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					Office Skills
Abbey Wood School Handbook

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List of content
1. Scheme of work  Schedule of lessons Introduction to the CLC @ Abbey Wood Health and Safety Keyboard Skills KAZ Job Application Skills o o o   CV Letter of Application Interview Skills 2. Course Content     

Telephone Skills Organising Skills

3. Teacher’s Notes

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1. Scheme of Work
Touch Typing and Basic Office Skills
A 10 Week Course for Year 11 Students 15 November 2004 – 28 February 2005 16 November 2004 – 01 March 2005 All students on this course shall be expected to practice regularly, in their own time, in order to build both accuracy and speed. Work sheets/practice sheets will be handed out each week to encourage this. Students who lack commitment will not succeed on this course. The course has been designed for all styles of learning (visual, audio and kinaesthetic). Unfortunately this course is not accredited; however, certificates will be issued at the end of the course. Subject Introduction to the course – Health and Safety Materials   PowerPoint presentation with worksheets Hot Potatoes (on computer) o Back/neck o Arm_wrist_fingers o Vision o Feet PowerPoint Presentation/Video Job application information (handout) CV Template Letter of Application (example) Letter of Application (template) Venue School Nr of Weeks (1) Schedule Wk 1

Job Application Skills  Writing a CV  Letters of Application  Application Forms Interview Skills

     

School

(1)

Wk 2

        

Telephone Skills

Kaz Touch Typing – ‘Hands on’ learning on the PC

PowerPoint presentation Crosswords (on computer or worksheet) Mock interviews PowerPoint/video presentation Hot Potatoes Matching exercise (on computer or worksheet) Call scenarios (worksheet) Mock phone calls PowerPoint presentation with worksheets Login instructions

School

(1)

Wk 3

School/CLC

(1)

Wk 4

CLC

(3)

Wks 5-7

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4 Organising Skills – PC file management and virtual filing  PowerPoint Presentation with worksheets CLC (1) Wk 8

Use of Office Equipment A demonstration of how and why the following equipment is used:  Photocopier  Fax  Shredder  Laminator  Binder  Cutter KAZ TOUCH TYPING TEST

CLC

(1)

Wk 9



Login instructions

CLC

(1)

Wk 10

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Touch Typing & Application Skills
A 7 Week Course for Year 10 Students 14 April 2005 – 26 May 2005 15 April 2005 – 27 May 2005 All students on this course shall be expected to practice regularly, in their own time, in order to build both accuracy and speed. Work sheets/practice sheets will be handed out each week to encourage this. Students who lack commitment will not succeed on this course. The course has been designed for all styles of learning (visual, audio and kinaesthetic). Unfortunately this course is not accredited; however, certificates will be issued at the end of the course. Subject Introduction to the course – Health and Safety Materials    PowerPoint presentation with worksheets All Tests – Home Page Hot Potatoes (on computer) o Back/neck o Arm_wrist_fingers o Vision o Feet PowerPoint presentation with worksheets Login instructions Hands-on Job application information (handout) CV Template Letter of Application (example) PowerPoint/video presentation Crosswords (on computer or worksheet) Venue CLC Nr of Weeks (1) Schedule Wk 1

KAZ Touch

       

CLC

(3)

Wks 2-4

Job Application Skills Writing a CV Letters of Applicatio n

CLC

(1)

Wk 5

 

Interview Skills

 

PowerPoint/video presentation Interview Skills Worksheet

CLC

(1)

Wk 6

KAZ TOUCH TYPING TEST



Login instructions

CLC

(1)

Wk 7

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2. Course Content
Introduction to the CLC @ Abbey Wood
[PowerPoint Presentation]

Health and Safety
[PowerPoint Presentation]

Health and Safety Using Computers

© By Petra Young

Keyboard Skills
[PowerPoint Presentation]

KAZ
[PowerPoint Presentation]

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Job Application Skills
[PowerPoint Presentation]

Writing a CV Template Letters of Application Template Interview Skills [PowerPoint Presentation]

Exercise: Crossword

Telephone Skills
[PowerPoint Presentation]

Exercise: Match

Organising Skills
[PowerPoint Presentation]

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3. Teacher’s Notes
Script for Touch Typing and Basic Office Skills Course SCHOOL Week 1 Introduction Although this course is called “touch typing and basic OFFICE skills” I really think that the skills you will learn on this course will become your “life” or “working” skills. These skills are not just used in an office environment and they are not just for clerks, typists or secretaries… Whatever industry you join, whatever position you hold within that industry, there is an extremely strong possibility that you shall be expected to use these skills. The course has been divided into sections Job Application Skills To help you get that interview Interview Skills To land you that first job Telephone Skills To build your confidence when using the phone File Management So you can file with confidence Touch Typing Demonstration of Office Equipment Whether you work as a hairdresser, a motor mechanic or anything in-between, you will need these skills and learning about them now will put you in a much better position when applying for that first job. The touch typing is a brief introduction to the keyboard. With practice you could achieve an acceptable and accurate typing speed but how well you do is up to you. It can be frustrating but with perseverance you WILL achieve…just like riding a bike or learning to swim once you have mastered it you will have this skill for life. HEALTH AND SAFETY PRESENTATION Week 2 This week we are going to concentration on our job application skills. JOB APPLICATION SKILLS PRESENTATION FOLLOWED BY CROSSWORD EXERCISE Week 3 Following on from last week….Let us assume that your applications were successful and you have been invited for an interview. What now?
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9 This week we are going to concentrate on interview skills. INTERVIEW SKILLS PRESENTATION Week 4 Telephone Skills Since texts and emails have become both affordable and popular many people, especially young people, have simply stopped talking on the phone. Slowly but surely the art of conversation and basic telephone skills are dying and many people are becoming wary or even afraid to use and talk on the phone. Businesses still rely heavily on the telephone. Employers still view telephone skills as vital. TELEPHONE SKILLS PRESENTATION FOLLOWED BY HOT POTATO EXERCISE No Course next two weeks - MOCKS CLC Week 5,6,7 KAZ TOUCH TYPING Week 8 PC File management and virtual filing POWERPOINT PRESENTATION FOLLOWED BY WORKSHEETS Week9 Demonstration of equipment Week10 KAZ TEST

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Health issues to consider when you use a computer
Have you wondered lately why you keep getting headaches or that you seemed to have permanent pain in the middle of your back. Have you considered that it well maybe from using your computer? What should you be checking?

Computers and Your Vision
Back to questions

According to the World Health Organisation, while it appears that VDT's do not lead to permanent damage to the eyes, visual discomfort is so widespread among operators that it must be regarded as a health problem and should be addressed. In a study of 38 female data-acquisition clerks using Video Display Terminals, most experienced some sort of vision-related fatigue. After VDT use, almost 3/4 had one or more types of eye discomfort. Two-thirds had "ocular eyestrain symptoms," half had "visual eyestrain symptoms". Also reported were headaches and musculoskeletal pain. VDT type or calibration has been found to not be as important to visual fatigue as the very nature of the work, which is close-up, repetitive, long-lasting visual work, although one study concludes that the VDT places an "added demand on the visual system". VDT work, as opposed to simple paper-based close-up work, does seem to require more effort, is more difficult, and increases the visual load. Eyestrain, visual impairment and visual fatigue can come from a variety of sources including: lighting conditions, glare, dirty screens, improper screen contrast and improper screen placement. In a study conducted in 1974, task lighting, general lighting and screen lighting were all tested for impact on the visual comfort of computer users. The study found that the design of light sources in an office environment can greatly aid or hinder visual comfort. The choice of background and character colour can greatly influence eye comfort or discomfort. Choosing colours that do not have a high level of contrast can lead to blurry vision, burning eyes, dry eyes, and even neck, back and shoulder discomfort. Visual Impairment (fatigue or irritation) can persist during off-work hours and, in cases of extremely heavy VDT use such as data entry, can last until the next morning. It is generally understood, however, that VDT-associated eye strain is only temporary.

Arms, Wrists and Fingers
Back to questions Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Knowledge about its symptoms and causes has almost become commonplace in the work world. According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, there is a strong association between a Cumulative Trauma Disorder (CTD) like Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in the wrist and keyboard use.

Position the arms, wrists and fingers incorrectly and then perform a repetitive task and you could be headed for trouble. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, perhaps as many as one-half of secretaries and over one-third of word processors experience some sort of symptoms associated with carpal tunnel syndrome.

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11 Many people assume that the aches and pains associated with repetitive tasks over time are merely natural by products of hard work. According to a 1990 study of Cumulative Trauma Disorders (CTD's), the aches and pains may be primarily the result of the repetitive tasks. Measures should be taken to make these tasks, such as typing on a keyboard, as naturally positioned and least harmful as possible. By moving your arms and wrists into a neutral position, you can reduce the effects of long periods of computer use. Adjust your chair height and/or keyboard height such that your forearms are parallel to the floor and your wrists are straight. Aids like wrist pads, mouse pads or wrist supports will straighten adverse angles, allowing more natural and comfortable movement. According to the American Journal of Industrial Medicine, to reduce adverse effects of repetitive motion, like Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, "job modification or redesign may be required".

Your Back & Neck
Back to questions

As many as 80% of the population complain of some kind of back pain in their lifetime. Long periods in front of a computer without proper lower back support can aggravate or heighten back pain. Improper keyboard and table height can be associated with shoulder, arm and neck pain. Additionally, if work is not placed in comfortable viewing range with something like a copy holder, one can experience shoulder, arm and neck pain. One study points out that with all the focus on the lumbar region of the back, the backward sloping chair has emerged in an attempt to support the lumbar region of the back. The backward slope can put pressure on the knees. In a 1986 study, subjects with back pain found relief by raising table and chairs by 7 cm. Your desk or table should be about two inches lower than your elbow. If your chair is not ergonomically designed, with adjustable arm rests, height control, and lumbar support, an add-on lumbar roll is a simple, inexpensive correction to the problem. The roll does two things: it helps both the outward curve of the spine in the thorax and the inward curve of the spine in the lumbar, the more natural weight-supporting body position. According to a 1986 study, no one posture is best for all VDT work. People need to lean forward for copy work and back for VDT work. An ergonomically designed chair can support the body in the multiple positions required. A chair's seat should adjust forward and back, the backrest angle should be adjustable, the backrest height should be adjustable and the seat height should be adjustable.

Care for Feet
Back to questions Most computer users do not realise that correct placement of feet while seated in front of a computer primarily helps to relieve back problems. Feet that are crossed do not help to support the body. Your back, in turn, bears all the weight incorrectly which can lead to discomfort after even a short period. Raise or lower your chair until your forearms are parallel to the floor, your wrists are straight and your fingers are resting on the keyboard. Your feet should then be flat on the floor and the angle between your thighs and your calves should be 90 degrees or more. Adjustable footrests can aid in making your workstation more comfortable, particularly if, after adjusting your seat height, your feet do not sit flat on the floor.
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Ergonomics Checklist for Computer Users
Back to questions

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To ensure that you minimise risks to yourself you should insure that you have your computer set up correctly so that you have a workstation which is set up as efficiently and ergonomically soundly as possible. Work Station Set-Up

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

       

Adeq uate Lighti ng. (1, 2) Safe guard s on machi nes shoul d confo rm to stand ards required. The chair should have five castors as any less could make it unstable. (4, 10, 11) If there are windows there should be no glare from them. If there is, then Blinds or Curtains should be fitted. (5) The image on the screen should be stable, with no flicker, you should be able to use the contrast button easily. (6) You should be able to swivel and move the screen easily and freely. (7) The keyboard must be tiltable and separate from the computer, thus avoiding fatigue in the hands and wrists (wrists supports should be supplied if needed). (8) The work surface needs to be of a standard size (not smaller than 600 mm deep and 1200 mm long). It should have a low reflective top but if it has a polished top than it needs to be covered with a card or some other non-reflective material. (9) The chair should allow freedom of movement. (4) A footrest should be supplied if needed. (11)

http://lang.swarthmore.edu/place/workstation_ns3.htm http://lang.swarthmore.edu/place/workstation_ie3.htm The information provided is the consensus of many ergonomics sources. Studies have shown, though, that an individual's preferred settings can deviate from usual recommendations. What is important is finding settings that are comfortable for you. Single distances or angles are not given; rather, ranges are, since finding what works for you is most important.

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Prevention
Back to questions If you can get into good habits when working on your computer this will cut down on risks to your health.

         

Lumbar region of the spine: Inward curve. (2) Thorax: outward curve. Chair swivels so operators can move periodically. Legs straight (6) Feet firmly on the floor, footrest used if needed. (5) Bottom of monitor no lower than 40 degrees. (9) Elbows parallel to middle of keyboard. Forearms parallel to floor. (7) Monitor 18-24" from eyes Centre of monitor at 15 degrees. (9) Eyes parallel with top of monitor. Top of monitor no higher than 0 degrees. (9) Wrists straight. (8)

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What else can be done?
Back to questions

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The first is proper workstation design with respect to characteristics such as screen height, desk and screen placement, and glare management. The next is a proper eye care regime. This includes eye rest, exercise, and medical examination. Ensure that you take frequently breaks away from the computer. In the work place breaks should be taken every hour for at least five minutes. What should you do if you show signs of RSI?      Ensure that you take immediate rest, even if you have to meet deadlines Identify the cause - keyboard, chair, desk, size etc When the cause is identified is there a way to of limiting exposure to the risk - e.g. can they use voice recognition software to avoid keyboard use? Evaluate the workplace, then assess the changes necessary Seek medical treatment from a GP

Web Links
www.ergonomics.org.uk/ The Ergonomics Society of the UK www.bsi.org.uk/bsi/welcome.html British Standards Institutions www.iso.ch/ International Standards Organisations www.isoh.co.uk/ Institution of Occupational Ergonomics www.cat.org/ Centre for Office Technology www.demon.co.uk/rsi/ RSI UK Society www.system-concepts.com/ Ergonomics constancy www.open.gov.uk/hse/hsehome.htm The Health and Safety Executive's Web site, contains a page on display screens and commonly asked questions. www.engr.unl.edu/ee/eeshop/rsi.html Personal Web site of US RSI suffer. Offers prevention and cure advice. http://www.ad.ic.ac.uk/occ_health/computer.htm Occupational Health http://www.coccyx.org.uk/coping/work.htm Sit/Stand Workstation - Furniture http://www.aoanet.org/commcenter/pressrelArchive_detail.asp?NewsSeqID=79 American Optometric Association http://condor.depaul.edu/~atamulis/ergo-1.html Ergo Notice (Computer Work Station)

[This web page was adapted from the site at http://www.brunel.ac.uk/~xxsubcc/archive/healtstuff.htm ]

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Interactive exercises using the text:
Health issues to consider when you use a computer Question Vision What should be regarded as a health problem? What did users of VDTs experience? Answer Back to text Visual discomfort.           Vision-related fatigue, eye discomfort, ocular eyestrain, visual eyestrain symptoms, headaches, musculoskeletal pain. Requires more effort, more difficult, increases the visual load. Close-up, repetitive, long-lasting visual work,  poor lighting conditions,  Glare, dirty screens,  improper screen contrast,  improper screen placement. The design of light sources (task lighting, general lighting and screen lighting) in an office environment. Back to text  Wrongly positioned arms,  wrists and fingers and performing a repetitive task.  Repetitive tasks, e.g. typing on a keyboard,  not naturally positioned arms, wrists and fingers.  By moving arms, wrists and fingers into a neutral position,  adjusting chair height and/or keyboard, so that forearms are parallel to the floor and the wrists are straight,  fingers must rest on the keyboard. Wrist pads, mouse or wrist supports. They allow more natural and comfortable movement. Back to text  Long periods in front of the computer without lower back support,  Improper keyboard and table height  Work not placed in comfortable viewing range. Multipositions of the chair:  to write: lean forward  to type: lean back      Chair’s seat needs to adjust forward and back, Backrest angle should be adjustable Backrest height should be adjustable Seat height should be adjustable. Copy holder,

In which way does VDT work differ from paper-based work? What can increase eyestrain, visual impairment and visual fatigue?

What can greatly aid or hinder visual comfort? Arms, Wrists and Fingers What can cause CTD? What causes aches and pains?

How can this be avoided?

Name aids, which help to prevent damage. Why are those aids effective? Back and Neck What can aggravate or heighten back pain?

Which function of an ergonomically designed chair supports the body?

Which aids support correct posture?

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What does lumber support do?

16 Ergonomic chair, Table and chairs raised by 7 cm, Desk and table should be 7cm (2 inch) lower than elbow,  Height control and lumbar support (addon lumber roll) Helps the outward curve of the spine in the thorax and the inward curve of the spine in the lumber – the more natural weightsupporting position    Back to text You should place your feet correctly by putting them flat on the floor

Feet What should you do or not do with your feet? What can happen, if you do not place your feet correctly? How should your feet be positioned? What can support a correct position of the feet?

You should not cross your feet!
Crossed legs do not support the body so that the back has to bear all the weight. Angle between your thighs and calves should be 90 degree or more. Put feet on adjustable footrest.

Please refer to the Ergonomic Checklist and Prevention of Injuries and Other Helpful Tips!!

Glossary:
VDT CTD CTS RSI Video Display Terminals Cumulative Trauma Disorder Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Repetitive Strain Injury

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CURRICULUM VITAE Name: Address:

Tel: Date of birth: Education: 1998 – 2003 GCSEs – to be taken in June 2003 Mathematics Double Science English Language English Literature Religious Education Personal Profile: Abbey Wood School, Eynsham Drive, LONDON, SE2 9AJ

Key Skills:

Work Experience/Employment:

Interests:

References Ms S Harry Headteacher Abbey Wood Eynsham Drive LONDON SE2 9AJ Mr./Mrs./Ms. Head of Year Abbey Wood School Eynsham Drive LONDON SE2 9AJ Mr./Mrs./Ms Tutor Abbey Wood School Eynsham Drive LONDON SE2 9AJ

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The Albany Theatre

Petra Young Middle Park Avenue Eltham SE9 5HR

Douglas Way Deptford SE8 4AG 5 November, 2004

Dear Sir or Madam: I am writing to apply for the vacancy of reception assistant, advertised in “The Mercury” on 4th February. Firstly I would like to give information about me. I am a pupil of Abbey Wood School. I am studying Mathematics, Double Science, English Language, English Literature and Religious Education. I am looking for a job, which fits in with my studies and would be happy to work on Saturdays or Sundays. I visited your theatre lat November to see the play called “Hannah and Hanna”, and I was very impressed with the play and the theatre. I am keen to learn more about how a theatre runs. I am hard working and I like to take responsibility for myself. I am applying for this job vacancy to gain more experience. I look forward to hearing from you. Yours faithfully, Petra Young

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“I hope this will solve your problem.” “The shipping date on your order should be next Friday.” “I don’t understand why customer service didn’t help you.” “Mr King is in a meeting. Why don’t you call back in an hour?” “I’m sorry it took so long. Now what do you want?” “I’m sorry you had to wait, our telephone operators are very slow”. “I’m sorry I didn’t call you back. My boss had us in another meeting that lasted all morning.” “Mrs Jones in our service department can help you with that.” “If you have any additional questions please call me.” “I’m glad we were able to help.” “Mr King is not available to take your call at the moment. Could I take a message or ask him to return your call?” “Thank you for your order” “Feel free to call us anytime.” “Mrs Jones is in a meeting. How can I help you?”

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Task: YOURSELF    Think about who you are and what you have to offer What are your strengths? Give examples! How would your best friend describe your good points?

List 10 of your good qualities – HONESTLY 1. . 2. . 3. . 4. . 5. . 6. . 7. . 8. . 9. . 10. .

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Job Application Skills (3)

Application Forms Why Do We Have Them



Application forms are used because employers need some method of comparing o the abilities, o experience and o personalities of those who apply.

  

FACT The application part of the job search process is vital if you are to get an interview. Employers need to know all about you in order to decide whether or not they invite you to an interview. By doing some careful planning you can choose the best way to describe yourself on an application form.

      

PREPARATION Photocopy application forms Carefully read through the copy Read through the copy again Plan before you complete the copy. Take your time Check your spelling Complete the original

YOURSELF    Think about who you are and what you have to offer What are your strengths? How would your best friend describe your good points?

OHP Exercise: List 10 of your good qualities – HONESTLY Examples Calm, Punctual, Sensible, Quick to learn , Polite, Creative, Confident, Organised, Reliable, Loyal, Responsible, Hardworking, Thorough, Careful, Friendly, Enthusiastic, Patient, Honest.

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How to get to KAZ at the CLC @ Abbey Wood
Start  All Programmes  Students Programmes  KAZ User Name: Password: awos1 password

SELECT YOUR KAZ VERSION

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“I hope this will solve your problem.” “The shipping date on your order should be next Friday.” “I don’t understand why customer service didn’t help you.” “Mr King is in a meeting. Why don’t you call back in an hour?” “I’m sorry it took so long. Now what do you want?” “I’m sorry you had to wait, our telephone operators are very slow”. “I’m sorry I didn’t call you back. My boss had us in another meeting that lasted all morning.” “Mrs Jones in our service department can help you with that.” “If you have any additional questions please call me.” “I’m glad we were able to help.” “Mr King is not available to take your call at the moment. Could I take a message or ask him to return your call?” “Thank you for your order” “Feel free to call us anytime.” “Mrs Jones is in a meeting. How can I help you?”

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Telephone Call Scenarios Taking Messages Option 1 You are a mechanic at, Fit Kwik, a local garage. The owner, Mr Sterling, has gone to the suppliers leaving you alone. He said that he wouldn’t be long but that was 3 hours ago! The phone rings……………………………… Option 2 You work in the customer services department of, Barks & Fencers, a large garden centre that supplies very expensive conservatory and patio furniture. Your manager, Ms Wood, is expecting a call from a very irate customer. She just pops to the loo when that customer rings…………… Option 3 You are a trainee sales negotiator at Harding, Harding & Harding, a local estate agents. All of the Hardings have been called into a meeting and must not be disturbed. The phone rings ……………………………………. Option 4 You work in the Head Office of Winterfields, a chain of supermarkets, in the accounts department. Mrs Bream, the accounts manager, is off sick and is not expected back for some time. The phone rings ………………………………………………………………..

Points To Look Out For 1. Answering the phone Who has answered (announcement) and offer of help.

2. Reason why person cannot take the call. 3. Offer of message to be taken. 4. Message: Date of call Time of call Name of caller Telephone number (extn) of caller Brief message

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