Deloitte 2009 Education Survey by coopmike48

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									Deloitte 2009 Education Survey Overview Redefining High School as a Launch Pad

What parents and students surveyed want from high school is at odds with what we’ve been asking our high schools to do for close to 100 years. Redefining the mission of high school is an important next step for building a 21st Century workforce. We need to create a strong college-going culture which ensures high school is viewed not as the end game, but as preparation for post-secondary education and career success.
Barry Salzberg CEO Deloitte LLP

Contents
Executive summary Key findings Methodology 3 4 11

Redefining High School as a Launch Pad • Deloitte 20009 Educational Survey Overview

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Executive Summary
Too few of our nation’s low-income students are graduating high school. Too few feel prepared for college. And, we continue to fall behind other developed nations in the number of college graduates we produce. It is clear that unless we take concrete steps to improve our education system and change the way we measure educational success, our businesses and our country risk losing their competitive edge. Against this backdrop, the Deloitte 2009 Education Survey set out to explore how the business community, government and organizations such as College Summit and City Year can work together to create a stronger college-going culture in our high schools and make post-secondary education the norm. The results revealed a dangerous discord on a fundamental question—the role of high school. When asked to identify the most important mission of high school, only nine percent of teachers surveyed chose preparing students for college and only 10 percent said that ensuring students graduate high school is a primary mission. And, as many as 40 percent of teachers said it is either “somewhat important” or “not important” that their students attend college. In stark contrast, the survey found that low-income parents and students rank preparing students for college the most important purpose of high school—42 percent and 48 percent, respectively. The results also uncovered a gap between student aspiration and actual preparedness. Encouragingly, 70 percent of students indicated that they “definitely” plan to attend college, and 60 percent said getting good grades in high school is “extremely important” in determining the likelihood of college enrollment. But despite this heartening data, only 22 percent of students said their high school has done an “excellent” job in preparing them for college, and only about a quarter feel “very prepared” to handle college courses. These stats reveal an important challenge for our nation, however, as a large portion of students with aspirations to attend, and finish college, is not likely to reach its goal. The findings demonstrate that our current high school evaluation system doesn’t do enough to encourage administrators, principals, and teachers to think of the longer term needs and future career goals of their students. Overall, the results speak to the need to reshape the mindset among educators so that they view high school as a launch pad to post secondary education and career success, and not solely as a destination. In achieving that we must re-evaluate the way we measure our teachers and schools and the way we view success. We must move away from focusing solely on state tests and other immediate metrics and apply a longer term view that aims at providing our high schools students with real learning that is applicable to college courses and even further down the line in the workforce.
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Redefining High School as a Launch Pad • Deloitte 20009 Educational Survey Overview

Key Findings

• Deloitte 20009 Educational Survey Overview

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Dangerous disconnect
Only 9% of high school teachers think preparing students for college is their primary mission, whereas low-income parents and students say that preparing for college is the most important purpose of high school.
Teachers: What is your primary mission as a teacher?
40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 50 40 30 20 10 0 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

Students: Which of the following is the most important purpose of high school?
50 40 30 20 10 0 50 40 30 20 10 0 50 40 30 20 10 0 50 40 30 20 10 0 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

Parents: Which of the following is the most important purpose of high school?
50 40 30 20 10 0 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

80 80 60 you teach: 38% 80 70 70 70 50 60 60 Teach students basic life skills: 30% 60 40 50 50 50 high school: 10% 40 40 40 Ensure students graduate 30 30 30 30 20 Prepare students for success in college: 9% 20 20 20 10 10 10 10 Ensure students pass required exams: 7% 0 0 0 0

Help students master the subject

60

Getting prepared for college: 48%
60 60 60

Learning basic life skills: 21% 50 50 50 50
40 Graduating 40

high 40 school: 18% 40
30 the workforce: 20 10 0 20 10 0

30 Getting prepared for 30 30 20 10 0 20 10 0

Prepare students for the workforce: 6%

80 70 60 50 11%40 30 20 10 0

80 70 40 60 60 Preparing students for the workforce: 40 50 50 30 40 graduate 40 30 Ensuring students 20 30 30 20 high school: 10% 20 20 10 10 10 10 0 0 0 0 60

Preparing students for college: 42%
80 50

Teaching basic 70 skills: 34% life 50

50

13%

40 30 20 10 0

Redefining High School as a Launch Pad • Deloitte 20009 Educational Survey Overview

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High school as an end in itself
Only 60% of high school teachers say it is “very important” that their students attend college. And, only 10% say their primary mission is to ensure students graduate high school.
How important is it to you personally that the students from your high school attend college?
50 40 30 20 10 0 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 40 60 35 50 30 40 25 20 30 15 20 10 10 5 00

How would you rank each of these activities in terms of what you consider your primary mission as a teacher?
40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

50 0

40 0

30 0

20 0

10 0

00

060

60 50 40 30 20 10 0

Very important: 60% 80

050

040

030

020

010

0 0

80 70 Somewhat important: 36% 70 60 60 50 50 Not too important: 4% 40 40 Not important at all: 1% 30 30 20 20 10 10 0 0

50 40 30 20 10 0

Help students master the subject you teach: 38% 50 Teach students basic life skills: 30% 40 Ensure students graduate high school: 10% Prepare students for success in college: 9% Ensure students pass required exams: 7% Prepare students for the workforce: 6%
0
Redefining High School as a Launch Pad • Deloitte 20009 Educational Survey Overview

30 20 10

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Preparedness doesn’t match aspiration
40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 How 0

Seventy percent 50 40 of low-income students say they “definitely” want 60 50 50 50 35 50 40 40 40 to attend college, but only a little40more than a quarter say they feel 30 40 30 30 30 30 “very prepared.” 25 20 30
likely is it that you to get into college and continue your education?
80 60 Definitely: 70% 15 10 10 5 will attempt 0 0 20 20 10 0 20 10 20 20 10 10

How prepared do you believe you currently 0 0 0 are to handle college courses?
60 50 40 30 20 10 0 60 80 Very prepared: 27%

40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

60 50 40 30 20 10 0

80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

60 50 40 30 20 10 0

70 50 60 Probably: 26% 40 50 Probably not: 2% 40 30 30 20 Definitely not: 2% 20 10 10 0 0

50 70 60 Somewhat prepared: 60% 40 50 Not30 40 prepared: 9% too Not 20 30 prepared at all: 3% 20 10 10 0 0

50 80 70 40 60 30 50 40 20 30 20 10 10 0 0

60 50 40 30

60 50 40 30

25 20 15

25 20 15

80

70 Redefining High School as a Launch Pad • Deloitte 20009 Educational Survey Overview 60 50 40

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80 70 60 50 40

Parents: Students aren’t prepared
40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 50 40 30 20 10 0 50 40 30 20 10 0

Eighty-nine percent of parents say it’s “extremely”40or “very 60 60 40 50 35 50 50 35 40 40 important” that their child goes to college. But only 29% say 30 30 40 40 25 25 30 30 their child is “very 30 prepared” to handle the coursework. 20 30 20
50 20 10 20 10 20 20 10 0

How important is it to you that10 your child 0 0 0 attends college?
60 50 40 30 20 10 0 60 Extremely 80 important: 55% 70 50 60 Very important: 34% 40 50 Somewhat important: 9% 30 40 30 20 Not too important: 1% 20 10 10 Not important at all: 1% 0 0

15 15 10 10 5 your opinion, how prepared 5 In 0 handle college courses? 0 to

is your child

80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

60 50 40 30 20 10 0

60 50 40 30 20 10 0

80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

50 40 30 20 10 0

50 Very prepared: 29% 40 Somewhat prepared/ 30 Not too prepared: 64% 20 Not prepared at all: 5% 10 0

60 50 40

25 20

25 20

80 70 60

Redefining High School as a Launch Pad • Deloitte 20009 Educational Survey Overview 80

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70 60

20 0 15 5 10 0 55 00

30 30 20 20 10 10 00 20 20 10 10 00

Preparedness breeds confidence…
10 10 00

20 20

20 20 15 15 10 10 55 00

80 0 70 0 60 0 50 0 40 0 30 0 20 0 10 0 00

While more than half of students, parents, and teachers cite confidence to succeed in 80 60 60 80 60 60 college as an “extremely important” determinant for attending college, only 22% of 70 70 50 50 50 50 students and 18% of parents think their school does an “excellent” job of preparing 60 60 40 40 40 40 students. And only half of students say they are “very confident” they5050 have the 30 40 30 30 40 30 knowledge of what to do in high school to prepare for college. 30 30 40 60 50
20 20 10 10 00 20 20 10 10

50 50

40 40

30 30

20 20

…Confidence leads to success.
30 20

40

How important is student confidence 10 in their ability to succeed in college in 0 determining college attendance?
60 60 50 50 40 40 30 30 20 20 10 10 00

35 30 40 00 25 20 30 15 20 How would you rate the job your high 10 10 5 school has done preparing students 0 0 for college? 50

20 20 10 10 00

10 10

00

Students: How confident are you that you have the necessary knowledge about what to do in high school to be best prepared for college?
50 40 30 20 10 0

60 50 40 30 20 10 0

25 25 20 20 15 15 10 10 55 00

80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

Parents Teachers Students

Parents

Students

80 80 70 70 60 60 50 50 40 40 30 30 20 20 10 10 00

Very confident: 50% Somewhat/Not too confident: 48% Not confident at all: 2%

“Extremely Important”

“Excellent”

Redefining High School as a Launch Pad • Deloitte 20009 Educational Survey Overview

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25

80

20 10
50 40 30 20 10 0

0

60 50

15 10 5 0

Influencing a college going culture
60 50 40 30 20 10 0

80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

40 30 20 10 0

50 40 30

20 Predictably, parents, students, and teachers overwhelmingly agree that80parents are most 50 responsible for encouraging their 10 70 40 60 child to go to college. But 74% of parents say they are not “very 0 50 30 40 knowledgeable” about where to access information and resources. 20 30
20 10 0 10 0

40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

Who is most responsible for building a college going culture?
80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

Parents: How knowledgeable would you say you are about the sources of information and counsel on college education, such as admissions information, scholarships and grants, etc? Very knowledgeable: 26% Somewhat/Not very knowledgeable: 67% Not knowledgeable at all: 7%

25 20 15 10 5 0

Parents

80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Teachers

Students

“Families” Response

Redefining High School as a Launch Pad • Deloitte 20009 Educational Survey Overview

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Methodology
KRC Research was commissioned by Deloitte LLP to conduct a series of surveys among three target audiences. A total of 401 online interviews were conducted among U.S. high school teachers, counselors and administrators, 400 telephone interviews were conducted among U.S. low income parents of high school students, and 601 telephone interviews were conducted among U.S. low income high school students. The margin of error at the 95% confidence level for the two 400 samples is +/- 4.9%, while the student sample’s margin of error is +/- 3.9%. The surveys were conducted between September 1 – 13, 2009. Additionally, for purposes of these surveys, lower income was defined as U.S. household with incomes lower than $40,000 a year.

Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu, a Swiss Verein, and its network of member firms, each of which is a legally separate and independent entity. Please see www.deloitte.com/about for a detailed description of the legal structure of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu and its member firms. Copyright © 2009 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved. OOC 0082


								
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