Projects Morocco fisheries pdf2 by fjzhxb

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									Moving
Sushi
on
Moroccan
fisheries


Morocco fisheries, and meeting with the new fisheries director:

Morocco
 was
 our
 last
 stop
 on
 the
 West
 African
 leg
 of
 the
 expedition.
 With
 a
 coastline
 of
 approximately
 2500km
 and
 an
 extremely
 productive
 fishery,
 we
 were
excited
to
delve
into
various
positive
marine
projects
and
to
discover
more
 about
Morocco’s
marine
resources.
 From
 a
 personal
 point,
 we
 found
 it
 very
 difficult
 with
 cameras
 to
 approach
 people,
especially
fishermen.
Our
route
took
us
from
the
border
of
Mauritania
up
 the
 entire
 coastline
 to
 Tangiers
 in
 the
 North,
 where
 we
 caught
 the
 ferry
 from
 Morocco
 to
 Spain
 over
 the
 tiny
 22km
 gateway
 strip
 of
 water
 leading
 into
 the
 natural
 fish
 trap,
 the
 Mediterranean.
 Southern
 Morocco
 is
 politically
 unstable,
 although
 as
 tourists
 one
 would
 never
 guess
 it.
 There
 are
 disputes
 with
 the
 so‐ called
“Western
Sahara”
and
Morocco,
one
in
which
will
continue
for
some
years
 to
come.
It
was
unsettling
to
see
the
large
military
presence
in
Dakhla.
Although
 Dakhla
 is
 a
 strategic
 and
 interesting
 fisheries
 port,
 we
 were
 not
 permitted
 top
 enter,
 let
 alone
 enter
 with
 cameras.
 It
 was
 obvious
 that
 Morocco
 was
 secretive
 about
 their
 fisheries,
 and
 our
 task
 in
 finding
 positive
 fisheries
 or
 conservation
 projects
would
be
very
difficult.




Pictures:
Fishers
at
the
Sidi
Ifni
port
off
loading
their
catch
of
sardines
and
anchovies.





We
departed
Dakhla
for
Sidi
Ifni,
where
we
visited
the
port
authorities
and
the
 fisheries
 administration
 to
 ask
 for
 permission
 to
 enter
 the
 port
 with
 our
 cameras.
 Sidi
 Ifni
 has
 a
 substantial
 sardine,
 anchovy
 and
 octopus
 fishery.
 Although
not
all
present
at
the
port,
the
octopus
fishery
has
277
vessels
fishing
 actively
to
obtain
their
60
000
MT
annual
quota.
We
were
not
able
to
access
the
 port,
 but
 we
 did
 nevertheless.
 We
 obtained
 footage
 by
 acting
 as
 tourists,
 and
 were
accompanied
by
a
guide
who
knew
fishermen
and
fish
processors.
We
were
 not
 trying
 to
 dig
 up
 ghosts
 in
 Sidi
 Ifni;
 instead
 we
 were
 looking
 for
 inspiring





1


Moving
Sushi
on
Moroccan
fisheries


shots
and
people.
We
filmed
the
offloading
of
fishing
vessels
and
were
humbled
 by
something
you
don’t
get
to
see
everyday.
The
fishers
were
offering
a
portion
 of
 their
 catch
 to
 women
 who
 were
 standing
 with
 buckets
 on
 the
 docks.
 Economically
 there
 are
 few
 options
 for
 lower
 income
 families
 to
 earn
 a
 living.
 The
 women
 accepting
 fish
 on
 the
 docks
 could
 be
 described
 as
 the
 poor
 of
 the
 poor.
The
fish
they
received
from
the
fishers
was
free,
and
they
could
sell
it
in
the
 markets,
 which
 was
 the
 majority
 of
 their
 income.
 Although
 it
 is
 never
 nice
 to
 observe
just
desperation,
but
it
was
amazing
to
see
such
generosity.
The
sardines
 were
 quickly
 bundled
 into
 cold
 storage
 trucks
 and
 transported
 to
 processing
 plants
 in
 Agadir,
 from
 where
 the
 product
 would
 be
 distributed
 internationally.
 This
has
caused
problems
in
the
past,
we
learned
that
4
to
5
months
prior
to
our
 arrival
there
was
an
uprising
against
the
transport
of
fish
from
Sidi
Ifni
to
other
 ports
 for
 processing,
 the
 argument
 was
 simple
 we
 have
 no
 money
 or
 jobs,
 the
 fish
should
be
processed
at
the
Sidi
Ifni
port,
thereby
creating
jobs
and
income.
 The
 blockage
 of
 the
 port
 by
 fishers
 got
 nasty
 when
 clashes
 with
 the
 police
 and
 military
 occurred,
 where
 some
 lives
 were
 lost.
 It
 was
 understandable
 then
 the
 sensitivity
 towards
 our
 cameras.
 Interesting
 though,
 with
 our
 guide
 explaining
 the
genuine
nature
of
our
task,
fishers
were
happy
to
be
filmed
and
spoken
to.




Pictures:
Moroccan
fishers
hut
in
the
seaside
cliffs,
and
an
anchovy
poking
out
of
fishing
crate.



One
major
obstacle
was
that
nobody
wanted
to
be
interviewed
officially,
neither
 fishers
nor
fisheries
administration
personal.
We
required
permission
from
the
 Ministry
of
Fisheries
to
ask
questions.
Unfortunately,
the
ministry
was
in
Rabat
 and
 we
 were
 still
 1000
 km
 south,
 with
 many
 interesting
 ports
 and
 fisheries
 en
 route.
 With
 an
 expedition
 exploring
 fisheries,
 a
 somewhat
 controversial
 and
 lucrative
 topic,
 acquiring
 information
 is
 always
 difficult,
 but
 Morocco
 was
 proving
to
be
impossible.
We
managed
to
acquire
some
footage
from
Agadir
port,
 and
 spoke
 with
 some
 friendly
 and
 helpful
 fisheries
 statisticians.
 We
 discussed
 data
collection
and
Morocco’s
fisheries,
but
unfortunately
language
barriers
and
 no
camera’s
were
our
problem.





2


Moving
Sushi
on
Moroccan
fisheries


We
 had
 a
 lucky
 break,
 when
 we
 were
 put
 into
 contact
 with
 the
 Moroccan
 Director
of
Fisheries
and
Aquaculture,
a
delightful
and
intelligent
Mrs.
Driouich.
 We
 were
 offered
 a
 2‐hour
 interview,
 which
 was
 interesting
 and
 positive.
 Mrs.
 Driouich
went
on
to
explain
the
following:
 • • • • Moroccan
 fishery
 is
 extremely
 important
 to
 the
 country
 both
 economically
and
politically.
 The
annual
fisheries
capture
is
approximately
900
000
MT.
 Of
the
total
annual
capture
75
–
80%
consists
of
small
pelagic
fish.
 The
main
fisheries
sectors,
which
include:
 o Tuna
fishery,
(Atlantic
Bluefin
Tuna
(ABT)
or
commonly
known
in
 Morocco
as
red
tuna).
 o Small
 pelagic
 fisheries
 (combines
 sardines,
 anchovies
 and
 mackerels).
 o Octopus
fishery
 o Artisanal
fishery
(small
line
boats)
 o Shark
fishery
(sharks
are
severely
depleted
at
present)
 o The
fisheries
sector
was
undergoing
management
revamps:
 Revision
of
the
shark
fishery
management
plan.
 Revision
of
the
Tuna
management
plan,
observer
program
to
complement
 the
guidelines
agreed
upon
with
ICCAT
(International
Commission
for
the
 Conservation
of
Atlantic
tuna).
 Developing
 a
 monitoring
 and
 management
 strategy
 for
 the
 Octopus
 fishery
(to
avoid
the
catastrophic
stock
collapse,
which
occurred
in
2004).
 There
 was
 a
 move
 to
 develop
 and
 generate
 finfish
 aquaculture
 facilities
 (those
that
are
present
include
muscles
and
oysters).


• •

• •

According
to
Mrs.
Driouich,
the
king
himself
constructed
her
appointment,
which
 is
relatively
new,
and
in
accordance
with
the
need
to
develop
efficient
fisheries
 management
plans
for
the
sustainable
utilization
of
Morocco’s
fish
resources.




Picture:
Fisheries
port
in
Agadir.


Morocco
 definitely
 has
 excellent
 fishery
 knowledge;
 by
 this
 I
 mean
 they
 have
 a
 fisheries
office
with
personal
collecting
fisheries
data
at
every
port.
Furthermore
 there
is
VMS
and
compliance
vessels
in
every
port
we
visited,
which
is
more
than
 any
other
country
we
visited
with
exception
to
South
Africa
and
Namibia.





3


Moving
Sushi
on
Moroccan
fisheries


Despite
 the
 excellent
 control
 with
 which
 the
 ministry
 manages
 the
 fishery,
 we
 found
some
reports
compiled
by
NGO’s
in
Spain
detailing
Morocco’s
fleets
fishing
 illegally
with
driftnets
in
the
Mediterranean,
more
specifically
in
the
straights
of
 Gibraltar
 and
 the
 Alboran
 sea.
 A
 report
 compiled
 by
 Oceana
 states
 that,
 “The
 Mediterranean
sea
is
considered
“legally”
free
of
driftnets,
when
in
the
summer
 of
2005,
and
after
been
banned
by
various
administrations,
the
General
Fisheries
 Commission
for
the
Mediterranean
(GFCM)
adopted
a
binding
resolution
where
 driftnets
of
any
length
were
prohibited
from
capturing
large
migratory
species.
 Compliance
with
these
agreements
however
is
far
from
effective.
Countries
such
 as
 Italy,
 France,
 Morocco,
 Turkey
 and
 Algeria
 are
 still
 using
 this
 fishing
 gear,
 making
up
a
Mediterranean
fleet
of
more
than
500
vessels”.
 Oceana
 continues
 to
 describe
 a
 series
 of
 recommendations
 directed
 both
 at
 the
 European
 Union
 and
 the
 Spanish
 and
 Italian
 governments,
 in
 order
 that
 the
 Moroccan
governments
conversion
plan
should
be
successful.
 1.




 The
 Moroccan
 government
 has
 already
 breached
 various
 international
 agreements
 regarding
 driftnets.
 Once
 the
 conversion
 plan
 concludes
 (a
 plan
 to
 convert
the
fishing
gear
from
driftnets
to
other)
on
the
1st
of
January
2009,
the
 relevant
measures
should
be
applied
in
the
case
that
this
fleet
(of
approximately
 150
drift
netting
vessels)
continues
to
operate.
 2.




1.25
million
Euros
will
be
allotted
annually
for
the
elimination
of
this
fishing
 gear
 from
 the
 Moroccan
 fleet.
 However
 the
 marketing
 and
 buying
 within
 the
 European
Union
of
swordfish
caught
illegally
with
driftnets
constitutes
not
only
 a
 contradiction
 but
 also
 unfair
 competition
 with
 EU’s
 long
 line
 fleets.
 For
 this
 reason
the
importing
of
illegally
caught
swordfish
should
not
be
permitted
once
 the
 prohibition
 of
 the
 use
 of
 driftnets
 in
 the
 Kingdom
 of
 Morocco
 becomes
 effective.
 3.




Given
Spain’s
role
as
leading
importer/exporter
of
illegally
caught
swordfish
 comes
from
shared
stocks,
makes
it
necessary
to
increase
co‐operation
between
 Spain
 and
 Morocco
 for
 the
 elimination
 of
 this
 fishing
 gear
 and
 for
 the
 implementation
of
plans
for
effective
traceability
of
the
imported
fish
products,
 so
that
consumers
can
distinguish
between
the
illegal
origin
of
the
product.
 Our
observations
towards
Morocco’s
fishery
are
that
it
is
far
advanced
from
 the
 majority
 of
 African
 states,
 with
 respect
 to
 surveillance,
 data
 collection
 and
compliance,
and
this
is
positive.
Every
country
in
the
world
with
a
fishing
 fleet
has
or
continues
to
conduct
illegal
fishing,
this
is
simple
due
to
the
lucrative
 markets
for
fish,
and
that
cheating
is
easy.
The
general
make
up
of
the
Moroccan
 fisheries
Ministry
and
new
appointment
of
Mrs.
Driouich
as
director
of
fisheries
 and
aquaculture,
is
positive
and
I
am
confident
that
decisions
and
management
 plans
will
be
based
on
research
and
scientific
data
rather
than
financial
benefit.

I
 believe
 that
 Morocco
 should
 consider
 utilizing
 NGO’s
 as
 a
 source
 of
 scientific
 data,
 international
 funding,
 and
 an
 objective
 tool
 for
 discussing
 management
 procedures
of
marine
Protected
Areas.
Currently
there
are
no
NGO’s
working
in
 Morocco,
which
I
believe
leaves
a
gap
in
effective
resource
management.
We
had
 an
excellent
experience
in
Morocco
and
can
suggest
this
beautiful
country,
as
a
 destination
must
when
visiting
the
magic
continent
of
Africa.
 
 4


Moving
Sushi
on
Moroccan
fisheries




Picture:
2M
TV
crew
filming
Moving
Sushi


Thank
 you
 to
 the
 Ministry
 of
 Fisheries
 and
 Aquaculture
 and
 especially
 to
 Mrs.
 Driouich
 for
 her
 time
 and
 passion,
 and
 to
 Oceana
 who
 supplied
 us
 with
 excellent
 reports
 on
 the
 fantastic
 conservation
 and
 surveillance
 work
 they
 are
 conduction
 within
European
Union
Waters
and
the
Mediterranean.
Lastly
a
special
thanks
to
 all
who
made
our
stay
in
Morocco
so
memorable,
you
know
who
you
are
and
will
 never
forget.
 
 

MRS. DRIOUICH KINGDOM OF MOROCCO MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE AND MARITIME FISHERIES DEPARTMENT OF MARITIME FISHERIES







5



								
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