Docstoc

Guess that Animal

Document Sample
Guess that Animal Powered By Docstoc
					Guess that Animal
Pass on the Gift House Party Game
Provided is a listing of some of the animals Heifer provides its project partners including trivia and information on how each animal helps pull families in need out of hunger and poverty. Give each person or team, depending on how many people there are, one of the animal pages. Have them read off the trivia, from the information on the sheet, to the group about their animal. The other participants can then guess which animal they are describing. Once the animal has been guessed, share with the group everything the animal passes on to help families in need around the world. As individuals or teams guess the correct animal being described, they get a point. Go around the group until each person has described their animal and what it passes-on. At the end, the individual or group with the most points is the winner.

Variations on the game:
Play charades with the animals. Have each person or team act out their animal without using any sound. After someone correctly guesses the animal, have the person share with the group what that animal passes on. Pin an animal to the backs of the guests, without them knowing which animal. Have them ask for clues as to what animal they are to others at the party. Play Pictionary where each guest has to draw the animal based entirely on the trivia and what that animal passes-on without drawing the animal itself.

Trivia:

Heifer

This animal is currently found throughout much of the world. This animal’s wild ancestors were native to northern Africa, Europe, and southern Asia. Gestation period is an average of nine months and time to weaning is an average of six months. This animal’s grouping is structured according to a dominance hierarchy. Each individual must yield to those above it in the hierarchy. Calves adopt their mother's status in the hierarchy. Weight ranges from 325 to 3,000 lbs; avg. 1660 lbs. This animal can consume about 70kg of grass in an eight hour period. The process of digestion takes about 70-100 hours. They have two hollow horns. Domestic cows have no upper incisors; instead they have a thick layer called the dental pad. The jaws are designed for the circular grinding motion used to crush coarse vegetation.

What Heifers Pass On:
• • • • • A good dairy cow can produce four gallons of milk a day - enough for a family to drink and sell. The sale of surplus milk earns money for school fees, medicine, clothing and home improvements. Milk protein transforms sick, malnourished children into healthy boys and girls. The manure is used to fertilize crops, which increases yields. Because a healthy cow can produce a calf every year, the gift will be passed on and eventually help an entire community move from poverty to self reliance.

Sheep
Trivia:
The first domesticated type of this animal resided mainly in the Middle East and Central Asia but since then have been introduced everywhere On average they are 44 to 440 lbs; avg. 242 lbs. Number of offspring— one to two with a gestation period of about five months.

These animals have a highly developed flocking or herding instinct. Large groups (up to 1,000 or more) move over an area collectively, rather than as individuals. They become considerably stressed when separated from others, often calling and pawing at the ground. In general, this animal feeds mainly on grasses while in pastures and can be fed a wide variety of hays and oats. This animal has a large and complex stomach which is able to digest highly fibrous foods that can not be digested by many other animals.

What Sheep Pass On:
• • • • Entire communities depend on wool, meat and milk from sheep. Sheep often give birth to twins or triplets and can graze even the hilliest, rockiest pastures unsuitable for other livestock. Heifer provides hardy, high quality sheep that produce thicker, warmer wool than most local breeds. Warm in winter, cool in summer, waterproof and durable - wool is a valuable product that struggling families can use for clothing or to sell for income.

Trivia:

Llama

This animal is polygamous. Males gather a harem of about six females into a designated territorial region and then aggressively drive away all other male llamas of breeding age that come into the area. This animal lives an average of 16 years and weighs about 300 lbs. Because of their aggression and protectiveness towards other animals, they are commonly used as guard animals for sheep, goats and horses. This animal has an unusually high content of hemoglobin in its bloodstream and oval-shaped red blood corpuscles, both of which are adaptations for surviving in an oxygen-poor, high altitude environment. The Andean highlands, especially in southeast Peru and western Bolivia, is the natural habitat of this animal. This animal breeds once yearly with a gestation period of 11 months.

What Llamas Pass On:
• • Llamas and their kin, the alpaca, provide Heifer Andean families with an invaluable source of transportation, income and wool. Just one alpaca can provide eight pounds of highly prized wool which is used for making blankets, ponchos, carpet and rope.

• •

Llama droppings help fertilize topsoil — improving crops and reducing erosion. Llamas are loaded with goods for market and trek across rough, mountainous areas of Latin America. As they travel, llamas' padded feet don't damage the fragile terrain and their selective browsing doesn't destroy sparse vegetation.

Water Buffalo
Trivia:
This animal provides more than 5% of the world’s milk supply. This animal is sensitive to heat because it has fewer sweat glands and is known for wallowing in mud. Wallowing helps to cool the animal because water in mud evaporates more slowly than just water alone, extending the period of cooling. Wallowing also serves to cake the animal with mud, which protects it from biting insects. During hotter parts of the day, it may completely submerge itself in water with only its nostrils and eyes exposed. These animals are like tractors in Southeast Asia, providing 20 to 30 percent of farm power; they also serve as means of transportation, and their dung is collected and used as fertilizer. This animal is known live to 25 years in the wild, and 30-35 years in captivity. Females are capable of producing one offspring every two years. The gestation period is 300 to 340 days. The face of this animal is long and narrow, with rather small ears and large horns.

What Water Buffalo Pass On:
• • • • Water buffalo provide draft power for planting rice and potatoes, milk for protein and manure for fertilizer and fuel. A farmer can plant four times more rice with a buffalo than by hand. Water buffalo haul heavy loads to the market, where the sale of extra produce brings in vital income for clothing, medicine and school. By renting their buffalo to neighbors, Heifer partner families can earn money for home improvements.

Protein-rich milk, strength to till soil, manure to enrich the land ... so many benefits. And, in turn, water buffalo are happy just to graze on coarse grasses and other plants not suitable for harvesting.

Goat
Trivia:
Since the domestication of this species, they have been spread all over the world by humans. The milk from this animal is actually more digestible than cow milk. More people worldwide use this animal for dairy and meat than cows. It’s a social animal and prefers to be in the presence of others; groups can vary in size from five to 20 members or as high as 100. This animal is regularly farmed for milk, wool, cheese, meat and leather. This animal weighs 100 lbs on average. This animal typically lives to be 15 years old in captivity. When the female gives birth, most often it is to twins.

What Goats Pass On:
• • Goats can thrive in extreme climates and on poor, dry land by eating grass and leaves that humans and other animals can’t eat. A dairy goat can supply a family with up to a gallon of nutritious milk a day. Extra milk can be sold or used to make cheese, butter or yogurt. Goat milk is easily digestible and is consumed by more children around the world than cow’s milk. Families use goat manure to fertilize gardens. Because goats are small and gentle, everyone in the family can take care of goats. Heifer partners are taught zero-grazing: bringing fodder to animals in enclosures; rather than letting them graze fragile land. Because goats often have two or three kids a year, Heifer partners can quickly acquire herds which will help them earn money for food, health care and education.

• • •

Trivia:

Chicken

This animal has over 200 distinct noises it can make for communicating. There are actually more of this animal on earth than people.

This animal is the closest living relative to the T-Rex. This animal can travel nine miles an hour. This is usually a combined effort of running, jumping and flying. Adding females, especially younger ones, to an existing group, can lead to violence and injury. A female leads her babies to food and water – she will call them to edible items, but rarely feeds them directly. When there is no male in the group, one of the females will take over the role and will begin to crow and stop laying eggs.

What Chickens Pass On:
• • • • Protein-packed eggs from even a single chicken can make a life-saving difference for a hungry child. Heifer helps many hungry families with a starter flock of ten to 50 chicks. A good hen can lay up to 200 eggs a year - plenty to eat, share or sell. Because chickens require little space and can thrive on readily available food scraps, families can make money from the birds without spending much. Chickens help control insects around homes and fertilize gardens.

Rabbit
Trivia:
This animal exists in the wild on every continent except Asia and Antarctica and domesticated ones are found worldwide Babies are blind and helpless. The mother visits the nest for only a few minutes each day to nurse them, but the milk is extremely rich. Domestic animals of this species can live to be up to nine years old. However, mortality during the first year of life in wild populations is generally quite high, and can reach as much as 90 percent. They prefer to live in groups. Females have an average of six babies with a gestation period of only 30-37 days. This animal is an herbivore, eating a diverse diet of grasses, leaves, buds, tree bark and roots. This animal weighs between 3 and 5.5 lbs Rabbit manure can be applied directly on gardens without composting.

What Rabbits Pass On:

• • •

Rabbits are a low-cost, high-yield gift that helps impoverished families increase their protein intake and income from the sale of fur. Rabbits are easy to care for; they eat simple foods, such as carrot tops, sweet potato vines and grasses. Rabbit manure can be applied directly on gardens without composting. Because rabbits have so many offspring, the process of passing on the gift multiplies each gift quickly and helps many other families better their lives.

Trivia:

Geese

This animal vocalizes markedly during the breeding season, as many vocalizations are integral to courtship, territoriality and baby care. Some species retain cohesive family groups year round. Many species have been domesticated for egg, meat and liver production. This animal inhabits aquatic habitats such as lakes, ponds, streams, rivers and marshes. Several days prior to hatching, young chicks start calling from inside the egg. Adult plumage acquisition may take one to three years. This animal may live in groups of up to several hundred thousand individuals.

What Geese Pass On:
• • • • Geese can lay up to 75 eggs a year and even a small flock can add protein and income quickly for families in need. Geese are easy to care for because they don't require much shelter and can adapt to hot, wet or cold weather. Geese can also find a good portion of their food by themselves, and they efficiently dispose of weed seeds and gobble up insects, slugs and snails. Best of all, geese are highly efficient producers of animal protein. And they're vigilant "watchdogs," loudly warning when uninvited guests arrive at the homestead.

Trees
Trivia:
Trees help prevent erosion. Certain types are given to families so they have a steady source of food for their livestock. (Fodder trees) Other types are provided to boost income and nutrition. (Fruit trees)

They protect drinking water sources. Trees provides a homegrown source of firewood that can relieve pressure on forests.

What Trees Pass On:
• • • • In addition to livestock, Heifer often provides families with trees. On steep hillsides, trees and grasses keep the soil in place. Many varieties also bear fruit for nutrition and extra income. Fast growing trees can be planted around springs or water sources to purify and protect drinking water. Since so many families in the developing world depend on wood for cooking and heating, a readily available, renewable source of wood saves time, money and effort. Through training, families learn how to keep their small plots of land healthy and renew the soil for future generations by planting trees, using natural fertilizer, and limiting grazing.

Trivia:

Bees

This animal’s home can be found both above and below the ground, however, above ground is most common. This animal communicates mainly by performing special dances. These dances may include messages about the location of food or even a warning that danger is near Once the first generation of babies become workers, the lead female can devote more of her time to laying eggs and the others become responsible for feeding both the developing babies and the lead female. Breeding occurs in the summer months. Males grow up to ½ inch long. Females grow up to about ¾ of an inch, while the lead female may measureoneinch with a wingspan of 1 ½ inch.

What Bees Pass On:
• • • • Beehives require almost no space and, once established, are inexpensive to maintain. The sale of honey and wax means extra income for food, medicine and other basic necessities. As bees search for nectar, they pollinate plants. Placed strategically, beehives can as much as double some fruit and vegetable yields. In this way, a beehive can be an asset to a whole village. Although most Heifer partners keep bees as a supplement to family income, beekeeping can be a family's livelihood.

Trivia:

Pig

Smell is by far the most advanced of this animal's senses. This animal can survive in a variety of environments, from deserts to mountainous terrain. This animal weighs between 110 and 770 lbs. Females give birth to six babies on average with a gestation period of 115 days. This animal is sensitive to severe temperature changes and has developed the technique of wallowing in mud or water to maintain a comfortable temperature. Wallowing also protects against sunburn and insect bites. This animal is also prone to sunstroke in unusually warm temperature.

What Pigs Pass On:
• • • • • Heifer animals are like "living savings accounts" for struggling families, and the pig may well be the most interest-bearing. Each pig is a valuable source of protein and farmers can use their manure to nourish crops and soil and increase crop yields. Pigs need little land and can thrive on crop by-products and kitchen scraps. An average sow can provide a family with up to 16 piglets a year so farmers can quickly gain a source of income from the sale of offspring. Pigs usually double their three-pound birth weight in their first week and can grow to more than 200 pounds in six months.


				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:93
posted:12/21/2009
language:English
pages:9