; It's Elementary
Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out
Your Federal Quarterly Tax Payments are due April 15th Get Help Now >>

It's Elementary

VIEWS: 74 PAGES: 5

  • pg 1
									It’s Elementary…Lesson Planning

Final Thoughts

Hi everyone. I finally got all your responses from our workshop typed up. I’ve included all your ideas into the powerpoint, or if your not into all that you can just save this document instead. I want to thank all of you for a)attending the workshop (which mean you had to wake up early, brave the walk to Grace Hall in the snow, and be somewhat coherent for the 60 minute workshop), and b) sharing your thoughts on the good, bad, and ugly of teaching elementary school. Also thank you for your patience with my horse voice…it was really great that I didn’t have talk for the entire workshop! Now it’s onto the final thoughts of the workshop. As elementary teachers we face a wide variety of situations. We all have unique circumstances (prefectural/municipal ALT, one shot vs. semi-regular, small classes vs. large classes) which allows us opportunities to customize our lessons. As the golden rule says, “every situation is different,” and it applies just as much to our lessons as everyday life. I hope you can take these ideas and make them work for your classes. I also hope the opportunity of sharing with your peers will help you during your stay as an ALT. Thank you again for all your hard work, attention, and honesty. Happy teaching!

Time to share… What works?
• Brian Y: Vocabulary – I have lots of smaller schools. If you have fewer than 15 kids I usually pass the vocab cards around. For example, I say “elephant” then pass the card to student 1, he repeats it and passes it down the line. After they get the pronunciation down gradually speed up. Never forget, lots of praise!! • Carly Romano: Review – What's this? Game: Have students ask each other, “what's this?” in pairs. If they get it right, they keep the card. If they get it wrong, the other kid gets the card if they know it. If they both don't know, ALT keeps the card. At the end, there is a speed round where the ALT shows the cards they didn't know. Whoever has the most cards wins. • Jody Buhay: Anything!!! (w/flashcards) – Memory (of a different variety): You have about 10 flashcards per person/group (same for everyone) and they're face down. ALT says 3 items (for example apple, orange, banana). Children remember the words and word order, then flip the cards/arrange appropriately. The ALT then asks students to repeat the order. Continue on to 3, 5, 7, or even 10 cards.

•

Thomas: Names – For those who are not 1-shot ALTs it is a great teaching advantage to know your students` names. It makes things more personal and kids will see that you too are trying hard to remember foreign names/words. You give effort, you get effort back.

•

Natalie: Prepositions – – Get students to use their pencil cases/erasers and practice “in”, “under”, “beside,” etc. Get students to stand at their tables. Practice “on,” “in front of,” “under,” etc.

•

Jason Johnson: Any Vocabulary – Board Game: Divide class into teams. Each team has 1 dice. One player at a time stands up and responds to my question or yells out vocab. After each player answers, they roll the dice and I move their game piece. Draw the game on the board like this: START   FINISH

•

Kathleen Iu: Any topic/ vocabulary – The U Tataki Game: Divide students into teams (2-3 teams). Each team receives a “tataki” fly swatter. ALT yells a vocab word and the first person in each team runs to the board to swat the flashcard. The fastest teams gets a point.

•

Rachel Johnson: Self-Introduction – As a 1-shot I introduce myself frequently. I try to make the most of my opportunity to let the kids get to know me by bringing in a few unusual pictures of my family/hobbies, and answering their questions with honest answers/stories. The picture I show them of my brother includes an opossum he caught. I also include a picture of my Dad BBQing.

•

Aaron: Numbers/ Shapes (5th /6th grade) – Review numbers and about 5 shapes then play pictionary after dividing the class into 2 teams. Have 1 kid from each team draw the target word (taught in secret) using only the previously learned shapes. The kid who guesses the answer then gets a bonus question (how many squares are there?) If correct give a bonus point.

•

Semus Couch: Fruits, Veg., Food 2 teams. Each team chooses a runner. ALT walks around with a “mic.” Students ask, “Do you like…?” If ALT says, “yes I do” the runners race to touch the said food. First person to touch it get a point. If it's “no I don't” then ALT moves onto the next student.

Alaine Nozawa: Shopping –

/

Animals

I go through a simple shopping dialogue w/students and give them a handout with both English and Japanese. After they have a good idea of what they must say I give them paper money and break them into groups. Groups practice the dialogue using other props so they can pretend they are actually a store clerk/ customer.

–

Before introducing vocabulary, I have extreme close-up pictures of each animal. The kids guess what animal it is. After some guesses I show the regular picture of the animal. The kids get a kick out of seeing whether or not their guess is correct. It can get tedious if there's a lot of vocabulary. I also ask, “what's this?” when showing the close-up pictures.

•

Charlie M: Body parts/ right, left –

/

I like/ want/ can, etc:

Blindfolded Face/ Body Building: Make teams. One kid asks, “what's this?” and everyone tells him what face/body part it is. Then both teams shout left/right for the placement (there is a lying team!)

–

I like/ want/ can, etc: with a genki class teach various actions that they gesture. For example, ALT says, “I like…(gesture).” Students then ask, “do you like…?” Then students do the gestures in small teams.

•

Lindsay Benedict: Colors – “I spy with my little eye something that is…(color).” Depending on the grade level, students can guess the object or run and touch it. Winner gets to spy the next object with their little eye.

•

Ivan: “May I have/ Do you have” – Make paper hats out of (English) newspaper- about 4-5. Have children stand in rows behind a number of desks divided into teams. The children lined up are customers, the kids on the other side are clerks. The customers ask, “may I have…” or “do you have…”(a card on the board). If it doesn't exist on the board then the clerk must say, “I'm sorry” and the customer goes to the back of the line.

•

Kiminori Fujimoto: Colors – – – Writing practice pronunciation. Example: colors Prepare origami paper. Prounounce colors showing origami. Write down color. First letter (R-ed) (B-lue) (W-hite) Additional activity: make animals using origami

•

Richard Dewey: Memorizing Vocabulary – When teaching a set of vocabulary, I pay attention to which words cause trouble and gradually reduce the number of words, focusing on those that are causing trouble. As the set of words becomes smaller, I think I let the kids feel they are making progress, while prioritizing study time on the words they need.

•

Shin Chau: Weather – Get some play darts. Make weather flashcards. Divide into 2 groups. One member of each group is chosen. Group A asks, “How is the weather today?” The person from team B answers, “It's…(windy).” The person from team A must throw the dart on the windy flashcard. If it lands correctly, teams A wins a point. If incorrect, team B gets a point.

•

Tina Wang: Body Parts – Get all students to close their eyes. ALT gives instructions (“please touch your…”). Then review answers.

•

Mie Kudo: – I'm teaching to JHS. For 1st grade students I sometimes use songs to review the alphabet, numbers, days of the week, etc. While we're singing I sometimes have the students write the words with their fingers.

•

Joe `Rico Suave`: Animals (1st-2nd grades) – Assign each student an animal in secret. Make a list of around 6-10 animals with spots for students` names on the side (see example). Have each student ask each other: “Who are you?” and they answer, “my name is….(animal).” Then, students write down which animal each student is and race to find them all. Animals Pig Students` names: Dog Cat

What Doesn't Work?
•

Modification suggestions?

Thomas: Difficult Songs – This bombs if teachers do not help you out.

•

Carly: Any topic – Just showing the flashcards and having students repeat the names. Their attention wanes and it gets old fast.

•

Kathleen Iu: Any topic – Teaching a topic that students have no way to relate to their own lives (things of no interest to the students and cannot be applied outside the classroom.)

•

Joe “Rico Suave”: Any topic – When teaching months to 3rd-4th graders, even using pretty flashcards and visual aids, just repetition and quizzing is ineffective. Instead, we used a game where 2 teams had to race to read all the words (or something to that extent), which worked great .(Janken Battle Game)

•

Jody Buhay: Shopping – Shopping conversation w/the 2 teachers as shop owners and the children as shoppers because the children not in the conversation go crazy. Q suggested making it a speech competition to keep the students` attention.

•

Richard Dewey: Overly complex Games – Be careful that games/activities are not too complex. First, it's difficult to explain in Japanese. Second, the kids will be confused. For example, 1st and 2nd graders may not even have the concepts of left and right fully understood, so a game with “pass the card to your left” might not work.

•

Other suggestions: – – – Beware batsu games- students may cry! Beware flashcard overload or not enough vocabulary. Do more in a lesson than simply say/repeat.

Please note: These are not typed in any particular order. Also, I tired to type your responses exactly, however there might be a few minor changes due to space. I apologize for any mistakes I may have made.


								
To top