LLM in Human Rights Law by yu1351

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LLM in Human Rights Law LLM/MSSc. in Human Rights and Criminal Justice Cross Border LLM in Human Rights Law Cross Border LLM in Human Rights and Criminal Justice Student Handbook 2009-10

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Contents
Welcome and Key Contact Details Organisation of Programmes
A: Overview 9 B: Schedule of Taught Modules 17 C: Taught Module Descriptions 21 D: Staff Profiles 43 E: Attendance Policy 53 F: Assessment – Required Format and Regulations 54 G: Dealing with Problems 58 H: FAQ 61

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Dissertation Information
A: Introduction 63 B: Timeline 64 C: General Dissertation Advice 66

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Careers Information Appendices
A: Sample Coursework Cover Sheet 79 B: Sample Coursework Feedback Sheet with Markscale 80 C: Dissertation Title and Supervisor Form 83 D: Dissertation Title Page Format 84

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Disclaimer

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Welcome
Welcome to the LLM/MSSc human rights programmes at Queen‟s School of Law. In the pages of this handbook we hope to give you an overview of the programmes, along with practical information on their administration which is designed to assist you with your studies. Please take time to read the handbook carefully. The Programme Director for the LLM/MSSc human rights programmes is Dr Aoife Nolan. She has overall responsibility for the Human Rights LLM Programmes and MSSc in Human Rights and Criminal Justice. She will be your main point of contact throughout the year. You should feel free to contact Aoife (Aoife.nolan@qub.ac.uk); Rm 27.203 School of Law) if you have questions or queries about anything you read in this handbook, or about the administration of the programmes more generally. Questions about individual modules or assignments should normally be directed to the relevant module coordinator. You will find contact details for each of the module coordinators inside this handbook. Dr. Graham Ellison is the contact person for MSSc in Criminology students (g.ellison@qub.ac.uk). We hope that you will make friends easily during your time at Queen‟s. We believe that it is important to foster a sense of community among those of you working here with us, not only for your own enjoyment but also because it provides further opportunities for debate and academic discussion. We will arrange various social occasions throughout the year, as well as seminars and other events within the School of Law Seminar Series. These will be posted on notice boards and the School website: please keep an eye open for them. Contacting You When you enrol you will be issued with a username and password which you can use to access the QUB Webmail - Queen‟s email system. Open your internet browser and login here: https://owa.qub.ac.uk/ Please note that it is VITAL that you check your Queen‟s email account regularly. We have difficulty receiving email from students with Hotmail and Yahoo accounts since the University filtering system sometimes assumes this to be spam mail. Important announcements in relation to your programmes and courses are sent out via Queen‟s Email and it is your responsibility to check this on a regular basis. University Regulations All programme requirements in the Handbook are subject to the overriding imprimatur of the University‟s Regulations for taught postgraduate programmes. It is the responsibility of students to acquaint themselves with these Regulations. The University Regulations are available at: http://www.qub.ac.uk/directorates/media/Media,137687,en.pdf Section 2 of the University Regulations sets out the Regulations for Postgraduate Taught Programmes.

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Staff Involved in the LLM/MSSc Human Rights Programmes Name
Dr. Jean Allain, Reader Dr. Karen Brennan, Lecturer Dr. Vicky Conway, Lecturer Ms. Claire Dwyer, Lecturer Prof. Brice Dickson Dr. Graham Ellison, Senior Lecturer Ms. Eileen Fegan, Lecturer Prof. Adrian Guelke Prof. Tom Hadden, Honorary Staff Ms. Ruth Jamieson Dr. Sylvie Langlaude, Lecturer Dr. Neophytos Loizides, Lecturer Prof. Shadd Maruna Dr. Alison Mawhinney, Lecturer Dr. Anne-Marie McAlinden, Lecturer Prof. Kieran McEvoy, Dr. Ronagh McQuigg, Lecturer Dr. Ephraim Nimni, Reader Dr. Aoife Nolan, Lecturer Dr. Tom Obokata, Lecturer Prof. Phil Scraton Dr. Peter Shirlow, Senior Lecturer Ms. Bal Sokhi-Bulley, Lecturer Dr. Hakeem Yusuf, Lecturer

Email
j.allain@qub.ac.uk k.brennan@qub.ac.uk v.conway@qub.ac.uk c.dwyer@qub.ac.uk b.dickson@qub.ac.uk g.ellison@qub.ac.uk e.fegan@qub.ac.uk a.guelke@qub.ac.uk t.hadden@qub.ac.uk r.jamieson@qub.ac.uk s.langlaude@qub.ac.uk n.lozides@qub.ac.uk s.maruna@qub.acuk a.mawhinney@qub.ac.uk a.mcalinden@qub.ac.uk k.mcevoy@qub.ac.uk r.mcquigg@qub.ac.uk e.nimni@qub.ac.uk aoife.nolan@qub.ac.uk t.obokata@qub.ac.uk p.scraton@qub.ac.uk p.shirlow@qub.ac.uk b.sokhi-bulley@qub.ac.uk h.yusuf@qub.ac.uk

Telephone
9097 3445 9097 3446 9097 TBA 9097 1021 9097 3456 9097 3463 9097 3339 9097 3658 9097 1347 9097 3458 9097 3420 9097 3231 9097 3400 9097 3475 9097 3869 9097 3873 9097 3602 9097 3625 9097 1493 9097 1365 9097 3598 9097 1437 9097 3466 9097 1364

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Head of School Professor Colin Harvey Director of Education Dr Peter Shirlow, Senior Lecturer Postgraduate Coordinator Dr Jean Allain, Reader LLM/MSSc Human Rights Programmes Director Dr Aoife Nolan, Lecturer Examinations Officer Dr Anne Marie McAlinden Postgraduate Administrator Mrs Judith Cardwell Postgraduate Secretary Mrs Theresa Taylor Law Librarian: Mr John Knowles School Manager Mrs Meave Gilchrist m.gilchrist@qub.ac.uk 9097 3863 j.knowles@qub.ac.uk 9097 3640 t.taylor@qub.ac.uk 9097 3842 j.cardwell@qub.ac.uk 90973182 a.mcalinden@qub.ac.uk 9097 3869 aoife.nolan@qub.ac.uk 9097 1493 j.allain@qub.ac.uk 9097 3445 p.shirlow@qub.ac.uk 9097 1437 m.madden@qub.ac.uk 9097 3452

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The Examinations Officer is Dr Anne Marie McAlinden. You should, in the first instance, contact module leaders concerning all matters relating to examination regulations or procedures. If you remain unclear about these procedures please contact Anne Marie.

Module leaders: Individual staff members are in charge of each module and should be consulted for further information on these programmes. They are responsible for the running of the particular module, for examination, setting and marking assessment and for holding an annual review of that module.

The Postgraduate Secretary is Mrs Theresa Taylor. Theresa is located in the Postgraduate Office, Room G01, 29 University Square and is a great source of information on all aspects of the degree programme.

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Organisation of Programmes

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A: Overview
Both LLM programmes are offered on a modular basis. They may be completed in one year on a full-time basis or two years on a part-time basis. To complete a degree, students must have successfully passed modules amounting to 180 credits (120 credits for taught modules and 60 for dissertation). Please note that all information on the degrees and all modules will be posted on the Queen‟s On Line system, for which you will be provided with a username and password. Information on changes to modules, etc. will be posted this way so you must check regularly the On Line system. Timetable The following pages contain information on the sequencing of taught modules for 2009-10. You can always find current timetable information on the School website at: http://www.law.qub.ac.uk/schools/SchoolofLaw/Education/Postgraduates/ For timetables for the Politics modules, see http://www.qub.ac.uk/schools/SchoolofPoliticsInternationalStudiesandPhilosophy/Edu cation/LectureTimetables/

LLM IN HUMAN RIGHTS LAW Aims
This programme is designed for those with an academic and professional interest in human rights, regional standards, discrimination and the control of civil unrest.

Organisation of the LLM Programme: Full Time students
Semester 1 Students taking the LLM in Human Rights are required to take the following compulsory module in Semester 1: LAW8010 Human Rights Law I (30 credits) You will also have to choose from the following options to the equivalent of 30 credits: LAW8014 Equality and Law (30 credits) PAI9007 Theories of Ethnicity and Ethnic Conflict (30 credits)(Politics module)

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Semester 2 In the second term you must take the following compulsory module: LAW8011 European Convention on Human Rights and Current Issues: Human Rights II (30 credits) You will also have to choose from the following options to the equivalent of 30 credits: LAW8012 LAW8019 LAW8021 LAW8027 LAW8062 LAW8063 Conflict Regulation (30 Credits) Children‟s Rights (15 credits) Women‟s Rights (15 credits) Theories of Rights (15 credits) Human Rights and Governance (15 credits) Human Rights and Exploitation (15 credits)

PAI9006 Northern Ireland and the World (30 credits) (Politics Module) PAI9013 National & Ethnic Conflict Management (30 credits) (Politics Module) Dissertation (LAW8029) All students are required to complete a dissertation of up to 20,000 words (60 credits) in the final summer of their degree. For more detail on dissertation format and wordlength, see Appendix 2.

Organisation of the LLM in Human Rights: Part Time students YEAR 1
Semester 1 Students taking the LLM in Human Rights are required to take the following compulsory modules in Semester 1: LAW8010 Human Rights Law I (30 credits) Semester 2 In the second term you must take the following compulsory module: LAW8011 European Convention on Human Rights and Current Issues: Human Rights II (30 credits)

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YEAR 2
Semesters 1 and 2 You will have to choose from the following options to the equivalent of 60 credits (30 credits in each Semester): Law Options LAW8012 LAW8014 LAW8019 LAW8021 LAW8027 LAW8062 LAW8063 Conflict Regulation (30 Credits) Equality and Law (30 credits) Children‟s Rights (15 credits) Women‟s Rights (15 credits) Theories of Rights (15 credits) Human Rights and Governance (15 credits) Human Rights and Exploitation (15 credits)

Politics Options PAI9006 Northern Ireland and the World (30 credits) PA19007 Theories of Ethnicity and Ethnic Conflict (30 credits) PAI9013 National & Ethnic Conflict Management (30 credits) Note that the availability of modules can change from year to year.

Dissertation (LAW8029) All students are required to complete a dissertation of up to 20,000 words (60 credits) in the final summer of their degree. For more detail on dissertation format and wordlength, see Appendix 2.

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LLM/MSSc IN HUMAN RIGHTS AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE Aims
This programme is designed for those with an academic and professional interest in human rights within the context of criminal justice.

Organisation of the LLM Programme: Full Time students
Semester 1 Students taking the LLM in Human Rights and Criminal Justice are required to take the following compulsory modules: LAW8010 Human Rights Law I (30 credits) AND ONE OF: LAW8030 Theory and Practice in Criminology (30 credits) LAW8031 Criminal Justice Processes (30 credits) Semester 2 Students must obtain further 60 credits from the list of options below (30 credits from each discipline): Human rights modules: LAW8011 European Convention on Human Rights and Current Issues: Human Rights II (30 credits) LAW8013 Conflict Regulation (30 Credits) LAW8019 Children‟s Rights (15 credits) LAW8021 Women‟s Rights (15 credits) LAW8027 Theories of Rights (15 credits) LAW8062 Human Rights and Governance (15 credits) LAW8063 Human Rights and Exploitation (15 credits) Criminal Justice modules: LAW8040 A Social History of Criminal Justice (15 credits) LAW8044 Restorative Justice (15 credits) LAW8046 Comparative Youth Justice (15 credits) LAW8048 Penal Policy and Practice (15 credits) LAW8049 Psychological Aspects of Crime (15 credits) 11

LAW8051 Criminal Justice Research (15 credits) LAW8052 Sentencing and the Criminal Justice System (15 credits) LAW8053 Transitional Justice and Conflict Transformation (15 credits) Dissertation (Law 8029) Students are required to submit a dissertation of up to 20,000 words (60 credits) by the end of the summer of the final year of their degree. For more detail on dissertation format and word-length, see Appendix 2. Those students who are enrolled in LLM in Human Rights and Criminal Justice must do their dissertation on a topic in human rights and those who are registered for MSSc in Human Rights and Criminal Justice must do their dissertation on a topic in the area of Criminology or Criminal Justice. Dissertation topics must be approved by the programme co-ordinator.

Organisation of the LLM/MSSc Programme: Part Time students
YEAR 1
Semester 1 Students taking the LLM/MSSc in Human Rights and Criminal Justice on a part time basis are required to take the following compulsory module: LAW8010 Human Rights Law I (30 credits) Semester 2 Students must take optional modules to the equivalent of 30 credits from the list below. This can be one 30 credit module, or two 15 credit modules. Provided that one sticks to the limit (30 credits from each discipline over 2 years), students can take a combination of modules from two disciplines (e.g. one 15 credit module form HR and one from CJ). Please note that optional modules are subject to change and staff availability. Human rights modules: LAW8011 European Convention on Human Rights and Current Issues: Human Rights II (30 credits) LAW8013 Conflict Regulation (30 Credits) LAW8019 Children‟s Rights (15 credits) LAW8021 Women‟s Rights (15 credits) LAW8027 Theories of Rights (15 credits) LAW8062 Human Rights and Governance (15 credits) LAW8063 Human Rights and Exploitation (15 credits)

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Criminal Justice modules: LAW8040 A Social History of Criminal Justice (15 credits) LAW8044 Restorative Justice (15 credits) LAW8046 Comparative Youth Justice (15 credits) LAW8048 Penal Policy and Practice (15 credits) LAW8049 Psychological Aspects of Crime (15 credits) LAW8051 Criminal Justice Research (15 credits) LAW8052 Sentencing and the Criminal Justice System (15 credits) LAW8053 Transitional Justice and Conflict Transformation (15 credits)

YEAR 2
Semester 1 Students are required to take ONE of the following compulsory modules: LAW8030 Theory and Practice in Criminology (30 credits) LAW8031 Criminal Justice Processes (30 credits) Semester 2 You are required to take options to the equivalent of 30 credits from the list above, bearing in mind the limit noted above. Please note that optional modules are subject to change and staff availability.

Dissertation (Law 8029) Students are required to submit a dissertation of up to 20,000 words (60 credits) by the end of the summer of the final year of their degree. For more detail on dissertation format and word-length, see Appendix 2. Please observe the distinction between LLM and MSSc noted above.

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LLM IN HUMAN RIGHTS (CROSS BORDER) LLM IN HUMAN RIGHTS AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CROSS BORDER)
The School of Law Queen‟s University Belfast and the Irish Centre for Human Rights, Faculty of Law, National University of Ireland, Galway have established two exciting Masters programmes. These programmes, the first such law programmes in Ireland, will entail students attending classes for one semester in Belfast, one semester in Galway, and spending a summer in either location completing their dissertation.

Organisation of the LLM Human Rights Cross-Border Programme
Semester 1 - QUB In Semester 1, students are required to take the following compulsory modules: LAW8010 Human Rights Law I (30 credits) LAW8014 Equality and Law (30 credits) Semester 2 – Galway Students must choose the equivalent of two full modules (30 ECTS credits at Galway, which translate into 60 UK credits). Some examples include: International Criminal Law International Humanitarian Law Minority Rights and Self-determination African and Inter-American Human Rights Systems Conflict and Post Conflict Studies Refugees and Asylum Seekers Child Rights Law Gender and Human Rights Contemporary Issues in Human Rights Disability and International Law Business and Human Rights The modules offered by Galway in Semester 2 will be selected at a special induction meeting for Cross Border students in October/November. Dissertation Students are required to undertake a dissertation on an approved topic, which should normally be about 20,000 words. If a student wishes to do his/her dissertation at Queen‟s, he/she will obtain a degree from here. Alternatively, if one chooses to do 14

this at Galway, he/she will graduate from there instead. For more detail on dissertation format and word-length for Queen‟s, see Appendix 2.

Organisation of LLM Human Rights and Criminal Justice CrossBorder Programme
Semester 1 - QUB In the first semester students are required to take the following compulsory modules: LAW8010 Human Rights Law I (30 credits) LAW8031 Criminal Justice Processes (30 credits) Semester 2 – Galway Students must take the equivalent of two full modules (30 ECTS credits). The equivalent of one full module (15 credits) must relate to International Criminal Law. Optional modules are as noted above. The modules offered by Galway in Semester 2 will be selected at a special induction meeting for Cross Border students to be held in October/November Dissertation Students are required to undertake a dissertation an approved topic, which should normally be about 20,000 words. The same rule on dissertation as above applies.

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B: Schedule of Taught Modules
For more details on which modules are available to students on the various human rights LLM/MSSc programmes, including the modules available to those students taking such programmes on a part-time basis, see above in Section A.

LLM in Human Rights Law
Semester 1 MODULE CODE LAW8010 LAW8014 PAI9007 MODULE NAME Human Rights Law I Equality and Law W EEKS RUNNING Weeks 1-12 Weeks 1-12 MODULE COORDINATOR Dr. Rory O‟Connell Dr. Aoife Nolan Dr. Ephraim Nimni

Theories of Ethnicity Weeks 1-12 and Ethnic Conflict (Politics module)

Semester 2 MODULE CODE LAW8011 MODULE NAME European Convention on Human Rights and Current Issues: Human Rights II Conflict Regulation Children‟s Rights Women‟s Rights Theories of Rights Human Rights and Governance Human Rights and Exploitation Northern Ireland and the World (Politics Module) WEEKS RUNNING Weeks 19-33 MODULE COORDINATOR Dr. Jean Allain

LAW8012 LAW8019 LAW8021 LAW8027 LAW8062

Weeks 19-33 Weeks 19-24 Weeks 25-33 Weeks 19-24 Weeks 19-24

Dr. Jean Allain Dr. Aoife Nolan Ms. Eileen Fegan Ms. Bal Sokhi-Bulley Dr. Rory O‟Connell

LAW8063

Weeks 25-33

Dr. Jean Allain

PAI9006

Weeks 19-33

Prof. Adrian Guelke

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PAI9013

National & Ethnic Conflict Management (Politics Module)

Weeks 19-33

Dr. Neophytos Loizides

LLM/MSSc. in Human Rights and Criminal Justice
For more details on which modules are available to students on the various human rights LLM/MSSc programmes, including the modules available to those students taking such programmes on a part-time basis, see above in Section A. For more details on which modules are available to students on the various human rights LLM/MSSc programmes, including the modules available to those students taking such programmes on a part-time basis, see above in Section A. Semester 1 MODULE CODE LAW8010 LAW8030 MODULE NAME Human Rights Law I Theory and Practice in Criminology W EEKS RUNNING Weeks 1-12 Weeks 1-12 MODULE COORDINATOR Dr. Rory O‟Connell Dr. Graham Ellison and Ms. Ruth Jamieson

LAW8031

Criminal Justice Processes

Weeks 1-12

Dr. Karen Brennan and Dr. Clare Dwyer

Semester 2 MODULE CODE LAW8011 MODULE NAME European Convention on Human Rights and Current Issues: Human Rights II Conflict Regulation Children‟s Rights Women‟s Rights WEEKS RUNNING Weeks 19-33 MODULE COORDINATOR Dr. Jean Allain

LAW8012 LAW8019 LAW8021

Weeks 19-33 Weeks 19-24 Weeks 25-33

Dr. Jean Allain Dr. Aoife Nolan Ms. Eileen Fegan

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LAW8027 LAW8062

Theories of Rights Human Rights and Governance Human Rights and Exploitation Social History of Criminal Justice Restorative Justice Comparative Youth Justice Penal Policy and Practice Psychological Aspects of Crime Criminal Justice Research

Weeks 19-24 Weeks 19-24

Ms. Bal Sokhi-Bulley Dr. Rory O‟Connell

LAW8063

Weeks 25-33

Dr. Jean Allain

LAW8040

Weeks 25-33

Ms. Ruth Jamieson

LAW8044 LAW8046

Weeks 25-33 Weeks 19-24

Dr. Vicky Conway Prof. Phil Scraton

LAW8048

Weeks 25-33

Ms. Clare Dwyer

LAW8049

Weeks 19-24

Prof. Shadd Maruna

LAW8051

Weeks 19-24

Dr. Anne Marie McAlinden

LAW8052

Sentencing and the Criminal Justice System

Weeks 25-33

Dr. Anne Marie McAlinden and Dr. Karen Brennan Ms. M. Requa & Dr. Hakeem Yusuf

LAW8053

Transitional Justice and Conflict Transformation

Weeks 19-24

Cross Border LLM in Human Rights Law
Semester 1 MODULE CODE LAW8010 LAW8014 MODULE NAME Human Rights Law I Equality and Law W EEKS RUNNING Weeks 1-12 Weeks 1-12 MODULE COORDINATOR Dr. Rory O‟Connell Dr. Aoife Nolan

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Semester 2 See Section A above for information on modules offered at NUI Galway.

Cross Border LLM in Human Rights and Criminal Justice
Semester 1 MODULE CODE LAW8010 LAW8031 MODULE NAME Human Rights Law I Criminal Justice Processes W EEKS RUNNING Weeks 1-12 Weeks 1-12 MODULE COORDINATOR Dr. Rory O‟Connell Dr. Karen Brennan and Dr. Clare Dwyer

Semester 2 See Section A above for information on modules offered at NUI Galway.

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C: Taught Module Descriptions
1st Semester

LAW8010: Introduction to Human Rights Law: Human Rights I Course contents This module introduces the concept of human rights and the main features of national and international human rights law. It seeks to ground students in the basic concepts, debates, and legal regimes which exist both domestically and internationally. The module looks at the emergence of human rights as part of international law. It looks at the various ways in which human rights law can be enforced at the UN, regional, and national levels, and how these different fora reinforce each other. The module considers the different categories of rights that have emerged: civil and political; economic and social; and individual and group rights. The seminars will examine the nature of the obligations to respect, protect and promote human rights, discuss the circumstances in which rights can be limited (or derogated from). We will also look at some topic issues in human rights law: the challenges posed by economic globalisation and by societies in transition. This module aims to offer students the opportunity to: 1. explore how human rights have emerged at the international level; 2. assess the impact of human rights law at the international, regional and national levels; 3. enhance their understanding of the limitations to human rights law; 4. evaluate the ways in which human rights can be enforced; 5. develop advanced research techniques and essay-writing skills; and 6. improve communication skills.

Compulsory elements The module will be assessed on the basis of one essay of 6,000 words which must be signed in at the School of Law Postgraduate Office. The deadline is January 11th for Human rights 1, before 5.00.

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Law8014: Equality and Law Course Contents This module aims to provide a comprehensive introduction to the way in which the law seeks to ensure equality between individuals and groups. We begin with an exploration of some basic questions to do with our understanding of equality as a social value and examine the key concepts which inform equality law. We then consider the legal frameworks, mechanisms and strategies designed to advance equality at the UN, European and national levels. During the course of this exploration, issues such as the intersectionality of the grounds of discrimination; social and economic rights; affirmative action; and Section 75 of the Northern Ireland Act are considered. Students will develop the following skills and knowledge: 1. a good understanding of the legal provisions relating to antidiscrimination and equality; 2. the ability to critically examine current concepts of equality and the legal strategies designed to advance them; 3. the ability to critically evaluate the implementation of current anti-discrimination law.

Compulsory Elements The module will be assessed on the basis of one essay of 6,000 words which must be signed in at the School of Law Office by 17:00 on Wednesday 13 January 2009. Students will be asked to select an essay title from a list which will be circulated in Week 4 of the semester.

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LAW8030: Theory and Practice in Criminology Course Contents On completion of this twelve week module each student should be conversant with the dominant paradigms in western Criminology, and will be able to demonstrate the insights that can be gained from such theories and their application to specific criminal justice problems and to apply such theories to practical situations. Through a critical and evaluative exposition of criminological theory, students will be shown that that concepts such as „crime‟, „criminality‟ „policing‟ and „punishment‟ do not have any universal or general relevance, but rather can be said to be „socially constructed‟ and contingent upon a range of historical, political, social and cultural factors. The course will also demonstrate how an applied use of criminological theory can be used to deconstruct the „commonsensical‟ and often media-inspired explanations for a range of contemporary problems, and accounts of criminality.

Compulsory Elements For details of assessment, please see the module hand book.

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LAW8031: Criminal Justice Processes Course Contents The aim of this twelve week module is to enable students to develop a clear knowledge and understanding of the aims and values of criminal justice processes, policies and practices. The issues and tensions that confront the wide range of participants in criminal justice processes will be examined and the cultural and political contexts in which criminal justice processes function will be considered. In the module we hope to cover: Models of Criminal Justice; Criminal Investigations; Suspects Rights; Forensic Expertise; The Role of the Prosecution; Preparation for Trial (Disclosure); The Role of the Trial Judge; Lay Participation in the Criminal Process; Principles of Sentencing; The Role of Victims in the Criminal Process and; Miscarriages of Justice. Compulsory Elements For details of assessment, please see the module hand book.

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PA 19007: Theories of Ethnicity and Ethnic Conflict (Politics Module) This module examines theories and concepts of ethnicity, cultural diversity, nationalism, national identity, multiculturalism, ethno-nationalism and gender and nation as they relate to contemporary conflict. Cases of ethnic conflict are explored by examining the right of minority cultures and politics of ethnic assimilation and by looking at genocides and forced population transfers. We conclude by critically examining territorial and non-territorial models of national self determination. For further details, please contact the module convenor.

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2nd Semester

LAW8011: ECHR and Current Issues: Human Rights II Course Contents This module considers the system of human rights protect of the Council of Europe while focusing on various rights enshrined in the European Convention on Human Rights. The module explores in detail the various jurisprudential tools with which the European Court of Human Rights has developed its case-law, especially in the context of recent, high-profile judgments. Much of the case-law considered touches on Northern Ireland, be it directly through judgments involving the United Kingdom, or by extension, as a result of the Human Rights Act. Students will acquire knowledge and understanding of: 1. the overall regime of human rights protect in Europe with an emphasis on the Council of Europe. 2. the standards set by specific articles of the European Convention on Human Rights. 3. the manner in which the European Court weighs the rights of individuals against other interests. To that end we will examine closely the principles used to justify limitations on rights. 4. how the issues in question have been dealt with in the courts of the United Kingdom and Ireland. Reference will therefore be made, for example, to the UK‟s Human Rights Act 1998 and to Ireland‟s European Convention on Human Rights Act 2003. 5. the extent to which it protects socio-economic rights. One of the objectives of the module is to allow students to compare the Convention‟s system for protecting those rights with that of the European Social Charter.

Compulsory Elements Human Right II is assessed on the basis of a 6,000 word essay.

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LAW8012: Conflict Regulation – International Humanitarian Law Course Contents This module considers the international law which is applicable in armed conflict whether at the domestic or international level. Focusing on Hague Law and Geneva Law, the module considers the fundamental concepts applicable in armed conflicts, and the manner in which these precepts of law seek, not to limit war but, to facilitate it. Embedded in our examination of humanitarian law will be a consideration of international criminal tribunals which have been established to deal with the most serious breaches of the laws of war. Further, consideration will be given to the issue of human rights in times of conflict; that of „terrorist versus freedom fighter‟; as well as states of emergency which allow for the derogation of certain international human rights in time of natural or man-made disaster. Students will acquire knowledge and understanding of: 1. humanitarian law and its relation to human rights law. 2. the black-letter law to-date and the general principles which allow for the able to apply to future scenarios. 3. leading presentations, of developing inter-personal and leadership skills, in a friendly setting, such as building an argument, demonstrating through proof, and being able to challenge assumption and positions.

Compulsory Elements Conflict Regulation is assessed on the basis of a 6,000 word essay.

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LAW8019: Children’s Rights Course Contents This module traces and locates the development of children‟s rights within the historical, political and ideological context of changing perceptions and representations of „childhood‟. The seminars focus on the key international standards in the area of children‟s rights and considers contemporary debates concerning the implementation of those standards. Topics covered in the module will include: the relationship between age and power ▪ the challenges posed to the realisation of children‟s rights both in the private and public domains ▪ the participation rights of the child ▪ the regulation, criminalisation and punishment of the child ▪ child poverty and the social and economic rights of the child ▪ the different enforcement mechanisms for children‟s rights. Students will develop the following skills and knowledge: 1. a critical awareness of the competing theoretical and ideological frameworks of childhood and the family, which underpin policy and legal reform 2. a capacity to analyse and apply children‟s rights under international law 3. an understanding of the issues that arise in relation to the implementation of children‟s rights in the international and domestic contexts 4. an awareness of the contested issues in theoretical and applied debate regarding the rights of children Compulsory Elements The module will be assessed by one 4,000 word-essay, The topic of the essay will be of your own choosing – however, it is important to have received approval for your topic with the module convenor prior to submission.

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LAW2807: Theories of Rights Course Contents Human rights have been described as „the Enlightenment promise of emancipation‟ and as „that which we cannot not want‟. How has such a universally accepted conception of rights come about? What does it mean to critically evaluate this discourse? And what does this reveal about rights themselves? This module asks these questions and so aims to offer a theoretical and critical understanding of human rights. The approach of the course is critical, socio-legal and inter-disciplinary, drawing on the areas of law, legal theory, history, moral and political philosophy. The topics covered include, for instance, „what is a human right‟ and „rights and representation‟ – i.e., rights as a socially constructed discourse that represents identities and operates via power relations. We will also look at differing themes and dimensions in rights protection – for example, „rights and women‟ (where, for example, we will consider the historical development of „rights and women‟ and the paradoxical nature of rights as tools of both emancipation and discipline), „group (minority) rights‟ and „rights and secularism‟. Students will develop the following skills and knowledge: 1. a knowledge and understanding of a number of theoretical and critical approaches to human rights and law more generally; 2. a comprehension of how differing theoretical and critical approaches to human rights animate a Western understanding of law within a global, social and political context; 3. the ability to critically reflect upon and analyse complex legal/critical theory; 4. the ability to formulate cogent arguments and to draw upon theoretical and critical tools to engage in complex problem solving and policy development; 5. heightened oral, written and research skills through class discussion, group work and coursework. Compulsory Elements The course is assessed by one 3,000 word essay. The topic of the essay will be of your own choosing – however, it is important to have discussed the topic with the module convenor prior to submission. For further information, please contact the module convenor.

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LAW8021: Women’s Rights Course Contents This module aims to explore how international human rights law operates in relation to women within various social, political and cultural contexts. We will consider several themes and topics, including: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. feminist theoretical approaches to international human rights law the sources and operation of human rights for women abortion and reproductive rights cultural relativism and women‟s rights strategies to enhance women's rights in practice

Students will develop the following skills and knowledge: 1. the ability to discuss critically feminist critiques of human rights law, including international law 2. the capacity Evaluate the extent to which human rights law currently offers sufficient recognition to the rights of women 3. the ability to analyse critically key areas of women's rights in human rights law such as pervasive gender discrimination, property and inheritance rights and reproductive rights

Compulsory Elements This course is assessed by way of a single 3,000 word essay on an agreed topic.

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LAW8062: Human Rights and Governance 2000-2010 Course Content This module will address the way in which human rights and democracy interrelate under conditions of governance in today‟s world. This module will focus on the vexed question of how a liberal democracy responds to political movements that may be variously characterised as illiberal, undemocratic, anti-constitutional or opposed to a fundamental feature of the state. These movements come in many different guises: groups associated with paramilitary organisations, religious fundamentalist parties, extreme right wing and anti-immigrant parties, separatist parties. We will commence with an introductory seminar on the nature of democracy. Our second seminar will look at political philosophical efforts to address the question of how much tolerance the “intolerant” should receive. In Week Three, we will examine some of the “historical” approaches to this problem during the Inter War and Cold War years. In Week Four, we will look at the modern jurisprudence on party dissolution, while Week Five will examine some of the less drastic responses. Finally, we will raise the question of the democratic credentials of self proclaimed liberal democracies. By the end of this module you should be able to: 1. understand how human rights and democracy relate to each other 2. appreciate the complexities of governance in the modern constitutional state 3. be able to suggest how specifically democratic governance may be promoted or impeded through the use of human rights law.

Compulsory elements The module will be assessed on the basis of 1 x 3500 essay on a topic to be agreed with the module convenor. Suggested essay topics will be circulated before the end of the module. Two copies to be submitted on a date to be confirmed.

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LAW8049: Psychological Aspects of Crime Course Contents This module will take a psychosocial and developmental approach to understanding the processes of engaging in and disengaging from criminal behaviour across the life course. A particular emphasis will be on the biographies of individuals in the criminal justice system and understanding these experiences from their perspective. Additional topics include the role of addiction and recovery in criminal careers, the controversial concept of psychopathy, the psychology of sexual offending, and psychosocial rehabilitation interventions. The module will also consider the psychology behind punitive approaches to crime control and punishment, including issues such as the authoritarian personality and the psychology of torture, totalitarianism and state violence. Compulsory Elements For details of assessment, please see the module hand book.

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LAW8051: Criminal Justice Research Course Contents An understanding of research methods is important in order to critically assess the wide range of information and research findings which are available on the criminal justice system. In this module, students will be introduced to sociological and legal research methods used by criminal justice researchers, including qualitative and quantitative methods, documentary and record based research and case and statute analysis. This course will be examined by one essay of 3,000 words in which students will critically assess the research methods used a chosen research report and present their conclusions in a clear and accessible manner.

Compulsory Elements For details of assessment, please see the module hand book.

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LAW8052: Sentencing and the Criminal Justice System Course Contents The sentencing of offenders by the courts is a key stage in the criminal justice system. This module evaluates the theoretical and practical aspects of the sentencing process. It explores the sociological aspects of judicial decision making such as the complex relationship between the judiciary, political, public and media pressures and the actual sentences received by offenders, as well as the traditional theories of punishment which underpin sentencing practice. In addition, the module also examines the actual sentencing process in terms of the principal criteria influencing the judge‟s decision and the range of sentences in the judicial armoury from custody to diversion as well as more controversial sentences such as electronic tagging and restorative justice measures for particular classes of offender. Compulsory Elements For details of assessment, please see the module hand book.

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LAW8053: Transnational Justice and Conflict Transformation Course Contents The aim of this course is to develop a critical understanding of the relevance of what is increasingly referred to as „transitional justice‟ in the resolution of social and political conflict. The module will critically explore the historical and contemporary meaning of the term transitional justice and the ways in which it has been applied in various jurisdictions emerging from conflict. Students will be asked to consider the various philosophical and moral issues associated with this subject including notions of accountability, justice, expediency, reparations, reconciliation and political generosity. They will then be asked to analyse the pros and cons of all of the major strategies and mechanisms available for the pursuit of post conflict justice including the international ad hoc criminal tribunals for Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia (the ICTR and the ICTY), The International Criminal Court, the hybrid tribunals in Sierra Leone and East Timor, the use of Truth and Reconciliation Commissions and various community based initiatives which are discussed as examples of „transitional justice from below.‟ Students will finally critically reflect upon the particular challenges associated with international justice and the reconstruction of the domestic justice system in post conflict countries and the role more generally that justice plays in a process of political transition.

Compulsory Elements For details of assessment, please see the module hand book.

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LAW8063: Human Rights and Exploitation – The Parameters of Forced Labour Course Contents This six-week module is research driven and meant to allow students to undertaken independent research with the aim of establishing the parameters of what is meant by „forced labour‟ as first set out in the 1930 International Labour Organisation (ILO) Convention and developed subsequently through the jurisprudence of the ILO Committee of Experts on the Application of Conventions and Recommendations. The Module sets the scene for this consideration by examining the historical evolution of slavery, the abolitionists movement, followed by a focus on the work of the ILO in the area of forced labour with a final session devoted to placing the issue of forced labour within the context of human trafficking. The Module seeks to answer the following research question: What are the parameters of forced labour: what is forced labour, what is not forced labour, and when does forced labour amount to slavery? Students will acquire knowledge and understanding of: 1 2 3 4 independent research (of the type which is required for the dissertation); the nature of exploitation and its various manifestations both in general international law and in international criminal law; the methods of evaluating material and focusing on establishing the parameters of forced labour in law; independent research skills and essay-writing expertise;

Compulsory Elements Research Report (worth 20%): 1000 word Report presented on the progress which students have made thus far in considering the assigned Research Question. Such presentations take place in Sessions 3-6 wherein each students makes an oral presentations of their work in progress. The Research Report is accompanied by a one-page outline of the findings thus far. Essay (worth 80%): 3000 word essay on the overall significance of the Research Question considered. The essay not only provided the black-letter law understanding of the Research Question, but contextualise it by explaining the significance and repercussions which flow from one‟s understanding of the Question considered.

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LAW8040: A Social History of Criminal Justice Course Contents This six week criminology elective is designed to provide students with a broad overview of the social history of crime and criminal justice. The module will build on the key theoretical and substantive elements introduced in the core criminal justice and criminological theory modules. It will focus on developing an understanding of 19th century perceptions of crime and criminals and the impact of social change on criminal justice policy and institutions after 1800. A variety of historical sources and crime historiographies will be used to explore how public and official reactions to contemporary social conflict, marginality and criminality were mediated through understandings of social difference (gender, class, age and race) and moral responsibility. We will explore these relationships through case studies of responses to crime problems such as prostitution, property crime and crimes against the person. Students will acquire knowledge and understanding of: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. the key relationships between crime and industrial society prevailing 19th century modes of „apprehending‟ crime and criminals the „gendering‟ of crime in the 19th century representations of the „criminal classes‟ in popular discourse class, welfare and criminal justice in 19th century Britain

Compulsory Elements There is 1 compulsory assessment element. Students will be required to write a summative essay answering a question set mid-way through the module (4,500 words maximum including footnotes and bibliography). This essay makes up 100% of the total module mark.

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LAW 8044: Restorative Justice Course Contents The aim of this course is to develop a critical understanding of the emerging concept of “restorative justice”. The course will explore a range of issues relevant to the topic including; the historical and contemporary definitions of restorative justice; the anatomy of restorative justice programmes (what they do); the breadth of applications of restorative justice from alternative to formal justice with young people at risk, white collar crime, police malpractice, school bullying as well as more community based programmes including those established to deal with communal, political or ethnic conflict. The course will also include an analysis of some of the principle critiques of restorative justice including the difficulties in ensuring quality control, the degree of focus on the needs of victims, the question of a lack of "due process" and the rights of offenders, “net-widening”, over professionalisation by the statutory services and other issues including the particular challenges of using restorative justice to deal with serious acts of individual or communal violence.

Compulsory Elements For details of assessment, please see the module hand book.

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LAW 8046: Comparative Youth Justice Course Contents This module critically examines the competing theoretical frameworks of „childhood‟ and „youth‟ that underpin policy and legal reform in the contexts of „crime‟ and „deviance‟. During the course of the module we examine the development of „justice‟ versus „welfare‟ discourses and their implementation within a range of domestic and international contexts. We also examine and assess formal (state) and informal (community) responses to youth „crime‟ and „antisocial behaviour‟ in Northern Ireland including the use of state care and custody. An awareness of international children‟s rights standards and guidelines regarding youth justice, punishment and custody is advocated throughout the module. Compulsory Elements For details of assessment, please see the module hand book.

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LAW8048: Penal Policy and Practice

Course Contents This module explores and critiques the philosophies/ideologies of punishment and prisons. It aims to provide an understanding of penal theories and their relation to the formulation of penal policy and strategies of intervention. It provides a critical evaluation of diverse nature of penal discourse and explores the diversity of experience, response and adaptation within the penal context and will assess the utilisation and impact of penal sanctions. Topics include the history and emergence of the prison, prisoner release and reintegration, the effects of imprisonment, the effectiveness of different forms of punishment and critiques of incarceration. Compulsory Elements For details of assessment, please see the module hand book.

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PA19006: Northern Ireland and the World (Politics Module)

It used to be common for the protagonists in the conflict in Northern Ireland to claim that the situation here is unique. With the growth of greater awareness of the existence of deeply divided societies in other parts of the world, political discourse in Northern Ireland has been strongly influenced by comparisons with other societies, especially since the start of the peace process in 1993. This course critically examines the role of external forces (such as the American connection and a possible European role) on the evolution of both the conflict and the peace process. It also looks at a series of comparisons of Northern Ireland with other societies (for example, South Africa, Israel/Palestine, the Basque country, Cyprus, Corsica, Puerto Rico, Quebec, Sri Lanka and East Timor) and critically examines the similarities and differences between them and Northern Ireland. In the process, general themes, such as the role of interpretations of self-determination, the impact of partition and the salience of island status are explored. For further details, please contact the module convenor.

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PA19013: National and Ethnic Conflict Management (Politics Module)

This module examines the principal strategies and techniques of conflict regulation, including: the context and practicalities of negotiations; usefulness (and problems) of mediation and third-party interventions, territorial management of divisions, whether by means of federalism, „re-scaling‟, or partition; consociationalism as a means of conflict-management; mediation and negotiation; post-conflict reconstruction and peace-building; settler and refugee conflict issues. For further details, please contact the module convenor.

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D: Staff Profiles & Contact Details
Individual Module Coordinators are responsible for the design and delivery of their modules, and for setting and administering assessment for their modules. If you have a query which relates to the content or administration of an individual module, you should contact the module coordinator in the first instance. Contacting Academic Staff Each member of staff keeps advertised office hours (usually 2 hours per week – details available from the School Postgraduate Office) when you can call by his or her room to discuss queries. Outside these designated times it is advisable to make an appointment in advance by email. Staff Profiles Dr. Jean Allain Dr. Jean Allain, B.A., D.P.A, M.A., D.E.A., Ph.D. Jean Allain is a generalist in international law with a specialisation in human rights and an expertise in issues of slavery. He was appointed as Senior Lecturer at Queen‟s in August 2004 and Extraordinary Lecturer at the Centre for Human Rights, Faculty of Law, University of Pretoria, South Africa, in 2008. He completed his studies at the Graduate Institute for International Studies of the University of Geneva in 2000. He had previously written his Master‟s thesis at the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, in San José, Costa Rica. While undertaking graduate studies in Geneva, he spent six months in The Hague, as a law clerk for the President of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. Dr. Allain has published in leading international journals including the American Journal of International Law, British Yearbook of International Law, European Journal of International Law, International Journal of Refugee Law, and Human Rights Quarterly. He is author of: The Slavery Conventions (2008), International Law in the Middle East (2004) and A Century of International Adjudication (2000); and editor of Unlocking the Middle East: The Writings of Richard Falk (2003). Dr. Allain is the Editor of the Irish Yearbook of International Law and a member of the International Editorial Board of the African Journal of Human Rights Law. Professor Brice Dickson Professor Brice Dickson B.A., B.C.L., MPhil. Professor Dickson graduated from the University of Oxford with undergraduate and postgraduate law degrees in the mid1970s and was called to the Bar of Northern Ireland in 1976. He then held a Leverhulme European Studentship at the University of Paris II(Sorbonne) and lectured for two years at the University of Leicester. He returned to Northern Ireland in 1979 to lecture at Queen's. From 1991 to 1999 he was the foundation professor of law at the University of Ulster. During most of that period he served as a Commissioner and, later, deputy chair, of the Equal Opportunities Commission for Northern Ireland and in 1999 he was appointed as the full-time Chief Commissioner of the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission He returned to Queen's in 2005 42

as Professor of International and Comparative Law. Professor Dickson has written the standard textbook on the legal system of Northern Ireland (now in its fifth edition) and has written or edited other books on French law, the European Convention on Human Rights, civil liberties in Northern Ireland, the House of Lords and Supreme Court activism. His main research interests at present are the role of Supreme Courts (especially adjudication within the House of Lords), the methods for reviewing the effectiveness of counter-terrorism measures, and the role of amnesties in conflict resolution. Ms. Eileen Fegan Ms. Eileen Fegan, LL.B., LL.M. Eileen Fegan graduated in Law from Queen‟s University in 1992. In 1994 she was awarded an LLM in Feminist Legal Theory the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, after which she held lecturing posts in Lancaster University, New College, Oxford and Cardiff Law School. In her earlier career she wrote substantial articles on feminist legal theory and carried out funded empirical research in Canada on women‟s experiences of abortion decisionmaking, publishing articles in Feminist Legal Studies and Social & Legal Studies. In 1999 Eileen was a visiting scholar at Harvard, Boston and York (Toronto) University Law Schools. She also played a central role in developing Women‟s Studies in Annajah University on the West Bank. She rejoined Queen‟s University 2000, where she specialises in Gender and Law and Women‟s Human Rights. Eileen has published recently on Northern Irish abortion law, „post-abortion syndrome‟ in North America and legal education in the UK. She is currently involved in several community outreach projects throughout Northern Ireland, with „Women into Politics‟. Professor Tom Hadden Professor Tom Hadden BA 1961, LLB 1962, PhD 1967(Cambridge) is a Emeritus Professor of Law. He helped to found the LL.M programme in human rights in 1989. He was a part-time Commissioner of the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission from 1999 to 2005, a member of the Standing Advisory Commission on Human Rights from 1985 to 1990, and has for many years been active in the human rights field, particularly that of minority rights and emergency law. Among his recent publications are Northern Ireland: The Choice (Penguin Books 1994) (with K.Boyle), The Protection of Human Rights in the context of Peace and Reconciliation in Ireland (1996) for the Dublin Forum for Peace and Reconciliation, several working papers for the UN Working Group on Minorities, most recently International and National Action for the Protection of Minorities (2004) and Integration with Diversity in Security, Policing and Criminal Justice (2006). He has also published pamphlets on the issues of separation and sharing as part of the Human Rights Centre's occasional papers series. Professor Colin Harvey Professor Colin Harvey LL.B., PhD. Colin Harvey is the Head of the Law School at Queen's. He is also Professor of Human Rights Law. From 2000-2004 he was Professor of Constitutional and Human Rights Law, School of Law, University of Leeds and Co-Convenor of the Human Rights Research Unit. In 1999, he was a

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Visiting Professor at the Refugee and Asylum Law Program, Faculty of Law, University of Michigan. Professor Harvey was appointed to the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission in June 2005 and took up his position as a part-time Commissioner from 1 September 2005. He is on the Advisory Board of the British Institute of Human Rights. He was a member of the Northern Ireland Higher Education Council from 2002-2006 and a member of the Steering Committee of the UK section of the International Association of Constitutional Law from 2003-2006. He was Refugee Co-ordinator for Amnesty International (Irish Section) 1998-2000 and a member of the Executive of the Committee on the Administration of Justice 19992000. He is on the editorial board of Human Rights Law Review and is the Case Editor for the International Journal of Refugee Law. He has published extensively in academic, and more popular formats, on issues of human rights law and politics. He is the General Editor of Human Rights Law in Perspective published by Hart Publishing. His books include: Seeking Asylum in the UK: Problems and Prospects (2000, Butterworths), Human Rights in the Community: Rights as Agents for Change (ed., 2005, Hart Publishing), Sanctuary in Ireland: Perspectives on Asylum Law and Policy (ed., with Ursula Fraser, 2004, Institute of Public Administration), Human Rights, Equality and Democratic Renewal in Northern Ireland (ed., 2001, Hart Publishing). His articles include: (with J.C. Hathaway) 'Framing Refugee Protection in the New World Disorder' (2001) Cornell International Law Journal 257, 'The Right to Seek Asylum in the European Union' [2004] European Human Rights Law Review 17-36, 'Dissident Voices: Refugees, Human Rights and Asylum in Europe' (2000) 9 Social and Legal Studies 367. Dr. Sylvie Langlaude Dr. Sylvie Langlaude. Sylvie holds a law degree from the University of Aix-enProvence, France (2001) and a LLM from the University of Nottingham (2002). She completed a PhD thesis at the University of Bristol on the right of the child to religious freedom in international law (2006), which was published by Martinus Nijhoff Publishers in 2007. While doing her PhD she also taught at undergraduate level and did some consultancy work for the OSCE. From 2006-2008 she was a City Solicitors‟ Educational Trust lecturer at the University of East London. She joined the School of Law at Queen‟s in September 2008. Her research interests include human rights, religious liberty, children‟s rights and freedom of expression. Dr. Alison Mawhinney Dr. Alison Mawhinney BA., LL.M., PhD. Alison Mawhinney completed her undergraduate studies at Trinity College Dublin where she graduated with a BA (Hons) in Political Science in 1988. She completed a LLM in International Human Rights Law at the University of Essex in 1996 and a PhD at Queen's University Belfast in 2005. She has worked for a variety of organisations in the field of human rights including the Irish Refugee Council, the Council of Europe, the OSCE and the UN WFP. She is currently involved in research in the areas of freedom of religion in schools, religious discrimination in employment and the human rights obligations of non-state service providers. Dr. Ronagh McQuigg 44

Dr. Ronagh McQuigg LL.B. LL.M. Ph.D. C.P.L.S. Ronagh McQuigg graduated from Queen‟s University Belfast with a LL.B. in 2002. She then obtained a LL.M. in Human Rights Law in 2003 and a Ph.D. in 2006, both from Queen‟s University Belfast. In 2006 she provided research assistance on a project assessing the effectiveness of the Equality Commission in relation to Section 75 of the Northern Ireland Act 1998. She qualified as a solicitor in 2008, after being awarded a Certificate in Professional Legal Studies from Queen‟s University and having completed her professional training with a leading commercial law firm. She is a member of the Law Society of Northern Ireland. Her research focuses on the effectiveness of international human rights law, particularly in relation to violence against women. Dr. Aoife Nolan Dr. Aoife Nolan, LLB, PhD. Dr. Nolan is Assistant Director of the Human Rights Centre at Queen's University, Belfast. She has previously worked as a Senior Legal Officer with the Economic, Social and Cultural Rights Litigation Programme at the Geneva-based Centre on Housing Rights and Evictions. She is Coordinating Editor of the Housing & ESC Rights Law Quarterly. In addition to other activities, she is a Research Associate with a Think Tank for Action on Social Change, Ireland and is involved in their Democracy Audit Ireland Project. She has also served as a Council of Europe Expert. During the course of her studies, she was a Visiting Research Fellow at Columbia University School of Law, New York, a Thomas Addis Emmet Fellow in Public Interest Law at the University of Washington, Seattle, and spent time as a Visiting Student at the University of Cape Town. Her primary areas of research are economic and social rights, children's rights, international human rights law, public interest law and comparative constitutional law. She has written and been published on these topics. She is currently working on a monograph on children's socio-economic rights, democracy and the courts, which will be published by Hart Publishing in 2010. Dr. Tom Obokata Dr. Tom Obokata, BA, MA, LLM, PhD. Dr. Obokata is Assistant Director of the Human Rights Centre, and Co-ordinator for Human Rights Postgraduate Programmes. He is a Japanese scholar who joined the Human Rights Centre in 2006. After completing his first degree in International Relations (Honours) at the University of Southern California (1997), he moved to the United Kingdom to pursue postgraduate studies. He obtained an MA in Theory and Practice of Human Rights (Essex)(1999), LLM in International Criminal Law (Sussex)(2000), and PhD in Law (Nottingham)(2004). Prior to his study at Nottingham, Tom worked for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) Regional Office of Japan and the Republic of Korea (1999-2000). His research focus has been the human rights aspects of trafficking of human beings, and he has served as a Specialist Advisor to the Joint Committee on Human Rights of the UK Parliament on the subject matter (2006-2008). Previously he was an independent expert for a joint European Union/Council of Europe project on trafficking (2004-2006). He is also a researcher for the International Human Rights Network (http://www.ihrnetwork.org) and consults for Iselin Consulting (http://www.iselinconsulting.com), which specialises in criminal intelligence (with a particular focus on transnational crimes), human rights protection, and international law enforcement co-operation. His representative publications 45

include „Illicit Cycle of Narcotics from a Human Rights Perspective‟ (2007) Netherlands Quarterly of Human Right, Trafficking of Human Beings from a Human Rights Perspective: Towards a Holistic Approach (Martinus Nijhoff Publishers 2006), and „Trafficking of Human Beings as a Crime against Humanity: Some Implications for the International Legal System‟ (2006) International and Comparative Law Quarterly. Dr. Rory O‟Connell Dr. Rory O‟Connell, BCL (ELS) (University College Dublin); LL.M. (UCD); Ph.D (EUI, Florence). Rory's research and teaching interests are in the areas of Human Rights and Equality, Constitutional Law and Legal Theory. His current research projects include age discrimination, the right to work, Budget Analysis and the democratic responses to anti-democratic political forces. His publications include Legal Theory in the Crucible of Constitutional Justice (Ashgate 2000) and articles in Ratio Juris, the International Journal of Constitutional Law, European Human Rights Law Review and other journals. Several of his research projects have been supported by grants from the British Academy, Nuffield Foundation and Changing Aging Partnership. Rory is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, and teaches at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. He coordinates the Constitutional Law in Context undergraduate module and teaches on the Masters LL.M. Programme in Human Rights. He is currently on the supervision team for four doctoral students. Rory's first lecturing post was in Comparative Law at Lancaster University Law School, where he was responsible for Lancaster's Law with Language programmes from 1997 to 2001. He joined QUB in 2001, where he has acted as an Advisor of Studies, Postgraduate Coordinator (Human Rights) and Assistant Director of the Human Rights Centre . Rory is a member of the Human Rights Centre and was appointed a Senior Lecturer in September 2008. Ms. Bal Sokhi-Bulley Ms. Bal Sokhi-Bulley, Bal graduated with a degree in European Law from the University of Warwick in 2003 and obtained a Masters in International Human Rights Law from the University of Nottingham in 2005. Bal‟s research interests are in the areas of human rights, critical theory and governance, and socio-legal theory and method. In terms of her current research, Bal is completing her PhD at the University of Nottingham, which is entitled Human Rights and the European Union: A Foucauldian Analysis and critically examines the governance/rights discourse of the EU from a governmentality perspective. An article based on this doctoral research is forthcoming (International Journal of Law and Context, 2009) and Bal has previously published in the areas of women‟s rights and non-discrimination whilst working as a Research Assistant at the Human Rights Law Centre, University of Nottingham (2005). Bal has been a partner, since 2006, in a project on Legal Research Methodologies in EU and International law. In terms of teaching, Bal has taught modules in European Union Law for the last three years at the University of Nottingham and Queen‟s respectively, and supervised LLM dissertation workshops (Nottingham 2007-08). Bal joined the Law School at Queen‟s in September 2008. Dr. Hakeem Yusuf

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Dr. Hakeem Yusuf, Prior to joining the Law School at Queen‟s, Hakeem was an Undergraduate Tutor in Jurisprudence and International Law Tutor at the Glasgow Law School where he studied for his PhD which he completed in 2008. He obtained his Bachelor of Laws (Hons) degree from the University of Lagos in 1996. He qualified from the Nigerian Law School in 1997 and was called to the Nigerian Bar in 1998. After a two year stint in private practice, he worked as a barrister for five years in the Attorney-General‟s Chambers, Lagos State Ministry of Justice. He worked closely with the Attorney-General on some of the most important criminal and civil cases in Nigeria's post-authoritarian transition to civil rule. He also tutored Bar Finals students of the Nigeria Law School (the body responsible for the professional training of barristers and solicitors in Nigeria) on internship in Criminal Law and Criminal Procedure in the Attorney-General's Chambers. He acted as Counsel to a number of significant inquiries and task forces (including the Panel of Inquiry into Civil Disturbances in Lagos State, 2002-05, and the Lagos State Task Force on Fake and Counterfeit Drugs, 2002-05). He was also a Member of Lagos State Committee for Reform of Criminal Justice Administration (2002-05). With scholarships from the Transitional Justice Institute, the Lagos State Government and the Planethood Foundation, New York, he obtained a Masters of Laws (Human Rights) degree from the Transitional Justice Institute (TJI), University of Ulster in 2006. He was the pioneer TJI intern at the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission (NIHRC) in the summer of 2006. At the University of Glasgow, he held the School of Law Scholarship, the Lagos State Government Foreign Scholarship and the Planethood Foundation, New York Scholarship. His thesis focused on transitional justice, judicial accountability and rule of law. He has published his research in leading peerreviewed journals, including the International Journal of Transitional Justice, Law and Policy, and the African Human Rights Law Journal. His article „The Judiciary and Constitutionalism in Transitions: A Critique‟ won the Silver Medal in the Global Jurist 2007 Awards. Recently, he won the Highly Commended Award, Emerald Literati Network Awards, 2009 for his article „Democratic Transition, Judicial Accountability and Judicialisation of Politics in Africa: The Nigerian Experience‟ published in (2008) 50 (5) International Journal of Law and Management 236-261.

There are also a number of staff involved in teaching Criminal Justice modules: Dr. Karen Brennan Dr. Karen Brennan graduated in law from University College Dublin in 2000. She entered into the integrated LLM/PhD programme in October of that year; and was awarded a Government of Ireland Research Scholarship for the Humanities and Social Sciences in 2002. Karen's chosen thesis topic was the law on infanticide. Her research involved an analysis of cultural and historical perspectives on maternal child killing, an examination of the development of infanticide legislation in both England and the Republic of Ireland, and a comparative exploration of the continued relevance of such laws. Karen completed her PhD thesis in 2006. She is interested in continuing research in the area of infanticide as well as in other areas of criminal law. During the course of her postgraduate studies in UCD, Karen was a Senior Tutor in Criminal Law. She was also a member of the Editorial Board of the UCD Law 47

Review. In 2006, Karen was appointed as Researcher to the Rapporteurs on the Legal Protection of Children in the Republic of Ireland. In October of that year, she took up the position of lecturer in law in Queen‟s University Belfast. Karen teaches on a number of undergraduate and postgraduate criminal justice modules, including Criminal Law, Criminal Process 2, Evidence, and Criminal Justice Processes. Dr. Vicky Conway Dr. Vicky Conway graduated from University College Cork with a B.C.L. in 2001 and the following year with an L.L.M. She then spent a year studying at the University of Edinburgh where she was awarded an M.Sc. in Criminology and Criminal Justice in 2003. After this she attended Queen's University Belfast to undertake her doctoral studies which she completed in 2008. Her thesis focused on socio-historical roots of police accountability problems in the Republic of Ireland. While in Queen's she tutored Criminal Law and Criminology. In 2005 she was appointed to the position of Teaching Fellow at the University of Leeds where she taught both undergraduate and postgraduate courses on criminology and criminal justice. She was appointed to the position of Junior Lecturer of Law at the University of Limerick in July 2007. She joined the School of Law in Queen‟s University Belfast in September 2009. She is also a reviewer for the Journal of Law and Politics. Dr. Clare Dwyer Dr. Clare Dwyer joined QUB's Law School in January 2007. Previously, she had been Lecturer in Law at the Transitional Justice Institute, University of Ulster where she taught on the areas of International Human Rights Law, International Criminal Justice & Law Enforcement and Criminal Law. In 2004, Clare had worked within the School of Law at Queen‟s and was involved in a major multidisciplinary research project evaluating Children‟s Rights in Northern Ireland. From 2002 – 2004, she worked as Projects Manager for Donnelly-Hall Ltd, a management and research consultancy which was engaged by the Department for International Development, World Bank and the United Nations, to provide technical assistance in the areas of legislation and criminal justice to countries from the former Soviet Union and Former Yugoslavia. Clare has been involved in projects reviewing and updating legislation in Kosovo and the Safety, Security and Access to Justice Programme (SSAJP) in Bosnia & Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, Macedonia and Serbia & Montenegro. From 2000 - 2002 she was employed part-time as a researcher on a number of projects based in the Institute of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Queen's and also taught on the undergraduate law programme. Dr. Graham Ellison Dr. Graham Ellison completed his undergraduate studies at Queen's University where he graduated with a BA (Hons) degree in Political Science and Sociology. He completed his PhD at the University of Ulster (Jordanstown) in 1996, and in 1997 was appointed to the post of Lecturer in Criminology at the University of Keele, England. In September 2000 he returned to Belfast to take up a Lectureship in the Institute of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Queen's University. He recently completed an ESRC funded research project to investigate young people's

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experiences of crime, policing and victimisation in Northern Ireland, and is current managing a research project funded by the Irish Government to develop closer criminological and criminal justice research links between the United Kingdom and Ireland. Ms. Ruth Jamieson Ms. Ruth Jamieson completed her undergraduate studies at Queen's University, Canada where she graduated with a Joint Hons BA in Sociology and English Literature in 1973. She completed her MPhil in Criminology at the University of Cambridge in 1988 for which she was awarded the Manual Lopez-Rey Prize. Before joining the Institute of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Queen's in 2004 she taught at Keele University from 1995-2004 and at Cambridge University. Prior to that she worked for the Canadian Department of Justice on the research and evaluation of Federal/ Provincial Legal Aid and Access to Justice Programs. She also has published widely in the areas of war and crime and transnational crime. She is currently involved in research on topics such as the effects of long-term imprisonment, and gender and resilience in armed conflict. Ruth is Equal Opportunities Officer for the School of Law. Professor Shadd Maruna Professor Shadd Maruna joined QUB's Law School in 2005 as a Reader in Criminology. Previously, he had been a lecturer for four years at the University of Cambridge, Institute of Criminology, and before that was an assistant professor for three years in the School of Criminal Justice at the University at Albany, State University of New York. He holds a Ph.D. in Human Development and Social Policy from Northwestern University (Chicago, USA) and his work generally involves taking a psychosocial angle on applied, criminal justice issues. He is particularly interested in the idea of personal redemption. His first book, Making Good: How Ex-Convicts Reform and Rebuild Their Lives (American Psychological Association Books) was named the Outstanding Contribution to Criminology by the American Society of Criminology (ASC) in 2001. In 2004, he was named the Distinguished New Scholar by the ASC's Division of Corrections and Sentencing. He is the co-editor of After Crime and Punishment (2004) and The Effects of Imprisonment (2005), and coauthor of Rehabilitation (Key Ideas in Criminology) (2007: Palgrave) and author of Making Good: How Ex-convicts Reform and Rebuild Their Lives (2001: American Psychological Association). He is also the book review editor for the journal Punishment and Society. Dr. Anne-Marie McAlinden Dr. Anne-Marie McAlinden graduated in law from Queen's University in 1996. In1997 she was awarded the degree of MSSc from the Institute of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Queen's. Anne-Marie was appointed to the post of Lecturer in Law at the University of Ulster, Jordanstown, in September 2001 and later to the post of Lecturer in Criminology in January 2003. In the interim period she completed her PhD, a study on the management of sexual offenders in the community in Northern Ireland, in September 2002. She joined the School of Law at Queen's in September

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2003. Her main research interests lie in the areas of the management of violent and sexual offenders, restorative justice and criminal justice issues generally. Her book 'The Shaming of Sexual Offenders: Risk, Retribution and Reintegration' was published in January 2007 by Hart Publishing. Professor Kieran McEvoy Professor Kieran McEvoy is Professor of Law and Transitional Justice at the School of Law and Director of the Institute of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Queens University Belfast. He graduated with a LLB Hons in Law from Queens University Belfast in 1989, an MSc in Criminology from the University of Edinburgh in 1991 and a PhD from Queens in 2000. Between 1990 and 1995 he worked as Information Officer for NIACRO, a large non-governmental organisation which campaigns on behalf of prisoners their families and ex-offenders. He has also held a number of visiting scholar positions at a range of institutions including the New York University Law School, the Institute of Criminology University of Cambridge, the Mannheim Centre of Criminology at the London School of Economics, the Berkeley School of Law, University of California, the School of Law at Fordham University and he spent a year as Fulbright Distinguished Scholar at the School of Law, Harvard. He is Review Editor of the British Journal of Criminology and a member of the journals' Editorial Board; and a member of the Editorial Boards of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Contemporary Justice Review and Social and Legal Studies. His is also a member of the national executive of the British Society of Criminology. He is currently involved in a range of international comparative research projects on topics including restorative and transitional justice, ex-combatants, former political prisoners, truth recovery, amnesties and the judiciary and legal profession in transition. His books include Crime Community and Locale (with David O'Mahony, John Morison and Ray Geary) (2000, Ashgate) ; Paramilitary Imprisonment in Northern Ireland (2001, Oxford University Press- which won the British Society of Criminology book of the year award); 'Beyond the Wire': Former Prisoners and Conflict Transformation in Northern Ireland (with P. Shirlow (2008, Pluto), Truth Transition and Reconciliation (2008, Willan) and co-editor (with T. Newburn) of Criminology, Conflict Resolution and Restorative Justice (Palgrave 2003) and Judges, Human Rights and Transition (2007, Oxford University Press) with J.Morison and G. Anthony. Professor Phil Scraton Professor Phil Scraton is a Professor of Criminology and member of the Institute of Criminology and Criminal Justice in the School of Law. He graduated in Sociology from the University of Liverpool where he completed a Masters by research on the Irish traveling community. His PhD, on police powers and accountability, is from the University of Lancaster. Previously Lecturer in Criminology at The Open University, he founded the Centre for Studies in Crime and Social Justice at Edge Hill University and was appointed Professor in 1991. The Centre established an international reputation in critical criminology including innovative undergraduate and postgraduate programmes. His main research interests are: controversial deaths, their investigation and the rights of the bereaved; the regulation and criminalisation of children and young people; children‟s rights; critical theory and critical methodology; the 'war on terror' and its impact on human rights, civil liberties and academic 50

freedom; the politics of incarceration. In 2005 he was awarded a Visiting Professorial Scholarship to Monash University, Melbourne. His current funded research is: Understanding the lives of children and young people in the context of conflict and marginalisation. Dr. Peter Shirlow Dr. Peter Shirlow joined the School of Law in 2007. His main research interests include ethno-sectarian fear, paramilitary (former) prisoners, conflict transformation and attacks upon essential services staff. He is co-author of the books Belfast: Segregation, Violence and the City (with Brendan Murtagh) and ‘Beyond the Wire’: Former Prisoners and Conflict Transformation in Northern Ireland (with Kieran McEvoy).

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E: Attendance Policy
The University Regulations require that full-time students “be in attendance at the University during the 15 weeks of each semester and whatever additional time is required by the programme of study for which they are registered”. Further, Section 7.5 of the Regulations reads: Students are expected to attend all scheduled sessions and other forms of instruction as defined by the programme of study. Specific attendance requirements, including explicit attendance thresholds, will be stated by the School. The School of Law devolves the specific attendance requirements, including explicit attendance thresholds, to the Module Coordinators. Consult your Module syllabus. Lack of attendance will be brought to the attention of the School and students will be contacted to ascertain whether, in light of their absence, they wish to continue in their designated programme. It is the student‟s responsibility to cover material in sessions missed. The Regulations regarding attendance are found under the General Regulations for all University Courses at Section 7 of the University Regulations.

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F: Assessment - Required Format & Regulations
All taught modules on the LLM/MSSc are assessed by means of written coursework assignment. For details of assessed work for each of the individual modules (including submission dates) please see the syllabus for each module. Completed assignments should be signed in at the School of Law Postgraduate Office (29.G01 - from 9.30 am – 1 pm and from 1.45 pm – 5 pm). Individual tutors will not under any circumstances accept assignments from students. If there is no receipt of your assignment it will be assumed that it was not submitted. Under exceptional circumstances it may be possible to submit course work by email or by post (with proof of posting), but only where this has been pre-arranged with the postgraduate secretary. Students should submit two copies of all type written assignments including their dissertation. All assessed work should be anonymised (no names but include your anonymous assessment code) and should include a cover sheet. It is important that assignments are provided in a standard typed format (double spaced, at least one inch margin etc.) with an appropriate bibliography. Normally, a student will be given a mark for their assignment following the relevant Examination Board (held, in February, June, August/September and November). A copy of the assignment may be sent to the External Examiner. When submitting assignments it is the student‟s responsibility to ensure that a duplicate is retained of each such assignment. Format of Assignments The primary function of the assignment(s) is to test the ability of the student to understand a particular subject area – at a theoretical, policy and practical level. Written assignments should reflect the plurality of views on any given topic. Assessments should be submitted with a cover page including the name of the designated tutor, your anonymous code, the title of the module and code, the total number of words (including footnotes and references, but excluding bibliography and appendices) as well as the date the assignment is due. See Appendix A for a sample. The assignment must follow a conventional format i.e. be appropriately annotated (in standard form), be typewritten, indicate the source of secondary materials in the text, use referenced quotations as appropriate, and provide a bibliography detailing (according to a standard format) all materials utilised.

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As noted above, students must submit two copies of the assignment, one of which must be made available for the purposes of the External Examiner (if required) by the end of the appropriate internal examination period. Students should also retain a copy for themselves. The length of the assignment is indicated separately for each module. In all cases, dissertations, projects and assignments must be presented by the stated date. Only in exceptional, documented, circumstances, will materials be accepted after those dates – more on this below. Cross Border Students You are expected to go to Galway for the beginning of teaching. You should post your work from Galway to the Postgraduate Secretary. Please make sure to use recorded delivery. The work should be postmarked no later than the submission date.

Assessment of Coursework Coursework assignments in the School of Law will be marked in reference to the Conceptual Equivalent Scale (see Appendix B). All examination and appeal procedures are subject to the overriding requirements of the Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences and those of the University. Anonymity All assessments conducted by the School of Law will be marked anonymously. Therefore, you should include your anonymous assessment code only and not your name on all your assessed work. No comments will be written on any assessment. The marker‟s comments will be made on a separate feedback sheet. Over Length Coursework Written assignments that exceed the established word length shall be penalised by deduction of marks (University Regulation 6.28 stipulates this). Penalties shall begin to apply where written assignments exceed their established word length by more than 10%. These penalties are also graduated to take account of students who exceed the established word length by a greater margin. The following penalty scale shall apply: Established Word Length Exceed by More Than: 10% 20% 30% Late Submission of Assessed Work Number of Marks to be Deducted 5 10 20

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It is essential that students submit their coursework on time. Strict penalties are applied for late work and will be applied unless prior approval has been sought for an extension based on exceptional circumstances. Coursework submitted late will be penalised at a rate of five percent of its total mark for each day that it is late. After five days the coursework will receive a mark of zero. Coursework required to be submitted by a prescribed time will be deemed to be one day late if submitted after that prescribed time on the due date. Extensions may be granted only in exceptional circumstances. A list of guidelines on acceptable extenuating circumstances is contained in the Policies and Procedures Manual, available from the Academic Affairs office or at: http://www.qub.ac.uk/directorates/AcademicStudentAffairs/AcademicAffairs/. Students must fill in and submit to the School of Law Postgraduate Office a coursework extensions form and provide documentary evidence. It is the student‟s responsibility to provide evidence as no extensions will be provided without it. Exemptions shall be granted only if there are extenuating circumstances, and where the student has made a case in writing to the School Manager within three working days of the deadline for submission. Only the Course Co-ordinator (Dr Aoife Nolan) can authorize an extension: module coordinators and pathway co-ordinators cannot. The Regulations regarding late submission of assessed work are found at Section 2.1.6 to 2.1.24 University Regulations. Problems Affecting your Work If you are having difficulties that may affect your studies please let us know. Make sure you let the Programme Director, who acts as your advisor of studies, know of any such problems as soon as possible. You may find it necessary or useful to see the Student Counselling Service or the University Health Centre or Disability Services. Please see the next section of this handbook for more details of these services. Marking Scale & Progression Issues The following mark scale is used in assessing all Postgraduate programmes: 70+ 60+ 50+ Below 50 Pass with distinction Pass with commendation Pass Fail 55

The pass-mark is 50%. Usually one attempt at retaking a failed module or piece of assessed work may be undertaken, but unless there are extenuating circumstances the maximum achievable mark will be 50%. A candidate who, after any final resubmissions, fails to achieve a mark of 50% in the dissertation, may be offered a Diploma in Human Rights. Distinction Please note that from the academic year 09/10 regulations for taught postgraduate programmes have been changed to revise the criteria for the award of a Master‟s Degree with distinction. For Master‟s Degrees, a pass with distinction will be awarded only where an overall average of 70+ is achieved, a mark of 70+ is achieved in the dissertation module and an average of 65+ is achieved in the other modules. Plagiarism and Academic Offences The University Regulations state that it “is an academic offence for a student to commit an act whereby he/she gains or attempts to gain an unfair advantage”. Plagiarism is an academic offence. Issues of plagiarism are taken very seriously by the School of Law. Students are responsible for knowing the University Regulations and abiding by them. Cases of plagiarism will be penalised, resulting in the possible failure of the Module and removal from the programme. Instances of plagiarism are reported to the professional legal bodies, which regard plagiarism as evidence of being unfit to practice law. The University Regulations defines plagiarism in the following terms and provides definitions of other types of academic offences: 3.17 Plagiarism: It is an academic offence for students to plagiarise. Plagiarism is defined as the presentation of the work of others as the writer‟s own without appropriate acknowledgement. This includes auto-plagiarism (to use excerpts from his or her previous work without appropriate acknowledgement) and selfplagiarism (to submit one piece of work more than once, e.g. where such work has been previously been submitted for a different assignment). 3.18 It is also an academic offence for a student to permit another student to copy his/her work submitted for assessment. Both parties will be dealt with in accordance with these procedures. 3.19 Collusion: It is an academic offence for two or more students to work together on an assignment that is meant to be done individually. It is expected that the work being assessed, unless specifically designated as a group assessment, shall be the sole work of the student submitting it. 3.20 Fabrication: It is an academic offence for a student to claim to have carried out experiments, interviews or any form of research which he/she has not in fact carried out, or where he/she invents or falsifies data, evidence or 56

experimental results. It is also an academic offence for a student knowingly to make use of falsified data as described above. Procedures for dealing with both major and minor academic offences are outlined in the University Regulations at Sections 3.24 to 3.50.

G: Dealing with Problems
It is possible that some issues may affect your studies during your time at Queens. These may include personal or financial difficulties, as well as difficulties or concerns with the course. It is essential for you to maintain regular contact with the tutors responsible for your modules and you should inform them of any difficulties which may impact on your work (you do not need to be specific). Help will often be available and staff will do their best to support students during their studies. Support may be available from one or more of the following persons: Module leaders: they are primarily there to manage the course, but if you have a concern that relates to that particular module they should be contacted in the first instance. It is essential that you keep them informed of any seminars that you miss. LLM/MSSc Human Rights Programmes Coordinator Dr Aoife Nolan should be contacted for any difficulties with the course as a whole. Postgraduate Coordinator in the School of Law, Dr Jean Allain. Jean should be contacted via the Postgraduate Secretary, Mrs Theresa Taylor if modules leaders and the Programme Co-ordinator are unable to resolve your issue.

-

-

Most importantly, the School of Law is anxious to support students who are facing genuine difficulties and you can contact any member of staff with whom you feel comfortable, if appropriate.

The University also provides a number of support services:

The University Student Counselling Service: this provides confidential counselling and can help if you want to talk through a problem, regardless of how big or small. The Student Counselling Service offers a confidential, friendly and professional, and free, service to those who are experiencing difficulties during their time at University. Problems may relate to either academic or personal concerns. It is located in the Student Guidance Centre, 91a University Road (next to the University Bookshop). For full details please see the Counselling Service website: http://www.qub.ac.uk/directorates/sgc/counselling/. Tel. 9097 2774; email: counsellor@qub.ac.uk. Outside office hours, students can also avail of emergency telephone counselling support on Freephone 0800 389 5362. 57

The University Health Centre is situated at 5 Lennoxvale (behind Science Library), Tel: (028) 9033 5551319 Email: reception.157@uhcq.gp.n-i.nhs.uk

The University Disability Services is also located in the Student Guidance Centre. Queen's is committed to equality of opportunity for all students and will, therefore, strive to facilitate students with disabilities as an integral part of the Queen's community. You can telephone Disability Services on (028) 9027 2727 to make an appointment, or email them at disability.office@qub.ac.uk.

The University’s Equal Opportunities Unit is situated on Level 4 of the Administration Building. It deals with Equality policy, monitoring and training and any complaints relating to harassment or discrimination on the grounds of religious belief, political opinion, race, sex, colour, ethnic origin, sexual orientation or disability. These are investigated using the Student Complaints Procedure, with the advice and involvement of the University‟s Equal Opportunities Unit.

A wealth of additional support information is also available from the Student Guidance Centre. Please familiarise yourself with its website: www.qub.ac.uk/sgc.

Student Complaints Procedure
There are three stages in the proposed complaints procedure: (a) Informal Stage: Most complaints can be quickly and satisfactorily resolved informally at local level, and so complainants are urged in the first instance to try to resolve their problem as close to source as possible - i.e. with the person responsible who has handled the matter, or if necessary, with the person in charge of that area or the person "closest" to the perceived problem without being personally involved or implicated. It may turn out that similar complaints have been received in the past and that the problem is already being addressed. For example, if you have a problem with a taught course, the person to consult in the first instance might be the lecturer concerned. If the problem cannot be resolved, you might contact (generally in this order), your Programme Director, Director of PG Studies, Director of Education or Head of School. Alternatively, your complaint might be raised at a Joint Consultative Committee (JCC) meeting. (b) Formal Written Complaint: If still dissatisfied, you should submit your complaint in writing, using a standard form, to the Academic Council Office and it will then be passed to the appropriate senior manager (usually a Dean or a senior administrator). Complaint forms are available from the Academic 58

Council Office, Faculty Offices, and the Students ‟ Union, the PEC, the University Health Service and the Library. The written complaint must normally be submitted within 10 days of the outcome of the 1st (informal) stage, or, if you feel the informal approach is inappropriate, normally within 25 days of your first becoming aware of the incident or issues giving rise to the complaint. (c) Appeal: If still unhappy with the response to your complaint, you can appeal to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Students and Learning), again using a standard form. An appeal panel, made up of people with no prior involvement in your case and chaired by a lay member of Senate, will then meet, normally within 25 working days. You should learn the outcome within 5 days of the meeting. (Note: The response times indicated above may be unachievable outside the usual semester dates. In such cases you should receive an interim reply with a contact name and a date by which you can expect to hear further.) Advice and complaint forms can be obtained from the Academic Council Office (Tel: 9027 3006, or use internal extension 3006, or email academic.council@qub.ac.uk). Complaint forms are also available from Faculty Offices, the Students‟ Union, the PEC, the University Health Service and the Library. If you are unhappy about a University policy or regulation, you should raise your concerns in the first instance with the Students‟ Union.

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H: Frequently Asked Questions
Some common questions about academic issues can be answered here: Can I convert from full-time to part-time status, or vice-versa? There is usually not a problem with this, and the fees will be adjusted accordingly. You should check with Aoife Nolan and Theresa Taylor if you wish to do this. What happens if I fail a module? The School operates a policy whereby if you fail one assessment then you will be allowed to resubmit the work once, but will only be awarded a maximum of a pass mark (50%) unless there are valid extenuating circumstances (e.g. a medical certificate). What if I want to change my degree or leave? There may be circumstances where you feel that you can no longer continue with the degree. Fees can be refunded up until the end of October of the year you start. Fees for the subsequent semester can be refunded provided you inform the University before the end of February. What if I have never studied law or worked in human rights before? A significant number of students take these degrees without ever having studied law or human rights before and we are aware of this. It may require you to read more than others to get to grips with basic concepts at the start of the course, but we do not imagine you to be in a worse position than others who may have studied law before. If you are experiencing difficulties at any time during the course you should see your personal tutor, module leader or LLM coordinator. What if I am in the Cross-Border degree and wish to stay at Queen’s? We ask students to commit to Programmes and accept them on that basis. If you have been accepted onto a Cross-Border Programme, then you will not be allowed to transfer to a QUB-only programme. If you cannot finish the dissertation by the hand in date If you cannot finish your dissertation by the due date, then it may be possible to register as a write up student and submit the dissertation at a later date. This entails paying a fee and graduating later.

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Dissertation Information

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A: Introduction
The final phase of the LLM/MSSc programmes is designed to test the application of materials - concepts, evidence, and methods - acquired in the taught modules, to a particular context within the broad field of law. The dissertation is worth 60 credit points out of the 300 total for the degree (each taught module is worth 20 credit points). It can be on any subject of your choosing within the broad field of law, though generally it will work best if based in part on topics, ideas or themes you have already encountered in the taught modules. A dissertation is essentially an extended essay – typically it will be 15,000 to 20,000 words in length (including footnotes). It should be an original piece of research, intended to represent a critical advance on present knowledge or practices. It is essential that the topic selected is one in which a supervisor possesses appropriate expertise. Many students are daunted at first about the prospect of having to write a dissertation. This is a perfectly natural and acceptable reaction, but it is very important not to be overwhelmed. The dissertation is completed slowly over a fairly long period. You will have support from a supervisor who is an expert in the field, and who will give you feedback on your plan and a draft chapter. When it comes time to choose your topic, the important thing will be to select an area which interests and engages you. A dissertation workshop will provide you with practical advice to help you as you begin to put together the project.

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B: Dissertation Timeline for Students Aiming to Complete in Sep 2010
Key Dates 2010, February Students attend workshop session Coordinator PG with dissertation LLM/MSSc

2010, 1st March

Students submit dissertation proposal to School of Law Postgraduate Office Supervisors Committee are allocated by PG

2010, 1st April

2010, 30th June

Submission dissertation

of

draft

chapter and outline.

July/August 2010, 1st September

Writing Up Submission

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Notes

(1) (1) Every student is required to complete the Research Ethics Approval process prior to commencing his/her research project. In the many cases, LLM dissertations will be classed as “Low Risk” (that is, the dissertation research will not involve any interviewing, use of questionnaires etc, or human subjects). The Ethics Approval process for Low Risk projects requires you to discuss the project with your supervisor and complete a short online form. The supervisor is responsible for ensuring that the project is actually low risk. Anyone considering a medium or high risk project should, after discussion with his/her supervisor, contact the chair of the School Research Ethics Committee, Professor Philip Leith: p.leith@qub.ac.uk. Approval of the School Research Ethics Committee is required, which involves the completion of a peer review of the proposed research project. Full details on the School‟s Ethics Approval Policy, and the required forms for low, medium, and high risk projects, can be found here: http://www.law.qub.ac.uk/schools/SchoolofLaw/Research/EthicsApprov al/. (2) If your dissertation will involve interviewing, use of questionnaires etc, or human subjects, your project is „medium risk.‟ You will be required to obtain a peer review of your proposal from a member of staff who is not your supervisor. The peer review will be emailed to you and you can copy it into the paragraph in the medium risk online form with the heading “Give a brief outline of your ethical review process. This should include reviewer(s) name(s) and any aspects they have highlighted as requiring special consideration.” (3) If your dissertation will involve interviews of „ordinary people‟ or of vulnerable subjects (children, patients etc) then your project is „high risk.‟ Please talk to your supervisor about procedures in this case. (4) Short extensions (around one week, two weeks) to dissertation submission deadlines are exceptional, and normally only possible in the face of medical or very serious extenuating personal circumstances. You should contact Aoife Nolan as soon as possible if such circumstance arises. (5) For Part-Time students, the dissertation procedure should begin in the second academic year.

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C: General Dissertation Advice
It is in the nature of research that individual dissertations will vary enormously. But the following might provide some useful and generally applicable advice, irrespective of the topic you are investigating. Dissertation content The content of a dissertation can vary considerably. But generally, it should fit within the following parameters. (a) A critical overview of the research literature on a particular topic. (b) Investigation of a particular thesis – you need to develop and defend a particular line of argument on the topic in question, and comment on existing materials accordingly. You can use any of a variety of approved methodological tools, though in practice most LLM/MSSc dissertations involve library based research and evaluation of existing legal rules and principles. Identifying a topic A wide range of topics are possible for the dissertation. It will always help if you pick an area that you find interesting or engaging. Possibly the best way to start is to think of subjects you have enjoyed studying on the LLM/MSSc so far, and identify a particular area of interest. Go back to the textbooks and cases on the subject. Find references there to current articles and get a feel for live areas of research and interest. Use these to inspire you to your own particular views and arguments. And have a discussion with a relevant member of staff from the School who conducts research in the specific area (information on staff interests can be found on the School website: http://www.law.qub.ac.uk/Staff/). In focusing on a particular dissertation topic, you should address specific issues: (a) (b) (c) (d) What general or specific body of theory does the investigation draw on? What information is needed in order to explain or develop my argument? What research method(s) should be adopted to collect the information? What is the timetable that must be observed in order to collect and analyse the material? (e) Is access to the material feasible, ethically correct, and what barriers of confidentiality may be involved? Planning the dissertation (a) Develop a timetable for the completion of the various stages. Inevitably, this timetable must be flexible to allow for unknown hurdles such as difficulties in obtaining access to reading matter. (b) Ensure access to appropriate educational materials such as a word processor, library and Inter Library Loan forms. 65

(c) Ensure that any appropriate permissions have been received from data holders. (d) Ensure that all references used are noted in detail at the time of access. Much tedious work will occur if you do not make full annotations at an early stage. This material should be maintained in the same form as the eventual bibliography at the end of the dissertation/project. (e) Keep records of relevant illustrative materials such as quotations. Outline of Dissertation The dissertation should be type-written, double-spaced, with at least a one-inch margin and include the following, where relevant: (a) Title page and details

(b) The dissertation will be maintained for public use by the Human Rights Centre or the Institute of Criminology and Criminal Justice on completion. Ensure therefore that all appropriate disclaimers are made with regard to copyright, personal references, that all permission required is noted and all cases of confidentiality and ethical concerns recognised. (c) Statement of acknowledgments – for example, to any agency that has facilitated the study. (d) Abstract of approximately 150-200 words. That abstract should not be written until the completion of the dissertation -but it is critical for a future reader as a guide to the contents. (e) Contents page of chapters, including sections within chapters; appropriately page numbered. (f) Introductory section – outlining the forthcoming chapters; review of the initial evidence, demonstrating familiarity with the existing materials; a relevant literature review; and a statement of the central hypothesis(es). (g) A methodology section – the length and nature of this will vary. Thus a dissertation that consists primarily of a general literature review of material will clearly require much lesser statement of methodology than studies which are concerned to analyse quantitative or qualitative evidence. In the latter cases, the section will include a statement regarding piloting, sampling techniques, validation procedures, forms of data collection, and in the case of a comparative study, a rationale for the basis of that comparison. (h) Text in chapters, appropriately referenced. Ideally the chapters should commence with the broad issue of the study and conclude with the narrow, definitive themes.

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(i) Summary and conclusions – this chapter should tie together all the disparate threads of the study. It should commence with a re-statement of the hypotheses being investigated and locate the findings with a general review of existing knowledge. The conclusions should show how the findings from the study add to such knowledge or are at variance with such received wisdom. Consequential research suggestions may be made. As appropriate, qualified policy recommendations may be included. (j) Bibliography detailing all books and articles referred to in the dissertation, in an approved alphabetical style. (k) Appendices as appropriate - for example, a copy of any questionnaire utilised.

Submission of Dissertation At the time of formal submission, two bound copies are required by the University. The dissertation should be bound securely (e.g. by spiral wire binding or soft binding), but does not need to be in hard cover format. The finalised dissertation must be submitted to the Law School postgraduate office on or before the relevant submission deadline (normally 1 July or 1 September, depending on whether you plan to take up a place at a professional law school in the same year). Exceptions to this date are granted only in exceptional circumstances. In the latter case, you must receive prior written approval from Aoife Nolan. Note that as LLM/MSSc degrees are normally presented at the Winter Graduation Ceremony, delay in submitting the dissertation may result in the postponement of graduation for a year, and students will incur additional writing-up fees for dissertations submitted late. Marking Guide Marks below 50% on the Dissertation constitute a Fail. These will include instances where students have demonstrated little knowledge, have written shallow, uncritical, and descriptive accounts with little analysis, have included substantial irrelevant or unnecessary materials, or generally failed to reach the required standard which demonstrates progression from related undergraduate work. Plagiarism is an offence against the University‟s Regulations.

A summary of what is required in each of the marking bands is given below: 50-59 Marks in this range constitute a PASS and demonstrate evidence of a reasonable knowledge of the topic area with evidence of broadly understood reading. Analysis adequate but not original or in-depth. Presentation and organisation mostly clear but not all major points covered or conceptually understood. Most materials relevant though some irrelevant or unnecessary materials included. Not adequately theorised. 67

Some points and arguments not substantiated. Reasonable use of referencing with some room for improvement. 60-69 Marks of 60 or above will constitute a PASS WITH COMMENDATION. For marks in this range all sections are considered good with clear development and analysis of relevant hypothesis. Broad review of relevant literature, interpreted intelligently, issues understood. Evidence of independent thought. Well, sequentially organised and presented. Readings from literature and lectures well integrated. Major points covered, no irrelevant materials and correct and complete referencing. 70+ Marks of 70 or above will constitute a PASS WITH DISTINCTION. All sections outstanding. Critical thought displayed through with clear line of debate. Well-written, in-depth analysis to support substantiated arguments, and clear, qualified conclusions. Extensive reading list beyond the prescribed, well integrated into text. Issues clearly understood, excellent presentation and organisation. All major points covered, up-to date sources, no irrelevant material, correct and complete referencing, considerable evidence of original thought and theoretical sophistication consistent with Distinction level for a Postgraduate course. The conceptual equivalents for each mark band are provided at Appendix B below. Role of Supervisor A copy of the Academic Council‟s „Formal Code of Practice for the Supervision of Research Students‟ is available for consultation although subject to amendment in relation to a primarily taught course. Notwithstanding what is contained in that document, the student should note that the supervisor‟s role is to supervise the work. This is an advisory role. The student is responsible for planning, scheduling, and designing the study or project; and for collecting, correcting, and analysing the material. The supervisor can provide guidance and advice as long as adequate notice is provided. It is critical - and the student‟s responsibility - to keep in regular touch with their supervisor.

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Careers Information

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Roisin Copeland is the staff member in Careers, Employability and Skills allocated to advising law students.

Careers, Employability and Skills Sorting out what you might do after graduation takes time. You need to start this process early, ideally in Year One by: • Considering your career options and planning ahead • Gaining work experience and placements • Building employability skills • Developing career management skills. The Careers, Employability and Skills, through its senior Careers Adviser Roisin Copeland, provides a comprehensive careers guidance service to law students and works together with the School of Law‟s Careers Liaison Adviser Dr Alison Mawhinney to support you in career planning from Year 1 and throughout your time at Queens. The Careers, Employability and Skills provides students with access to the latest information on placements and opportunities via the careers website‟ vacancies database and a range of employer files, brochures and directories. Students can also receive careers guidance via the e-mail facility on the website or one-to-one guidance through the drop-in sessions with the duty-advisor during opening hours as well as one-to-one sessions via bookable guidance interviews. A number of documents are produced for law students including the Moving into Law Guide which outlines the routes to qualifying in the legal profession. This information includes the relevant contact and application details as well as useful employment profiles of previous Queen‟s law students. The Careers, Employability and Skills is located at Student Guidance Centre, 91a University Road (Above the University Bookshop and the Ulster Bank) Telephone: 028 9097 2770 or E-mail: careers@qub.ac.uk 70

Specific services provided by Careers, Employability and Skills Careers Guidance The Careers, Employability and Skills is a central unit which provides guidance, information and advice. You can consult with a careers adviser about your career ideas and plans during opening hours (9-5pm) in the Student Guidance Centre. You may be asked to make use of information held by Careers, Employability and Skills prior to seeing an Adviser. This will ensure that your consultation is useful and meaningful in dealing with the issues you raise. The following services are available: (a) personal guidance through duty adviser during opening hours. (b) booked guidance interviews can be arranged with the Law Careers Adviser Roisin Copeland by calling into the Student Guidance Reception. Issues students often raise include: effective completion of application forms and CV construction preparation for interviews and assessment centres choosing the best career option for you computerised careers guidance support systems – Prospect Planner.

Employability Skills Initiatives The Careers, Employability and Skills offers programmes that are open to students of any degree discipline to help prepare students for graduate recruitment and provide insight into the graduate labour market. The programmes are: Certificate in Career Development Leaning this is a 10-week programme for students at any level, meeting two hours per week. Sign-up in semester week 1 at www.qub.ac.uk/careers Events database

School of Law careers programmes Careers Advisers organise programmes of talks, workshops and information sessions in partnership with academic Schools. These include sessions on, for example, career options with your degree subject. You will be notified of these through posters displayed in your School and where available, by e-mail. An outline of scheduled events for Law students can be found on the School of Law website under „Education‟ >Careers

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Autumn and Spring Careers Programmes See www.qub.ac.uk/careers >Events database and pdfs for updated information These programmes open to students of any degree discipline, comprise a variety of employer led skills workshops, talks and other events designed to inform you about career options, international study and work opportunities. Graduate employers are involved in the delivery of many of the workshops and talks. The Autumn programme aimed at final and pre-final year students can be collected from the Careers, Employability and Skills at the start of the academic semester in September. The Spring programme, aimed at pre-final and first year students is available for collection from the Careers, Employability and Skills at the beginning of the second semester. Access to Recruiters of Students and Graduates Make the most of opportunities to meet recruiters on campus. Discover the facts and gain insight into life in the graduate workplace, how to be effective in selection and recruitment and career development opportunities in your chosen career area. The Careers, Employability and Skills facilitates student/employer networking through a wide range of subject specific Careers Fairs namely: Administration, Finance & Management Fair Tuesday 20 October 2009, 11.00- 3.30, Whitla Hall

Engineering, Science & IT Fair Wednesday 21 October 2009, 11.00-3.30, Whitla Hall

Law Fair Wednesday 4 November 2009, 2.00- 4.00, Whitla Hall

Work Experience Fair Wednesday tbc February 2010, 11.00- 3.30, Whitla Hall

Partnership Fair: NI Graduate Recruitment Fair Tuesday tbc June 2010.

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Careers Information The Careers, Employability and Skills has a well stocked reference library and maintains supplies of useful “take away” publications such as “The Times Top 100 Graduate Employers”, “First Interviews Sorted” and a wide range of career guides. The Careers, Employability and Skills has a growing list of useful websites connecting students to on-line recruitment and occupational information. During your time at Queen‟s regularly make use of information held on: Occupations Graduate employers Graduate recruitment

Postgraduate study, funding and vocational training Further information on Law postgraduate http://www.law.qub.ac.uk/ProspectiveStudents/. courses may be found at

Internships/Internship Bursary The School of Law has strong contacts with local NGOs and other human rights institutions and can assist students if they are interested in internship/voluntary work. Currently the Human Rights Centre has an arrangement with the following organisations: Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission: the statutory body for Northern Ireland, established as a result of the Good Friday Agreement Law Centre NI Committee for the Administration of Justice (CAJ): a prominent human rights organisation in Northern Ireland NICEM: Northern Ireland Council for Ethnic Minorities If you are interested in being involved please contact Dr. Onder Bakircioglu or Dr. Aoife Nolan and NOT the organisations direct, as specific projects are planned in some cases: The Human Rights Centre also offers an internship bursary of up to £1000 to a student who secures internship abroad after completing his/her study. This bursary might be shared by 2 or more students if suitable applicants present themselves.

Field Visits During the first Semester the Centre will coordinate at least one field visit to institutions dedicated to human rights issues in Belfast. Students will have a chance 73

to visit bodies such as the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission, the Equality Commission of Northern Ireland as well as Amnesty International, among others. In spring or summer, the Centre also organises a field trip to a human rights institution in Europe. Such institutions include, the European Court of Human Rights, International Criminal Tribunals or United Nations in Geneva.

Building work experience, accessing part-time work Use your time at Queen‟s to develop your employability skills and business awareness by accessing the wide range of vacation work and placement opportunities available to students on the careers website: Database of part-time jobs on and off campus through the Student JobShop information bulletins on vacation placements, vacation courses and year-long industrial placements. In addition, Careers, Employability and Skills has a specialist adviser for Work Placement who offers: personal guidance in relation to work experience programmes designed to help you find placement, prepare for placement and relate it to your own career development. A new programme to enable students to gain an accredited award which recognises skills developed through different types of casual work or voluntary experience is The Queen‟s Work Experience Award. Accreditation for all non-academic aspects of your life at Queen‟s. All levels, all disciplines (throughout academic year) www.qub.ac.uk/degreeplus A series of workshops will be scheduled to support the qualification, contact the Student Guidance Centre for further information

Subject related workplace Experience Relevant work experience can really enhance your application for graduate opportunities and training contracts. Many students undertake work experience in Northern Ireland Law firms and volunteer in a range of support services e.g. www.victimsupport.org Corporate and commercial Law firms in London and the regions offer varied Easter and summer internships go to www.lawcareers.net At the 4th November Law Fair applications will be opened for Student Study Tour to London Law Firms 2010. This week long visit to a range of corporate and 74

commercial firms takes place annually in January after the exams. There will be a number of events on campus to raise awareness of applications for internships and the value of participating in the Study Tour.

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Summary of Sources of Careers Information

CAREERS GUIDANCE All Students One-to-one Careers Guidance Duty Adviser, 15mins – information, applications review Law Duty Adviser (RC), 15mins – information, applications review Law Adviser (RC), 45mins – by appointment only (arrange through Friday morning duty or 02890972770 SGC) Available all year round Available all year round Available all year round 9.00am-5.00pm SGC Fridays 9-1pm SGC Thursdays 9-5pm SGC

INFORMATION RESOURCES Law Careers Publications Free copies of a range of publications are available in Careers, Employability and Skills INFORMATION area of the Student Guidance Centre Northern Ireland Law Society route to qualification The Writ (Journal) Institute of Professional Legal Studies QUB Bar Council of NI www.barlibrary.com www.lawsoc-ni.org

www.qub.ac.uk/ipls

Prospects Law website

www.prospects.ac.uk/law

Law Society of England and Wales, Solicitor Regulations Authority UK Applications for LPC

www.lawsociety.org.uk

www.lawcareers.net UK Legal Firms information www.lawyers2b.com www.legal500.com www.chambersandpartners.com

www.sra.org.uk

www.lawcabs.ac.uk

Gradireland Law website

www.gradireland/law

UK Bar Council

www.barcouncil.org.uk

Additional resources

www.qub.ac.uk/careers >useful links>weblinks by subject

Law Society of Ireland

www.lawsociety.ie

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Appendices

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Appendix A – Sample Coursework Cover Sheet Coursework Cover Sheet Module: This sheet must be filled in and attached to the coursework. Anonymous Code ………………………….. Module Name ……………………………. Module Coordinator:……………………………. Assignment Type: ………………………………………… Assignment Title: …………………………………………………..………………. Word Limit: …………………….

Actual word count (including footnotes but not bibliography or appendices) ………….. Deadline …………………… Date handed in: ……………………. Certification: I certify that the attached work is entirely my own, and that all material which is not my own has been appropriately quoted and referenced. I understand that plagiarised work may result in a mark of zero and lead to serious disciplinary measures. Please tick this box to agree to this statement: 

Presentation Requirements: Must be typed or word processed. Staple in top left corner. No folder or plastic cover. Spacing 1.5 or double spaced. Put page numbers

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Appendix B: Sample Postgraduate Assignment Feedback Sheet Student Number: Module Name: Title: Date Submitted: ____________ Date Marked: _____________ _____________
1 Knowledge Demonstration of knowledge

Module Number:

Name

of

First/Second

Marker:

2

Critical Discussion Ability to bring critical understanding to bear on the material: not accepting everything at face-value: exercise of reasonable judgement about what is important and what is not Use of Sources Evidence of reading, both from the set texts and beyond them, and appropriate appeal to relevant literature to support and refute arguments. Argument The overall construction of the argument of the essay, including the drawing of relevant conclusions

3

4

5

Structure The essay as a piece of writing: its flow, style, and grammatical construction

General Comments

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(Appendix B continued) Please note that the information provided in the assessment grid below is for your INFORMATION and GUIDANCE only. It is not intended to be proscriptive and your grade may reflect issues that are NOT necessarily referred to below.

Knowledge A+

Critical Discussion

Use of Sources Argument

Structure

A

High critical Knowledge judgment and beyond module confident grasp content* of complex Evidence of issues innovative and original use of learning resources. Evidence of Evidence of Use of a wide superior, thorough range of comprehensive critical appropriate and deep appreciation sources, knowledge of the and evaluation indicating relevant module of relevant personal content theory and research, and research and a with full critical systematic and awareness of creative their status and attempt to relevance relate it to the topic Evidence of extensive knowledge of the relevant module content, without major misapprehensions Evidence of good critical appreciation and evaluation of relevant theory and research and a systematic attempt to relate it to the topic Use of a wide range of appropriate sources with some critical awareness of their status and relevance

Thorough and systematic knowledge and understanding. Clear grasp of all relevant issues involved.

Clear evidence of Absolutely clear independence of and well thought and expressed. originality. Methodological rigour.

Argument is sound and substantial, with points developed in a clear and cogent fashion. There is a significant element of originality.

An assignment whose clear structure and expression significantly enhances its argument

B Argument is sound and substantial, although not entirely original. A generally wellstructured and expressed assignment, which communicates clearly

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C Evidence that relevant module content is adequately understood, but with some gaps or misapprehensions Evidence of a general critical stance, although some material not evaluated Use of a range of appropriate sources, but without critical evaluation, or missing some significant items Argument is let down by occasional confusion or flaws While the assignment has some failings in structuring and/or clarity of written expression, these do not impair its capacity to communicate

D Evidence of Limited and Argument is The assignment limited critical uncritical use of a sometimes trivial, has failings in evaluation in restricted range confused or structuring some areas, of sources flawed and/or clarity of with some lost written opportunities or expression, misunderstandi which impair its ngs capacity to communicate Little or no Sources not used Either no The assignment Little or no evidence of to support discernible, or has evidence of critical substantive seriously flawed unacceptable familiarity with evaluation of assertions or academic failings in content of module material. argument argument structuring and/or clarity of written expression Evidence that relevant module content is broadly understood, but with significant gaps or misapprehensions

E

* module content should be interpreted as the topic or area of research being undertaken in the study in keeping with the learning outcomes for the module.

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Appendix C

LLM In Human Rights Law LLM/Mssc. In Human Rights And Criminal Justice

Academic Year: 2009/10 Name of Student: ________________________________________ Student No. ______________________________________________

Please name 2 preferred supervisors:

1._____________________________ 2. _____________________________

Topic/Title of Dissertation:

Outline Plan of Dissertation (350 words, continue overleaf).

Please return this form to Theresa Taylor by ?? May 2010: t.taylor@qub.ac.uk For QUB use only Supervisor Allocated

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Appendix D

Format for the Dissertation Title Page: „An analysis of the Effectiveness of Target Hardening as a Crime Prevention Strategy‟ by Joan Bloggs, Student Number 1234 A Dissertation submitted as part of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Legal Science, School of Law, Queen‟s University Belfast. Except for the appropriately referenced materials, this thesis is entirely my own work carried out under the supervision of XX. Total number of words XX Student Name and student number Signed XX Date September 2010

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Disclaimer Whilst every effort has been taken to ensure the accuracy of the information in these pages, the University wishes to emphasise that the contents contained are regularly reviewed and are naturally subject to change from time to time as required. It is the responsibility of the user/reader to check the accuracy of relevant facts with the Institute before entering any financial or other commitment based upon them. The University also gives notice that it will not accept liability for the contents of any pages which do not conform to the University's information policy and guidelines.

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