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					2009 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth

Presentation Outline

• Active Healthy Kids Canada
• 2009 Report Card
• • •
History, Strategic Direction, Strategic Partners Active Kids are Fit to Learn: Highlighting the Relationship Between Physical Activity, Learning and Academic Performance Report Card Influences and Indicators: How Do the Pieces of the Puzzle Fit Together?

• Physical Activity/Inactivity • School • Family and Peers • Community and Built Environment • Policy

About Active Healthy Kids Canada

• • •

Established in 1994, a national organization with a passionate voice for the development of active healthy children and youth in Canada. Focused on making physical activity a major priority in the everyday lives of Canadian families. Committed to providing expertise and direction to policymakers and the public on increasing and effectively allocating resources and attention toward physical activity for children and youth.

Mandate Active Healthy Kids Canada
•
Strategic national leadership – advancing knowledge, evidenceinformed communication and advocacy strategies – to influence issue stakeholders who affect physical activity opportunities for children and youth. The primary vehicle to achieve this mandate is the Active Healthy Kids Canada Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth and its related activities.

•

Strategic Partners

2009: The Fifth Annual Report Card

The Report Card is an evidence-informed communications and advocacy piece designed to provide insight into Canada‘s ―state of the nation‖ each year on how, as a country, we are being responsible in providing physical activity opportunities for children and youth.

Active Kids are Fit to Learn

The 2009 Report Card shines a light on the relationship between physical activity, sport, comprehensive school health approaches and effective learning. Physical activity builds strong, smart kids.

Growing Strong, Smart Kids

Research indicates that even when the time is taken away from other subjects, physical education and physical activity do not negatively affect academic achievement and in fact have positive effects on learning and academic performance: • production of substances that protect delicate neurons in the brain • improvements in memory, concentration, and attention span • improvements in grades and test scores • increased self-esteem, self-confidence and self-image • reduced misconduct behaviours at school • increased feelings of school connectedness supporting kids with developmental or learning differences

Growing Strong, Smart Kids

• Ontario school health initiative including physical activity
indicated a 36% increase in reading and a 24% increase in math scores over a two-year period.

• A study of over 5,000 students indicated that girls with the
highest levels of physical education participation had higher math and reading scores.

• Another US study of over 12,000 students indicated that daily
physical activity was associated with higher math and reading achievement.

• Alberta study of 5,000, which showed that active living had
positive results on school performance.

Report Card Influences and Indicators
How do the pieces of the puzzle fit together?

Report Card Influences and Indicators

• The Report Card has been revised to frame around the
Physical Activity Levels grade.

• It continues to assess the influences and indicators that have
an impact on Physical Activity Levels.

• It also continues to look at the outcomes associated with
physical activity and how these also then influence Physical Activity Levels.

Key Indicator: Physical Activity Levels

•

The Physical Activity Levels grade is based on Canadian Physical Activity Levels Among Youth (CanPLAY) Survey which takes annual measures and uses pedometers to objectively measure physical activity.
This Grade directly ties to the goal set by Ministers of Sport, Physical Activity and Recreation to increase the number of children and youth meeting physical activity guidelines to 17% by 2015 – this allows for an annual measure of progress in each Report Card.

•

Physical Activity Levels

• Moving on Up?

• The proportion meeting the guidelines has increased
from 9% in 2006 to 13% in 2008 - statistically significant progress

• A Long Way to Go…

• Objectively measured data indicates 87% are not meeting
Canada’s physical activity guidelines

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LEVELS

CanPLAY Survey Results Proportion Meeting Guidelines

Proportion Meeting Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines (%)

18% 16% 14% 12% 10% 8% 6% 4% 2% 0% 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08

Year
PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LEVELS

CanPLAY Survey Results Mean Number of Steps

Mean Number of Steps for Children and Youth (2005-2008)

12,000 11,000 10,000 9,000

8,000
7,000 6,000 5,000

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

Year

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LEVELS

2007 Canadian Community Healthy Survey

Proportion of 12 to 17 year old boys and girls who self-report they are moderately active or active, by province/territory.
100

*
90

* * * * *

Proportion Moderately Active or Active (%)

80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10

*

National averages for boys and girls
Boys Girls

0
YT NF NB MB AB BC PEI ON NWT SK NS QC NU

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LEVELS

Active Play

• There is not comprehensive nationally representative data to
adequately assess this indicator, but only 50% of young children indicate participating in unorganized sport.

• Regional information indicates a third of youth report doing no
physical activity as part of their free time and 60% of disabled youth report that they seldom or never play games with friends.

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LEVELS

Nature Deficit Disorder

• Children are missing out on ‗everyday adventures‘; those small
but significant experiences through which they learn about the world, develop their coordination and grow independence.

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LEVELS

Active Transportation

• Although nearly 2/3 of Canadian families indicate living within a
reasonable distance to walk or cycle to school, just over 1/3 report having walked to school and 80% report never having cycled to school.

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LEVELS

Organized Sport and Physical Activity Participation

• Children

from the lowest income level are three times more likely to never have participated in organized activities and sports compared to those in the highest income level.

• Youth with disabilities have significantly lower
sport participation levels

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LEVELS

Health Behaviour of School-Aged Children Survey
Participation in individual and team sports – disparities for youth with disabilities.
60 70
Youth with physical disabilities National sample

Proportion Participating in Individual Sports (%)

Proportion Playing League Team Sports (%)

50 40 30 20 10

60

50
40 30 20 10 0

Youth with physical disabilities National sample

0

seldom once a or never month

once a week

two or usually three every day times a week

seldom or never

once a month

once a week

two or three times a week

usually every day

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LEVELS

Screen Time

•

Current national data indicates that only 10% of Canadian youth are meeting the guideline for screen time of <2 hours per day, and many get close to 6 hours per day. However, new regional surveys show positive findings, moving to levels closer to the guideline. The increase in active gaming may help transition screen time from strictly being a sedentary activity, but cannot replace other forms of physical activity.

•

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LEVELS

Sedentary versus active gaming: energy expenditure
200

Energy Expenditure (kilocalories per hour)

160

120

80

40

0

Resting Energy Expenditure

XBOX 360

Wii Sports Bowling

Wii Sports Tennis

Wii Sports Boxing

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LEVELS

Physical Education

• •

Only 23% of schools that say that only a trained physical educator teaches physical education—a substantial decrease since 2001 A smaller proportion of students are taking PE in secondary school compared to the elementary level, yet more teachers trained in PE work in the secondary than in middle and elementary schools

SCHOOL

BC Principals Survey 2007-2008:

•

Elementary school is a time of critical importance in the establishment of proper motor development and skills – students, require high-quality PE instruction to ensure that they start off on the right path when it comes to physical activity and sport participation

SCHOOL

BC Principals Survey 2007-2008: Barriers to PE Implementation

Competing demands for teaching other subjects Inadequate facilities and space Lack of necessary staff to implement change Guidelines too stringent Financial constraints Lack of Support from teachers Lack of PE equipment
0 20 40 60 80 100

Proportion Reporting (%)
Middle & Secondary Schools Elementary Schools

SCHOOL

Sport and Physical Activity Opportunities at School

•

Regional data from a number of jurisdictions indicate that 70% of students feel schools place some emphasis on student participation in recreational sports and more than 80% report that their school put some emphasis on developing positive attitudes about physical activity and self-esteem

SCHOOL

Infrastructure and Equipment

•

80-95% of schools have a gyms, playground equipment, playing fields, and paved play areas, with the 60-75% of students and schools reporting these are in good condition

•

There has a decrease in access to baseball diamonds, skating rinks, running tracks, swimming pools, tennis courts, or weight rooms

SCHOOL

School Policy

•
• •

65% of schools surveyed report having a policy to increase physical activity among students
53% have fully implemented policies to provide a range of physical activity opportunities 46% have implemented policies to hire those with university qualifications in PE

SCHOOL

Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute: 2006 Schools Survey

Ensure Ongoing Funding of Equipment Provide a Range of Physical Activity No Cuts Policy to Promote Participation Coaches have NCCP Qualifications Hiring of University-Qualified PE Teachers Daily Recess

Daily PE
0 20 40 60 80 100

Proportion of Schools With Fully Implemented Policies (%)

SCHOOL

Family Environment

•
•

A regional study indicates that 88% of parents say their children are physically active, yet objective measures indicate that 87% are not meeting guidelines Evidence exists that parents are working to ensure activity through encouragement, financial support, transportation and volunteering

FAMILY AND PEERS

Peer Influence

•

A review of literature from 19992005 concluded a positive association exists between physical activity and friend support

• More participants indicated friends
participation is associated with unstructured vs. structured physical activity.

FAMILY AND PEERS

Peer Influence

“They all played so I joined too”

“Friends taught and encouraged me”

FAMILY AND PEERS

Proximity and Accessibility

•

92% percent of parents surveyed feel that there are adequate programs and facilities for their kids to be active locally 58% of Canadian municipalities surveyed offer discounted fee structures for families to help encourage and promote physical activity

•

COMMUNITY AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

Usage of Facilities, Programs, Park and Playgrounds

•

Only 15% of parents report frequent use of programs and facilities and 34% of report frequent use of parks and spaces

COMMUNITY AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

Community Programming

• •

84% of Canadian municipalities report that they offer physical activity programming or scheduling targeted towards families – an increase since 2000 The majority of Canadian parents also report that the programs and facilities meet the needs of their children well or very well

COMMUNITY AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

Perceptions of Safety and Maintenance

• •

For over a decade, perceptions of neighbourhood safety have remained high in parents of preschool children 83% of youth report that their neighbourhood is safe for younger children to play outside

COMMUNITY AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

Municipal Policies and Regulations

•

One quarter of municipalities have guidelines specifying bicycle racks at public buildings and only 20%-40% indicate having specific policies requiring safe pedestrian and bicycle routes when retrofitting existing communities or developing new areas

COMMUNITY AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

Federal Government Strategies and Investments

•

While there have been some promising investments for sport and recreation infrastructure in 2008, the actions for the Standing Committee on Health Report from 2007 need attention Federal transfer payments on sport and physical activity have dropped slightly despite a promise of 1% of federal health funding to be directed at health promotion in 2007

•

POLICY

Provincial Government Strategies and Investments

•

The collective goal declared by provincial Ministers of Sport, Physical Activity and Recreation to increase physical activity levels by 2015 provides an impetus to reinforce provincial strategies and investments, but there needs to be increased attention given to gathering data and evaluative information on these various strategies

POLICY

Sport, Physical Activity and Recreation Ministers: 2015 National Physical Activity Targets

•

By 2015, for children and youth aged 5 to 19 years:

•
•

to increase, by seven percentage points the proportion of children and youth who participate in 90 minutes of moderate-tovigorous physical activity
to increase the average number of steps taken by all children and youth from 11,500 steps to 14,500 steps per day, which is equivalent to an increase of 30 minutes of physical activity per day.

POLICY

Comprehensive Approach to Sport and Physical Activity: Sport Matters Group

Inc reased federal investment in sport and physic al ac tivity to a minimum of $500 million/year, so that Canada meets its target of investing the equivalent of 1% of the health c are spending on sport and physic al ac tivity Infrastruc ture Substantial long- term investments to erase the infrastruc ture Funds defic it (estimated at $15 billion) in sport and rec reation and address new demands in growing c ommunities (projec ted at $18), through partnerships with the provinc es, territories, munic ipalitie T ax Measures Innovative tax measures to enc ourage greater partic ipation in sport and new sourc es of funding from the private sec tor and the public Leadership New federal leadership strategies inc luding a Cabinet Minister Changes responsible for Sport, Physic al Ac tivity and an integrated departmental c orporation or separate agenc y responsible for sport and physic al ac tivity polic y implementation

Investment T argets

POLICY

Industry, Philanthropic and Research Investments

•

There has been an increase in support from philanthropic, research and industry funding sources in the area of physical activity – continued engagement and enhanced involvement of these sectors is critical to further facilitating behaviour change

POLICY

The Report Card serves as...

•

A public awareness mechanism and call to action through a nationwide media advocacy strategy An accountability index for all Canadians A surveillance synthesis mechanism An advocacy tool for physical activity leaders and orgs A policy driver A process for identifying research and surveillance needs A challenge to other countries and jurisdictions to implement similar processes to allow comparisons and facilitate improvements

• • • • • •

2009 Report Card Research Work Group

• •

Chair – Mark Tremblay CHEO Research Institute Coordinator - Rachel Colley CHEO Research Institute Cora Craig / Sue Cragg CFLRI Ian Janssen Queens University

• •

Louise Masse University of British Columbia John Spence University Alberta Doug Willms University of New Brunswick Michelle Brownrigg Active Healthy Kids Canada

•
•

•
•

•

Steve Manske/Erin Hobin University of Waterloo

Data Sources
•
Key data sources: • Health Behaviour of School-aged Children Survey (HBSC) • Tell Them from Me Survey (TTFM) • Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute: 2005 Physical Activity Monitor; 2006 Survey of Canadian Schools; CANPLAY Survey; 2004 Survey of Municipalities • Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) • National Longitudinal Survey on Children and Youth (NLSCY) • Participation and Activity Limitation Survey, Statistics Canada (PALS) • SHAPE Survey (Alberta Preschoolers) • WEB-Span Survey (Alberta) • School Health Action Planning and Evaluation System (SHAPES) • SHAPES: School Health Environment Survey In addition, the long form Report Card includes a comprehensive set of references and a variety of specific recommendations in each section and can be accessed at activehealthykids.ca.

•

2008 Report Card Supporters

The 2009 Report Card is supported by the Public Health Agency of Canada and:

activehealthykids.ca


				
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