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“Boogie Woogie Stomp”

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					“Boogie Woogie Stomp” Thursday June 7, 2007
U.S. Cellular Front Porch
11:30-1:00 Blues in the Schools: Erwin Helfer, Katherine Davis and Eric Noden with the Stone Academy All Stars – The Blues in Schools program is a success story for an quality educational program. In this program, blues performers go teach children about one of the great true American art forms. Each year, some of these children get to perform at the Chicago Blues Festival on the Front Porch Stage. The kids will perform here with Erwin Helfer a fine pianist, Katherine Davis (See below), and guitarist Eric Noden. 1:30-2:30 Aaron Moore Aaron Moore is a solid if not spectacular pianist and singer 3:00-4:30 Bobby Slim James with Joanne Graham – I haven‟t heard of either of these two 5:00-6:30 Phil Guy and the Chicago Machine – While not as flamboyant as his famous older brother, Phil Guy is a much more consistent performer. Similar his brother he plays the hard edged “West Side” Chicago Blues sound mixing blues with soul, funk, and rock. He‟s not afraid to experiment – he has even been known to throw a little bit of rap into a funky cover of Johnny “Guitar” Watson‟s “A Real Mother For Ya”

Route 66 Road House
12:00-1:30 Boogie Woogie Stomp: The Music Explosion which gave birth to the modern era-Honoring the Ammons Family (Lila Ammons, Edsel Ammons, Sonny Leyland, Renaud Patigny, and Bob Hall) 2:00-3:30 Soul/Blues: the lifeblood of the blues today featuring Bob Jones, Rip Daniels, Julius Lewis, and Willie Clayton moderated by Larry Hoffman 4:00-5:30 Centennials Memorial: Jim O’Neal, Larry Hoffman, Michael Frank, and Bob Porter remembering annual honorees and the passing of the legends in 2006 such as Homesick, Henry and Robert Jr., Ruth Brown, Snooky Pryor, Chico Chism

State of Mississippi Juke Joint
12:30-2:00 Chainsaw DuPont – Chainsaw DuPont is one of the better younger (although no longer young) blues musicians pushing blues into a much more modern sound. He refers to his style of blues as “Delta Crush” - a mixture of many styles of blues as is evidenced by his “blues trilogy” centering around three different blues regions: Bourbon Street Breakdown (Louisiana/New Orleans), Ghosts of Beale Street (Memphis), and Lake Street Lullaby (Chicago). He never just mimics older style though. Instead, these albums are modern takes on the classic styles played by a musician who has absorbed the traditional styles and integrated them into a very personal style.

2:30-3:30 John Primer – Former Muddy Waters sideman John Primer also spent years as the backbone of Magic Slim‟s band the Teardrops as well as many other artists around town. Nowadays he leads his own group the Real Deal. Back in the day when folks would ask me where to find some classic Chicago Blues, I would always respond by saying “Find John Primer. Even if he‟s playing in a pickup band, it‟ll be the tightest band playing around town.” He can still deliver the goods today 4:00-5:30 Jimmy “Duck” Holmes – ( See below) 6:00-7:30 Chicago Jam Station with Dave Specter, Aron Burton and Kenny Smith – The jam stage is an open stage where musicians can step on stage with the backing of a solid Chicago bands. Dave Specter is a tasteful guitarist who is well versed in classic Chicago style with a nice jazzy twist. Aron Burton has spent years as Albert Collins bass player. Kenny Smith is quite possibly the busiest drummer on the Chicago Blues scene today because, quite frankly, he‟s one of the best. State of Louisiana Bayou Station and Social Club 12:30-1:30 Willis Prudhomme and Zydeco Express From the few recordings I‟ve heard, he plays some very enjoyable Zydeco songs in a very traditional manner. Aside from that, I don‟t know much 2:00-3:00 Bob Hall – No clue who he is 3:30-4:30 Boogie Woogie Stomp: Renauld Patigny – From what I hear he plays blues and ragtime piano. That‟s all I know though. 5:00-6:00 Boogie Woogie Stomp Part 2: Carl Sonny Leyland and Lila Ammons – Lila Ammons is a singer with famous roots. Her father Albert Ammons was a legendary boogie woogie pianist and her uncle was Gene “Jug” Ammons – one of the great saxophonists to come out of Chicago. I‟ve never heard her though nor have I heard Carl “Sonny” Leyland Gibson Guitars Crossroads 12:00-1:30 Charles E. Shaw and the Chicago Blues Rebellion Band featuring Lady Sax and Lady Cat – not sure who these folks are and what they are rebelling against 2:00-3:30 Osee Anderson and Da Blooze Folks – Maybe he‟s good, maybe not but I‟ve got to say the term “blooze” just pisses me off whenever I‟ve seen it. It makes anyone who uses it sound like a cheesy bar band 4:00-5:30 Hoochie Coochie Boys: Muddy’s side men featuring George Mojo Buford, John Primer, Rick Kreher, Ray Killer Allison, Calvin Fuzz Jones, Barrelhouse Chuck, and introducing Muddy Waters Junior – This is one of the most anticipated sets of the blues festival. Aside from a band that consists of Muddy Waters sidemen (John Primer, Calvin Jones, and Mojo Buford are most notable here) and local stalwarts (Barrelhouse Chuck), this is also one of the first major performances of Muddy Waters Junior – one of Muddy‟s sons. From all accounts he has “the voice” and a great stage presence similar to Muddy. The big question is whether or not he can stand on his own with some original material and style in the way his step-brother Big Bill Morganfield does. If he can do this we could be looking at a major blues star in the making

Petrillo Music Shell
6:00-7:10 Willie Clayton – Not one of my favorites due to his choice of material (a little too “smooth” sounding for me) but a good singer in the “soul blues” format. 7:20-8:20 Jimmy Dawkins - His nickname “Fast Fingers” may be misleading (he‟s not a particularly fast guitar player) but that doesn‟t mean he can‟t play. On a good night Jimmy Dawkins can serve up gutsy blues in the classic West Side vein. My only problem with him is that his performances seem to vary in quality. A few times I‟ve seen him he has been spectacular and others he has been pretty mediocre 8:30-9:30 00 Koko Taylor and the Blues Machine – After several health issues, Chicago‟s reining Queen of the Blues is back with an exciting new album which is a much more stripped down effort compared to her last few releases. This change has served to rejuvenate her and is the best of her recent efforts. While her voice is not as strong as it was years ago, she still can deliver the goods along with the Blues Machine which is usually one of the better backing bands around due to the presence of guitar slinger Vino Louden

“30th Anniversary-Sons of the Blues-The New Generation is the Now Generation” Friday, June 8, 2007
U.S. Cellular Front Porch
11:30-12:30 Blues in the Schools with Billy Branch and the children of Mississippi – This is another installation of the blues in the schools program (see above). This time the blues kids are performing here with one of the biggest advocates of the program and arguably one of the best harmonica players in the world, Billy Branch (more on Billy Branch see the main stage for this evening) 1:00-2:30 J.W. Williams and the Chi Town Hustlers – J. W. Williams anchored the bass chair for Buddy Guy and Junior Wells for years and has led his band the Chi Town Hustlers for the last few decades. Aside from putting on a terrific show, his band has the second coolest name in Chicago next to tonight‟s honorees the Sons of Blues. He tends to scare away purists because he adds a great deal of funk to his music and can stray a bit from the classic Chicago sound just as his former employers did before him. Don‟t let that bother you though, my opinion of purists is about as low as the low A string on J. W.‟ s bass – Good music is good music and that‟s what J. W. has been dishing out for years 2:45-3:30 Vernon and Joe Harrington - never heard of either of them 4:00-5:30 Lurrie Bell – This performance was originally supposed to pair Lurrie Bell with his father Carey Bell who played harmonica with Muddy Waters before becoming a legendary figure in the blues harmonica world. Tragically, Carey passed away recently a few months after Lurrie lost his wife, photographer, Susan Greenburg (http://www.sgreenbergphotography.com/). Lurrie, also a founding member of the original Sons of Blues, is an exciting guitar player who pulls raw emotion from his guitar without overplaying. Unlike most modern blues guitarists, he uses a clean punchy guitar tone to produce sharp jabbing melodic guitar phrases that almost sound like he is conversing with the band. If that weren‟t enough, he his raw gospel informed vocals are right up there with best performers today. Expect an emotional performance here from arguably the best blues guitarist in the world today. Don‟t miss this show. 5:45-7:00 The No Static Blues Band featuring Mary, Lynn and Renee Lane – No clue who any of them are

Route 66 Road House
12:00-1:30 The Significance of the Berlin Jazz Festival as told by Jim O’Neal with some of the outstanding performers of the era. 2:00-3:30 Blues: a family affair with Johnnie Mae and son Jimi Prime Time Smith 4:00-5:30 Chicago Blues Today: An intimate inside discussion with authors David Whiteis and Karen Hanson

State of Mississippi Juke Joint 12:00-1:00 Jimmy Duck Holmes – One of the musicians who recorded on “Broke and Hungry Records” a new record label created by Jeff Konkel to capture some of current unknown bluesemen of the Mississippi Delta. In a world where blues is constantly slick and overproduced, Jimmy‟s album “Back to Bentonia” is raw, rough, rural acoustic blues without any of the niceties of modern stylings. The end result is one of the best albums I‟ve heard in years. 1:30-2:30 Terry “T” Williams/Wesley Jefferson – Both members of this duet are better known for raw electric blues in the delta but produced an excellent CD of low key acoustic blues on “Broke and Hungry”. Not sure what they have planned but if it‟s anything like the CD you‟re in for a treat. 3:00-4:00 Clarksdale Delta Blues Museum – Not sure what they will do here… maybe talk about the Museum 4:30-5:30 Jimmy Duck Holmes (see above) 6:00-7:30 Chicago Jam Station with Kenny Smith, Guy King and Calvin Jones – The jam stage is an open stage where musicians can step on stage with the backing of a solid Chicago bands. Kenny Smith is Willie “Big Eyes” Smith‟s son and quite possibly the best blues drummer in Chicago other than his father. Calvin Jones was Muddy Waters‟ last bassist.

State of Louisiana Bayou Station and Social Club
12:00-1:00 Darryl Davis – A boogie woogie pianist with a unique talent – He‟s written a book on the Ku Klux Klan that has received some pretty good reviews. However, it‟s his keyboard playing that should get your full attention as well it should – he‟s a solid musician of great skill 1:30-2:30 Ken Saydak – An exciting keyboard player and good vocalist who led the band roots band Big Shoulders. He performs around town often and has recorded and produced some fine records including one of Zora Young‟s recent efforts. 3:00-4:00 Ariyo – A member of the current Sons of Blues as well as several other bands, Ariyo is a disciple of the great Otis Spann. However, he is not just content to emulate Otis‟ style – he has moved beyond it to forge his own sound and in doing so has become one of the most in demand pianists in town today and rightfully so. He is one of the most unique keyboard voices on the scene today. 4:30-5:30 Willis Prudhomme and Zydeco Express - Here they are again. See above for details

Gibson Guitar’s Crossroads
12:00-1:30 Carl Weathersby – A longtime member of the Sons of Blues before striking out on his own, Carly Weathersby is one of the best musicians out there playing blues with a healthy dose of rock. He‟s a spectacular guitarist and very good vocalist. He was sideline by health issues a few years back but has now come roaring back to the height of his powers. This should be a terrific performance. 2:00- 3:30 Mighty Joe Young Jr. featuring Chontella Renee – If Mighty Joe Young Jr. is half as good as his more famous father, a West Side guitar slinger, then he‟s in for a great career. Unfortunately, I don‟t know a thing about him or his featured performer, Chontella Renee 4:00-5:30 Carlos Johnson and the Serious Blues Band – I would argue that the Sons of Blues are to modern Chicago Blues what John Mayall‟s Bluesbreakers were to British Blues and Rock in that they just keep churning out amazing guitarists as is evidenced by three former SOB guitarists playing sets today. Where Lurrie Bell is traditional and Carl Weathersby pushes be boundaries of blues/rock, Carlos Johnson is the most modern sounding of the three by incorporating blues, rock, funk, and jazz influences. He plays a right handed guitar upside down a la Albert King and Otis Rush and their influence on his playing is very clear. However, he has melded their influence with several guitarists in various other genres, most notably jazz giant Wes Montgomery. The end result is a rare guitarist with monster technique, a unique sound, and impeccable taste. The fact that he was scheduled to play the same time slot as Lurrie Bell is criminal. Luckily we will probably hear them play together at the SOB reunion later tonight. Petrillo Music Shell 6:00-7:05 Johnnie Mae Dunson and son Jimmie “Prime Time” Smith – Johnny Mae Dunson overheard doctors telling her mother that she wouldn‟t live past the age 14 due to a weak heart. I guess that heart is a quite a bit stronger than expected since she‟s now in her mid eighties. She didn‟t waste those extra seventy years either. She honed her skills as a drummer on in the famous Maxwell Street Market and then proceeded to write some of the most famous blues songs (Muddy Waters‟ “Evil” comes to mind). She is best known for her work with Jimmy Reed. Her son Jimmie “Prime Time” Smith plays solid blues in the classic Chicago Tradition 7:15-9:30 Billy Branch’s Sons of the Blues 30th Anniversary Reunion – Billy Branch‟s Sons of Blues were originally comprised of the children of famous blues musicians plus front man Billy Branch. They played thoroughly modern blues that was still firmly rooted in the classic Chicago sound. Their personnel turned over quite a bit over the years but the quality of the performances have remained consistently great. While the focus is on Billy Branch‟s world class harmonica, the band has been a breeding ground for amazing guitarists – Lurrie Bell, Carl Weathersby, and Carlos Johnson have all been members of the Sons of Blues. With all of them performing earlier today, expect them to show up on stage tonight. I both love and fear jam sessions: While the music is great they are often marked by moments of brilliance separated by long dull blocks of the band feeling each other out until they find the right grove. This won‟t be the case here however given the fact that these players have all been together in a band, you can expect two hours of solid music from the most storied modern Chicago Blues band of the past three decades

“Downtown Saturday Blues” Saturday, June 9, 2007
U.S. Cellular Front Porch 11:30-1:00 Fruteland Jackson’s Birthday Party – Fruteland Jackson is a blues educator who is also one of the best performers around when it comes to acoustic blues. Fruteland is a master of many blues styles including many “pre-war” styles that few would even attempt to pull off (“prewar” blues is a designation used to describe blues recorded prior to World War II). His CD “Blues 2.0” should have won a Blues Music Award but it was released the same year Buddy Guy released his spellbinding acoustic album “Blues Singer”. As good as “Blues Singer” was I think Buddy won on star power alone – “Blues 2.0” was FAR superior in my opinion. The performances on “Blues 2.0” were just as passionate and the songs were mostly original with themes rooted in the present. The a cappella title song for instance sounds like a classic plantation work song but the subject matter deals with the plight of the modern white collar worker and includes lines like “I traded my shovel for a hundred e-mails”. 1:30-3:00 Wanda Johnson and Shrimp City Slim – Wanda‟s album sounds like the classic soul blues recordings of the „70s with nice grooves and interesting songwriting. If she and Slim can pull it off live this will be a very entertaining performance 3:30-5:30 Chicago Harmonica Project Part II featuring Little Arthur Duncan, Charlie Love, Big D, Jeffery Taylor, Mervyn ”Harmonica” Hinds, Reginald Cooper supported by Rick Kreher,E. G. McDaniel, Mark Brumbach, Twist Turner, and Illinois Slim - This should be a fantastic showcase for harmonic addicts. The original Harmonica Project was created to produce a CD to highlight some of the better lesser known harmonica players. Two of my favorites in this group include Big D and Harmonica Hinds, both of whom I‟ve heard play with Tom Holland, a terrific guitarist who knows his harp players – he‟s James Cotton‟s guitarist so you can catch him here at the Front Porch with James Cotton tomorrow 6:00-7:30 Khalif Wailin’ Walter – He‟s a good performer in the vein of his uncle Carl Weathersby but in my opinion still doesn‟t have a unique voice. Still, he can really play the heck out of his guitar

Route 66 Road House
11:00-1:00 The Great Lakes Blues Society Summit, hosted by Big City Blues Magazine 1:30-3:00 Blues on Film: John Sayles “The Honeydripper” 3:30-5:00 Cultural Tourism: a Virtual Blues Tour on the Blues Trail (Chicago Office of Tourism, Representatives from the States of Mississippi and Louisiana moderated by Jim O’Neal) State of Mississippi Juke Joint 12:00-1:00 Terry “T” Williams - If this is an electric performance look out. Word is that he plays raw ragged blues in the modern Mississippi style. This should be a great performance

1:30-2:30 Homemade Jamz Blues Band – This band is a group of youngsters (all under 20 nd years old I believe) that took 2 place in the International Blues Competition in Memphis this year. Word on this band that is very positive but the video clips I‟ve seen make me think that they are terrific for their age but not great compared to many of the veterans on stage. The truth can always be found of the bandstand not video so this will be a great test for them. Regardless of how they do, I hope they keep on doing it because kids their age playing the blues is key to this music continuing. 3:00-4:00 Alvin Youngblood Hart – A terrific performer of old pre-war styles as well as modern electric blues rock. Not sure what style he will be playing here but I prefer his acoustic performances to his rocked out electric performances (although those are pretty good too) 4:30-5:30 Jimmy “Duck” Holmes (see above) 6:00-7:30 Chicago Jam Station w/ Kenny Smith, Guy King, and Calvin Jones (See above)

State of Louisiana Bayou Station and Social Club 12:30-1:30 Dave Drazin - From what I hear he is a jazzy sort of blues keyboard player 2:00-3:30 Drink Small – A terrific performer who has been around since the 1950‟s he‟s equally adept at using keyboards and guitar to highlight his smoky vocals. 4:00-5:00 Willis Prudhomme and Zydeco Express – Here he is again. Must be a shortage of zydeco musicians out there 5:00-6:00 Tony Llorens – Who?

Gibson Guitar Crossroads
12:00-1:15 Elmore James Jr. with Cadillac Zack – Elmore James, Jr. is not the most original performer but he has his namesake‟s trademark guitar sound down cold. His vocals, while good cannot match the emotional power of Elmore James‟ but the number who could vocally compete with Elmore James can probably be counted on one hand. Cadillac Zack is a guitarist and producer. He‟s at his best in the older Chicago styles of the „50s so this should be a good pairing 1:45-3:15 David Dee and Family – Don’t know who these people are 3:45-5:00 The Honeydripper All-Stars featuring Gary Clark Jr., Eddie Shaw, Arthur Lee Williams, Henderson Huggins, and Mabel John – Nice collection of veteran talent here highlighted by former Howlin‟ Wolf sideman and Wolf Gang frontman, saxophonist Eddie Shaw Petrillo Music Shell 5:00-6:00 Nellie Tiger Travis – A good if not great female blues singer. I haven‟t seen her in a while though so maybe she‟s improved. 6:10-7:00 Big Jay McNeely with Jesse Scinto – This should be one of the highlights of the festival this year. Big Jay McNeely plays hard swinging high energy jumping blues and early rock and roll. If anything gets the crowd dancing this year, this will be the show

7:20-8:20 Irma Thomas and the Professionals – New Orleans Queen of Soul is one of the most magnificent singers you‟ll hear. Where Koko Taylor grabs you with raw emotion, Irma Thomas does so with impeccable technique without unnecessary vocal gymnastics. With the recent loss of Etta James, Irma Thomas is one of the few who can fill that void musically. 8:30-9:30 Magic Slim and the Tear Drops – A long time Chicagoan now re-located to Nebraska, Magic Slim is one of the most solid performers of classic Chicago Blues. His guitar style and nickname both came from the same person – his mentor the legendary Magic Sam. No one stomps out a blues shuffle nowadays like Magic Slim. His slashing guitar, smoky vocals, and enormous repertoire (very few performers know as many songs as Magic Slim) all point to this being a grat way to close out perfect Saturday night

“Wang Dang Doodle” Sunday June 10, 2007
U.S. Cellular Front Porch
11:30-1:00 Melvia Chick Rogers and her Gospel Harmonizers – Don‟t know much about her other than the fact she is not to be confused with Chick Rogers the “Stoop Down Man” 1:30-3:00 Cephas and Wiggins – Chephas and Wiggins have been together as a duo for several decades. During this time they have solidified their hold as the premier living performers in the classic Peidmont Style – an rural acoustic blues styling with an intricate finger picked guitar 3:30-5:00 James Cotton – Mr. Superharp himself has come back to Chicago! While time and injury have worn away his distinctive voice, he can still blow harp with the best of them. A cross between Sonnyboy Williamson II and Little Walter, Cotton spent years as the harmonica player for Howlin‟ Wolf and Muddy Waters before blazing his own more modern blues sound. His guitarist is a personal favorite of mine – Tom Holland. Tom has taken numerous Chicago blues guitar styles and has woven them into a style that is all his own. In particular, I love his Earl Hooker influenced slide guitar 5:30-7:00 Zac Harmon – One of the most exciting performers in blues today, Zach Harmon is the complete package of a powerful singer, amazing guitarist, excellent songwriter, and dynamic performer. He‟s thoroughly modern while still taking elements of older blues styles. He won the International Blues competition a few years back after making a living producing records and his star has been on the rise ever since. I guarantee that after the festival, those that see his performances (he‟s playing several times today) will be buzzing about him

Route 66 Road House
11:30-1:00 The Art of the Blues: Geraldine Nash, Gustina Atlas, Patty Crosby, George Berry, and Bessie Johnson discuss the essence of Mississippi Folk Art with Larry Morrissey 1:30-2:30 Sunnyland Tales: Sam Burkhardt, Steve Freund, David Honeyboy Edwards, and Barrelhouse Chuck 3:00-5:00 Howlin’ Wolf Birthday Party with family and friends.

State of Mississippi Juke Joint
12:00-1:00 Zac Harmon (See above) 1:30-2:30 Homemade JamZ Blues Band (See above) 3:00-4:00 Bobby Rush – (See below) 4:30-5:30 Jimmy Duck Holmes – (See above) 6:00-7:30 Chicago Jam Station w/ Dave Specter, Harlan Terson, and Mike Schlick - Today‟s jam session features Dave Specter and Harlan Terson – one of the very best blues bassists you‟ll ever hear as is evidenced by the fact that he‟s recorded with guys like Lonnie Brooks, Lurrie Bell, and Eddie Shaw among others.

State of Louisiana Bayou Station and Social Club
12:30-1:30 Henry Gray and the Cats – Longtime Howin‟ Wolf Pianist has never reached the fame that many others of his generation have. However, he is easily as talented as his more famous compatriots. 2:00-3:30 Willis Prudhomme and Zydeco Express - In case you missed him (which would be nearly impossible since he‟s played so much already), the hardest working man in Zydeco is back for another show 4:00-5:00 David Honeyboy Edwards – Honeyboy Edwards is living history. It‟s well documented that he was among the last to see Robert Johnson alive but he‟s also an amazing player. He does have some bad shows as any man over the age of 80 might. However, when he‟s on he can be spellbinding

Gibson Guitar’s Crossroads
12:00-1:15 Lil’ Howlin’ Wolf – He‟s been around for some time now and was a protégé of the late great Howlin‟ Wolf. Other than that I don‟t see much evidence between him and his mentor. To his credit, he doesn‟t try to impersonate Wolf but to me he sounds average at best 1:45-3:00 Katherine Davis Blues Ensemble – One of the better female blues singers around today, Katherine Davis combines classic blues singing with a touch of jazz inflections. 3:30-5:00 Maurice John Vaughn Blues Band – Maurice John Vaughn has never been accused about being prolific. He‟s only put out a handful of recordings since the 70s but the few that he‟s made are soulful and funky affairs. He has a gruff singing voice that he pairs with smooth singing guitar playing that is devoid of clichés

Petrillo Music Shell
5:00-7:05 The Disciples Playing for Sunnyland: Sam Burkhardt leads Steve Freund, Bob Stroger, Barrelhouse Chuck, Kenny Smith, Calvin Jones, Willie “Big Eyes” Smith, Kenny Barker with Big Time Sarah and Deitra Farr – The late pianist Sunnyland Slim was considered a mentor and patriarch to many great bluesmen. Here some of his disciples and compatriots pay tribute to a master. Featured players include pianist Barrelhouse Chuck who owes a great debt in style to Sunnyland, the father/son tag team of Willie and Kenny Smith on drums, and powerhouse vocalists Big Time Sarah and Deitra Farr 7:15-8:15 Tribute to Wolf featuring James Cotton, Hubert Sumlin, Eddie Shaw, Abb Locke, Henry Gray, Jody Williams, Smokey Smothers with Lafayette “Shorty” Gilbert, and Willie Smith – Expect a great set here by a number of musicians who have played with Wolf at one time or another. James Cotton was amongst Wolf‟s early pre-Chicago band members. His Chess Era sidemen are in tow as well including Henry Gray and the potent tag team of Jody Williams and Hubert Sumlin on guitars. This should be another highlight of the festival

8:25-9:30 Bobby Rush – Funky, gutbucket, and soulful are words that are often used to describe Bobby Rush. He is the undisputed king of the “chitlin‟ circuit”, a group of clubs and juke joints in black neighborhoods all over the country. He plays a style of harmonica that pre-dates the amplified Chicago sound and creates a great contrast to the more modern funky backing of his band. His songs are full of double entendres so you may want to put the kids to bed before he takes the stage. For example, his song “Night Fishing” has less to do with fishing than it does other nocturnal activities (you don‟t think he‟s really talking about a “fishing pole” do you?). This should be a great performance and a fitting way to close of this year‟s festival


				
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