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Welcome What is a SAM Advantages of using a SAM What can a SAM do

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Welcome What is a SAM Advantages of using a SAM What can a SAM do Powered By Docstoc
					3 of 2005

Welcome
Based on feedback from our stakeholders, we realise that many users of national accounts are not aware of all the available products and how they can benefit from using them. The main focus for this issue will be on the Social Accounting Matrix (SAM). The SAM is one of the products which are compiled and published by national accounts. The first and second editions of the national accounts newsletter can be found on: http://www.statssa.gov.za/newsletters/NationalAccoun ts012005.pdf

analytical framework that a SAM presents. In the absence of a SAM, users have to reconcile the data themselves as a starting point for an internally consistent analysis as well as to ensure the consistency of the definitions used. The integration of economic and social statistics enables more interrelated policy monitoring and analysis. Above all, the linkage of income distribution issues to more macro-oriented objectives such as economic growth, low inflation rate and government fiscal balance comes within reach with a SAM.

What can a SAM do?
With a SAM one can bring together dispersed pieces of monetary and non-monetary information into a system of economic and social accounting matrices and extensions. This could open up possibilities for: * Rigorous theorising based on micro-economic insights; * Formal modeling, including feedbacks from nonmonetary to monetary; * Monitoring and forecasting of the impact of government policies or external influences on non-monetary variables; * Pinpointing gaps in the available dataset and discrepancies in the survey concepts. It is in a situation where basic information and other statistical resources are (very) scarce that it becomes important to make the best possible use of available data; * Serving as a benchmark dataset; * Providing a dependable summary of structural poverty; and * Exploring the impact of exogenous changes in such variables as exports, certain categories of government expenditure, and investment of the whole interdependent socio-economic system.

What is a SAM?
A SAM integrates supply and use tables and institutional sector accounts into a single matrix format. It is a presentation of the 1993 System of National Accounts in a matrix format focusing on issues that are of special interest in a country, e.g. an analysis of interrelationships between structural features of an economy and the distribution of income and expenditure among household groups. It therefore gives a social dimension to national accounts.

Advantages of using a SAM
The advantages of using a SAM can be summarised in terms of increased relevance, reliability, efficiency, consistency of national accounts, leading to improved quality. The SAM increases the relevance of economic and social indicators because they are derived from a meso-level information system. Reliability is enhanced because the more data are confronted at a meso-level, the more logical identities can be checked. Efficiency is served by the application of uniform units, classification and concepts throughout a statistical system. The compilation of a SAM, by which an optimal mix of top-down and bottom-up production methods is used, can lead to higher quality of those aggregates that can be produced along both routes. It also signals inconsistencies in basic sources such as population censuses, household expenditure surveys and integrated economic accounts. It is not the availability of these data per se that makes the difference, but the consistency and quality improvements reached through the process of statistical integration and the

What will we be able to measure?
With the SAM, we will be able to measure the following: * Consumption expenditure on goods and services by different household groups; * Generation of income by occupational group, skill level, gender, population group and percentile; * Use of income by population group and percentile; * Allocation of income by institutional sector; * Distribution of income by institutional sector; and

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Financial flows by financial intermediaries.

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Which SAMs were developed?
Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) implemented the 1993 SNA in 1999. The following reports have since been released: * An official report was published in November 2002 titled ‘Final social accounting matrix 1998 (Report no 04-03-02)’. This report is available on the Stats SA website (www.statssa.gov.za) as well as in print format from distribution@statssa.gov.za or tel. (012) 310 8619. An analysis report titled ‘Overview of the 1998 social accounting matrix’ was published in 2004. This report is available on the Stats SA website (www.statssa.gov.za) as well as in print format from distribution@statssa.gov.za or tel. (012) 310 8619. Two discussion documents were published on the Stats SA website (www.statssa.gov.za) for comments and suggestions. They are ‘Constructing a social accounting matrix: comparisons across eleven countries’ and ‘Labour Accounts for South Africa (D0403)’. Comments and suggestions on these documents can be e-mailed to RiaanG@statssa.gov.za or Membreym@statssa.gov.za. Currently, Stats SA is busy with the compilation of the SAM for the reference year 2002, which is scheduled for publication in mid-2006. * *

Gross domestic product per region for 2004 estimates indicated that the highest real annual economic growth rate was recorded in Western Cape at 5,3%, followed by KwaZulu-Natal and North West (at 4,9% each) and Eastern Cape at 4,6%. Stats SA revised the annual GDP estimates from 2002 to 2004. The growth rate for 2002 was revised from 3,6% to 3,7%, for 2003 from 2,8% to 3,0% and for 2004 from 3,7% to 4,5%. For more information go to: http://www.statssa.gov.za/publications/P0441/P04 413rdQuarter2005.pdf or contact Sakhele Gqabaza at: SakheleG@statssa.gov.za. A discussion document titled ‘Labour accounts for South Africa (D0403) was published in October 2005 on the Stats SA website. The aim of this document is to investigate whether South Africa will be in a position to publish a detailed labour accounts sub-matrix either as an external matrix, or as part of the main structure for the compilation of the next SAM. Comments and suggestions on this document can be e-mailed to: membreym@statssa.gov.za. For more information go to: http://www.statssa.gov.za/publications/D0403/D0 403.pdf Final supply and use tables for the reference year 2002 was published in October 2005. The most important domestically produced goods for 2002 were manufactured goods, which accounted for R 811 880 (32,3%) in 2002 as compared to R678 544 million (31,7%) in 2001. Community, social, and personal services accounted for R 381 353 million (15,2%) in 2002. Imported goods in 2002 were predominantly manufactured goods which accounted for 70,1% of the total followed by mining and quarrying with 11,2%. Expenditure on (the use of) the following products increased: agriculture, hunting, forestry and fishing (3,4% in 2002 compared to 3,1% in 2001), manufacturing (41,6% in 2002 compared with 40,5% in 2001) and also wholesale, retail and motor trade, hotels and restaurants (2,9% in 2002) and transport, storage and communication services (5,6% in 2002). For more information go to: http://www.statssa.gov.za/publications/Report-0404-01/Report-04-04-012002.pdf

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Prior to the introduction of SNA93, Stats SA followed the 1968 SNA and published a SAM for reference year 1988.

Recent publications
* The third quarter of 2005 estimates of GDP, the annual estimates of GDP from 1998–2004 and annual estimates of GDP per region from 1995– 2004 were published on 29 November 2005. The real GDP at market prices for the third quarter of 2005 compared with the second quarter of 2005, increased by an annualised rate of 4,2%. The main contributors to the increase in economic activity for the third quarter of 2005 were the manufacturing, wholesale, retail and motor trade, hotels and restaurants, finance, real estate and business services industries (0,9% of a point), the transport, storage and communication industry (0,6% of a point) and construction industry (0,3% of a point).

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Workshops attended
* Riaan Grobler attended the 4 Annual National Tourism Conference held in Sun City from 6 to 7 October 2005. The theme of the conference was ‘Tourism equity and growth through the 2010 World Cup and beyond’. The conference focused on priority interventions needed to position South Africa as a competitive destination globally. The conference also served as a basis to align all stakeholders in tourism behind the 2010 National Tourism Development Plan, and to promote the implementation of the Tourism Black Economic empowerment Charter and Scorecard. For further information contact Riaan Grobler at: RiaanG@statssa.gov.za. Anemé Malan attended a conference titled ‘Tourism Satellite Account (TSA): Understanding Tourism and Designing Strategies’ that was held in Iquazu Falls from 3–6 October 2005. The aim of this conference was to identify applications of the TSA for the benefit of all the stakeholders involved in tourism development and management. More than 80 countries attended the conference. Anemé contributed in the session on labour markets in the tourism sector by critiquing the central paper as well as presenting inputs on the situation in South Africa. For further information contact Anemé Malan at: AnemeM@statssa.gov.za. Eugene Kgantsi attended the sub–regional International Comparison Price workshops held in Zimbabwe, Harare from 22 to 25 August 2005, and in Tanzania, Dar es Salaam from 24 to 27 August 2005. Both workshops were aimed at data quality, data validation and introducing new surveys required for the ICP project in Africa. Joe de Beer attended the regional ICP workshop in Bamako, Mali from 17 to 21 October 2005, where the focus was placed on the role of National Accounts’ activities in the ICP project. The participants were from all participating African countries, various regional organisations, the African Development Bank statisticians and other international experts. Eugene also attended the regional ICP meeting in Uganda, Kampala from 14 to 18 November 2005, The workshop focused on the quality of data that has been submitted by 44 countries in Africa. The workshop was also held to commemorate Africa Statistics Day. For further information contact Eugene Kgantsi at: EugeneK@statssa.gov.za
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Riaan Grobler attended the provincial SAMs steering committee meetings of the North West, Northern Cape and Free State provinces held on 28 and 30 November and 1st December 2005 respectively. The provincial SAMs are compiled by Conningarth Economist and funded by the respective provincial governments, the Development Bank of Southern Africa and the Department of Provincial and Local Government. The provincial SAMs consist of four phases, namely: Planning, Compilation of the provincial SAM, Development of a provincial SAM Macro Econometric Model and sectoral multipliers and lastly, capacity building. The aim of the meetings was to deal with feedback on phase 2 and phase 3 of the project. For further information contacted Riaan Grobler at: RiaanG@statssa.gov.za.

Forthcoming publications
* An official report titled ‘Energy accounts for South Africa’ for the reference year 2004 will be published and disseminated in March 2006. Statistical release P0441: Gross domestic product, fourth quarter of 2005 will be published on the 28 February 2006. For more information or to be invited to the press conference please contact Sakhele Gqabaza at: SakheleG@statssa.gov.za.

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We wish you a merry Christmas and a prosperous new year

Contact us
Did you find this newsletter useful? We appreciate your feedback, especially if there are suggestions for improvement. Contact Membrey Mashiane at: MembreyM@statssa.gov.za

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