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Proposal Pictionary_

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					Proposal Pictionary!
Colleen Jolly and Mike Parkinson

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Agenda

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Agenda

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The Bottom Line…

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We Live in a Visual World

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Learning to Look
Look – at everything
– – – – – – – Advertisements The Internet TV Books/magazines Furniture/appliances Clothing/jewelry Your competitors

When your attention is captured try to figure out why
– How is the design achieved? • What medium/colors? • Where is it? – What do you notice first? – Why was it created? – Capture it…

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Learning to Look (con’t)
Good artists copy; great artists steal…
– …to generate ideas – Not to infringe on copyrights

Use everything you see as ideas Look, think, talk, do
– Sketch on napkins – Solve problems visually – Experiment!

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Would You Pet This Dog?

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Agenda

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Keep It Simple!
Information Design = to make verbs visible Focus on representing data/information truthfully and clearly
– Avoid confusing, distracting or unnecessary fluff (such as animations, too many colors, criss-crossing lines)

Keep proportions and color emphasis on the right pieces – your audience sees a change in size or color as having meaning If you use words, label everything simply to avoid misunderstanding
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Creating a Template
Solicitation/Bid Specifications
– – – – Font family and size (i.e.,Times 10pt ) Page and/or slide count Color vs. black and white Electronic and/or hard copy deliverables

Capture Information
– What the real project needs/wants are – What the real aesthetic likes/dislikes are

Corporate Styles Individual Preferences Give everyone involved a copy of the template

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3 Rules About Presentations
Rule 1: Consistency

Rule 2: Consistency

Rule 3: Consistency

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Art = Opinions

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Blue and Blue Andy Warhol, 1982

Blue and Red Andy Warhol, 1982

Crimson and Pink Andy Warhol, 1982

Fuchsia and Yellow Andy Warhol, 1982

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Introduction to Color
Color is the first/most important aspect
– First impressions count!

Color sets the tone, creates emotional response that may vary in different cultures Use color to draw the eye to or from information Warm tones vs. cool tones Discord vs. harmony
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Color (con’t)
Basic Color Theory Color consists of 3 variables
– Hue = where the color appears in a rainbow – Saturation = how intense the color is – Value = how light or dark the color is

Yellow (primary)

Orange (secondary)

Green (secondary)

Complementary (“Opposite”) and Analogous (“Buddies”) Colors

Red (primary)

Blue (primary)

Purple (secondary)
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Color Perception
History Lesson! Josef Albers (1888 – 1976) The Devil is in the Details:
– Theory: We perceive even the smallest changes in color when in context of another color. These changes can dramatically affect our understanding, mood and the intended effect. – “Homage to a Square”: • The square was the ideal shape – mathematically proportionate and never occurring in nature • The colors react with each other when processed by the human eye, causing optical illusions that clash, echo, and otherwise change our understanding of the color
Josef Ablers - Homage to the Square (No. Unknown)
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Color Perception Demonstration

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Choosing Your Color Palette
Limit your palette
– 1-4 main colors, (you can use shades of those colors) – Your colors, your company’s colors, a synergy of both

Balanced palette
– Colors that are analogous (“buddies”) and their complements

Complementary palette
– Colors that are opposite each other on the color wheel

Monochromatic palette
– Shades of a single color
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Color Affects Emotions

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Color = Mood Western concepts:
Red = Empowering, bold Orange = Warmth, happiness Yellow = Happiness, energy Green = Balances, refreshing Blue = Relaxing, cool Violet = Comforting White = Pure, associated with cleanliness Black = Authoritative, shows discipline

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Cultural Color
Red = In Europe, Socialism; in India, Purity/Weddings; in China, Luck and Prosperity; in South Africa, Mourning Orange = In Ireland/UK, Protestantism; in Holland, Royalty Yellow = In Japan, Courage Green = In Muslim Countries, Sacred color; in East Asian Stock Markets, Drop in Price; in North American Stock Markets, Increase in Price Blue = In Iran, Heaven/Spirituality Violet = In Thailand, Mourning; in the US/UK (and Many other Western Countries), Royalty White = In China (and other Eastern Countries), Death; in Many Western Countries, Purity/Weddings Black = In the US/UK (and other Western Countries), Death
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RGB vs. CMYK
On-screen vs. Print

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Agenda

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Know the P.A.Q.S.

Primary Objective A udience Questions Subject Matter
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Primary Objective
Know your primary objective.

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Primary Objective— Example 1

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Primary Objective— Example 4

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Primary Objective— Example 5

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Primary Objective— Example 6

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Primary Objective— Example 7

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Audience Know your audience.

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Audience

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Audience—So What?

Process 2

Process 1

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Audience—Benefit

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Audience—So What?

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Audience—Benefit

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Audience—So What?

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Audience—Benefit

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Audience—So What?

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Audience—Benefit

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Audience—So What?

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Audience—Benefit

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Questions

Know the questions that need to be answered to achieve the primary objective
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Questions—Like… Why should I care? What is it? What does it do? How does it work? How much does it cost? How fast is it? How long does it take? What makes it better than anything else?

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Subject Matter
Know the subject matter.

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Subject Matter— Example 1a
What are benefits of using a new architecture? How does it work? (How do the pieces fit together?) What is unique about the solution? Can it work with legacy systems?

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Subject Matter— Example 1b
2. How does it work? (How do the pieces fit together?)

1. What are the benefits of using a new architecture 4. Can it work with legacy systems?

3. What is unique about the solution?
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Agenda

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Four Methods

1. 2. 3. 4.

Literal Method Substitution Method Quantitative Method Assembly Method

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Literal Method— Example 1

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Literal Method— Example 2

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Start & Finish
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Midpoint

Substitution Method— Example 1 Visual Metaphor

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Substitution Method— Example 2
Where would you rather live?

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Quantitative Method— Types

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Quantitative Method— Types

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Quantitative Method— Types

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Quantitative Method— Pie Charts (Segment Charts)

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Assembly Method— Example 1a
BOGL has a four-phase process for introducing the new technology. Phase One involves training and mentoring. Phase Two is the final removal of the old tools and the introduction of the new computers. Phase Three provides onsite IT support 24x7 for one month. Phase Four submits, collects, and takes action using a formal evaluation.

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Assembly Method— Example 1b

Phase 1
Train and Mentor

Phase 2
Remove Old Tools and Introduce New Computers

Phase 3
24x7 Onsite IT Support (1 Month)

Phase 4
Evaluate and Adjust Systems/Processes
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Assembly Method— Example 1c

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Agenda

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Modern/ International Style
History Lesson! Modernism (early 20th Century) “Designing a New World”
– Theory: Creating a new world in which all of the arts combined to fundamentally change the urban environment. • Became the most influential and universal visual style ever (still is!) • Espoused: simplicity, purity, new materials (steel, glass, etc.), mass production, efficiency, form and function • Affected every aspect of life: architecture, utensils, furniture, clothing, entertainment, advertising/ propaganda, health and fitness – even the kitchen sink!

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Less is More

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English Baroque Chair
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Modern Cantilever Chair

Successful Universal Design
Good design is:
– – – – Clear, clean and concise Familiar Easy to understand in an instant Needs no or few words to communicate “the message”

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The Importance of Lines
Line = basic design element, a “moving dot” A line describes/points to/is a shape Use horizontal lines to evoke calm, measured activity or repose Use diagonal lines to inspire excitement, show dynamic interaction Use arrow heads to give lines specific directions
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How to Show Emphasis
Use color Use size/proportion Use placement/focal point
– Central, isolated, radial, specific

Use balance
– Balance implies harmony/good, imbalance implies negative

Use contrast
– Small differences make big impressions

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Color and Proportion Emphasis
Color
1 2 3

Receive Proposal Receive Proposal

Read Proposal Read Proposal

Order Pizza Order Pizza

Proportion = Relative Size

Small

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Placement Emphasis
Focal Point is Specific

M.C. Escher - Symmetry Work (No. Unknown)

Focal Point is Mobile

Rene Magritte-The Son of Man

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Balance Emphasis
Balance = Visual Weight
Balanced

Imbalanced

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Contrast Emphasis— Unity/Variety
Unity = Visually Related

Variety = Relieves Boredom of Unity

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Design Techniques
Connectivity or Flow/Direction Supplemental, Infrequent, or Less Influential Relationships Future/Past State Cooperation and Synthesis Interaction and Influence Details or Descriptions Grouping Hierarchy Highlighting Icons and Symbols Organization Order vs. Disorder Space Constraints
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Connectivity and Flow/Direction

Illustration by Bob Ulrich

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Hierarchy

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Organization
Alphabetical/Sequential

Time

Magnitude

1901

1938 1912 1957 1976 2002

Location Category

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Icons vs. Symbols
Icon = visual metaphor, can be literal, typically obvious
– Ex., heart, lock, smiley face, umbrella

Symbol = typically learned, becomes culturally standard
– Ex., bio-hazard symbol, pause button, peace symbol, recycling symbol

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Universal Symbols
Mathematical: greater than and equal to, sum of Boolean Operators: AND <Plus>, NOT <Minus>
– Ex. On Google type “chickens + -rooster”

Scientific: Infinity, Pi, Delta
– Many are Greek Symbols

Astrological/Astronomical: Mars, Earth, Capricorn Engineering: Not Gate, Resistor Religious: Cross, Star of David, Ying-yang Symbol Political: Anarchy, Communism Popular Global Corporations: Nike, Toyota Monetary: Yen, Dollar Sign
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Icons and Symbols Samples

Cut

Airport

Phone

Unlock

Listen

Tools Required

Team

Firewall

Time

Partnership

Security

Architecture
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(More) Icons and Symbols Samples

Radioactive

Medical

Talk

Compliant

Pause

Virgo

Internet

Danger

Database

Process

Idea

Diagnose
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Same Icon, Different Message

Process

Teamwork

Cooperation

Manufacturing

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Different Icon, Same Message

Security

Security

Security

Security

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Agenda

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Rules of the Game
Step 1: Divide the players into teams. Step 2: Have each team select a picturist to do the drawing for the first word(s). This duty rotates to all players in turn. The remaining team members try to guess the word being drawn. Step 3: Let the beginning team's picturist select the first card. S/he has only 5 seconds to study the word(s) s/he will sketch. Step 4: Start the timer, and give the picturist 60 seconds to sketch clues for his/her teammates. Step 5: Allow the picturist's teammates to try guessing the word for the full 60 seconds as long as the picturist draws no words, letters or numbers and uses no body gestures. Step 6: A successful team that has identified the word within the time limit gains one point, some cards may contain bonus points and the score will be modified accordingly. Step 7: Let the same team then select the next card and continue with a new picturist. Only when the time expires before a word is identified does play rotate to the left to another team. Step 8: Continue play until a team wins by collecting 20 or more points.
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Ready, Set, DRAW!

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Questions and Answers

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colleen@24hrco.com and mike@24hrco.com ; (703)533-7209
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