Material Checklist for School-Ag by fjzhxb

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									MATERIALS CHECKLIST FOR SCHOOL-AGE PROGRAMS

Compiled by: Community Services for Children, Inc. 1520 Hanover Avenue, Allentown, PA 18109 (610) 437-6000, 1-800-528-SACC (7222) FAX (610) 437-6500

Funding through a contract with the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare © 1999

Materials Checklist for School-Age Program

Introduction Arts and Crafts

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1 2-3 4-5 6-7 8-9 10-11 12 13-14 15-16 17-18 19-20 21-22 23

Blocks – Manipulatives Books Cooking

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Dramatic Play Equipment

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Games and Computer……….…………………………………………………………….. Software Language ……………………………………………………………………………….. …………………………………………………………..

Movement and Outdoor Play

Music …………………………………………………………………………………… Science – Nature ……………………………………………………………………….. ………………………………………………………….

Woodworking – Construction

INTRODUCTION
Developing an appropriate environment for school-aged children takes some creative work and planning. There is an abundance of sturdy, well designed, age-appropriate equipment available from which you can choose. Not all of it needs to be an expensive purchase; many items can be found in your work or home environment. We hope these material checklists will serve as a starting point for those of you who have just begun thinking about serving school-aged children, and as a support reference for those of you already planning for and/or serving school-age children. When your environment functions well and holds children’s interest, you can relax, get to know your children, and enjoy their individuality. That’s when your job really becomes fun! Some of the materials listed are appropriate for a limited age within the school-age child care group. The identification key is as follows: (Y) indicates that it is more appropriate for a “younger” school-age child, 5 – 7 years, (O) indicates that it is more appropriate for “older” school-age children, 8 – 11 years, (*) indicates materials which you should have on hand to start your program These are only general guidelines to help you set up your program. If there are no codes or ages listed behind the material, then the item is appropriate for all ages within a school-age child care program. If you have limited resources available, be sure to choose a variety from each area and for all ages of children you will be serving.

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ARTS AND CRAFTS
School-age children enjoy creating and planning projects. They also enjoy making their own inventions, signs, and props for play in other areas. Try to choose an arts and crafts area with hard flooring that is close to a water source for easy clean up.
Craft Supplies – General Use * Stapler and Staples * Paintbrushes (Variety of sizes) Hole Puncher Camera and Film Scissors Jars with Lids Sponges * Tape: Masking and Cellophane * Pencils Stencils * Erasers * Paper (Variety of Sizes) Newsprint Construction Butcher Scrap * Easel Clips * Glue Paste * Tempera Paint * Watercolors * Chalk Finger Paints Oil Pastels 2 Modeling and Carving Clay Paper Mache Foil Soap Flakes Soft Wood Soap Cakes Plaster

Needlework * Yarn Threads * Big Needles Mesh Fabrics Weaving Materials Looms and Hoops Frames Knitting Needles Crochet Hooks Scissors

Arts and Crafts (continued)
* Crayons Crayola Multi-cultural paints, markers, & crayons Charcoal * Markers * Clay Hammers * Clay/Play-Doh * Old Magazines and Catalogs Glitter Bottles * Craft Sticks * Beautiful Junk * Pipe Cleaners Toothpicks Cotton balls Rubber Bands String Fabric Scraps Beads Buttons Leather and Fur Scraps Variety of Color and Textures of Cloth Hooks Snaps Tape Measure Printing Wood Blocks Gadgets Nature Materials Cardboard Sculpturing Wire Glue Wood Scraps Wood Tools Metal Scraps Pipe Cleaners Styrofoam Pieces

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BLOCKS - MANIPULATIVES
School-age children are not too old to play with blocks. When offered a variety of interacting accessories, they will come up with elaborate creations. Allow as much space as you can for this area. Blocks * Unit Blocks Pattern Blocks Bristle Blocks Street Signs Tape Vehicles (Matchbox or Tonka) Animals/Barn/Fence People Wooden Train Set (Y) Hollow Wooden Blocks Motor Mat Dinosaurs Dollhouse and Accessories Cardboard Cartons

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Blocks - Manipulatives (continued)

Manipulatives/Math Tangrams Pentominoes Measurement Set Clock/Telling Time Knexs * Legos – Legos Technic Set or Erector Set (O) Color Mosaics (Y) * Puzzles (10 – 500 pieces) Models Spirograph Geoboards (Y) Tape Measure * Rulers (Regular and Metric) Yardstick Compass and Protractors Play Money Tinkertoys (Y) Lincoln Logs Dominoes/Domino Rally

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BOOKS
When choosing books, please review to ensure that they represent people from a variety of cultures and backgrounds, both male and female. People and cultures should be portrayed in a realistic, not stereotypical way. Try to set this area in a secluded corner of the room with plenty of natural or artificial lighting. Book Categories That Should Be Represented: Folk Tales, Informational (i.e., sports, music, how-to’s), Mysteries, Jokes, Nonfiction, * Dictionaries, Myths and Fables, Poetry, Animal Stories, Biographies, Multi-racial/Multi-cultural, Reference, & Career Suggested Books: Up to 5 years: Whistle for Willie – Ezra Keats Giant John – Arnold Lobel Jumanji – Van Allsburg Abiyoyo – Pete Seeger Tikki, Tikki Tembo – Arlene Mosel Alexander & The Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day – Judith Viorst 6 – 8 Years: The Boy of the Three Year Nap -- Dianne Snyder Now We Are Six – A. A. Milne Children of Long Ago – Lessie Jones Little Saying Good-bye to Grandma – Jane Resh Thomas Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs – Judi Barrett Magic School Bus Series – Joanna Cole Charlotte’s Web – E. B. White The Secret Garden – Frances Hodgson Burnett 6

Books (continued) 8 – 12 Years: And Then What Happened, Paul Revere? – Fritz Tales of a Fourth-Grade Nothing – Judy Blume One of the Third Grade Thonkers – Phyllis Reynold Naylor Joyful Noise: Poems for Two Voices – Paul Fleischman Rootabaga Stories, Part One – Carl Sandburg The People Could Fly: American Black Folktales – Virginia Hamilton North of Freedom – Anne Holm The Long Journey – Barbara Corcoran Over 12 Years: The Call of the Wild – Jack London Crutches – Peter Hartling A Girl from Yamhill: A Memoir – Beverly Cleary Rhythm Road: Poems to Move To – Selected by Lillian Morrison Favorite Folktales from Around the World – edited by Jane Yolen Paul Harvey’s “The Rest of the Story” – Paul Aurandt Something Upstairs: A Tale of Ghosts – Avi Other Popular Children’s Authors: Richard Scarry (Y) Charlottee Zolotow (Y) Bill Peet (Y) Steven Kellogg (Y) Tomie DePaola Dr. Seuss (Y) Laura Numeroff (Y) Robert McCloskey (Y) Eric Carle (Y) Chris Van Allsburg H. A. Rey (Y) Ludwig Bemelmans C. S. Lewis (O) Beverly Cleary (O) Richard Atwater (O) Laura Ingalls Wilder (O) B. G. Hennesy (O) Rudyard Kipling (O) Louisa May Alcott (O) Jerry Spinelli (O) * * Look for “Caldicott Medal-Winning” books See your local library for more information on grade-appropriate books 7

COOKING
Cook together for fun and nutrition while enabling your school-aged children to create a useful, delicious afternoon snack. This is the perfect opportunity to reinforce safety, cleanliness, hand washing, and having children clean up after themselves.

Supplies * Cookbooks * Measuring Spoons and Cups Paring Knives (direct supervision only) * Spatulas * Mixing Spoons * Cookie Cutter * Bowls * Turners Vegetable Peeler * Cooking Sheets * Pots and Pans Sifter Egg Beater * Rolling Pin Grater Whisk Can and Bottle Openers Pitchers Timer Dish Cloths Blender Dish Towels Dishes Silverware Serving Dishes Aprons Fire Extinguisher Cutting Board Pot Holders Juicer

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Cooking (continued)

Appliances (To be used only under direct supervision!) Broiler Oven Popcorn Popper Blender Hot Plate/Electric Fry Pan Portable Mixer Wok Note: Even if you do not have access to a kitchen, your program should have basic cooking equipment.

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DRAMATIC PLAY
School-age children still like to pretend. At this age, they enjoy more elaborate pretend play settings and dramas. Collect and/or purchase materials that dramatize life experiences. When not in use, many of these materials can be stored in large, appropriately labeled “prop” boxes. If possible, use real props. Auto Repair Old Car Parts Tools Old Shirts Hats Doctor or Vet Stethoscope Blood Pressure Gauge Doctor’s Jacket, Face Mask, etc. Thermometer Band Aids Ace Bandage First Aid Book Posters Relating to Health Gauze

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Dramatic Play (continued)

* Baby Bottles, Diapers, Clothes * Fake Food Vacuum (Dustbuster) Sturdy Cardboard Boxes * Table and Chairs Empty Food Containers * Tablecloth Mirror Placemats Makeup (children’s) Dishes and Utensils Tools Pots and Pans Telephone Spice Tins Stuffed Animals Empty Food Containers * Cot or Small Stuffed Chair * Dishpan Old Blanket, or Sheets, or Beach Towels * Dustpan and Broom Shoes * Dress-Up Clothes (for boys and girls) Paper and Pencils * Dolls: Representative of both sexes and a variety of ethnic groups Office or Business Paper Pens and Pencils Rolodex Telephone Paper Clips Stapler Envelopes “Stamps” (stickers) School Desk Blackboard Old Textbooks Chalk and Eraser Paper and Pencil Bell Pointer and Yardstick Theater Old Halloween Costumes Stage Props Puppets and Marionettes (bought and homemade) Materials for Scenery and Costuming Flashlight Tape Recorder Art Supplies to Create Props Puppet Size Props Story Books That Lend Themselves to “Plays” (i.e., Three Little Pigs, Hansel And Gretel 11 Restaurant Menus Receipt Book Dishes Trays Checkbook Telephone

Store Cash Register Play Money Empty Food Boxes Car Parts to “Sell” Clothing to “Sell” Toys to “Sell” Paper Bags

EQUIPMENT
Whether you have your own space or share space, why not let the children have some of the responsibility for organizing their space? Keep in mind the saying: “a place for everything, and everything in its place.” Furniture (General) Filing Cabinet Tables and Chairs (child sized) Cubbies (or other private storage space) Bookshelves Storage Shelves and Closets Garbage Pails (several) Cots or mats (just a few for resting) Workbench Couches or Easy Chairs Beanbag Chairs Bulletin Boards (1 mounted at adult height, others at child height) Furniture (Housekeeping) Cradle (Y) Sink (Y) Stove (Y) Washer and Dryer (Y) Supplies Mailboxes Camera (Kodak Instamatic) Puppet Theater Water/Sand Table (Y) Clocks Easel Chalkboard Smocks Flannel Board (Y) Exercise Mats See-through Plastic Storage Containers Full Length Mirror Video Camera Pillows Comforters Rugs & Mats 12

GAMES AND COMPUTER SOFTWARE
When choosing games, try to include games that emphasize problem-solving, multi-cultural diversity, self-esteem, and conflict resolution. Large Ping-Pong Bumper or Regular Pool Foosball Table (O) Glide Hockey (Air) Small * Marbles * Playing Cards Candyland (3 – 6) Memory Games (3 – 6) Barrel of Monkeys (3 and up) Blocks and Marbles (4 and up) Chutes and Ladders (4 – 8) Old Maid (4 and up) Go Fish (4 and up) Trouble (5 and up) Scrabble for Juniors (5 and up) Monopoly Junior Mickey Mouse Yahtzee (5 and up) Don’t Break the Ice (5 and up) Operation (6 and up) Bingo (6 and up) Twister (6 and up) Magna Shapes (6 and up) Lotto (3 and up) Mousetrap (6 and up) Bed Bugs (6 – 10) Chinese Checkers (7 and up) Connect Four (7 and up ) Guess Who (7 and up) Uno (7 and up) Checkers (7 and up) Pictionary Jr. (7 – 11) Scrabble (8 and up) Battleship (8 and up) Monopoly (8 and up) Yahtzee (8 and up) Scattergories Junior (8 – 12) Tumbling Towers (8 and up) Ball and Jacks (8 and up) The Game of Life (9 and up) Twenty-Four Boggle Chess

Choose at least two of the above games from each age grouping that will be in your program. 13

Games and Computer Software (continued)

Games Without Props or Planning Charades Red Light, Green Light Mother May I Simon Says Seven Up Hide and Seek Paper and Pencil Games Connect the Dots Mazes Word-Puzzle Books Hangman

Mental Games Alphabet Gossip Who Am I? Twenty Questions Guess the Number

Computer Software Check catalogs, talk to other programs, and do some computer research when choosing appropriate software for school-age children. Here are some resources to help you begin: Developmental Evaluation of Software for Young Children by Susan W. Haugland and Daniel D. Shade, published by DelMar Publishers, Inc. Survey of Early Childhood Software by Warren Buckleitner, published by High Scope Press, 600 North River Street, Ypsilanti, MI 48198, (313) 485-2000. Harley Courseware/Software Co., 133 Bridge Street, Dimondale, MI 48821, 1-800-247-1380.

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LANGUAGE
Choose materials that reflect and expand your school-aged children’s communication. Encourage children to dramatize favorite stories or involve them in using words to create a language game. Basic Supplies Flannel Board Felt Objects (Y) Writing Utensils: Pens Chalk Markers Pencils Erasers Lined Paper Puppets Books Dictionary Thesaurus Listening Station Journals – For Children to Write In Children’s Encyclopedias/Reference Books Pictures Posters Tape Recorders/Cassette Tapes Duplicating and Printing Materials Telephones

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Language (continued)

Magazines Some popular subscriptions for children include: Ranger Rick Stone Soup: The Magazine for Children Highlights for Children National Geographic Sports Illustrated for Kids Kid City Zillions Odyssey Plays Crayola Kids Magazine American Girl Contact Kids Disney Adventure Children’s Digest Cobblestone Creative Kids Cricket Faces

Some popular subscriptions for teens include: Young Miss Boys Life Girls Life Teen Note: You may want to evaluate each magazine before ordering for your program.

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MOVEMENT AND OUTDOOR PLAY
Outdoor space should include large, open spaces for group games and secluded places to sit and talk or get involved in dramatic play. *Riding Toys Note: Safety helmets and pads should be used with roller blades, skates, bikes, and street hockey (parents provide). Big Wheels (Y) Scooters (O) Wagons and Carts(Y) Rollerblades Bicycles Roller Skates *Climbing and Balancing Equipment Climbers Ropes Ladders Trees Fallen Trees Lumber Swings Horizontal tire swings allow for cooperative play for small groupings. *Balls Tennis Soccer Nerf Wiffle Basketball Rubber Playground Balls Football Volleyball Kickball Badminton Balance Beam Railroad Ties Pogo Stick Stilts

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Movement and Outdoor Play (continued)

Equipment for Gross and Fine Motor Development * Bats (wiffle and wood) Hoola Hoops (Y) Horseshoes or Ring Toss Air Pump Chalk for “Sidewalk” Games * Bean Bags Stilts (O) Hockey Sticks (O) * Jump Ropes (long and short), Chinese Tumbling Mats Batons Nets (for ball games) Racquets Basketball Hoop * Parachute Snap Wall (Y) Frisbee Yo-yo

* Equipment to Encourage Creation of Play Space Sand and Digging Equipment Boards Large Cartons and Crates Loose Tires Large Blocks Rope Sheets of Fabric, Wood, or Cardboard for “Roofing” Equipment for Hot Weather Activities Hoses Water Buckets Sprinklers Approved Pools Spray bottles – games can be played with these Equipment for Snow Activities Shovels Sleds Snow Saucers Movement Books and Records - by Phyllis Weikert Inner Tubes Logs Large Spools

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MUSIC Invite children to bring their favorite recordings to supplement your selection. Help them to learn how to use equipment carefully and with respect for others. Basic Equipment * Radio * Tape Recorder Record Player or Compact Disc Player * Listening Center * Tapes or Records Evergreen, Everblue by Raffi Fire Within by Libana Walk a Mile by Vitamin L All for Freedom by Sweet Honey in the Rock From Rice Paddies and Temple – Traditional Music of Vietnam by Phong Thuyet Nguyen and Patricia Shenan Campbell Rhythmically Moving Series – produced by Phyllis Weickert Changing Directions Series – produced by Phyllis Weickert Everyone Wins by Jeff Sobel Children’s Artists to Look for: Raffi (up to age 5) Hap Palmer (up to age 8) Ella Jenkis (up to age 8) Tom Chapin (5 and up) Collection should include a variety of musical styles: ethnic, rock and roll, jazz, classical, folk (representative of many cultures), show tunes, contemporary and old music, & children’s music. 19

Music (continued) Dance Props Fancy Dress-Ups Scarves Capes Tutus Dance Shoes Clogs Instruments Autoharp Keyboard or Piano Harmonicas Kazoos Guitar Recorder * Xylophone * Bongo Drum Talking Drum (African) Dance Bells (Native American) Guiro (Latin) Rain Stick (Chilean) * Rhythm Instruments Streamers Hoops Pompoms Rope

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SCIENCE-NATURE
The school-age child is an explorer asking questions, seeking answers, and finding out how things work. A few plants or animals to care for, as well as a collection of natural and saved items, are fun and appropriate for all ages. Animals (If you choose to have pets, staff must be willing to model responsible ownership): Gerbil Fish Rabbit Ant Farm Guinea Pig Bird Hamster African millipede *Plants Nature Trays or Collections (rotate at least weekly): Pinecones Leaves Snake Skins Flowers Insects Rocks

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Science-Nature (continued) *Sand and Water Equipment Buckets Shovels Funnels Measuring Equipment Spray Bottles Tubes Sponges Gardening Tools Rake Hoe Shovel Trowels Discovery Aids * Prisms * Globe Food Coloring Eye Droppers Kaleidoscope Anatomy Models (skull, heart, skeleton) Mounted Insects Rock Pick Air Pump * Magnifying Glass * Scale * Magnets Compass * Flashlight * Thermometers (alcohol only!) * Timer/Clock Rain Gauge Accessories * Notebooks and pencils for recording Books and posters for referencing Mixing utensils Batteries Plastic gloves (non-latex) 22 * Microscope * Binoculars * Safety Goggles * Mortar and Pestle * Barometer * Metric Measurement Set (weight, volume, Tape measure) Tweezers, Tongs, Forceps Magic Kit/Spy Kit, etc. Butterfly Net Weather Vane Grow Light Aquarium Terrarium Bird Feeders Bug Cage Pendulums Water Pump Sand Mill Hose Pieces Bubble Pipes Straws Oil

WOODWORKING-CONSTRUCTION
Working with wood gives school-age children the opportunity to make real things using real tools. Stay close by and supervise their work. Take the extra time to introduce children to the tools and their proper uses. Basic Equipment Mallets * Safety Goggles * Wood (vary sizes, thicknesses, and harnesses) Plane * Sandpaper * Hammers Screwdrivers Pliers Manual Drill * Clamps (variety of sizes) Vise Screws * Nails * Styrofoam * Glue Old Appliances to Take Apart Telephone Record and Tape Player Bike Typewriter Toaster Clock or Watch Calculator

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Cc\provider\forms\d-prm material checklist SACC programs packet 6-00


								
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