. ―Part of ‗Fortune‘ in Society Museum‖. photo. 31. Picture of 1779 North Carolina currency on exhibit in Society’s museum. Kegley, George. ―Note from the President.‖ 32. Journal of the Roanoke Historical Society Vol. 2, No.1, Summer 1965 Goodwin, Edmund P. ―The South Western Turnpike Road.‖ illus. 1-2, 33-34. The turnpike was chartered in 1846 to go from Salem to Tennessee. Kegley, George. ―Toll Gates in This Century.‖ 3. Roanoke County toll gates beginning in 1914. ------- ―Boyhood Collection is Remembrance of Past.‖ photo. 4. Photograph of Sidney P. Taliaferro with his collection of chewing tobacco tags and plugs, which he donated to the Society. Scott, Margaret. ―Thomas and Tasker Tosh: The Brothers Who Owned Roanoke.‖ 5-12. The Toshs settled along Goose Creek (Roanoke River) in the early 1740s. -------. ―Lone Oak, 1767?-1964.‖ photo. 13-14 Tosh home; believed to be the oldest house in Roanoke. Stood at 324 King George Avenue; demolished in 1964. Martin, James H. ―Founding of Patrick County.‖ photos. 15-19.

Patrick County was founded in 1791. -------. ―Peaks of Otter: I. A Postscript to Prehistory.‖ 20. A postscript to Jean White’s “Three-Layer Cake of Prehistoric Virginia,” which appeared in the previous issue of the Journal. Robinson, Don. ―Peaks of Otter: II. Coming of the White Man.‖ photo. 21, 34. ---------. ―Peaks of Otter: III. How it Was in 1907.‖ photos. 22-25. Rachal, William M. E. ―Beginnings of the Virginia Historical Society.‖ 26-32. Part of a talk given before the Society in May 1965 at the Hotel Roanoke. Goodwin, Edmund P. ―Almanacs, Ration Books and Rapiers.‖ 35. Recent acquisitions of the Society. Kegley, George. ―Notes from the President.‖ illus. 36. Journal of the Roanoke Historical Society Vol. 2, No.2, Winter 1965-66 Niederer, Frances J. ―John Nolen‘s Roanoke City Plan of 1907.‖ illus. 1-8. Pendleton, Lee. ―Southwest Virginia Turnpikes.‖ 9-12. Political card with 1892 Virginia slate of electors for the Prohibition Party. 12. --------. ―1753: Saga of a Pioneer Pilgrimage through the Roanoke Region.‖ illus. 13-19. Translation of a diary in German of a dozen Moravians who traveled through the Roanoke region in 1753 from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, on their way to Moravian lands in North Carolina. The portion of the diary covering the route from Buchanan to the Blackwater River is chronicled. --------. ―You Could Take a Legal Gamble in 1796.‖ illus. 20. Illustration of a lottery ticket to finance the New London Academy in Bedford County. ―When Editorials were Editorials: Butler in Virginia‖ 21-22 Reprint of an article and accompanying editorial from the Roanoke Times (Salem, Va.) of January 18, 1868. -------. ―Machine Age: 1832.‖ photo. 22 Photograph of a 134-year old sewing machine and a fluting machine for men’s shirts. Sammons, Lena Gardner. ―Fort Vause: The Site and the Story.‖ photos. 23-33.

Fort Vause stood in what is now the village of Shawsville. It was attacked and burned by the French and Indians in 1756. It was rebuilt by Captain Peter Hogg and visited by George Washington in October 1756. Board, C. A. ―A Day in Richmond.‖ photo. 34 Reprint of an article by Board, editor and publisher, in the Bedford Democrat, Liberty, Virginia, March 8, 1888, describing a trip to Richmond by sleeping car, and the street cars he saw in Richmond. Kegley, George. ―Note from the President.‖ photo. 35-36. Journal of the Roanoke Historical Society Vol. 3, No. 1, Summer 1966 Kegley, F. B. ―Shot Tower at Jackson‘s Ferry.‖ photo. 1-7. The shot tower above the New River at the community of Jackson’s Ferry in Wythe County is believed to have been constructed around 1815-1830 and was used for the manufacture of shot until around 1830. --------. ―New Executive Director Named.‖ photo. 7. Announcement of the appointment of Anna Logan Lawson as the Society’s Executive Director. Dulaney, Ben Bane. ―Homelife in Virginia: 1776-1835.‖ photos. 9- 10. Describes “Homelife in Virginia Between the Wars: 1776-1835,” an exhibition sponsored by the Roanoke Fine Arts Center at the Roanoke Public Library. Terry, Mary S. ―Big Lick Home Front: 1861-65.‖ illus. 11-21. Narrative written in 1894 by Terry (1839-1910), who lived at “Elmwood,” now Elmwood Park. -------. ―The Society Circles Franklin County.‖ photos. 22-23. Summary of the Society’s fourth annual expedition, to sites in Franklin County. Almost 200 participated. Givens, Lula P. ―Mountain Lake.‖ photos. 24-34. History of Mountain Lake in Giles County. Wrenn, Tony P. ―Historic Preservation – A Challenge to Virginians.‖ 35-39. Address by Wrenn before the annual dinner of the Society at Hotel Roanoke on June 17, 1966. Kegley, George. ―Note from the Past President.‖ 40. Journal of the Roanoke Historical Society Vol. 3, No. 2, Winter 1967

Scott, Margaret P. and Wilson, Rachel. ―Hollins College and the Civil War.‖ illus. 1-5. Kegley, George. ―Henry Ford and Friends on Tour.‖ photos. 6-10. Narrative of the 1918 “camping trip” taken by Harvey Firestone, Jr., Thomas A. Edison, Henry Ford, and writer-naturalist John Burroughs through West Virginia, Virginia, and North Carolina, including a dinner stop at the Hotel Roanoke. Foley, Mary Dodd. ―Searching for Your Ancestors.‖ photo. 11-18. Showalter, Mrs. English. ―Note from the President.‖ 19. -------. ―Society Sponsored Museum Opens in Fincastle.‖ photos. 20-23. Describes November, 27, 1966, opening of the Botetourt Historical Museum. Barnes, Raymond. ―Roanoke Valley‘s Early Iron Mines.‖ illus. 24-27. ―A citizen.‖ ―Why Vaccinate.‖ 27 Letter to the Fincastle Herald, January 4, 1894. -------. ―Society‘s Toy Exhibit Attracts Visitors to Salem Museum.‖ photos. 28-29. Moncure, Mrs. Philip St. Leger. ―Recollections of Bent Mountain, Virginia.‖ photos. 3037. Roanoke Historical Society membership roll. 1966-1967 38-40. Journal of the Roanoke Historical Society Vol. 4, No. 1, Summer 1967 Smith, Elmer L. ―The Pennsylvania Dutch Culture of the Shenandoah Valley.‖ photo. 17. Adaptation of talk Smith made before the annual meeting of the Society June 21, 1967. Barnes, Raymond. ―Interstate Interchange Covers Town of Gainsborough.‖ illus. 8-11. Goodwin, Edmund P. ―Bell Mont: The Fleming Plantation.‖ photos., illus. 12-21. Bell Mont (various spellings) was the home of Col. William Fleming (c1727-1795); it is surrounded by present day Monterey Gofd Course in northeast Roanoke. ---------. ―Let‘s All Make Whiskey.‖ 22 Snippets on Prohibition from the Wytheville Dispatch and the Roanoke Saturday Review of July 10, 1886.

Kilmer, Mrs. Buford Henderson. ―‘The Buford Place‘ for 200 years – Locust Level.‖ photo. 23-28. Locust Level is located on the outskirts of Montvale in Bedford County, and is the seat of the Buford family. Gen. Andrew Lewis died at Locust Level in 1781. The wife and daughters of Robert E. Lee once summered there during the Civil War and Lee visited there. ------. ―Society Makes Strong Plea for Fincastle.‖ photo. 29-31. -------. ―Election of Officers.‖ photo. 31. Announcement of new officers and new Executive Director, Susan Burks Williams. -------. ―The Society Takes Fifth Annual Tour into History.‖ photos. 32-33. Fifth annual Society tour covered eastern Botetourt and southern Rockbridge Counties. Eisenberg, William Edward. ―Early Lutherans in Western Virginia.‖ photo. 34-38. Excerpts from The Lutheran Church in Virginia 1717-1962, printed by J. P. Bell, Inc., (1967). -------. ―Saddlebags and Bank Ledgers.‖ photo. 39-40. Summary of some recent acquisitions of the Society. Journal of the Roanoke Historical Society Vol. 4, No. 2, Winter 1968 Skaar, Arnold. ―Farmers and Shopkeepers: 28th Regiment, Virginia Volunteers, 18611865.‖ illus. 1-11. First two chapters of a paper on a regiment comprised of men from Roanoke, Craig, Botetourt, and Bedford Counties. Goodwin, Edmund P. ―Roanoke at the Beginning.‖ 12-13, 26. Dulaney, Ben Bane. ―New River: First of the Western Waters.‖ photos. 14-19. An adaptation of an article by Dulaney which appeared in the July 1956 Norfolk and Western Magazine. Janssen, Dr. Raymond E. ―The Teays, Ancestral River of Mid-America.‖ illus. 20-24, 26. The Teas is the predecessor of the New, Kanawha, Ohio, Mississippi, and other rivers. The article is excerpted from an article in the December, 1953, The Scientific Monthly. ------. ―A New Brick House for $105 and a Horse Critter.‖ photo. 25-26. 1847 contract for construction of a house for James Hogshead near Daleville. Kirkwood, James J. ―Walled in by the Appalachians.‖ photos. 27-32.

Paper stems from the author’s campside talks given during summer work as a seasonal naturalist on the Blue Ridge Parkway. ------. ―Yesterday‘s Tools on Display.‖ Photo. 34. Describes fourth exhibit at the Society’s museum in the Roanoke College Library. Lawson, Anna. ―Hollins Girls Step into History.‖ photo. 35-37. Describes work of five Hollins students in the Society’s museums in Salem and Botetourt. Ragland, R. Holman. ―Cigar Manufacturing in Roanoke and the Wooden Indian.‖ photos. 38-42. ―Roanoke Historical Society New Members.‖ 43-44. Journal of the Roanoke Historical Society Vol. 5, No. 1, Summer 1968 ------. ―Montgomery White, 19th Century Social Center.‖ photos.; illus. 1-7 History of the old Montgomery White Sulphur Springs resort and community about five miles northeast of Christiansburg; it served as a Confederate hospital during the Civil War. Robertson, James I., Jr. ―Virginia‘s Neglected Soldiers.‖ photos. 8-14. An expansion of an address delivered by Dr. Robertson June 26, 1968, to the Society about southwestern Virginia soldiers during the Civil War. Skaar, Arnold. ―A Rugged Group of Men: 28th Regiment, Virginia Volunteers.‖ illus. 15-26. Final two chapters of a paper on a Civil War regiment comprised of men from Roanoke, Craig, Botetourt, and Bedford Counties Rader, Jacqueline Hundley. ―Samuel Rader, 1801-1891, Botetourt Brick Mason.‖ photos. 27-30. ------. ―History Grows in Botetourt.‖ photo. 31 Plans for celebrating Botetourt County’s 200th anniversary in 1970. ―Roanoke Historical Society Members.‖ 32. Lawson, Anna. ―Pennsylvania Dutch Fashions and Early Roanoke.‖ photos. 33-37. Describes 1968 display of Pennsylvania Dutch items in the Society’s museum at Roanoke College, and another display of “photographs, playbills, maps, documents, and other memorabilia” from early Roanoke. ------. ―Society Tours Home Country.‖ photo. 37-38

Sixth annual tour of the Society, this year to Roanoke, Salem, and Roanoke County. -------. ―Roanoke County Map Prepared.‖ photo. 39-40. Describes comprehensive historical map of Roanoke County done by J. R. Hildebrand. Journal of the Roanoke Historical Society Vol. 5, No. 2, Winter 1969 Goodwin, Edmund P. ―Collectors‘ Items Span Four Centuries.‖ photos.; illus. 1-7, 36. Describes recent acquisitions by the Society, including approximately 1,000 letters to and from the Breckenridge family of Botetourt. Alexander, Edward P. ―Saving Virginia‘s Treasures.‖ photos. 8-14. Talk entitled “Historic Preservation in Virginia” given by Dr. Alexander, director of interpretation and vice-president of Colonial Williamsburg, to the Society on November 22, 1968. Howbert, William E. ―Salem is Improving ‗Fast.‘‖ 14. May 10, 1856, description of Salem. Scott, Margaret P., Wilson, Rachel. ―Edward William Johnston and Roanoke Female Seminary.‖ illus. 15-25. The authors, both Hollins College professors, write of the forerunners of Hollins at a former resort at Botetourt Springs. ------. ―Is There An Older Roanoker?‖ photo. 26 About Mrs. Lena Hart Hoback, daughter of Dr. Henry Clay Hart; she was 90 on Sept. 13, 1968, and had lived in Roanoke all of her life .[She died July 26, 1969.] Wilson, Goodridge. ―Five Rivers Flow West.‖ photo.; illus. 27-33. Dr. Wilson continues his series on rivers of western Virginia with an article on five streams which flow from the far southwest into other states. ------. ―Longwood Was Salem‘s Castle‖ photo. 34-35. An epitaph for 64-year old Longwood, a Salem Victorian mansion recently destroyed by fire. Barnes, Raymond. ―Roanoke Cows in 1898.‖ 35. Excerpt from Barnes’ recently published History of the City of Roanoke about the City’s longstanding “cow issue.” Journal of the Roanoke Historical Society Vol. 6, No. 1, Summer 1969 ------. ―Lewis Miller, Folk Artist.‖ photo.; illus. 1-1-7.

Miller (1796-1882), one of America’s greatest folk artists, spent the last quarter of his life in Christiansburg. ------. ―New Claim for Oldest Resident.‖ 7. Miss Annie Lee Luck Fishburn was born in Big Lick April 4, 1874, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Fishburn. Robertson, James I., Jr. ―Johnny Rebs from Virginia and the Fairer Sex.‖ photo. 8-14. . ------. ―New President, Secretary Named.‖ 14. Joel Richert named new executive secretary of the Society; J. R. Hildebrand elected secretary. Anderson, Ellen Graham. ―The Four Anderson Brothers.‖ photos. 15-29. The author is the granddaughter of Judge Francis Thomas Anderson (1808-1887), one of four prominent Anderson brothers who are the subject of the article. ------. ―Early Preston Papers Given.‖ 30-32. Excerpts from early letters donated to the Society by Robert T. Preston. Barnes, Raymond P. ―Roanoke River: Once Called Saponi, Round Oak, Goose Creek.‖ photo.; illus. 33-36. Cocke, C. Francis. ―St. Mark‘s, Fincastle, Has Roots 200 Years Old.‖ photos. 37-39. Excerpt from Cocke’s recent book St. Mark‘s Episcopal Church, Fincastle, Virginia, Two Centuries of the Church in Botetourt County; the church was built in 1837. ------. ―New Books on Old Themes.‖ 39-40. Reviews of new books pertaining to local and regional history. Dial, Wylene P. ―Appalachian Dialect: Vivid, Virile and Elizabethan.‖ photo.; illus. 4150. An extension of a talk by the author delivered to the Society September 23 [1969?]. ------. ―Kefauver‘s Folly.‖ Photos. 50-51. Describes recreation of a county store at the Society’s exhibit room at Cherry Hill, the Roanoke Fine Arts center headquarters. ------. ―History Is Examined At Natural Bridge.‖ 52-53. Describes activities at May 1-3, 1969, fourth annual Conference of Southern Historical Societies held at Natural Bridge. ------. ―Two Fort Sites Explored.‖ photos. 54-55.

Discusses excavations of Fort Lewis west of Salem, and Fort Fauquier at Looney’s Ferry on the James River. Journal of the Roanoke Historical Society Vol. 6, No. 2, Winter 1970 “Botetourt County 1770-1970” ------. ―Here‘s to Botetourt.‖ illus. 1 Introduction to all-Botetourt issue of the Journal. Stoner, R. D. ―How the Mother County Began.‖ photo; illus. 2-7. Lewis, Frances McN. ―Fincastle – ‗More than a County Seat.‘‖ photo.; illus. 8-13. Moore, Roddy. ―Early Craftsmen.‖ photos. 13-16. Moore is director of the Blue Ridge Institute at Ferrum College. ------. ―Mary Johnston, Writer of the Past.‖ photos. 17-23. Johnston (1870-1936) was the author of more than 25 novels and many other writings; she was born in Botetourt County. Fulwiler, Harry, Jr. ―Cherry Tree Bottom.‖ photos. 24-27. Description of early land grants in the bend of the James River between the mouths of Looney’s and Purgatory Creeks in North Buchanan, known as Cherry Tree Bottom. ------. ―Fire Destroys Landmarks.‖ photos.; illus. 28-31. Botetourt landmarks that have burned over the last two centuries. Goodwin, Edmund P. ―The Turnpike Through Botetourt.‖ photo.; illus. 31-35, More about the South Western Turnpike Road, as gleaned from papers donated to the Society by the heirs of Dr. J. William McCauley, whose grandfather John McCauley was superintendent of the Turnpike. ------. ―Western Inhabitants - an ‗Incumbrance‘?‖ 35-36 March 20, 1767, letter from Thomas Lewis, Augusta County surveyor and justice, opposing the creation of Botetourt County (letter in Society’s collection). White, Clare. ―The Bells of Fincastle.‖photos. 37-39. About the longtime tradition of ringing the town’s church bells on New Years Eve. ------. ―14 Iron Furnaces of Botetourt.‖ photo. 39-41. McClenny. ―An 18th Century Spinet.‖ photo. 42-44. Discusses a Hitchock spinet, thought to have been brought to Botetourt County about 1740 by the Crawford family; the spinet is in the Museum of the Botetourt Historical Society.

Barnes, Raymond. ―The Village of Daleville.‖ photo. 44-47. ------. ―‘Echo from the Hills‘ Will Tell Bicentennial Story.‖ 47-48. About a two-act pageant linking old Botetourt’s frontier beginnings with the present; the culmination of the County’s Bicentennial celebration. Lewis, Frances McN. ―Historic Fincastle Inc.‖ illus. 48-49. Summary of the organization’s activities over the prior two years. Rader, Jacqueline Hundley. ―Botetourt Centennial‖, and ―Botetourt .‖ 50-51. The official poem and song of Botetourt’s Bicentennial, both by Ms. Rader. ------. ―A County Album.‖ photos. 52-59. A sampling of photographs of structures, mainly homes, in Botetourt County. Johnston, Fanny. ―Retrospect and Prophecy -1885‖ 59-60. Poem by Ms. Johnston from the Fincastle Herald, 1885. Journal of the Roanoke Historical Society Vol. 7, No. 1, Summer 1970 Wust, Klaus. ―The Great Flood of 1749.‖ 1-4. A talk about the Roanoke River flood of August 1749 given to the Society in the fall of 1969. Frantz, Maria Jane Gish. ―Roanoke County in the 1840's.‖ photos. 5-10. A 1914 account by Ms. Frantz (1838-1929) of her girlhood on a Roanoke County farm before the Civil War. Around 1851, her family moved to Roanoke, Illinois, a community named by families who moved from this area. White, Clare. ―A Misty Tour of Henry.‖ photos. 10- 14. Account of the Society’s history tour of Henry County May 16, 1970. Kegley, Mary B. ―The Town of Newbern.‖ photos. 15-24. Newbern was Pulaski County’s first county seat from 1839 until 1895. ------. ―On Campus 70 Years Ago.‖ 24. Advice from the Roanoke College YMCA’s students’ handbook for the 1898-1899 session. ------. ―Woolen Mill, a Major Botetourt Industry.‖ photos. 25. Photographs of the old Fincastle Woolen Mill. Hohenberg, Alice I. ―Civil War Draft Problems in the Shenandoah Valley.‖ 26-33. Portions of a senior thesis about Mennonites and Brethren in Rockingham County during the Civil War.

Dinwiddie, Sarah. ―Hales Ford Classical School.‖ photos. 34-43. A unique Franklin County institution which operated for at least 20 years after it was formed in 1874; it stands on Route 122, about six miles north of Burnt Chimney. ------. ―New Books on Old Themes.‖ 43-44. Review of two new books. ------. ―Botetourt‘s 200th Birthday.‖ photos. 44-46. Summary of Botetourt County’s 1970 Bicentennial Celebration. ------. ―Col. William Fleming Recalled.‖ photos. 46-48. Visit of descendants of Col. William Fleming to his gravesite and home; desk of Fleming donated to Society. Diehl, George West. ―High Bridge Church Is 200.‖ photos. 48-51. The story of High Bridge Presbyterian Church in Rockbridge County from 1770 to 1970. ------. ―Ancient Artifacts Acquired.‖ photo. 51-52. Large collection of Indian artifacts donated to the Society by the daughter of Col. J. Sinclair Brown. McDowell, James. ―James McDowell‘s Travels in 1828.‖ 52-54. Notes from the Virginia phase of a trip taken by Mr. McDowell of Fincastle in 1828 “traveling in search of a place to locate a store.” ------. ―Fire Protection.‖ illus. 55. A “remedy against fire” found in the Bible of George Washington Rader (1797-1894) of Botetourt County. [A note on page 29 of the following issue of the Journal reports that the “remedy” is a charm dating from at least the sixth century.] Wood, Walter K. ―Alleghany Turnpike, 7 Miles Long.‖ illus. 56-66. Excerpts from a thesis on the Alleghany Turnpike, built in Montgomery County more than 150 years earlier. ------. ―Where We Were in 1806.‖ 66-68. An excerpt from an account in catechetical form of Virginia’s counties and their “capitals” printed in Baltimore 164 years previously. Journal of the Roanoke Historical Society Vol. 7, No. 2 (undated) [1971] McNulty, Katherine Kennedy. ―Gen. James Breckinridge, Frontier Man for All Seasons.‖ photos.; illus. 1-21.

Breckenridge (1763-1833), part of a distinguished family and a lawyer, served in Congress from 1809-1817; his home, Grove Hill, stood near Fincastle until destroyed by fire in 1909. ------. ―A Bonsack Election Story.‖ 22. From the Roanoke Times of November 5, 1890. Stoner, R. D. ―Botetourt‘s Three Courthouses.‖ photo.; illus. 22-27. ------. ―A Disastrous Conflagration.‖ photo. 28-29. About the May 6, 1870, fire in Fincastle, which destroyed 60 homes, leaving 400 homeless. ------. ―‘Fire Remedy‘ is 1,400 Years Old.‖ 29-30. A follow up to an article in the previous issue of the Journal. Goodwin, Edmund P. ―Roanoke‘s 300th Anniversary.‖ 30-36. This is a talk that Goodwin delivered to the Society November 18, 1970, on “The Roanoke Valley in the Colonial Period, 1608-1776.” Winborne, Lee. ―Early Lighting Devices.‖ photos. 37-42. Talk delivered by Mrs. Winborne January 26, 1971, titled “The History of Early Lighting with Emphasis on the Colonial Period.” Levskit, Frank R., Jr. ―Montgomery Men in Mexico.‖ illus. 43-50. The article explores the role of men from Montgomery County in the Mexican War. ------. ―Rev. Peyton M. Lewis, Slave, Teacher, Preacher.‖ photos.50-53. Once a slave of Benjamin Deyerle at Garst Mill, Rev. Lewis (1849-1934) became valedictorian of his class at Hampton Institute, the first black teacher in Bedford County, and a minister of the African Methodist Episcopal Church for fifty years. ------. ―Bedford Saves an Old Church.‖ photo. 54-56. Believed to be the oldest intact church in Bedford County, the building has been renamed the Bedford Historic Meeting House. Goodykoontz, Robert. ―Floyd County in the 1890's.‖ photos. 56-64. The author (1884-1970) put on paper before he died reflections of his 86 years of life. Journal of the Roanoke Historical Society Vol. 8, No. 1. Winter 1972. Hume, Ivor Noel. ―The Past Is Right Here for the Archaeologist.‖ photos. 1-5.

Talk given by Hume April 28, 1971, at a joint meeting of the Society and the Roanoke Chapter of the Archeological Society of Virginia. Davis, James A. ―The 51st Virginia Infantry, Farmers Turned Soldiers.‖ photos. 6-11. This southwestern Virginia regiment fought in the Civil War. Slone, Pedro T. ―Turner‘s Creek Valley - ‗The land that time forgot.‘‖ 12-23. Recollections of living in a mountainous Franklin County community. Lyle, Royster, Jr. ―Log Buildings in the Valley of Virginia.‖ photos. ; illus. 24-31. Talk given to the Society March 18, 1972. Edwards. Pauline. ―Mary Harvey Trigg, An Unusual Widow.‖ photos. 32-41. Mrs. Trigg (1781-1851) was the widow of Maj. Stephen Trigg, one of the signers of the Fincastle Resolutions and one of the founders of Fincastle. ------. ―Old Letter Tells of Early Society.‖ 40-41. April 17, 1876, letter from A. H. H. Stuart of Staunton to William McCauley of Salem concerning the creation of the “Roanoke Historical Society” at Roanoke College. Sammons, Lena Mac Gardner. ―The McDonalds of McDonalds Mill.‖ photos. 43-51. A saga of the McDonald family, early settlers on the north fork of the Roanoke River in Montgomery County. Kegley, Mary B. ―‗Long Way Home‘ Is Successful.‖ photos. 52-56. The New River Historical Society – sponsored outdoor historical drama about the capture of Mary Draper Ingles by Indians at the Draper’s Meadows Massacre in July, 1755, and her escape. ------. ―Old Communion Service Displayed.‖ 56. Exhibition entitled “Church Silver of Colonial Virginia” at the Virginia Museum in Richmond. ------. ―A Visit to Wythe County.‖ photos. 57-59. The Society’s annual tour was to Wythe County May 8, 1971. ------. ―New Books on Old Themes.‖ 59. Reviews of new books of local and regional interest. ------. ―19th Century Crafts on Display.‖ photos. 60. Pictures of the Society’s exhibit at Cherry Hill of home crafts from the mid-1800s. ―Roanoke Historical Society Members.‖ 61-64. Journal of the Roanoke Valley Historical Society Vol. 8, No. 2. Summer 1972.

Cheek, Elizabeth. ―Benjamin Deyerle, Builder of Fine Homes.‖ photos. 1-13. Deyerle (1806-1883) built many fine homes in the Roanoke Valley. Kincanon, Luci Shaw. ―Roanoke County Barns of the 19th Century.‖ photos. 14-26. Scott, Margaret P. and Wilson, Rachel. ―Col. George Plater Tayloe, A Builder of Hollins College.‖ photos. 27-34 Tayloe (1804-1897) lived at “Buena Vista” in Roanoke, which was written about in Vol. 1, No. 2 of the Journal. Sappington, Roger. ―Where the Brethren Settled.‖ photos. 35-42. MacCord, Howard A., Sr. ―Digging at Looney‘s Ferry.‖ photo. 42-45. Excavations at a Botetourt County site on the south bank of the James River, west of the mouth of Looney Mill Creek, about 1.5 miles west of Buchanan; site of early “Looney’s Fort.” ------. ―No. 1 Fire Station Is Celebrated.‖ photos. 47-50. The 1908 Roanoke fire station on Church Avenue is an excellent example of Edwardian era firehouse architecture. ------. ―The Remarkable Dr. Reid.‖ photos. 51-54. Dr. E. Emmet Reid (1872- ), born in Fincastle, reflects on his 100 years of life. Barnes, Raymond P. ―The Old Gish Ordinary.‖ photos. 54-61. The Gish Ordinary dates to 1797, and was owned by the John Seibel family until it was razed in 1964-1965. Pendleton, Lee. ―Poor, Poor Mountain.‖ photos. 58-61. ------. ―A Visit to Bedford.‖ photos. 62-64. The Society’s annual pilgrimage was to six historic homes in Bedford County on May 20, 1972. ------. ―The General Has a New Office.‖ photos. 65-67. Gen. James Breckinridge’s law office in Fincastle has been restored. Smith, Elmer. ―Rheumatic Recollections.‖ 67-68. Dr. Smith writes of folk beliefs about how to prevent rheumatism. Journal of the Roanoke Valley Historical Society Vol. 9, No.1. 1973-1974. Glassie, Henry, III. ―Old Barns of Appalachia.‖ illus. 1-13. Dr. Glassie’s well-illustrated article first appeared in the summer 1965 issue of Mountain Life and Work magazine.

------. ―New Books on Old Theme.‖ 13. Reviews of new books of local and regional interest. Miller, Andrew P. ―Revolution in Montane Virginia.‖ photos. 14-20. An address by Attorney General Andrew Miller June 17, 1973, at the dedication of a monument commemorating the service of 26 soldiers and patriots of the Revolution who are buried in Fincastle Presbyterian Church Cemetery. -------. ―Soldiers, Patriots Honored in Fincastle.‖ 20-21. Identifies the 26 soldiers and patriots memorialized by the monument described in the previous article. Moorman, Warren. ―Roanoke Valley Medicine.‖ photos. 21-40. Dr. Moorman’s history of local medicine was presented to the Society at its February 20, 1973, meeting. ------. ―Society Has New Downtown Gallery.‖ photos. 41-42. Photographs of the Society’s new exhibit space at 10 Franklin Road, and of new acquisitions of the Society. Knoblock, Fred. ―Recollections of Ballad Collecting.‖ 43-49. Knoblock has collected Virginia ballad’s since 1931; he spoke to the Society November 2, 1972. ------. ―Ephraim Vause Was Robbed.‖ 49. About an advertisement in the September 11, 1760, Pennsylvania Gazette listing property stolen in Pennsylvania from Ephraim Vause, the man whose name was given to the fort burned by the French and Indians at present-day Shawsville in 1756. Shackelford, George Green. ―William Preston, Frontier Public Servant.‖ photo. 50-53. Dr. Shackelford’s address of June 2, 1973, at the dedication of a marker to Col. Preston (1729-1783) in his family’s cemetery at Smithfield Plantation, Blacksburg. Lyle, Royster, Jr. ―Alexander-Withrow Building, One of the First in Lexington.‖ photos. 54-62. The Alexander-Withrow building was constructed in 1789. Johnson, Patricia Givens. ―Cherry Tree Bottom, Crossroads of the Centuries.‖ photo. 6372. The area at the foot of Purgatory Mountain in Botetourt County has a rich history. See the earlier article on the area in Vol. 6, No. 2 by Harry Furwiler. ------. ―Southview, 150, Replaced by Motel.‖ photo. 73-74.

Southview, once described as “one of the loveliest old homes in Roanoke County,” was demolished in 1973. ------. ―A Tour of the New River Country.‖ photos. 74-76. Chronicles the Society’s tour May 26, 1973, of areas of Radford, Newbern, and Pulaski County. Ragland, R. Holman. Photo of street car tracks at the corner of Jefferson Street and Campbell Avenue in downtown Roanoke taken in 1935. Journal of the Roanoke Valley Historical Society Vol. 9, No.2. 1975. Eads, Sally A. ―Government by Families in Botetourt County.‖ photos. 1-15, 37. Governance in 18th Century Botetourt County. Morgan, John G. ―Indians Retreat from Virginians at Battle of Point Pleasant.‖photo. 1618. Article written for the Charleston Gazette in first person narrative style of the battle at Point Pleasant, October 10, 1774. Tate, Thad W. ―The Fincastle Resolutions: Southwest Virginia‘s Commitment.‖ photo. 19-31. Dr. Tate’s talk on the Fincastle Resolutions and the revolutionary movement in western Virginia given at a ceremony at Fort Chiswell High School in Wythe County marking the 200th anniversary of their signing, held January 19, 1975; the Resolutions are set out at 30-31. Kegley, Mary. ―Who the 15 Signers Were.‖ photo. 32-37. Article on the fifteen signers of the Fincastle Resolutions. Hamilton, Emory L. ―Settlement, Defense of the Frontier.‖ photo. 38-46. Paper on frontier forts in far southwestern Virginia given at a meeting of the Virginia History Federation in Abingdon in October 1974. ------. ―A Visit to Patrick County.‖ photos. 47-49. Description of the Society’s tour of Patrick County on October 19, 1974. Lee, Anne Carter. ―Bleak Hill, A Handsome Farm House.‖ photos; illus. 50-58. Bleak Hill is an Italianate farmhouse situated between Ferrum and Callaway in western Franklin County; it was constructed c1857 for the Saunders family. Saunders, Alice. ―Farm Fruits of the 1800s.‖ photo. 59-61. Recollections of life and dining at Bleak Hill in the 1800s. Taylor, Susie M. ―‘Noble Soul‘ of Bleak Hill.‖ photos. 61-69. Additional recollections of life at Bleak Hill.

―Index of the Journal‘s First Decade.‖ 70-73. Johnson, Patricia Givens. ―Maryland Border War Refugees Flee to the Roanoke Valley.‖ 73-76. The so-called “Conojacular War” results in many from the Susquehanna River valley resettling in the Great Lick area along the Roanoke River. Journal of the Roanoke Valley Historical Society Vol. 10, No.1. 1977. Whitwell, W. L. and Winborne, Lee W. ―The Sedon Journal.‖ photos. 1-27. The work of Gustavus Sedon, a 19th century architectural carpenter in Roanoke County, who left a 34-year journal, is examined; many photographs of his work included. Holmes, David L. ―The Colonial Church of Virginia.‖ illus. 28-40. Text of a talk delivered by Mr. Holmes to the Society in December 1975. ------. ―A Visit to Old Augusta.‖ photos. 40-43. The Society toured Augusta County on May 15, 1976. ------. ―Floyd History Explored.‖ photos. 44-47. Account of the Society tour of four homes, a mill, and a cemetery in Floyd County on October 16, 1976. ------. ―Roanoke Through 300 Years.‖ 48. The following four articles are from talks given April 21, 1976, to the 1900 Club, an organization of Roanoke citizens born in 1900; it was a part of the local 1976 Bicentennial celebration. Kegley, George. ―The Valley‘s Beginnings.‖ 48-50. Moomaw, E. C. ―Ted.‖ ―From Big Lick to Roanoke.‖ photo. 50-53. Garland, Robert A. ―Roanoke Was Alive in 1976.‖ 53-56. Bailey, Dr. F. Meade. ―The Future: More People on Less Land.‖ 56-60. Goodwin, Edmund P. ―Huntingdon Stands as City‘s Oldest Fine Home.‖ photos.; illus. 61-66. Huntingdon (sometimes spelled Huntington), a Georgian home built in the early 1820s, stands at the intersection of Huntington Boulevard and Oliver Road in northwest Roanoke. Lewis, Francis, and Haley, Anna Louise. ―Sculptor Honored World War I Veterans.‖ photos. 66-69.

Dudley Thompson Warren (1890-1934) was a self-taught Roanoke sculptor; he carved a World War I memorial that is on King George Avenue. Guerrant, Saunders. ―Franklin Folk Tales.‖ photo. 69-74, 66. Folk tales told by a Franklin County native. ------. ―New Books with Old Themes‖ 75-76. New books of local and regional interest reviewed. Journal of the Roanoke Valley Historical Society Vol. 10, No.2. 1978. Philippe, Louis. ―Seeing Virginia in 1797.‖ 1-5. Selections from the diary of a future king of France who traveled in America thirty-three years before ascending to the throne. Excerpted from Diary of My Travels in America, Louise Philippe, King of France, 1830-1848, translated from the French by Louis Becker. (Dell Publishing Co., Inc., 1977). Kegley, Mary B. ―The Big Fort.‖ photos.; illus. 6-30. The history of Fort Chiswell in Wythe County. Palmer, Earl. ―Cures from Mountain Herbs.‖ photos. 30-33. Lewis, Helen Beall. ―What They Owned in the 1840s.‖ 34-53. This article was originally a college paper entitled “Estate Inventories of Roanoke County, 1838-1849, from Inventory, Appraisals and Sales, Book I, Roanoke County Courthouse, Salem, Virginia.” Simpson, Pamela. ―Lexington Architecture.‖ photos.; illus. 54-61. Dr. Simpson’s paper is based on a talk given to the Society October 26, 1977; the City of Lexington features work by three nationally known architects. Salmon, John S. ―The Washington Iron Works.‖ photos.; illus. 62-75. Article based on an address by the author to the Society May 17, 1977; the Washington Iron Works was built in Franklin County before the Revolutionary War. Whitwell, W. L. and Winborne, Lee W. ―The National Register of Historic Places.‖ 7677. Lists the properties in Roanoke, Roanoke County, and Salem that are on the National Register of Historic Places. ------. ―Bicentennial Plates.‖ photos. 78-79. Acquisition of thirteen commemorative plates presented the Society through Congressman M. Caldwell Butler, commissioned by the American Revolution Bicentennial Administration to celebrate the Bicentennial.

------. ―Bringing an Old Pump to Life.‖ photo. 80-82. Celebrates the restoration of the 200 ton, 70 year-old municipal steam pump at Crystal Spring, made by the Snow Steam Pump Co. in Buffalo, New York. It provided water for the City from nearby Crystal Spring from 1905 to 1957. ------. ―Tours to Botetourt and Chatham.‖ photo. 83-84. The Society toured Botetourt County and Fincastle on May 28, 1977, and Pittsylvania County in the fall of 1977. Journal of the Roanoke Valley Historical Society Vol. 11, No.1. 1980. Sargent, James E. ―Clifton A. Woodrum, Congressman with a Flair.‖ photos. 22. The article covers the early years of Woodrum (1887-1950) , who became an outspoken advocate during the 1930s of President Roosevelt and the New Deal. Hippert, Roy. ―Col. James P. Woods, Lawyer, Congressman.‖ photos. 23-39 Woods (1868- ) served in Congress from 1919 to 1923, and later became the “dean of the Roanoke bar.” Moorman, Warren, Dr. ―John Hook: New London Merchant.‖ photos. 40-55. Hook (1745-1808) was a self-made successful businessman who acquired thousands of acres of land; his store was near Hale’s Ford. Hargrett, Felix. ―John Hook: Frontier Bookseller.‖ photo. 55-59. Hook (1745-1808) was one of the earliest, if not the first, bookseller on the Virginia frontier; 103 boxes of his business papers survive. Goodwin, Edmund P. ―How We Began.‖ 60-67. Goodwin writes of the early history of the Society, organized August 23, 1957. ------. ―Historic Pump Registered.‖ 67. Announces that the Crystal Spring Pumping Station has been placed on the Virginia Landmarks Register and entered in the National Register of Historic Places. ------. ―What We Collect.‖ photo. 68-69. Article lists some of the items contributed to the Society in recent years. ------. ―Historical Tours.‖ photos. 70-72 The Society toured Lewisburg and Greenbrier County, West Virginia, in October 1979; homes in Henry County in the spring of 1979; Lynchburg in the fall of 1978; and Staunton in the spring of 1978. ------. ―New Books on Old Themes.‖ 72, 104. Reviews of new books of local and regional interest.

McCombs, Dorothy. ―Spinning and Weaving In Montgomery County.‖ photos. 73-104. Two chapters of the author’s masters thesis; an in depth analysis of the work of spinning and weaving in the late 1700s and early 1800s in Montgomery County. Journal of the Roanoke Valley Historical Society Vol. 11, No.2. 1982. “Centennial Edition 1882-1982.” Jack, George S. and Jacobs, E. B. ―Roanoke history as recorded in 1912.‖ photos. 1-19. Excerpts from the authors’ 1912 History of Roanoke County, Roanoke City and the Norfolk and Western Railway. Menu - Hotel Felix menu of Thursday, December 19, 1889. 20. The Hotel Felix once stood on the site of what became the Norfolk and Western Railway office across from the Hotel Roanoke. Whitwell, W. L. and Winborne, Lee W. ―Where we were in 1864.‖ illus. 21-24. Map of Roanoke County prepared in 1864 by Lt. Walter Izard of the Confederate Topographical Engineers. ------. ―When knights were bold.‖ photo. 25-27. This account of a jousting tournament at Elmwood, the home of Benjamin T. Tinsley and later of Peyton L. Terry, was published in The Republican, a Lynchburg newspaper, in July 1871. ------. ―Restrictive Laws.‖ 27. Quaint City of Roanoke ordinances from 1884. Stonesifer, Paul ―A Jefferson Street stroll at the turn of the century.‖ photos. 28-31. Stonesifer (1890-1982) writes of his recollections of early Jefferson Street. Moorman, Warren L. Dr. ―Roanoke‘s first fire station.‖ photo. 32-37. Historic Fire Station No. 1, built in 1905 on East Church Avenue, is actually the City’s second fire station, the first having been built in 1888 at the northeast corner of Kirk Avenue and Jefferson Street. Payne, Maj. Neal, ed. ―How a railway clerk saw the new century.‖ photos. 38-46. Maj. Payne edited the diary of his father, Frank G. Payne, an N & W employee, who kept a diary for 56 years of happenings in Roanoke. Lewis, Frances. ―Life on Highland Avenue in the early 1900s.‖ photos. 47-57. Ms. Lewis ( 1907- ) writes of her childhood days in the Old Southwest section of Roanoke. Leos, Edward. ―Horace Engle, a creative Roanoker.‖ photos. 58-65. Excerpts and photographs from the book Other Summers, by Edward Leos; Engle (1861-1949), a photographer, chemist, promoter, inventor, and researcher

at Edison laboratories, apparently lived in Roanoke from around 1891 to 1913; he is known for his innovative photographs. Mann, Harold W. ―Economic development in Southwest Virginia.‖ photos. 66-81. A paper delivered by Dr. Mann for a Roanoke College Symposium, “Beyond the Blue Ridge Before 1900,” co-sponsored by the Society and the College. ------. ―N & W shops were big in the beginning.‖ 81. Prillaman, Helen R. ―The Watts, a pioneer family.‖ 82-83. Prillaman, Helen R. ―The Barrens, a garden spot.‖ photo. 84-85. The Barrens, long known as the P. C. Huff home, was razed in 1981 for construction of Valley View Mall. Moomaw, Edward C. (Ted). ―Merchants Organize.‖ 86-87. What became the Merchants Association of Roanoke Valley as of 1982 was first organized in 1901. Moomaw, Edward C. (Ted). ―How the star was turned on.‖ photo. 88-90. How the Roanoke Star came to be in 1949. ------. ―Roanoke‘s elected officials‖ 1892-1982. 91-93. List of Roanoke’s General Assembly members, congressmen, governors, and mayors. McQuillen, Dwight E. ―Acorn to Oak, that‘s Roanoke.‖ 94. A salutatory poem published in the first issue of “Acorns of Roanoke,” the Roanoke High School Annual, in 1910. Dr. McQuillen (1888-1962) was superintendent of schools for Roanoke from 1918 until 1953. ------. ―New books on old themes.‖ 95. Review of books of local interest published during the City’s centennial year. Journal of the Roanoke Valley Historical Society Vol. 12, No.1. 1984. ------. ―Farmer‘s Supply Transformed into Center in the Square.‖ photos. 2-5. History of the 1914 McGuire Building, which was transformed into Center in the Square, which opened in December 1983. White, Clare. ―Roanoke‘s First Dairy was on Orange Avenue.‖ photos.; illus. 6-18. History of what has been alleged by some to be the oldest house in Roanoke (the author disagrees); it stands in what is now Washington Park, and was once part of a dairy operation. Moseley, Irma Trammel and Forbes, Madeline Simmons. ―Vinton‘s Beginnings.‖ 18.

Account of Vinton’s beginnings extracted from Vinton History 1884-1984, by the authors; published by the Vinton Centennial Committee. Hart, W. H. and Hart, George L. ―How Dr. Hart Lost His Sight‖ and ―Dr. H. C. Hart‘s Life.‖ photos. 19-22. Recollections about Dr. Henry Clay Hart (1837-1918), Roanoke physician, by his son and grandson. Moorman, Dr. Warren. ―Dr. William Fleming Made House Calls.‖ illus. 23-31. Accounts of the life of Fleming (c1727-1795) from his account books and other sources; includes a Fleming “family tree.” Spangler, Martin O. ―Benjamin Keagy‘s Home.‖ photos. 32-41. Keagy (1816-1872) built his home in Roanoke County in 1857; includes family trees of the Keagy and Trout families. ------. ―Dr. Landon Cabell Rives, Jr.‖ 41. Rives (1825-1862), married Letitia Gamble Watts, and lived at Oaklands in Roanoke; he was a surgeon in the 1st Virginia Cavalry Regiment. Dickerson, Lynn II. ―The Back Creek Road.‖ photos.; illus. 42-56. History of a road in Botetourt County known as the Back Creek Road; reprinted from Summer 1982 issue of Appalachian Heritage. Guerrant, Saunders S. ―Guerrant Family Lived at First Baptist Church Site.‖ photo. 5759. Kagey, Deedie D. ―Where the Bonsacks Settled.‖ photos. 60-64. An account of the origins of the Bonsack family from the author’s book Community at the Crossroads: A Study of the Village of Bonsack of the Roanoke Valley. Journal of the Roanoke Valley Historical Society Vol. 12, No. 2. 1988. Whitwell, W. L. and Winborne, Lee W. ―First County Courthouse Stood from 1841 to 1909.‖ photos. 2-8. The County’s first courthouse was built in 1841 in Salem. ------. ―Fleming Backed Constitution.‖ 9-10. Fleming (1728-1795) served briefly as acting Governor, and cast Botetourt County’s vote to ratify the United States Constitution. Coulter, Judge Jack. ―Roanoke‘s First Judges.‖ photos. 10-28. The author traces the history of Roanoke’s courts from 1884 to 1973, including biographical sketches of the judges.

Lewis, Frances McNulty. ―A Tale of Two Houses.‖ photos. 29-37. History of Milton Hall in Alleghany County and Santillane in Botetourt County. McMullen, Glenn L. ―Norfolk and Western Archives at VPI.‖ photo. 38-43. In 1981, Norfolk & Western donated 300 linear feet of historical records to Virginia Tech, including records of 90 other companies and railroads associated with N & W. Jackson, Andrew. ―When ‗Old Hickory‖ Visited ―Salum.‘‖ 43. Letter from President Andrew Jackson to his son dated July 17, 1836, while the president stopped at the home of Dr. John Johnston, at the Great Spring, later Lake Spring in West Salem. The president complained of the impassable roads, which caused his carriage to break down. Haley, Anna Louise. ―Roanoke Catholic Churches.‖ photos. 44-55. History of area Catholic churches: St. Andrews, Our Lady of Nazareth, St. Elias, St. Gerard’s, and Our Lady of Perpetual Help. Allen, Mary Jane. ―Letters from School.‖ photos. 56-65. Letters written by Ms. Allen ( 1825- ) of Botetourt County to her parents (her father, Judge James Allen, was a justice on the Virginia Supreme Court; she was a niece of First Lady Dolley Madison) from the Patapsco Female Institute on the outskirts of Baltimore. Edited by Jean Showalter, her great-granddaughter, and Clare White. Middleton, Norwood. ―Salem Mills.‖ photo. 66-72. Early mills in Salem, including Martin Mill, Moore Mill, and Kesler Mill . ------. Move the Courthouse in 1843?‖ 72. An unsigned poem dated August 4, 1843, apparently relating to moving the Roanoke County courthouse from Salem to Big Lick. Hargrett, Felix. ―A Roanoke Visit in 1762.‖ 73-74. John Bartram (1694-1777), pioneer American botanist, visited the Roanoke Valley in 1762. ------. ―Roanoke Fast Becoming Known for Its Hay-Rides and Picnics.‖ photos. 75-77. Article from the Roanoke Times of July 17, 1921 about summer activities at Bent Mountain, Carvin’s Cove, Glenvar, Blue Ridge Springs, and other mountain spots. ------. ―Roanoke History in 1923.‖ 78-79. Account from the Roanoke Times of Nov. 11, 1923, about the establishment of a Roanoke Historical Society (which did not survive). Journal of the Roanoke Valley Historical Society Vol. 13, No.1. 1989.

(A special issue marking the observance of Roanoke County’s Sesquicentennial in 1988.) Fishwick, Marshall W. ―Roanoke County and Valley: The Lessons of History.‖ photos. 1-7. Dr. Fishwick’s keynote speech on September 17, 1988, at Roanoke College, in observance of the County’s Sesquicentennial. Kagey, Deedie. ―Roanoke County Communities Started Between the Mountains.‖ photos. 7-26. Traces the establishment of Catawba, Cave Spring, Bent Mountain/Back Creek, Bonsack, North County/Hollins, Gish’s Mill (Vinton), Poages Mill, Starkey, Clearbrook/Red Hill, Ballyhack/Mt. Pleasant, Masons Cove, and West County – Fort Lewis and Glenvar. Middleton, Norwood. ―The Early Economy of Roanoke County.‖ photos. 27-37. Newton, Louis M. ―Old City Point ‗Rail Road‘ Was N&W Forerunner in 1838.‖ 37-42. Whitwell, W. L. ―Overlooked Buildings by the Side of the Road.‖ photos. 42-48. The author reviews the architecture of Roanoke County. Miller, Mark and Thompson, Tony. ―How Did Colleges Choose Locations in the 19th Century?‖ photo. 48-53. Describes the formation and early student bodies of Roanoke College and Hollins College. Wilson, Bayes E. and Peters, Norma J. ―Roanoke County Schools‘ Legacy.‖ photos. 5462. Traces the history of the County’s school system since 1870. Gobble, Lowell, Douglas, P. B. and Ramsey, Glenn. ―Farming was the Backbone of Roanoke Area Growth.‖ photos. 63-69. Observations about farming over 150 years in the Roanoke area. Ritter, Rev. Guy A. ―Nationality and Religion.‖ 69-74. An overview of the rich diversity of religion in the Roanoke region, and its origins. Potts, Rev. Alpheus W. ―How ―A Religious Lot‖ Began.‖ 74-79. Explores the roots of the area’s Presbyterians, Methodists, Dunkards, and Baptists. Journal of the Roanoke Valley Historical Society Vol. 13, No.2. 1996. Hill, David P. ―Threading a Parkway Through the Blue Ridge.‖ photos. 2-13.

The author, a landscape architect, explores how the Blue Ridge Parkway was laid out and engineered. ------. ―Hotel Roanoke, ‗Large and Well Equipped.‘‖ photo. 14-17. Description of the new Hotel Roanoke from The Leader, published in Roanoke on October 28, 1882. Piedmont, Don. ―The Railroad Offices.‖ photos. 18-22. Describes the several office buildings, past and present, of the N & W in Roanoke. Klatka, Thomas. ―Totera Town Reconsidered.‖ 23-29. The author, an archaeologist, discusses the 1671 exploratory travels of Thomas Batts and Robert Fallam into western Virginia, in light of recent archaeological research in the region. White, Clare. ―Col. William Fleming‘s Origins.‖ photos. 28-42. Explores the Scottish and early colonial roots of Fleming (1728-1795). ------. ―Cupboard Comes Home.‖ photo. 43-44. A cherry cupboard that moved west with the Harshbarger family in the 1830s is returned to the Samuel Harshbarger House on Carvin Creek in Roanoke County after a 150-year stay in Indiana. Kern, John. ―Kentland Farm, A New River Plantation.‖ photo.; illus. 45-52. Article based on the nomination of Kentland for the National Register of Historic Places; the farm is situated on the east side of the New River below the mouth of Toms Creek in Montgomery County. Pezzoni, J. Daniel. ―Architecture of Kentland.‘ photos. 53-58. Describes the architectural features of Kentland. Russ, Kurt C. ―Making Pottery in Botetourt County.‖ photos. 59-73. Documents the traditional pottery manufacturing industry in Botetourt County; covers the Fincastle Kiln, Hinkle/Spigle Pottery, and the Obenschain Pottery. Henson, Edward L. ―Buck.‖ ―Cultural Shock in Botetourt County.‖ 75. Memories of life in Botetourt County in the 1930s. Journal of the History Museum and Historical Society of Western Virginia, Vol. 14, No. 1. 1999. Chrisman, D. Kent. ―Note from the Director.‖ Low, Thomas E. ―Roanoke‘s Neighborhoods and Streets.‖ photo.; illus. 4-11

The author, an architect, analyzes the contributions of pioneer city planner John Nolen of Cambridge, Massachusetts, who prepared two planning reports for Roanoke: the 1907 Remodeling Roanoke and the 1928 follow up, the Comprehensive City Plan. ------. ―Santillane and Bellmont Updated‖ 12. Introduction to the following two articles, which shed new light on the historic homes, Santillane and Bellmont. Logan, Beth. ―Henry Bowyer, not George Hancock, Built 19th Century Santillane.‖ photos. 13-21 If architectural historians are correct, Santillane was built in Botetourt County by Henry Bowyer in the 1830s. Kern, John. ―Documentary Evidence of Land ownership and Building Construction at Bellmont, 1760-1870.‖ photos. 22-39. Architectural evidence indicates that Bellmont, long believed to be the home of William Fleming (1728-1795) may have been constructed after his death; the author outlines the documentary evidence leading to this conclusion, as well as an appendix with entries from Fleming’s account book pertaining to Bellmont. Baratta, Erin. ―Gainsboro Neighborhood, 1890-1940.‖ photos.; illus. 40-50. Gainsboro, which developed into the center of the black community in Roanoke during the early 20th century, thrived with its own institutions, businesses, and leaders. Roberts, Alice and Roberts, Margaret. ―Gilmer Avenue, Northwest.‖ 51-52. Gilmer Avenue was the home of many prominent black residents, including civil rights lawyer Oliver Hill. Amos, Dr. J. Francis. ―Jubal Early, Lee‘s ―Bad Old Man.‖ photos. 53-62. Early (1816-1894) was a West Point graduate, lawyer, member of the House of Representatives, Commonwealth Attorney for Franklin and Floyd Counties, and one of Lee’s most trusted generals. Richardson, Darlene. ―Grave Reminders of the Past.‖ photos. 63-68. The author defines various types of cemeteries. Terry, F. B. ―Across the Rockies in ‘52 from Wythe County.‖ 69-71. Reprint of article from the Southwest Virginia Enterprise, Wytheville, Virginia, of October 10, 1902, about Captain Robert Henry “Cattle Bob” Crockett (1823____), of Wythe County, who left for the West to seek his fortune in 1852, leaving Illinois with 3,000 head of cattle, 50 head of “milch cows,” and 25 mules, headed for California; he returned to Wythe County in 1854, and later represented the County in the Virginia House of Delegates.

Cochener, Armand C. ―John Garry Built St. Andrew‘s for $108,000.‖ photos. 72-73. John J. Garry (1854-1905) was an Irish immigrant who built several important early Roanoke structures. ------. ―How Shaffers Crossing Got Its Name.‖ 74. Article reprinted from a Norfolk Southern brochure about its state-of-the-art locomotive running maintenance facility which opened in 1984. ―Maxims of Prominent Roanokers‖ 75. Reprint of a March 29, 1891, The Roanoke Herald, article listing the favorite mottos and maxims of 25 leading business and professional men of the city. Journal of the History Museum and Historical Society of Western Virginia, Vol. 14, No. 2. 2001. Chrisman, D. Kent. ―Note from the Director.‖ 2. Kegley, George. ―Vice Presidential Candidate had Carvins Cove Summer Home.‖ photos. 4-9. U. S. Senator and Democratic vice-presidential candidate in 1908, John W. Kern (1849-1917), built a large summer home, Kerncliffe, on a road leading into Carvins Cove after he was elected to the Senate; he entertained Vice-President Thomas Marshall there. Bearr, David W. C. ―Emma Comer, First Graduate of Roanoke City High School, 1894.‖ photos. 10-19. Ms. Comer (1873-1953) married C. L. Tinsley, president and principal owner of Tinsley Construction Co., general contractors. Piedmont, Donlan. ―Celebrating the Millennium - 1901.‖ Illus. 18-19. How Roanoke celebrated “The Dawn of the New Century.” ------. ―Mrs. Breckinridge‘s Brewery.‖ 20. Describes March 1, 1781, encampment of a Rockbridge County militia company near the residence of Col. Robert Breckinridge in Botetourt County on its way to the battle at Guilford Court House in North Carolina. Source: Annuals of Augusta County, Virginia, 1726-1781, Joseph A. Waddell. Staunton, Va., 1902. Pages 223-225. Piedmont, Dorathy. ―Growing up and Having Fun in South Roanoke.‖ photos. 21-28. Ms. Piedmont, a Roanoke native, writes of growing up in South Roanoke in the 1930s. Low, Betty. ―Peyton Terry, Roanoke‘s First Millionaire.‖ photos. 29-34. Peyton Leftwich Terry (1835-1898) was on the board of the Roanoke Land & Improvement Co, and was the principal officer of the Roanoke Gas Company, the

electric company, water company, and rail lines, among other local businesses.. His home, Elmwood, later served as the City’s library from 1921 to 1952. White, Clare. ―Where the Toshes Came From.‖ photo. 35-38. The Toshs were among the very earliest settlers of the Roanoke Valley. Kegley, F. B. ―George Washington Slept in Big Lick.‖ photo. 39-40. Washington, then a militia colonel on an inspection tour of frontier forts, lodged at the home of the widow Evans, near Crystal Spring in present South Roanoke on the night of Oct. 13, 1756. Sarver, Scott. ―First President Honored on 200th Anniversary of His Death.‖ 41-42. From a talk on “The Eternal Importance of George Washington in American History” by the author at a Dec. 14, 1999, commemoration of the 200th anniversary of Washington’s death. Bott, Caroline. ―Edgar A. Long Building Recalls Institute‘s Legacy.‖ photos. 43-49. The Christiansburg Industrial Institute opened in 1866 to educate blacks; over the years it has served as a private academy, a training school, a teacher education facility, and as a regional high school. Beagle, Ben. ―Peggy Maupin Recalls 100 Years in Bedford.‖ photos. 50-52. Peggy Ballard Maupin (1899- ) lived in Avenel (built in 1838) in Bedford. Anderson, Sherwood. ―Southwest Virginia – ―A More Delectable Land.‘‖ 53-56. Anderson (1876-1941) lived the last 15 years of his life in Marion. In the late 1920s he wrote two travel pieces, “Marion to Roanoke,” and “A Traveler’s Notes: The Shenandoah Valley,” which are reprinted here. They were originally published in Southern Odyssey: Selected Writings by Sherwood Anderson, Welford D. Taylor and Charles E. Modlin, eds. ------. ―Big Lick‘s First Post Office.‖ 56. According to a master’s thesis at Hollins College on “Mail Delivery in the Magic City,” by Paul M. English in 1997, Wigton King was appointed the first postmaster of Big Lick on Jan. 11, 1798 (Big Lick was officially chartered in 1874). Hagan, Alice Trout. ―How do Our Gardens Grow?‖ 57-59. The author saluted the 75th anniversary of the founding of the Roanoke Valley Garden Club in this speech on April 19, 2000. Stone, Mrs. Edward ―Miss Minnie‖). ―A Diary of Mrs. Edward L. Stone (Minnie Fishburn).‖ 60. Excerpts from a Journal kept by Mrs. Stone, who served as the Roanoke Valley Garden Club’s first president.

Piedmont, Donlan. ―Ships & Shipmates Sails On.‖ photo. 61-62. At least 52 vessels have borne the name Roanoke; this article covers the “Ships & Shipmates” exhibit mounted by the History Museum of Western Virginia to honor those vessels, including the cruiser Roanoke. ------. ―50 Star Citizens Honored for ‗Selfless Contributions.‘‖ photo. 63-65. To mark the 50th anniversary of the Mill Mountain Star, 50 “Star Citizens” of the last half-century were recognized. Journal of the History Museum and Historical Society of Western Virginia, Vol. 15, No. 1. 2002. Chrisman, D. Kent. ―Note from the Executive Director.‖ 3. Newton, Louis M. ―Railroads and Their People: 20th Century Rail Development in Southwest Virginia.‖ photos. 4-16. A look at how early railroads operated, from the perspective of those who worked in the industry; the author worked for the Norfolk & Western and Norfolk Southern railways from 1950 until 1987, retiring as assistant vice-president, Transportation Department. Kegley, George. ―The Virginia & Tennessee Railroad—150 Years Ago.‖ photos. 17-19. On November 1, 1852, the first train, believed to have been named “Roanoke,” pulled into Big Lick from Lynchburg. Garver, Thomas H. ―Working with Winston Link at the End of Steam Power.‖ photos. 20-28. Garver worked (1957 and 1958) as an assistant to O. Winston Link in photographing the last days of the steam locomotive, and was the organizing curator of the O. Winston Link Museum, constructed in the former Norfolk and Western Railway passenger station in Roanoke. Keller, Kenneth W. ―The Turnpikes of Southwest Virginia.‖ photos. 29-35. Dr. Keller presented this talk about early 19th century turnpikes of southwest Virginia at the April 2001 meeting of the Society. See Vol. 15, No. 2, p. 15 (2003) of the Journal for the end notes to this article. Ingoldsby, Kathleen. ―The Harris Family Archives and ‗Ma Sue‘ Hall.‖ photos. 36-48. Susan Maria Harris (1869-1958) lived a life of service in Floyd County, and kept albums of photographs she took of local scenes. Fariello, Anna. ―What Do We Leave Behind?‖ photos. 49-52. Thoughts inspired by a photographic exhibition, “Arcadian Monuments,” organized by the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts and displayed at the History Museum.

Daugherty, Candy. ―How Andrew Lewis Drove Gov. Dunmore out of Virginia (Gwynn‘s Island Revisited).‖ photo.; illus. 53-56. The Battle of Gwynn’s Island on July 9, 1776, forced the departure of Virginia’s colonial governor. Long, John. ―Who Named Salem?‖ 57-59. The author concludes that there is no conclusive documentary evidence as to who named Salem, Virginia, but that “Salem is Salem, regardless of the origins of the name.” ------. ―Regional Manuscript Guide Completed.‖ 60. Announced the publication of Charles A. Bodie’s Roanoke and New River Valleys, Virginia, Manuscripts: A Guide to the Collections in the United States, published by the Society in 2003. Kegley, George. Oliver Hill‘s Home May Become Human Rights Center.‖ photos. 61-63. The Oliver Hill Foundation is working to create an educational and policy center for the promotion and study of human rights in the boyhood home of prominent civil rights attorney Oliver W. Hill. Sr., at 401 Gilmer Ave. Baugher, Roy C. III, ―What Victory May Mean: A History of Ensign Horace A. Bass, Jr., USNR, and the USS Horace A. Bass APD-124.‖ photos. 64-71. Horace Ancel Bass Jr. was a Roanoke native and teacher at Jefferson High School who served as a naval fighter pilot during WWII, participating in the battle of Midway and the battle of the Eastern Solomons in 1942, where we was declared missing in action. Two years later, the Navy named the high-speed transport ship USS Horace A. Bass APD-124 after him; it became a muchdecorated ship. Journal of the History Museum and Historical Society of Western Virginia, Vol. 15, No. 2. 2003. Chrisman, D. Kent. ―Note from the Executive Director.‖ 3. Pulice, Michael J. ―The Legend of Benjamin Deyerle, Revisited.‖ photos. 4-17. Benjamin Deyerle (1806-1883) is widely credited with being Roanoke’s foremost builder of the 19th century; while Deyerle and his family certainly were responsible for many fine buildings, the author concludes that Benjamin has been credited with more than his share of the construction. Bearr, David W. C. ―Lest We Forget: A Vinton Landmark.‖ photos. 18-26. About the Vinton War Memorial, the home (called The Gunnery) that was razed in Vinton for it to be constructed on Washington Street (now Avenue), and the Cook family that built the house.

Knapp, Emerson. ―The Kanawha / New River on Mid-Eighteenth Century Maps.‖ illus. 27-35. Fariello, Anna. ―The Craft Revival in Appalachia: 1896-1937.‖ photos. 36-46. Excerpts from a 40-page catalogue prepared for the Society’s exhibit “Movers & Makers: Doris Ulmann’s Portrait of the Craft Revival in Appalachia,” which was shown at the History Museum from August 1, 2003, to February 1, 2004. Hagy, Claudia, ed. ―And the Mountains Sing with Joy: White Top Music Festival.‖ illus. 47-49. Reprint of an article from the April 1935 Mountain Number of The Southern Magazine, about the annual festival at White Top, which began in 1931. ------. ―Mrs. Roosevelt‘s Visit in 1933 Attracted Thousands to Abingdon.‖ 49. Excerpts from a 1962 article, apparently published in the Bristol HeraldCourier, about Eleanor Roosevelt’s visit to Abingdon and the White Top Festival in 1933. Webb, Vaughan. ―White Top Folk Festival Remembered.‖ photo. 50-51. Text from the program for “White Top Folk Festival Remembered,” a musical heritage performance commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Virginia Highlands Festival in Abingdon. Harwood, Doug. ―The Great Hoax.‖ photo. 52-55. Edited from an article in the Rockbridge Advocate of April 1993 and the book ‗Fesser McCluer, The Life and Times of J. Parry McCluer (2001). On March 8, 1873, the Lexington Gazette and Advertiser published a letter from Mr. McCluer, three years out of Washington and Lee, advising of the destruction of Natural Bridge by the “spontaneous combustion” of seams of “bituminous coal of asphaltum” in the bridge. The story, and subsequent letter that was part of the hoax, were picked up by the national media, including The Richmond Enquirer and the New York Times. McCluer later became a school superintendent, and Buena Vista’s Parry McCluer High School is named after him. End Notes from ―The Turnpikes of Southwest Virginia,‖ which appeared in Vol. 15, No.1, of the Journal in 2002. 55. Bearr, David W. C. ―Murder in Fincastle.‖ illus. 56-62. Article from the Virginia United Methodist HERITAGE bulletin of The Virginia Conference Society of the United Methodist Church about the murder January 10, 1857, about the murder in Fincastle of Rev. Daniel Pegee, a respected free black Methodist preacher. Rice, Clive E. ―Havoc at Hanging Rock.‖ photo. 63-66. The June 21, 1864, battle of Hanging Rock, north of Salem.

Piedmont, Dorathy Brown. ―Growing Up with Roanoke.‖ photo. 67-69. The author writes of her father Ernie Brown (1901- ), and his life growing up on South Jefferson Street in Roanoke. J. A. F. (John A. Francis?), intro. by John Long. ―A Horseback Ride on the Back Roads of Roanoke County in 1896.‖ photos. 70-74. In 1896, correspondent “J. A. F” (possibly John A. Francis) took a tour through the back roads of Roanoke County and reported on his travels to the Salem Times-Register; two of his articles, covering the south side of the County, are reprinted here. Ollie, Arleen J. ―African-American ‗Firsts‘ in Big Lick and Roanoke.‖ 75-77. Excerpts from the author’s book African-American History in Roanoke City: A Compilation of Records (2003). Robertson, William J. ―Professor C. E. Kregloe‘s Roanoke Classical School, 1899-1903.‖ photo. 79-86. The author, a Roanoke native, wrote this piece in 1951 about Prof. Kregloe (1859-1917) and his work at Roanoke Classical School for Boys on Jefferson Street in Roanoke. Index of The Journal of the Roanoke Historical Society, History Museum & Historical Society of Western Virginia, 1964-2002. 87-96. Journal of the History Museum and Historical Society of Western Virginia, Vol. 16, No. 1. 2004. Chrisman, D. Kent. ―Note from the Executive Director.‖ 3. Baumgardner, Judith M. ―‘No Contracts Too large or Too Small‘ for C. Markley and Son.‖ photos. 4-11. The author’s grandfather, Christopher Markley (1859-1931), and father, S. Chester Markley (1887-1972), formed C. Markley and Son, which constructed the Norfolk & Western Railway general offices, the Mill Mountain Incline, Crystal Spring pumping station, and many other local buildings, bridges, and utility systems. Thompson, Charles D., Jr. ―They Go Quietly: Agricultural Change in Franklin County, Virginia.‖ photos. 12-20. Originally published as a booklet funded by grants from the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and Public Policy and The American Academy of Religion, the article focuses on the exodus of dairy farmers from Franklin County, once one of the three largest dairy counties in the state. Harmon, Mary Louise Riley. ―My Memories of Carvin‘s Cove – A Long, Peaceful Valley.‖ photos. 21-31.

The author (1915-2000), lived in Carvin’s Cove the first twenty-seven years of her life. Davis, William B. ―African-Americans Have a Proud Ancestry.‖ photo. 32-35. Davis grew up in Roanoke County, and rose to become a senior foreign service officer. Dunnaville, Clarence, Jr. ―Gainsboro and its Outstanding Black Citizens.‖ photo. 36-41. An edited version of a talk given to the Society on February 25, 2004, covering the history of Gainsboro, religion, employment, legal constraints, housing, and prominent Roanoke black professionals of the 2oth century. Kegley, Mary B. ―Wilderness Road Began in Scott County, Not in Roanoke or Montgomery County.‖ 42-43. An article which first appeared in the Journal of the New River Historical Society (Newbern), Vol. 17, No. 1, 2004. Low, Betty B. ―19th Century Fund-Raising – DAR Flower Show in Roanoke, Nov. 10, 1896.‖ illus. 44-47. The 1896 Roanoke DAR Flower Show almost ended in disaster when the show’s tent was torn from its moorings by a gale. Pulice, Michael J. ―Preston-Brown House, an Old House Among Shopping Centers.‖ photos. 48-50. What may be the earliest surviving brick building in Roanoke County was built around 1821, and stands on West Main Street in Salem. Kegley, Dan. ―Searching for the Explorer Johan Peter Saling.‖ photo. 51-60. Saling explored the Virginia frontier in the early 1740s. Pulice, Michael J. ―Graham‘s Forge Mill – Architectural Gem.‖ photo.; illus. 61-64. Graham’s Forge Mill, located on Reed Creek east of Fort Chiswell in Wythe County, is a ca.1890 five-story frame structure topped with a cupola. It was a major contributor to the County’s economy during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Kegley, George. ―John A. Morehead of Salem, World Lutheran Leader, Helped Feed and Clothe Thousands after World War I.‖ photos. 65-67. Morehead (1867-1936) lived in Salem as a student at Roanoke College, and later as president of the College. He served as president of the executive committee of the Lutheran World Convention and as executive director of the National Lutheran Council, and was renowned as a humanitarian for his relief efforts after WWI. Pond, Gail. ―Mr. Jefferson‘s Neighbors.‖ photo. 68.

The author, the collections manager at Thomas Jefferson’s Poplar Forest, relates a story about Jefferson’s neighbors, the William Radfords, who once entertained Mr. Jefferson at their home, Woodbourne. Crotty, Gene. ―Did the Buffalo Roam in Southwest Virginia?‖ photos. 69-70. Buffalo did roam in southwest Virginia, as the author proves by citing the records of early visitors to the area. Cannaday, Isaac. ―Court Day in Salem,‖ and ―Circus Day in Salem.‖ photos.; illus. 7174. Two accounts of life in Salem by the author while a student at Roanoke College; the accounts were published in the college yearbook Roentgen Rays (apparently published in 1898). Journal of the History Museum and Historical Society of Western Virginia, Vol. 16, No. 2. [2005] Chrisman, D. Kent. ―Note from the Executive Director.‖ 2-3. Dotson, Rand. ―The ‗Progressive Reform‘ Movement in Roanoke, Virginia, 1900-1912.‖ photos. 4-11. A paper presented to the Virginia Forum in Winchester in April 2006, and to be incorporated into the author’s book The Magic City of the New South: Class, Community and Reform in Roanoke, Virginia, 1882-1912. Bearr, David W. C. ―The Victorian Courtship of Miss Emma and Mr. Tinsley.‖ photos. 12-18. From family papers, the author follows the courtship of Charles Lippitt Tinsley (1866-1941), longtime president of Tinsley Construction Co., Inc., and Emma Carr Comer (1873-1953), the first graduate of Roanoke High School. They married September 29, 1896. ------. ―Life in 1905.‖ 18. Statistics gleaned from the Internet on what life was like in 1905. Lanford, Stanard ―Stan.‖ ―Roanoke Families Built Many Roads from 1950-2005.‖ photos. 19-30. The author retired as president of Lanford Brothers Co., a Roanoke County contractor, in 2004 after fifty years experience. This is the first of a two-part history of builders of roads in the Roanoke Valley and western Virginia, many of them local family businesses. Kern, Dr. John and Brim, Randle. ―Bob Childress and His Six Rock Churches: Religious Patterns and Presbyterian Worship in the Appalachian Region, 1750-1950.‖ photos. 3142.

Rev. Robert W. Childress (1891-1956) has been immortalized by Richard C. Davids’ book The Man Who Moved a Mountain (Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1970). Childress built six rock-faced Presbyterian churches between the mid1920s and the early 1950s in Floyd, Carroll, and Patrick Counties. ------. ―Names of Batte and Hallam Misspelled for Centuries.‖ 42. According to Sara Bearss, senior editor of Virginia Biography, the proper spelling of the early explorers of southwest Virginia in 1671 is Thomas Batte and Robert Hallam (not Thomas Batts and Robert Fallam, as their namse have been commonly spelled by historians). Hildebrand, John. ―The Early Presbyterians in the Roanoke Valley, 1749-1851.‖ photos. 43-45. The Rev. John Craig, the first settled Presbyterian minister in Colonial Virginia, planted the seeds of Presbyterianism in the Roanoke Valley in 1749. Blankenship, Michael E. ―John Henry Pinkard and the African-American banks of Roanoke.‖ photos. 46-50. Roanoke’s legendary herbal doctor, John Henry Pinkard, left some 50 business journals, revealing his role in founding the Afro-American Bank on August 1, 1921. LeMay, Loretta J. ―Civilian Conservation Corps Restored the Jefferson National Forest to Health.‖ photos. 51-60. Between 1933 and 1942, the CCC brought thousands of young men into the Jefferson National Forest to work on forestry projects. Coulter, Judge Jack B. ―A History of Victory Stadium.‖ photos. 61-63. Victory Stadium was dedicated Thanksgiving Day, November 26, 1942, “to the cause of humanity and for the glory of God for the complete and permanent victory of America and her allies.” Bush, Mary Elizabeth ―Nona‖ McCauley. ―The Lives of John, William and John William McCauley.‖ photos. 64-67. John (1785-1864 )served as a State Senator from Salem; William (1837-1908) held many local offices and wrote the History of Roanoke County, Salem and Roanoke and Outstanding Citizens; John William (1878-1968) was a minister who started two new churches in Roanoke. Green, William. ―Raymond Loewy‘s 1949 Train Station.‖ photos. 68-70. Loewy designed the Norfolk & Western Railroad’s Roanoke passenger station in 1949; the author describes it as perhaps the country’s finest small train station. Crawford, B. Scott. ―Fear on the frontier in 18th Century Virginia: Reflections of fear Along Virginia‘s Western Waters.‖ illus. 71-78.

Crawford spoke at a program, “New Look at an Old War,” a January 2006 Society event marking the 250th anniversary of the start of the French and Indian War. ------. ―How We Were a Century Ago: Roanoke Valley in 1906.‖ photo. 80-83. From A Handbook of Virginia Information, Information for the Homeseeker and Investor, published by the State Department of Agriculture and Immigration in 1906. Dalmas, James E. ―Roanoke‘s Streetcars Operated for 61 years.‖ Photo. 84. Dalmas wrote the book The Street Railways of Roanoke 1887-1948, published by the Society. Journal of the Historical Society of Western Virginia, Vol. 17, No. 1. 2006-2007. “Society Anniversary Edition.” This issue marks the 50th anniversary of the Society, and contains a sampling of the diverse historical material published in the Journal over the previous 43 years. Chrisman, D. Kent. ―Note from the Executive Director.‖ 2-3. Kegley, George. ―Historical Society Journal is 43.‖ 3. Fishwick, Marshall W. ―Roanoke County and Valley: The Lessons of History.‖ photos. 4-8. From Vol. 13, No. 1 (1989) of the Journal. Dr. Fishwick’s keynote speech on September 17, 1988, at Roanoke College, in observance of the County’s Sesquicentennial. Hume, Ivor Noel. ―The Past Is Right Here for the Archaeologist.‖ photos. 9-11. From Vol. 8, No. 1 (1972) of the Journal. Talk given by Hume April 28, 1971, at a joint meeting of the Society and the Roanoke Chapter of the Archeological Society of Virginia. Wust, Klaus. ―The Great Flood of 1749.‖ 12-14. From Vol. 7, No. 1 (1970) Journal. A talk about the Roanoke River flood of August 1749 given to the Society in the fall of 1969. Philippe, Louis. ―Seeing Virginia in 1797.‖ 115-18. From Vol. 10, No. 2 (1978) Journal.. Selections from the diary of a future king of France who traveled in America thirty-three years before ascending to the throne. Excerpted from Diary of My Travels in America, Louise Philippe, King of France, 1830-1848, translated from the French by Louis Becker. (Dell Publishing Co., Inc., 1977). Frantz, Maria Jane Gish.―Roanoke County in the 1840's.‖ photos. 19-21. From Vol. 7, No. 1 (1970) Journal.

A 1914 account by Ms. Frantz (1838-1929) of her girlhood on a Roanoke County farm before the Civil War. Around 1851, her family moved to Roanoke, Illinois, a community named by families who moved from this area. Stoner, R. D. ―How the Mother County Began.‖ photo; illus. 22-24. From Vol. 6, No. 2 (1970) Journal. Lewis, Frances McNulty. ―Fincastle – ‗More than a County Seat.‘‖ photo.; illus. 25-27. From Vol. 6, No. 2 (1979) Journal. Kegley, George. ―Mary Johnston, Writer of the Past.‖ photos. 28-30. From Vol. 6, No. 2 (1970) Journal.. Johnston (1870-1936) was the author of more than 25 novels and many other writings; she was born in Botetourt County. Robertson, James I., Jr. ―Virginia‘s Neglected Soldiers.‖ photos. 31-34. From Vol. 5, No. 1 (1968) Journal. An expansion of an address delivered by Dr. Robertson June 26, 1968, to the Society about southwestern Virginia soldiers during the Civil War. . Terry, Mary S. ―Big Lick Home Front: 1861-65.‖ illus. 11-21. Narrative written in 1894 by Trout (1839-1910), who lived at “Elmwood,” now Elmwood Park. Low, Betty. ―Peyton Terry, Roanoke‘s First Millionaire.‖ photos. 41-44. From Vol. 14, No. 2 (2001) Journal. Peyton Leftwich Terry (1835-1898) was on the board of the Roanoke Land & Improvement Co, and was the principal officer of the Roanoke Gas Company, the electric company, water company, and rail lines, among other local businesses. His home, Elmwood, later served as the City’s library from 1921 to 1952. Moore, Roddy. ―Early Craftsmen.‖ photos. 45-46. From Vol. 6, No. 2 (1970) Journal.. Moore is director of the Blue Ridge Institute at Ferrum College. Glassie, Henry, III. ―Old Barns of Appalachia.‖ illus. 47-51. Dr. Glassie’s well-illustrated article first appeared in the summer 1965 issue of Mountain Life and Work magazine. Barnes, Raymond. ―Roanoke Valley‘s Early Iron Mines.‖ illus. 52-53. From Vol. 3, No. 2 (1967) Journal. Prillaman, Helen R. ―The Watts, a pioneer family.‖ 54-55. From Vol. 11, No. 2 (1982) Journal. Prillaman, Helen R. ―The Barrens, a garden spot.‖ photo. 56. from Vol. 11, No. 2 (1982) Journal.

The Barrens, long known as the P. C. Huff home, was razed in 1981 for construction of Valley View Mall. ------. ―Hotel Roanoke, ‗Large and Well Equipped.‘‖ photo. 57-59. From Vol. 13, No. 2 (1996) Journal. Description of the new Hotel Roanoke from The Leader, published in Roanoke on October 28, 1882. Kegley, George. ―Vice Presidential Candidate had Carvins Cove Summer Home.‖ photos. 60-63. From Vol. 14, No. 2 (2001) Journal. U. S. Senator and Democratic vice-presidential candidate in 1908, John W. Kern (1849-1917), built a large summer home, Kerncliffe, on a road leading into Carvins Cove after he was elected to the Senate; he entertained Vice President Thomas Marshall there. Roberts, Alice and Roberts, Margaret. ―Gilmer Avenue, Northwest.‖ 64-65. From Vol. 14, No. 1 (1999) Journal. Gilmer Avenue was the home of many prominent black residents, including civil rights lawyer Oliver Hill. Stonesifer, Paul ―A Jefferson Street stroll at the turn of the century.‖ photos. 66-68. From Vol. 11, No. 2 (1982) Journal. Stonesifer (1890-1982), writes of his recollections of early Jefferson Street. Kegley, George. ―Henry Ford and Friends on Tour.‖ photos. 69-70. From Vol. 3, No. 2 (1967) Journal. Narrative of the 1918 “camping trip” taken by Harvey Firestone, Jr., Thomas A. Edison, Henry Ford, and writer-naturalist John Burroughs through West Virginia, Virginia, and North Carolina, including a dinner stop at the Hotel Roanoke. Hill, David P. ―Threading a Parkway Through the Blue Ridge.‖ photos. 71-78. From Vol. 13, No. 2 (1996) Journal. The author, a landscape architect, explores how the Blue Ridge Parkway was laid out and engineered. Bailey, Dr. F. Meade. ―The Future: More People on Less Land.‖ 78-80. From Vol. 10, No. 1 (1977) Journal. Journal of the Historical Society of Western Virginia, Vol. 17, No. 2. 2008. Bollendorf, Jeanne M. ―Note from the Executive Director.‖ photos. 2-3. Fishwick, Doreen Hamilton. ―A Personal History of the Hotel Roanoke.‖ photos.; illus. 4-12

Ms. Fishwick was general manager of the Hotel Roanoke from 1986 until it closed in 1989, when Norfolk Southern Corp. gave the hotel to Virginia Tech. She presented this history in a talk to the Society on February 4, 2006, at the hotel. Kegley, George. ―‘Dust-clad motorcars‘ arrive in Roanoke in 1909!‖ photos.; illus. 1315. In July 1909, scout cars came to Roanoke from New York seeking a route for a national highway to Atlanta, and in October of that year, a caravan came through from New York on the way to Atlanta (only six years after the first car in Roanoke was reportedly driven by T. T. Fishburn, president of National Exchange Bank). Stone, Dr. Philip C. ―Lincoln‘s Virginia roots.‖ photo. 16-17 An edited version of an article by the president of Bridgewater College originally published in the Harrisonburg-Rockingham Historical Society newsletter; it traces the Virginia roots of Abraham Lincoln. Kegley, George. ―Col. J. Sinclair Brown: ―Hard to beat.‖ photos. 18-22. Brown (1880-1965) was the only Roanoke valley resident to serve as Speaker of the House of Delegates, and an influential figure in state government for a quarter-century. ―Men of the House.‖ 23. A list of Speakers and Clerks of the Virginia House of Delegates from southwest Virginia. Rawls, S. Waite III. ―What is it about the Civil War?‖ photo. 24-26. A talk given to the Society February 3, 2008, about the lasting impacts of the Civil War. Crawford, Jim. ―Images from the Old Belt.‖ Ed. by Christina Koomen Smith. photos. 2731. Crawford wrote and produced “Down in the Old Belt: Voices from the Tobacco South,” a documentary about the history and culture of tobacco. Mattos, Naomi A. ―Residential segregation in the City of Roanoke.‖ photos.; illus. 32-38. A summary of a talk given by the author on racial segregation laws in Roanoke during the early 1900s. Bryan, Malcolm W. III. ―The Prestons – A Southwest Virginia Dynasty.‖ photos.; illus. 39-51. The Preston and related families include governors, senators, representatives, and leaders in many endeavors in Virginia and elsewhere.

Cochran, Judge George M. ―Virginians Facing Reality – The 1959 Perrow Commission.‖ photos. 52-58. Former Justice Cochran writes of the 1959 commission appointed by Virginia Governor J. Lindsay Almond to recommend measures to solve the crisis in the state’s public school system brought about by the policy of “massive resistance.” Word, Tom. ―A Small Bag of Spices – Farming in Montgomery Co.‖ photos. 59-64. The author writes of his father Jack Word (1979-1954), a country lawyer and farmer of a 133-acre farm south of Christiansburg. Lanford, Stanard ―Stan.‖ ―Roanoke Families Built Many Roads from 1950-2005 – Part II.‖ photos. 65-81. The author retired as president of Lanford Brothers Co., a Roanoke County contractor, in 2004 after fifty years experience. This is the second of a two-part history of builders of roads in the Roanoke Valley and western Virginia, many of them local family businesses. Bowyer, Mathew J. ―Thirty-two Roanokes bear the same name.‖ illus. 82-83. Five of the 32 communities named after Roanoke are still in existence.


								
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