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					ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEM MANAGEMENT (EPSM)

ED72.04 ED72.05 ED72.07 ED72.08 ED72.09 ED72.10 ED72.11 ED72.21 ED72.22 ED72.23

Organization and Finance of a Power Utility Demand – Side Management Power System Design and Operation Power Distribution Systems DC and Flexible AC Transmission Computer Aided Power System Analysis Rural Electrification and Distributed Generation Power System Dynamics and Stability Power Sector Management Under Deregulation Optimization and AI Applications in Power System

2(2-0) 2(2-0) 3(2-3) 3(3-0) 3(2-3) 3(2-3) 3(3-0) 3(2-3) 3(3-0) 3(2-3)

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ASIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENT, RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT ED72.04 Organization and Finance of a Power Utility 2(2-0) Semester: August

Rationale: Efficient organization and well-managed finance are essential for a successful electric utility. This course is intended to give an overview of the organization and management of power utilities. It is designed to introduce new concepts and technologies in utilities operation, particularly on management decision making. Catalog Description: The policy and objectives of a power utility under given environment; management and account information; investment and finance; tariff; environmental constraints; marketing and public relation. Pre-requisite: None Course Outline: I. Management and Its Goals 1. Organization and Management 2. The Management Process 3. Managerial Skills and Managerial Performance 4. Policy and Objectives of a Power Utility 5. The Goal of a Firm Utility Financial Accounting 1. Balance Sheet, Income Statements & Cash Report 2. Depreciation 3. Interest Charges during Construction 4. Financial Statement Analysis Investment Proposal 1. Interest and Compounding 2. Measure of Price - Public versus Private Perspective 3. Economic Evaluation of Investment Proposal 4. Internal Rate of Return, Pay-Back Period Levelized Costs of Generation 1. Generating Systemm Costs 2. Basic Concept of Cost Levelization 3. Levelized Bus Bar Cost Electricity Tariffs 1. Traditional Approach 2. Long-run Marginal Costs 3. General Principles of Tariff Construction 4. Objectives of Tariff

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ED72.04 Organization and Finance of a Power Utility 2(2-0) VI. Utility Organization 1. Functional Structure 2. Divisional Structure 3. Matrix Structure 4. Hybrid Structure Electricity Industry and Market of Today and Tomorrow 1. Main Concerns of Electric Utilities 2. Performance of Electric Utilities 3. Power Sector Changes 4. Dynamic, Spot and Real Time Pricing 5. Regulatory Aspects - Towards Deregulation 6. System Planning under Evolving Utility Structures Computerized Electric Utility Management Game

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Laboratory Session: None Textbook: Lecture Notes Reference Books: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Steven Stoft, Power System Economics: Designing Market for Electricity, IEEE Press, Wiley-Interscience, 2002. D. Glorian (Chairman of Committee), Performance of Generating Plant, World Energy Council, 2001. K. M. Bartol and C. David: Management, 2nd Edition Martin McGraw-Hill, INC., 1994. T. W. Berrie: Electricity Economics and Planning, IEE Power Series, 1992. H. Levy and M. Sarnat: Capital Investment and Financial Decisions, 5th Edition, Prentice Hall, 1994. C. P. Stickney and R. L. Weil: Financial Accounting, Dryden Press, 1994. J. F. Weston, and E. F.: Brigham Essential of Managerial Finance, Dryden Press, 1990. Least-Cost Electric Utility Planning, Stoll, John Wiley, 1989.

Journals and Magazines: 1. 2. 3. 4. Financial & Accounting Systems, U.S.A IEEE Transactions on Power Systems, U.S.A. Management Accounting, U.S.A Proceedings of the IEEE, U.S.A.

Grading System: The final grade will be computed from the following constituent parts: midsem exam (40%), final exam (40%), assignment/project (20%). Open book examination is used for both mid-sem and final exams. Instructors: Prof. Surapong Chirarattanon
School Recommendation: SERD Forum 3.1; 14/3/2003 Academic Senate Approval: ADRC Endorsement: AS 03.58; 30/7/2003 AA 03.23; 23/6/2003

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ASIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENT, RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT ED72.05 Demand - Side Management 2(2-0) Semester: August

Rationale: An emerging trend in reducing cost and optimizing resource use in an electric utility is to promote efficiency of electricity use and to encourage customers to shift away from the system load peak while filling the system load valley. Concurrently there is a global development of the electric utility service towards deregulation. This course is intended to introduce concepts and practices in management of customer demand, and evaluation methodology of program success. It examines the methodologies for assessing the impact of energy efficiency and load management technologies on the utility‟s load shape. It would also examine the development of deregulation in the electric utility service and the emergence of integrated energy services in the industry. Catalog Description: The concepts and methods of Demand Side Management (DSM); customer load control; strategic conservation and load management technologies; customer incentives, program design, assessment of program penetration and impact on system load shape; cost/benefit analysis and feasibility of DSM program: utility deregulation; steps in reorganization of integrated electric services. Pre-requisite: None Course Outline: I. Concepts and Methods of DSM 1. Load Control, Energy Efficiency, Load Management 2. DSM Planning, Design, Marketing, Impact Assessment Customer Load Control 1. Direct, Distributed, and Local Control, Interruptible Load 2. Assessment of Impact on Load Shape Strategic Conservation and Load Management Technologies 1. Strategic Conservation, Improving Building Envelope, Air-Conditioning, Lighting 2. Electric Motor, and other Industrial Processes and Equipments 3. Load Shifting and Load Leveling through Thermal Energy Storage Customer Incentives, Program Marketing Design, and Assessment of Program Penetration 1. Type of Incentives and Programs, Program Design 2. Use of Analytic Hierarchical Process for Assessment of Customer Acceptance and Program Penetration Assessment of Impact on System Load Shape 1. Energy Audit and Assessment of Customers' Load Shape 2. Impact of DSM Programs on Load Shapes in Customer Groups, Categorized in Economic Subsectors, and by Geographical Location

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ED72.05 Demand - Side Management 2(2-0) VI. Cost/Benefit Analysis and Feasibility of DSM Program 1. DSM Program Costing and Load Shape Impact on System 2. DSM Program Cost/Benefit and Feasibility 3. Environmental Benefits

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Integrated Electric Utility Service under Deregulated Situation 1. Institutional, Legal, and Political Environments and the Stages of Development of Electric Utility Service 2. The Mechanism of Competition and Development of the Financial Environment for Economic Utilization of Resources for Electric Service

Laboratory Session: None Textbooks: 1. 2. 3. 4. C.W. Gellings, and J.H. Chamberlin: Demand-Side Management: Concepts & Methods, Fairmont Press, 1988. C. W. Gellings, and J. H. Chamberlin: Demand-Side Management Planning, Fairmont Press, 1993. Task VI, Existing Mechanisms for Promoting DSM and Energy Efficiency in Selected Countries, Research Report No.1, International Energy Agency, 1998. K. Livik and S. Fretheim (ed.): Deregulation of the Nordic Power Market: Implementation and Experiences 1991-1997, Norwegian Electric Power Research Institute, Norway, 1997. C. O. Bjork: Industrial Load Management: Theory, Practice and Simulations, Amsterdam, 1989. Hiroshi: Demand-Side Management of the Electric Power Industry in Japan, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 1992. D. R. Limaye, and V. Rable: International Load Management: Methods to Practice, Firmont Press, 1988. Proceedings of ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings and Industies, 1990-1999. Association of DSM Professional Energy Policy IEEE Power Engineering Review International Journal of Electrical Power and Energy Systems Proceedings of the IEEE Strategies

Reference Books: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Journals and Magazines: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Grading System: The final grade will be computed from the following constituent parts: assignments/semester paper (15%), mid-sem exam (35%), final exam (50%). Open book examination is used for both mid-sem and final exams. Instructors: Prof. Surapong Chirarattanon
School Recommendation: SERD Forum 3.1; 14/3/2003 Academic Senate Approval: ADRC Endorsement: AS 03.58; 30/7/2003 AA 03.23; 23/6/2003

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ASIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENT RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT ED72.07 Power System Design and Operation 3(2-3) Semester: August

Rationale: Power system networks are experiencing rapid growth in their size requiring increased interconnections between different utilities, especially in the developing countries. For coordinated operation of these systems, computer based dispatch centers are being set up which perform various energy management system (EMS) functions. The operation of interconnected systems also require formulating proper design criteria for setting up of new generating plants, EHV transmission networks and grid. Further, recent design practices must be adopted in selection of various associated equipments. This course is intended to expose the students to some of the design and operation practices being adopted in the modern power system networks. Catalog Description: Planning of power systems; design and operating criteria; system protection; automatic generation control; computer aided systems monitoring and communication; computer laboratory sessions on use of application software and sample system studies. Pre-requisite: None Course Outline: I. Planning of Power Systems 1. Evolution of Power Systems 2. Structure of Power Systems 3. Various Factors in Power System Planning Design and Operating Criteria 1. Various Dynamics of Power Systems 2. Transients Phenomena Time Range Effects and Control Measures 3. Methods of Transient Analysis 4. EHV Network Design, Grid Operation Transmission Line Steady State Operations 1. Transmission Line Representation (Short, Medium and Long Transmission Lines) 2. Lossless Lines 3. Maximum Power Flow 4. Line Loadability 5. Reactive power compensations System Protection 1 Design Criteria for a Protection System 2 Instruments and Tools in System Protection 3 Logical Design of Relays 4 Basic Schemes for Protection of Generators, Transformer and Transmission Lines

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ED72.07 Power System Design and Operation 3(2-3) V. Automatic Generation Control 1. Real and Reactive Power Control Loops in Generators 2. Load Frequency Control in a Single Generating Plant 3. Automatic Load Frequency Control (ALFC) of Single Area 4. ALFC for Multi Area, Tie-line Bias Control

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Computer Aided Systems Monitoring and Communication 1. SCADA and Systems Monitoring 2. Architecture and Functions of Energy Management Systems and Control Centers 3. Communication Requirements Power System Analytical Tools and Test Systems 1. Static Analytical Tools 2. Dynamic Analytical Tools 3. Various Test Systems Modern power system simulation Transients simple circuit Automatic load frequency control D. V. Deshpande: Electrical Power System Design, Tata McGraw Hill, 1993. T. Gonen: Electric Power Transmission System Engineering, John Wiley & Sons, 1988. P. Kundur: Power System Stability and Control, McGraw Hill, 1993. I. J. Nagarath, and D. P. Kathari: Power Systems Engineering, Tata McGraw Hill, 1994. J. E. Flood and P. Cochrane: Transmission System, Peter Pergrinus, 1991. Greenwood: Electrical Transients in Power Systems, John Wiley, 1991. R. H. Miller, and J. H. Malinowshi: Power System Operation, McGraw Hill Inc., 1994. X. Wang, and J. R. McDonald: Modern Power System Planning, McGraw Hill, London, 1994. British Electricity International: Modern Power Station Practice, Pergamon Press, 1991. B. M. Weedy and B. C. Cory: Electric Power Systems, Fourth Edition, 1998. IEE Proceedings Part C (Generation, Transmission and Distribution) IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery IEEE Transactions on Power Systems International Journal of Electrical Power & Energy Systems Power Transmission Design Proceedings of the IEEE

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Laboratory Session: 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 4. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Textbook: Lecture Notes

Reference Books:

Journals and Magazines:

Grading System: The final grade will be computed from the following constituent parts: midsem exam (30%), final exam (40%), labs & assignments (30%). Closed book examination is used for the mid-sem and an open book examination for the final exam. Instructor: Dr. N. Mithulananthan
School Recommendation: SERD Forum 3.1; 14/3/2003 Academic Senate Approval: ADRC Endorsement: AS 03.58; 30/7/2003 AA 03.23; 23/6/2003

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ASIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENT RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT ED72.08 Power Distribution Systems 3(3-0) Semester: August

Rationale: Distribution System is an important portion of power systems due to its high investment and its direct effect on customer. This course is intended to give an overview of the characteristics of distribution systems, power quality requirements, and protection measures. The planning and design considerations are also introduced. Catalog Description: Power supply requirements; customer classification; over-current protection devices and its coordination; power quality requirements and its control; reliability of distribution systems; planning and design consideration of distribution system; grounding and safety of distribution systems. Pre-requisite: None Course Outline: I. Introduction 1. Economic Growth and Electrification 2. The Importance of Distribution Systems 3. The Differences of Power Supply between Urban and Rural Area Load Characteristics and Consumer Classification 1. Load Survey 2. Load Fluctuation in Demand 3. Consumer Classification 4. Sensitive Load - Computer Loads Distribution Systems and Its Features 1. Distribution Systems 2. Distribution Primary Feeders 3. Bus-bar Arrangement 4. Unit Substations Power Quality Fundamentals 1. Definition of Power Quality 2. Harmonics, Voltage Sag, Interruption, Transients 3. Power Supply for Sensitive Loads Voltage Drop and Line Losses 1. Voltage Drop Definition 2. Solution to Improve Voltage Drop 3. Line Losses Definition 4. Calculation of Line Losses 5. Function of Capacitors, Optimal Placement

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ED72.08 Power Distribution Systems 3(3-0) VI. Reliability of Distribution System 1. Fundamentals 2. Factors Effecting on Reliability Planning and Design Consideration of Distribution System 1. Distribution Systems Planning 2. Distribution Systems Design Consideration 3. Automation of Distribution System Operation Distribution System Automation 1. Introduction 2. Objectives 3. Contents 4. Automation and Reliability 5. Examples

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Laboratory Session: None Textbook: 1. J. J. Burke: Power Distribution Engineering - Fundamentals and Applications, Marcel Dekker, 1994.

Reference Books: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. J. J. Burke: Power Distribution Engineering, Marcel Deker, In, 1994. H. L. Willis: Power Distribution Planning Reference Book, Marcel Dekker, Inc.1997. R. C. Dugan: Electrical Power Systems Quality, McGraw-Hill Co, 1996. E. Ladervi, and D. J. Holmes: Electricity Distribution Network Design, 2nd Edition, 1998. A. J. Pansini: Electrical Distribution Engineering, the Fairmont Press, Inc., 1992.

Journals and Magazines: 1. 2. IEEE Transaction on Power Delivery Power Engineering Journal

Grading System: The final grade will be computed from the following constituent parts: midsem exam (35%), final exam (45%), other: exercise, laboratory session, field trip, assignment (20%). Closed book examination is used for both in the mid-sem and final exams. Instructor: Dr. N. Mithulananthan

School Recommendation: SERD Forum 3.1; 14/3/2003 Academic Senate Approval:

ADRC Endorsement: AS 03.58; 30/7/2003

AA 03.23; 23/6/2003

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ASIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENT RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT ED72.09 DC and Flexible AC Transmission 3(2-3) Semester: August

Rationale: Developing countries are often facing problems in coping up with ever increasing load demands, because of lack of investments in building new generation and transmission facilities. This is where the flexible AC transmission system (FACTS) controllers come in to effect. FACTS controllers are products of FACTS technology; a group of power electronics controllers expected to revolutionize the power transmission and distribution system in many ways. FACTS controllers can increase the loadability or “distance” to voltage collapse of power system, so that additional loads can be added in the system without addition of new transmission and generating facilities. Catalog Description: Semiconductor power switches; high voltage direct current transmission; fundamentals of flexible AC transmissions; static var compensators; theyristor controlled series compensators; static sysnchronous compensators; static synchronous series compensators; unified power flow controller; application of various FACTS controller. Pre-requisite: None Course Outline: I. Introduction 1. Semiconductor Power Switches 2. Thermal Managements 3. Series and Parallel Connection of Switches Converters and Inverters 1. Fundamentals 2. Control Schemes 3. Current Source and Voltage Source Topologies High Voltage DC Transmission 1. Introduction to HVDC 2. Different Configurations of HVDC 3. HVDC Light 4. Harmonics and Filters 5. HVDC Protection 6. Merits and Demerits Traditional FACTS Controllers 1. Fundamentals (Real and Reactive Power Flow, Voltage Control) 2. Static Var Compensators (SVC) 3. Thyristor Controlled Series Compensators (TCSC) 4. Other FACTS Controllers (NGH-SSR, TCBR) VSI Based FACTS Controllers 1. Static Synchronous Compensators (STATCOM) 2. Static Series Synchronous Compensators (SSSC)

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ED72.09 DC and Flexible AC Transmission 3(2-3) 3. Unified Power Flow Controllers (UPFC) VI. Application of FACTS Controllers 1. Voltage Stability Improvement 2. Small Signal Stability Improvement 3. Transient Stability Improvement Controller Interactions 1. Generator Controllers vs FACTS Controllers 2. Among FACTS Controllers

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Laboratory Session:
1. 2. 3. 4. Simulation of HVDC link (EMTDC). SVC and TCSC application in power system (PSS/E). Switching level simulation of inverters and converters (EMTDC). Controller interactions (PSS/E)

Textbook: Lecture notes References Books:
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R. S. Ramshaw: Power Electronics and Semiconductor Switches, 2nd Edition, Kluwer Academic Press, 1993. M. H. Rashid: Power Electronics, Circuit, Devices and Application, 2nd Edition, Prince Hall, 1993. N. U. Mohan, T. M. Robbins and P. William: Power Electronics, Converters, Application and
Design, 2nd Edition, John Wiley & Sons, 2002. N. G. Hingorani and L. Gyugyi: Understanding of FACTS: Concept and Technology of Flexible AC Transmission System, Wiley-IEEE Press, December 1999. FACTS Application, IEEE Power Engineering Society, IEEE Publication December 1995.

Journals and Magazines: 1. 2. IEEE Transaction on Power Delivery IEEE Transaction on Power Systems

Grading System: The final grade will be computed from the following constituent parts: midsem exam (35%), final exam (45%), Other: exercise, laboratory session, field trip, assignment (20%). Closed book examination is used for both in the mid-sem and final exams. Instructor: Dr. N. Mithulananthan

School Recommendation: SERD Forum 3.1; 14/3/2003 Academic Senate Approval:

ADRC Endorsement: AS 03.58; 30/7/2003

AA 03.23; 23/6/2003

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ASIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENT, RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT ED72.10 Computer Aided Power System Analysis 3(2-3) Semester: August

Rationale: To pursue in-depth study leading to a career in electric utility or related organizations, it is essential to understand the tools for analysis and the phenomena in electric power systems. This course is intended to introduce students to advanced analytical tools for analysis of power systems under normal and disturbed conditions. The course aims at computer modeling power systems, mathematical techniques development and use of application software for system studies. Catalog Description: Modeling of power system components; load flow analysis; analysis of ac/dc systems; computer programming aspects; short circuit analysis; state estimation in power system; computer laboratory sessions on use of application software and sample studies. Pre-requisite: None Course Outline: I. Modeling of Power System Components 1. Basic Concepts 2. Single Phase, Three Phase Models 3. Matrix Representation of Networks 4. Bus Admittance Matrix, Bus Impedance Matrix 5. Network Reduction Techniques Computer Programming Aspects 1. Considerations for Large System Analysis 2. Sparse Matrix Techniques 3. Optimal Ordering of Nodes Load Flow Analysis 1. Formulation of Load Flow Problem, Solution Techniques 2. Newton-raphson Method 3. De-coupled, Fast De-coupled Methods Analysis of AC/DC Systems 1. Limitations of EHV AC Transmission 2. Introduction of HVDC Transmission, Principle Application, Advantages 3. Modeling of HVDC Lines in Load Flow Analysis Short Circuit Analysis 1. Effect of Short Circuits, Various Types of Faults 2. Symmetrical Components, Sequence Networks 3. Balance and Unbalanced Fault Analysis State Estimation in Power System 1. Maximum Likelihood Concepts 2. Weighted Least-Squares State Estimation Technique 3. Detection and Identification of Bad Measurements 4. Network Observability

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ED72.10 Computer Aided Power System Analysis 3(2-3) VII. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 1. 2. 3. 4.

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Computer Laboratory Sessions on Use of Application Software and Sample Studies Programming in MATLAB Iterative algorithms Introduction to power world software Simulation using power world software Newton Raphson power flow program Term project (develop power flow program) H. Saadat: Power System Analysis, McGraw-Hill, 1999. J. J. Grainger, and W. D. Stevenson: Power System Analysis, McGraw-Hill, Inc, Singapore, 1994. A. R. Bergen and V. Vittal: Power System Analysis, Prentice-Hall, 2000. R. Natarajan, Computer-Aided Power System Analysis, Marcel Dekker, 2002. J. Arrillaga, and C.P. Arnold: Computer Analysis of Power System, John Wiley & Sons, 1990. J. Arrillaga and B. Smith: AC-DC Power System Analysis, The Institution of Electrical Engineers, 1988. A. Greenwood: Electrical Transients in Power Systems, John Wiley, 1991. D. P. Kothari and I. J. Nagrath: Modern Power Systems Analysis, Tata-McGraw-Hill, 1989. P. Kundur: Power System Stability and Control, McGraw Hill, 1993. B. M. Weedy and B. J. Cory: Electric Power Systems, John Wiley & Sons, 1998. A. J. Wood and B.F. Wollenberg: Power Generation, Operation and Control, John Wiley & Sons, New York, USA, 1996. S. A. Nasar: Electric Power Systems, Schaum‟s Outline Series, 1990. IEEE Computer Applications in Power IEE Proceedings Part C (Generation, Transmission and Distribution) IEEE Transactions on Power Systems Power Engineering Journal, IEE

Laboratory Sessions:

Textbooks: Lecture notes

Reference Books:

Journals and Magazines:

Grading System: The final grade will be computed from the following constituent parts: assignments (20%), semester project (20%), mid-sem exam (30%), final exam (30%). Closed book examination is used for both mid-sem and final exams. Instructor: Dr. Weerakorn Ongsakul

School Recommendation: SERD Forum 3.1; 14/3/2003 Academic Senate Approval:

ADRC Endorsement: AS 03.58; 30/7/2003

AA 03.23; 23/6/2003

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ASIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENT, RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT ED72.11 Rural Electrification and Distributed Generation 3(3-0) Semester: August

Rationale: Rural electrification, which is requires huge investment, is an important concern in Asian electric power utilities. Distributed generation is one new option being promoted to solve rural electrification problems along with the some other problems of urban distribution systems. The issues such as system capacity investments, grid expansions, etc. also benefit through distributed generation. This course is intended to provide the knowledge on the importance and benefit of rural electrification, availability of resources, distributed generation technologies, technical and financial feasibility of applying distributed generation to rural and urban areas. Catalog Description: Rural electrification; distributed generation; demand for electric power: reliability evaluation: gas turbine powered distributed generators; fuel cell powered distributed generators; renewable resources distributed generators; distributed generation cost analysis; and grid interconnection option. Pre-requisite: None Course Outline: I. Rural Electrification in Developing Countries 1. Rural Economic and Social Development Considerations 2. Technologies, Costs and Choice of Technology 3. Demand and Benefits Forecasting and Program Development 4. Principles of Cost-Benefit Calculations 5. Development Goals, Financial Goals and Sources of Finance 6. Economic and Financial Analysis of Stand-alone Electrification Projects Distributed Generation (DG) versus Traditional Power Systems 1. Distributed Versus Central Station Generation 2. Traditional Power Systems Demand for Electric Power 1. Electric Power is Bought for End Uses 2. Load Curves and Load Curve Analysis 3. Coincidence Behavior and Load Curves Reliability and Reliability Evaluation 1. Reliability Indices 2. Reliability and Contingency Criteria for Planning 3. Decision Bases and Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation Cost and Economic Evaluation: 1. Costs 2. Time Value of Money 3. Decision Bases and Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation Gas Turbine Powered Distributed Generators 1. Basic Turbine Generator Concepts 2. Utility System Turbine Generators 3. Mini and Micro Gas Turbine Generators Fuel Cell Powered Distributed Generators
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ED72.11 Rural Electrification and Distributed Generation 3(3-0) 1. Fuel Cells: Using Fossil Fuel another Way 2. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells 3. Phosporic Acid, Molten Carbondate, Solid Oxide Fuel Cells VIII. Renewable Resources Distributed Generators: 1. Solar Thermal Power Generation 2. Photovoltaic (PV) Generation 3. Wind-Powered Generation Basic DG Case Examples: What to Include and How 1. DG Evaluation: Cost from Past, Present, and Future 2. Basic DG Cost Analysis 3. Cost Evaluation and Schedule of Demand Basic DG Cases: Grid Interconnection Options 1. The Power Grid 2. Pros and Cons of DG-Grid Interconnection 3. Example Case Study

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Laboratory Session: None Textbooks: Lecture notes 1. H. Lee Willis and W. G. Scott: Distributed Power Generation: Planning and Evaluation, Marcel Dekker, 2000. J. J. Burke: Power Distribution Engineering, Fundamentals and Applications, Marcel Dekker, 1994. T. Gonen: Electric Power Distribution System Engineering, McGraw-Hill 1986. M Mohan: Rural Electrification for Development: Policy Analysis and Applications, Boulder: Westview Press, 1987 G. Saunier: Rural Electrification Guidebook for Asia and the Pacific, AIT, 1992. Rural Electrification in Asia and the Far East (Report by a Panel of Experts), New York: United Nations, 1963. B. Kaye and William S: Pintz: Rural Electrification Issue Papers Honolulu, Pacific Islands Development Program/Resource Systems Institute, 1985. IEE Proceedings Part C (Generation, Transmission and Distribution) IEEE Transactions on Power Systems IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery Electrical Power and Energy Systems Electric Power Systems Research The Energy Journal

Reference Books: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Journals and Magazines: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Grading System: The final grade will be computed from the following constituent parts: midsem exam (30%), final exam (50%), assignments/projects (20%). Closed book examination is used for both in the mid-sem and final exams. Instructors: Dr. Weerakorn Ongsakul and Prof. Surapong Chirarattanon
School Recommendation: SERD Forum 3.1; 14/3/2003 Academic Senate Approval: ADRC Endorsement: AS 03.58; 30/7/2003 AA 03.23; 23/6/2003

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ASIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENT RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT ED72.21 Power System Dynamics and Stability 3(2-3) Semester: January

Rationale: Present day interconnected power system networks are characterized by their highly non linear dynamical behavior. Stability analysis is carried out at almost all stages of the power system design, operation and control to assess the dynamic response of the system to various types of disturbances and interaction of controllers. This course is aimed at providing a basic understanding to different types of stability phenomena being observed in the power system networks including the analysis methods and the design of control measures required for the improvement of system stability. Catalog Description: Basic concepts, definitions and classifications; dynamic modeling of various power system components; transient stability analysis; small signal stability analysis; methods of improvement; power system stabilizers; sub synchronous resonance; voltage stability - static and dynamic analysis, margin enhancement. Pre-requisites: Consent by instructor Course Outline: I. Basic Concepts and Definitions 1. Angular Stability (Transient, Small Signal) 2. Voltage Stability Dynamic Modeling of Power System Components 1. Generators (Non-linear and Linear Models Using d-q Transformation, Power Capability Curve) 2. Excitation System (IEEE Standard Models) 3. Turbine and Speed Governing System 4. Loads (Induction Motors and Composite Loads) 5. Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS) Devices Transient Stability Analysis 1. Single Machine - Infinite Bus System 2. Equal Area Criterion 3. Multi-machine Stability 4. Network Reduction and Numerical Integration Methods 5. Methods of Improvement Small Signal Stability Analysis 1. Eigenvalue and Participation Factor Analysis 2. Single Machine - Infinite Bus and Multi-machine Simulation 3. Effect of Excitation System and AVR 4. Improvement of Damping - Power System Stabilizer and SVS Supplementary Controls

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ED72.21 Power System Dynamics and Stability 3(2-3) V. Sub Synchronous Oscillations 1. Sub Synchronous Resonance (SSR) Phenomenon 2. Counter Measures to SSR Problems Voltage Stability 1. P-V and Q-V curves, Impact of Load and Tap-changer Dynamics 2. Static Analysis, Sensitivity and Continuation Methods 3. Proximity Indices 4. Methods to Enhance Stability Margin Introduction to Bifurcation Analysis 1. Saddle-node bifurcation 2. Hopf bifurcation and chaos 3. Other types of bifurcation 4. Chaos and Other types of bifurcations 5. Examples of different bifurcations

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Laboratory Sessions: 1. 2. 3. Small signal stability Transient stability Voltage stability

Textbooks: 1. 2. P. Kundur: Power System Stability and Control, McGraw Hill, 1994. C.W. Taylor: Power System Voltage Stability, McGraw Hill, 1994.

Reference Books: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. P. M. Anderson and A. A. Foud: Power System Control and Stability, IEEE Press, 1993. Grainger and W. D. Stevenson Jr.: Power System Analysis, McGraw Hill Inc., 1994. E. Kimbark: Power System Stability, Vol. I, II and III, IEEE Press, 1995. M. A. Pai: Energy Function Analysis for Power System Stability, Kluwer Press, 1989. CIGRE Task Force 38-02-10: Modeling of Voltage Collapse including Dynamic Phenomena, 1993. IEEE Committee Report: Voltage Stability of Power Systems: Concepts, Analytical tools and Industry Experience, Publication no. 90TH0358-2-PWR, 1990.

Journals and Magazines: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. IEE Proceedings Part-C (Generation, Transmission and Distribution) IEEE Transactions on Power Systems IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery IEEE Transactions on Energy Conversion Int. Journal 'Electrical Power and Energy Systems' Int. Journal 'Electric Power System Research' Proceedings of the IEEE

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ED72.21 Power System Dynamics and Stability 3(2-3)

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Grading System: The final grade will be computed from the following constituent parts: midsem exam (40%), final exam (40%), assignments/project (20%). Closed book examinations are used for both in the mid-sem and final exams. Instructors: Dr. N. Mithulananthan

School Recommendation: SERD Forum 3.1; 14/3/2003 Academic Senate Approval:

ADRC Endorsement: AS 03.58; 30/7/2003

AA 03.23; 23/6/2003

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ASIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENT, RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT ED72.22 Power Sector Management under Deregulation 3(3-0) Semester: January

Rationale: The organization of the electric sector in the world has been changing dramatically to allow for competition among generators and to create market condition in the sector, seen as necessary conditions for increasing the efficiency of electric energy production and distribution, offering a lower price, higher quality and secure product. This course is aimed at providing a basic understanding to different types of power system restructuring process of the world with special emphasis to the Asian countries. Catalog Description: Privatization and deregulation; components of deregulation; different models; international experiences; reform of electricity supply industry; operational issues; ancillary services; wheeling methodologies; transmission pricing. Pre-requisite: None Course Outline: I. Fundamentals of Deregulation 1. Privatization and Deregulation 2. Motivations for Restructuring the Power Industry 3. Unbundling Generation, Transmission and Distribution International Experiences 1. Deregulation Process around the World 2. Components of Restructured Systems 3. Independent System Operator (ISO): Functions and Responsibilities 4. Trading Arrangements (Pool, Bilateral & Multilateral) 5. Open Access Transmission Systems Different Models of Deregulation 1. UK Model 2. California Model 3. Australian and New Zealand Models 4. Biding Strategies 5. Forward and Future Market Reform of Electricity Supply Industry 1. Japan Model 2. Korea Model 3. Taiwan Model 4. Thailand Model Operational and Control 1. Old vs New 2. ATC 3. Congestion Management 4. Ancillary Services

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ED72.22 Power Sector Management under Deregulation 3(3-0) VI. Wheeling Charges and Pricing 1. Wheeling Methodologies 2. Pricing Strategies

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Laboratory Session: None Textbooks: Lecture notes and 1. 2. 3. M. Ilic, F. Galiana and L. Fink: Power System Restructuring: Engineering and Economics, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1998. L. L. Lai: Power System Restructuring and Deregulation, John Wiley & Sons, UK, 2001. M. Shahidehpour and M. Alomoush: Restructured Electrical Power Systems, Operation, Trading, and Volatility, Marcel Dekker, 2001.

Reference Books: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. L. Philipson and H. L. Willis: Understanding Electric Utilities and De-regulation, Marcel Dekker, 1999. S. Hunt and G. Shuttleworth: Competition and Choice in Electricity, John Wiley & Sons 1996. K. Bhattacharya, M. H. J. Bollen and J. E. Daalder: Operation of Restructured Power Systems, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2001. M. Shahidehpour, H. Yamin, and Z. Li: Market Operations in Electric Power Systems, IEEE/John Wiley & Son, 2002. S. Stoff: Power System Economics, IEEE/John Wiley & Son, 2002. S. Hunt: Making Competition Work in Electricity, John Wiley & Son, 2002. B. Murrey: Electricity Markets Investment Performance and Analysis, McGraw Hill, 1998. T. W. Berrie: Electricity Economics and Planning, IEE Power series-16, 1992.

Journals and Magazines: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. IEE Proceedings Part-C (Generation, Transmission and Distribution) IEE Transactions on Power Systems Electricity Journal Electricity Policy Journal Int. Journal „Electrical Power and Energy Systems‟ Int. Journal „Electric Power System Research‟

Grading System: The final grade will be computed from the following constituent parts: assignments/project (20%), mid-sem exam (40%), final exam (40%). Closed book examination is used for both in the mid-sem and final exams. Instructors: Dr. Weerakorn Ongsakul and Prof. Surapong Chirarattanon
School Recommendation: SERD Forum 3.1; 14/3/2003 Academic Senate Approval: ADRC Endorsement: AS 03.58; 30/7/2003 AA 03.23; 23/6/2003

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ASIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENT, RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT ED72.23 Optimization and AI Applications in Power System 3(2-3) Semester: January Rationale: Present day power systems have grown large with inter-connections to neighbouring systems. The operation of modern power systems is a complex task. For secure and optimum operation, various functions are carried out through modern Energy Management Systems (EMS). Decisions are required for various operating strategies such as Preventive Control, Emergency Control and Restorative Control. This course is intended to expose students to concepts and methodologies in optimization and AI techniques for power system operation. It aims to impart some hands-on-experience in the power system optimization through use of computer tools. Catalog Description: The realm and concepts of power system optimization; real time control of power systems; unit commitment, economic dispatch; optimal power flow; AI applications; computer laboratory session on use of application software and sample studies. Pre-requisite: ED72.10 Computer Aided Power System Analysis Course Outline: I. The Realm and Concepts of Power System Optimization 1. Introduction to Mathematical Programming 2. Linear and Non-linear Programming Techniques Real Time Control of Power Systems 1. EMS Functions 2. Security Analysis 3. Preventive Control/Restorative Control Unit Commitment 1. Constraints in Unit Commitment 2. Solution Methods of Unit Commitment 3. Dynamic Programming and Lagrange Relaxation Economic Dispatch 1. Economic Dispatch Problem 2. Solution Methods of Economic Dispatch 3. Base Point and Participation Factors Optimal Power Flow 1. Solution of Optimal Power Flow 2. Linear Sensitivity Analysis 3. Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow

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ED72.23 Optimization and AI Applications in Power System 3(2-3) VI. AI applications 1. Introduction to AI Techniques 2. Simulated Annealing 3. Evolutionary Programming

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VII. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1.

Computer Laboratory Session on Use of Application Software and Sample Studies Economic dispatch Unit commitment Optimal power flow Introduction to PSS/U-software Capacitor placement using PSS/U J. Wood and B. F. Wollenberg: Power Generation Operation and Control, John Wiley & Sons, 1996. J. A. Momoh: Electric Power System Applications of Optimization, Marcel Dekker, 2001. C. W. Bary: Operational Economics of Electric Utilities, Columbia Univ. Press, 1993. G. S. Christensen and S.A. Soliman: Optimal Long Term Operation of Electric Power Systems, Plenum Press, NY, USA, 1988. A.S. Debs: Modern Power Systems Control and Operation, EPRI Publication, USA, 1996. O. I. Elgerd: Electric Energy System Theory- An Introduction, McGraw-Hill, 1988. M. Illic and S. Liu: Heirarchical Power Systems Control, Springer, NY, USA, 1996. P. Kundur: Power System Stability and Control, McGraw Hill, 1993. J. Vardi and B. Avi-Itzhar: Electric Energy Generation: Economics, Reliability and Rates, MIT Press, 1993. Thermal Power Generation and Distribution-Achieving Higher Efficiency, Asian Productivity Organization, 1988. IEE Proceedings C (Generation, Transmission and Distribution) IEEE Transactions on Energy Conversion IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery IEEE Transactions on Power Systems Int. Journal on 'Electric Power and Energy Systems' Int. Journal on 'Electric Power Systems Research'

Laboratory Sessions:

Textbooks: Lecture Notes

Reference Books: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Journals and Magazines: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Grading System: The final grade will be computed from the following constituent parts: assignments (30%), mid-sem exam (30%), final exam (40%). Closed book examination is used for both mid-sem and final exams. Instructor: Dr. Weerakorn Ongsakul

School Recommendation: SERD Forum 3.1; 14/3/2003 Academic Senate Approval:

ADRC Endorsement: AS 03.58; 30/7/2003

AA 03.23; 23/6/2003

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