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					Preservation and Development Guidelines for the Historic Ames Shovel Works at North Easton, Massachusetts
Prepared by the:

Friends of the Historic Ames Shovel Works at North Easton, Massachusetts

Consultant Team: Utile, Inc. - Architecture and Planning GLC Development Resources – Development Feasibility Milford & Ford – Historic Preservation Noble and Wickersham – Coordination & Legal

November 12, 2008
View of the Ames Shovel Works in 1881

Contents
These guidelines are intended to provide suggestions and guidance for property owners, citizens, and public officials involved in the preservation and redevelopment of the Ames Shovel Works in North Easton, Massachusetts, one of the most important and best preserved factory complexes in Massachusetts. The document includes a summary of the historical and architectural significance of the site relative to its listing on the National and State Registers of Historic Places. For a more detailed description, refer to the report Historical and Architectural Significance of the Ames Shovel Works, North Easton, Massachusetts (Oct. 31, 2008), also prepared by the Friends. Although in preparing these guidelines we have been guided by the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties: Standards for Rehabilitation (1995), we fully acknowledge that all final determinations under state and federal historic preservation statutes and regulations will be made by the Massachusetts Historical Commission and (in the case of projects receiving historic tax credits) by the National Parks Service.

Introduction: i. Site Location and Description ii. Historical and Architectural Significance of Site iiA. Historical Significance iiB. Architectural Significance of Site Guidelines: 1. Historic and Architectural Significance 2. Adjacent Structures Within the Historic District 3. Site Edge: Main Street 4. Site Edge: Oliver Street 5. Site Edge: East Tracks and Mechanic Street 6. Site Edge: South Edge and Quesset Brook 7. Views Toward Site from Adjacent Historic District 8. Views Out From Toward Adjacent Historic District 9. Open Space and Pedestrian Movement Patterns 10.Building Limitations and Recommended Zones 11. Architectural Guidelines for Additions and New Buildings 12. Architectural Guidelines for Most Significant Buildings

Development Guidelines Historic Ames Shovel Works at North Easton, Massachusetts

i.

Site Location and Description
The following table summarizes the significance of the Shovel Works site and the larger North Easton Historic District, based on the criteria for National Register and State Register listing:

The Ames Shovel Works site is an 8.2 acre parcel of land in the village of North Easton, Massachusetts, within the Town of Easton. The site is bounded by Main Street to the west, Oliver Street to the north, a currently disused MBTA rail right-of-way to the east, and Queset Brook to the south. The site was used for the shovel-making activities of Oliver Ames & Sons and its successor firms between 1852 and 1953. The site remains largely occupied by an interconnected complex of factory buildings constructed by the Ames firm between 1852 and 1907. The site comprises the core of the North Easton Historic District, a 500-acre district with approximately 160 structures, which is one of the oldest and largest National Register districts in Massachusetts. Within the Historic District, the site is bordered by many prominent civic and residential buildings, including three National Historic Landmarks designed by H.H. Richardson and landscaped by F.L. Olmsted: the Oliver Ames Free Library (1877), the Oakes Ames Memorial Hall (1879), and the Old Colony Railroad Station (1882). Immediately to the south and east of the site within the Historic District is the existing commercial town center of North Easton.

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Criterion
1) The site is associated with events that have made a significant contribution to the broad patterns of our history.

Ames Shovel Works / North Easton Historic District
Shovel Works and Historic District are associated with the industrial transformation of 19th century America, as one of the first sites of mass production, and with the creation of the transcontinental railroad. Shovel Works and Historic District are associated with Congressman Oakes Ames and Union Pacific Railroad President Oliver Ames, Jr., both instrumental in the creation of the transcontinental railroad. Shovel Works is one of the finest surviving examples in New England of a complex of 19th century granite factory buildings. Historic District is physically, functionally, and aesthetically an extremely cohesive settlement and an exceptional example of an industrial company town. Historic District contains works by the leading architect, landscape architect, sculptor, and stained glass artist of 19th century America – H.H. Richardson, F.L. Olmsted, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, and John Lafarge – along with high quality works by other prominent architects and artists.

2) The site is associated with the lives of persons significant in our past.

ii.

Historical and Architectural Significance of Site
3) The site embodies the distinctive characteristics of a type, period, or method of construction, or... represents a significant and distinguishable entity whose components may lack individual distinction.

The North Easton Historic District was placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the U.S. Department of the Interior on November 3, 1972. By virtue of its National Register status, the District is also listed on the Massachusetts State Register of Historic Places, which is maintained by the Massachusetts Historical Commission (MHC). The National Register nomination, which provided the basis for the U.S. Department of the Interior decision to accept the site, states: “[The] North Easton historic district is physically, functionally, and aesthetically an extremely cohesive settlement. This unity doubtless stems from the fact that the village was created largely from one source: A resident manufacturing family (Ames) that carried out its business (shovels and tools), housed its workers and itself within a small compass, and provided itself and its workers with elaborate amenities. Industrial and transportation buildings form a core, around which lie two belts: an inner one of workers’ housing, smaller residences, and civic and commercial buildings, and an outer one of large estates. “North Easton is exceptional among many such paternalistic industrial communities in the quality of its architecture, landscape design and town plan.”

4) The site represents the work of a master, or possesses high artistic values.

Map identifying North Easton Historic District with site highlighted.

Aeriel view of site in relation to North Easton Historic District.

Development Guidelines Historic Ames Shovel Works at North Easton, Massachusetts

iiA. Historical Significance
The Ames Shovel Works is historically significant for its role in the industrial transformation of 19th century America as one of the first centers of mass-production. The Oliver Ames & Sons Company, at the height of its success in the 1870s, controlled 60% of the world market for shovels – a basic tool essential for constructing everything from railroads to canals to building foundations and mines. In its North Easton plant the company employed 400 – 500 workers and manufactured over 1 million shovels per year. By the time the Ford Motor Company became famous for its assembly line production, the Ames Shovel Works had already been producing shovels with a Ford-like process of specialization of tasks in the Long Shop and other Shovel Works structures for over 50 years. The money and power generated by the shovel company created one of America’s first great industrial fortunes. Congressman Oakes Ames and his brother, Union Pacific Railroad president Oliver Ames Jr., were instrumental in the creation of the transcontinental railroad in the late 1860s – and much of the actual construction work on the line was carried out with Ames shovels. In short, Ames shovels made in North Easton both literally and figuratively bound our nation together after the Civil War. The buildings that remain standing today are monuments to that time and to the firm for which they were created, with enduring interpretive and scholarly value to historians and citizens. The development of the Shovel Works complex began in 1852, after an earlier set of wooden industrial structures to the east of Shovel Shop Pond burned in a devastating fire. The Ameses used that event as a spur to relocate manufacturing to the Shovel Works site, and to dramatically modernize and expand their facilities. Between 1852 and 1907 the Ameses built the interconnected complex of stone factory buildings which survives virtually intact today. Steam engines were installed, to supplement water power as the energy source for the plant. A railroad line, built by the firm in 1855 and taken over by the Old Colony Railroad in 1866, allowed efficient delivery of raw materials and the shipping of finished shovels to national and international markets. The period of industrial preeminence of the Shovel Works, and its major phase of architectural development, had both ended by the 1920s. The physical plant was modernized and expanded in 1928, but these steps failed to reverse the economic decline of the site. The Shovel Works continued in production until 1952, when the company started to close down its operations in North Easton. In 1972 the Shovel Works site was sold, and it has been used since then as a multi-tenant industrial park.

iiB. Architectural Significance
The interconnected complex of one- and two-story tall stone factory buildings on the Shovel Works site is a fine example of the functional granite style of commercial and industrial construction in 19th century New England. The exterior walls of the stone buildings are load-bearing granite, on average 30” thick, quarried from a local quarry. The walls are laid in irregular fieldstone, with regularly cut stone blocks used as quoins at the corners, as lintels over window and door openings, and as vertical jambs at the doors. The interior construction is timber post-and-beam construction, supported on columns typically spaced at 12 feet on center. These construction techniques were likely a reaction to the devastating fire losses suffered by wooden buildings. This substantial construction also helped the structures withstand the heavy pounding and vibration of the heavy power hammers. There is a high degree of consistency in construction throughout the granite buildings of the complex, which have survived in a generally good state of exterior preservation. The different structures that make up the Shovel Works were each constructed for a different task in the manufacturing process. Thus, the Shovel Works are the physical manifestation of the innovative techniques of specialization and mass production that made the Ames firm a leader in America’s Industrial Revolution. The first new structure built was the 530-foot-long Long Shop, completed in 1852. Quite rapidly, a series of further buildings were added to the site, each one meant to house a different operation in the manufacturing process: the Steam Hammer Shop (1853), the Antrim Shop (1865), the Handle Shop (1866), the Plate-Polishing Shop (1867), the Antrim Opening Shop (1868), and the New Plate-Polishing Shop (1880). Tools and machines were made and repaired in the Machine Shop (1857). Energy was provided by the steam engine in the Engine House (1853), which was later expanded by construction of the adjacent Power House (1907). Finished shovels were warehoused in the Store House (1870). The Stables (1897) provided a civic face to the Main Street frontage, and the Tenement (1840s) is the sole on-site example of the extensive workers’ housing owned by the firm. Later additions to the complex, principally the steel-frame Blade Storage Shop (Glass Store House) (1928), post-date the site’s chief period of industrial significance and are architecturally inconsistent with the 19th century granite buildings.

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Site in 1907

Site in 2008

Development Guidelines Historic Ames Shovel Works at North Easton, Massachusetts

Historic and Architectural Significance
Significant Most Significant Less Significant Structure 1. Long Shop (1852) 2. Machine Shop (1857) 2A. Machine Shop Additions (1980s) 3. Engine House (1853) 4. Power House (1907) 5. Store House (1870) 5A. Long Shop / Store House Link (1930s / 1980s) 6. Steam Hammer Shop (1853) 7. Plate-Polishing Shop (1867) 8. New Plate Polishing Shop (1880) 9. Antrim Opening Shop (1868) 10. Valve House (1906) 11. Laboratory (1926) 12. Blacksmith Shop (pre 1934) 13. Glass Store House (1928) 14. Tenement (1840s) 15. Stables (1897) • • • • • • • • • • • • • Comments First and largest building in the Shovel Works, housing all stages of manufacturing process; set architectural style for the rest of original granite factory complex. Together with the Long Shop, the core of the original granite factory complex; housed key element of manufacturing process. • Post-dates chief period of industrial significance; inconsistent with architectural character of original complex. Housed key element of manufacturing process; architectural character consistent with rest of original granite factory complex. Together with Engine House, housed key element of manufacturing process; architectural character consistent with rest of original granite factory complex. Housed key stage of manufacturing process; architectural character consistent with rest of original granite factory complex. Post-dates chief period of industrial significance; inconsistent with architectural character of original complex. Highly significant historically, housing key stage in the manufacturing process. Exterior granite walls and highly significant and should be preserved; original pitched roof has been removed. Housed key stage of manufacturing process; architectural character consistent with rest of original granite factory complex.

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• •

Housed key stage of manufacturing process; architectural character consistent with rest of original granite factory complex. Post-dates chief period of industrial significance; inconsistent with architectural character of original complex. Post-dates chief period of industrial significance; inconsistent with architectural character of original complex. Post-dates chief period of industrial significance; inconsistent with architectural character of original complex. Post-dates chief period of industrial significance; inconsistent with architectural character of original complex. Sole on-site example of workers housing; well-preserved vernacular Greek Revival structure; landscaped site contributes to civic and residential character of Main Street. Played key role in firm’s history as stables and then offices; presents ceremonial public face of Shovel Works to Main Street, with its other civic and residential buildings.

•

1. Long Shop

5. Store House

9. Antrim Opening Shop

2. Machine Shop

15. Stables

3. Engine House / 4. Power House

Development Guidelines Historic Ames Shovel Works at North Easton, Massachusetts

Housed key stage of manufacturing process; architectural character consistent with rest of original granite factory complex.

Adjacent Structures Within the Historic District
As stated in the National Register nomination, the Shovel Works comprises the core of the North Easton Historic District. A key goal of the preservation and development guidelines for the Shovel Works site is “the preservation and protection of the distinctive characteristics of buildings and places significant in the history of the commonwealth and its cities and towns or their architecture, and through the maintenance and improvement of settings for such buildings and places and the encouragement of design compatible therewith.”*
*From MGL 40C Historic Districts, Section 2. Purpose.

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Two Ames factory buildings lie outside of the current Shovel Works site. Immediately to the north, across Oliver Street, is the Handle Shop (1866), currently the facility of the North Easton YMCA. Immediately to the west, across Main Street, the Antrim Shop (1865) has been converted to a private residence. In the 19th century the Ameses also owned and maintained over 90 units of housing for their workers; good examples near the Shovel Works include a series of two-family houses along Oliver and Elm Streets. The Old Colony Railroad Station (1881), a National Historic Landmark designed by H.H. Richardson with landscaping by F.L. Olmsted, is located immediately to the east of the site, across the MBTA rail right-of-way. The new station served as a symbolic gateway to North Easton from the outside world; it also provided a buffer between the industrial activities of the Shovel Works and the nearby landscaped estates of Oliver Ames III and Frederick L. Ames, the third generation Ameses who were Richardson’s clients. The building is owned by the Easton Historical Society, and it has been restored almost entirely to its original state. The west side of Main Street, opposite the Shovel Works site, is lined by a series of architecturally significant private, civic, and commercial buildings commissioned by the Ameses, which makes up a museum of late 19th century American architecture. Diagonally across from the Stables is Unity Close, the house of Oliver Ames, Jr. (Italianate, 1862). To the north of Unity Close are Unity Church (Gothic Revival, 1874) and its parsonage (1877). Further south along Main Street is the interrelated complex of the Oliver Ames Free Library (1877), the Oakes Ames Memorial Hall (1879), and the Memorial Cairn or “Rockery,” a landscaped Civil War memorial (1882). These works constitute a high point in the artistic collaboration of Richardson and Olmsted and are listed as National Historic Landmarks. Behind the Library is Queset, the home of Oakes Angier Ames (Picturesque Gothic Revival, 1854). To the south of the Rockery is the Oliver Ames High School (Carl Fehmer, 1895). Along the east side of Main Street, immediately south of the Shovel Works, are several private houses and the North Easton Savings Bank and Post Office (Shepley, Rutan and Coolidge, 1904).

Oakes Ames Memorial Hall (H. H. Richardson)

Ames Free Library (H. H. Richardson)

North Easton Rail Station (H. H. Richardson)

Antrim Hammer Shop

Unity Close

Handle Shop

Development Guidelines Historic Ames Shovel Works at North Easton, Massachusetts

Site Edge: Main Street
Historically, Main Street has always been the primary thoroughfare into North Easton Center and is home to many of the most significant civic and residential buildings within the Historic District. It has a distinctly bucolic character which should be maintained in order to preserve the historic setting and sequence in which these historic buildings are experienced. Some additional planting would be acceptable in areas which have lost their vegetation to driveways or other factors. Historic views of the Shovel Works from the lath 19th century onward show the Main Street edge from the Machine Shop north as a continuous landscaped strip of trees and grass. •It is recommended that the Tenement remain in place and is treated as a historic structure of high importance. •Vegetation along the street to the north of the Machine Shop should be maintained. The vegetated triangular area to the west of the Glass Store House should be kept and could be supplemented with more vegetation of similar type. Providing parking in this area is highly discouraged. •Vegetation to the south of the Machine Shop is less significant and could be removed and/or replaced if desired. Opening views to and from the Richardson buildings are encouraged to promote historical awareness between the site and its context. •Parking to the south of the Machine Shop is acceptable provided there is a small landscape buffer along the road.

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Main Street - View North

Main Street - View South

View of Machine Shop from Main Street

View of Ames Free Library from Main Street

Development Guidelines Historic Ames Shovel Works at North Easton, Massachusetts

Site Edge: Oliver Street
The Oliver Street edge of the site is home to a series of residential scaled worker housing buildings. Many of these remain and should be considered a significant contributor to the historic context around the site. There are also limited development opportunities on this edge of the site due to ownership issues, existing buildings and the memorial at the intersection of Main and Oliver. •All new buildings that are proximate to Oliver street should reflect the scale and pattern which exists on the street. •Generally new buildings on site are required to be of a consistent size and scale to the significant historic buildings existing. If new buildings are required to be built near the north end of the site they should reduce in size as they approach Oliver Street to reflect the scale of the existing buildings. •No new buildings are to be built on the area at the northeast end of the site nearest the train station. This area establishes an important open space which was the symbolic entry to the site for visitors arriving by train. Grade as is exists relative to the train station and long shop should be maintained at this area. Parking would be acceptable in this area.

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Oliver Street Elevation - Potential scale mediator with street edge and new construction.

View toward North Easton Rail Station from Oliver Street

View of existing facades from Oliver Street

View of Stables

Worker housing

View of North Easton Rail Station

Development Guidelines Historic Ames Shovel Works at North Easton, Massachusetts

Site Edge: East Tracks and Mechanic Street
The site does not directly front Mechanic Street rather it abuts the train station and tracks. As discussed in the Oliver Street guidelines, the northeast edge of the site nearest the train station is to remain unbuilt because of its historic importance as a symbolic entry to the site for visitors arriving by train. In general it would be desired to re-establish some of the long-standing pedestrian connections from the site to the station and to Mechanic Street. • No new buildings are to be built on the area at the northeast end of the site nearest the train station. This area establishes an important open space which was the symbolic entry to the site for visitors arriving by train. Grade as it exists relative to the train station and Long Shop should be maintained at this area. Parking would be acceptable in this area. • A pedestrian access point should be re-established between the site and the station at the existing track crossing directly to the south of the station. • A second pedestrian connection beneath the tracks is encouraged at the existing location which aligns with the south end of the Store House. This could facilitate a safer connection between the Library and the Children’s Museum. • The vegetation along this site edge is generally not part of this property. It is encouraged to maintain what vegetation exists on site here. • Vehicular and pedestrian circulation will likely be necessary along this edge of the site in the north/south direction both for daily use and emergency vehicle use.

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North Easton Rail Station from Mechanic Street

View North Easton Rail Station from site.

Children’s Museum

View toward pedestrian connection.

Historic rendering of pedestrian connection.

Development Guidelines Historic Ames Shovel Works at North Easton, Massachusetts

Site Edge: South Edge and Queset Brook
There is generally very little opportunity to develop new buildings along the south edge of the site and this is generally discouraged. The brook was historically a functioning part of the Shovel Works and it is encouraged to allow pedestrian access. There will be environmental and wetlands approvals to consider when developing this end of the site. • The area adjacent to the brook is currently paved and used for parking and service vehicles. If this area is to continue to be used for parking, a new planted zone immediately adjacent to the edge of the brook should be considered with the possibility of a pedestrian walkway. The planted area could also be utilized to buffer runoff from the parking areas before it enters the brook. • The southeast corner of the site has limited access for parking and is therefore an excellent candidate to be used for landscaped and/or paved open space, in conjunction with the adjacent buildings.

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Queset Brook

View

View

View

Development Guidelines Historic Ames Shovel Works at North Easton, Massachusetts

Views Toward Site from Adjacent Historic District
In general, views to and from the site are an important consideration in the development of the complex. It is an imperative to avoid adversely affecting the surrounding (off site) historic structures by developing too close to them or developing very tall structures in their primary view corridors. Similarly, it is encouraged to retain existing views from the site to these structures. It is the goal of these guidelines to encourage strong visual connections between the Shovel Works and the context which it served to sponsor. View 1. Maintain strong visual connection from the train station to the Long Shop and Store House. This was for many years the symbolic entry to the site for visitors arriving by train. The space formed between these buildings represents an important sequence to the complex. View 2. The views to the Oliver Ames Memorial and the Stables has been the first view to the site for vehicles and pedestrians for many years. This view should be kept free of new buildings and new plantings which would obscure this view. View 3. Re-opening the view from Main Street to the facades of the Machine Shop, Long Shop and Store House will reconnect these important buildings to the surrounding community. View 4. The view from the Ames Free Library is currently obscured by a row of relatively young but tall white pine trees. Re-opening this view up would be encouraged. View 5. As designed by Richardson and Olmstead respectively, the view from the Oakes Ames Memorial Hall and the Rockery offer an important historical perspective of the Shovel Works and it’s context. Development of new buildings on site must consider these views and the scale impact on them.

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View 1

View 2

View 3

View 4 (Historic view from approximate similar location.)

View 5

Development Guidelines Historic Ames Shovel Works at North Easton, Massachusetts

Views Out Toward Adjacent Historic District
In general, views to and from the site are an important consideration in the development of the complex. It is an imperative to avoid adversely affecting the surrounding (off site) historic structures by developing to close to them or developing very tall structures in their primary view corridors. Similarly, it is encouraged to retain or restore existing views from the sight to these structures. It is the goal of these guidelines to encourage strong visual connections between the Shovel Works and the context which it served to sponsor. These visual connections are intended to reinforce the important relationships that the buildings of this district share. These strong visual links will serve to reinforce the important historical connections between the Shovel Works and : View 1. + 2. Preserve the views to the Train Station View 3. Preserve views to Train overpass View 4.+ 5. Preserve views to Unity Close View 6. Restore views to Ames Free Library and Oakes Ames Memorial Hall

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View 1 and 2

View 3

View 4

View 5

View 6

Development Guidelines Historic Ames Shovel Works at North Easton, Massachusetts

Open Space and Pedestrian Movement Patterns
• The industrial character of the site should generally be maintained. • Easy pedestrian movements through the site, strengthening connections with adjacent neighborhoods and civic uses. Fences and other isolating buffers are to be discouraged except where used to screen utilitarian areas. • Open spaces should be categorized into hardscape and softscape as shown in diagram. • Parking area along Oliver Street to reduce sight lines to vehicles. • Pedestrian and vehicle movement areas may be distinguished by paving textures and materials, while maintaining historic industrial character of site interior.

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Space between Machine Shop and Antrim Opening Shop

Main Street

Space between Long Shop and Atrim Opening Shop

Development Guidelines Historic Ames Shovel Works at North Easton, Massachusetts

Building Limitations and Recommended Zones
A
Plan Limitations: The acceptable new building zone was determined from the site edge analysis, and the scale and massing of the existing historic structures. Within the boundaries of this new zone, the overall footprint of new construction should be limited to the footprint of the existing Glass Store House. Height Limitations: The height limitations of new structures should be limited to 35’ above grade, throughout the site. New construction should register the cornice lines of the existing long buildings in massing and potentially in architectural detailing.

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B

B

A

Section A-A

Section B-B

Development Guidelines Historic Ames Shovel Works at North Easton, Massachusetts

Architectural Guidelines for Additions and New Buildings
Source: The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties (1995), Standards for Rehabilitation “Rehabilitation” is defined as the act or process of making possible a compatible use for a property through repair, alterations, and additions while preserving those portions or features which convey its historical, cultural, or architectural values. 1. A property will be used as it was historically or be given a new use that requires minimal change to its distinctive materials, features, spaces, and spatial relationships. 2. The historic character of a property will be retained and preserved. The removal of distinctive materials or alteration of features, spaces, and spatial relationships that characterize a property will be avoided. 3. Each property will be recognized as a physical record of its time, place, and use. Changes that create a false sense of historical development, such as adding conjectural features or elements from other historic properties, will not be undertaken. 4. Changes to a property that have acquired historic significance in their own right will be retained and preserved. 5. Distinctive materials, features, finishes, and construction techniques or examples of craftsmanship that characterize a property will be preserved.
Recommended dimensions based on existing structures

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6. Deteriorated historic features will be repaired rather than replaced. Where the severity of deterioration requires replacement of a distinctive feature, the new feature will match the old in design, color, texture, and, where possible, materials. Replacement of missing features will be substantiated by documentary and physical evidence. 7. Chemical or physical treatments, if appropriate, will be undertaken using the gentlest means possible. Treatments that cause damage to historic materials will not be used. 8. Archeological resources will be protected and preserved in place. If such resources must be disturbed, mitigation measures will be undertaken. 9. New additions, exterior alterations, or related new construction will not destroy historic materials, features, and spatial relationships that characterize the property. The new work will be differentiated from the old and will be compatible with the historic materials, features, size, scale and proportion, and massing to protect the integrity of the property and its environment. 10. New additions and adjacent or related new construction will be undertaken in such a manner that, if removed in the future, the essential form and integrity of the historic property and its environment would be unimpaired.

Recommended dimensions based on existing structures

Development Guidelines Historic Ames Shovel Works at North Easton, Massachusetts

Architectural Guidelines for Most Significant Buildings
These architectural guidelines are intended to address the preservation and rehabilitation of the granite factory buildings on the Shovel Works site identified as “Most Significant”: the Long Shop (1852), Machine Shop (1852, 1857). Engine House (1853), Antrim Opening Shop (1868), Plate-Polishing Shop (1867), Store House (1870), New Plate-Polishing Shop (1880), and Power House (1907). Preservation of the existing granite exterior walls of the Steam Hammer Shop (1853) should be treated in the same manner; potential top-floor additions to that structure are addressed separately. Elements to be preserved intact, except as expressly noted below: • Existing granite walls • Existing window and door openings • Existing rooflines, eaves, and cupolas Potential alterations to most significant structures, where necessary to meet code and habitability requirements for new uses: • Dormers (shed dormers preferred) • Skylights (should be set flat on line of roof, without projecting bubble shape) • Additional window openings (should be consistent in scale and proportion with existing windows, but with details clearly distinguishing new from historic construction) • New door openings (cutting down of existing window sill would be preferred to new openings, but with details clearly distinguishing new from historic construction) Note that for projects seeking the use of federal and state historic tax credits, it is likely that only limited alterations, such as those identified here as “Minor Interventions,” would be permitted on primary building facade. More extensive “Major Interventions” might be permitted on secondary building facades. In general the Historic Tax Credit process is iterative and subject to the review and judgment of both the National Park Service and the Massachusetts Historic Commission.

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Existing Conditions

Minor Intervention

Major Intervention

Development Guidelines Historic Ames Shovel Works at North Easton, Massachusetts

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