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					Francis Holland School
Newsletter February 2007
Tanzania School Link

We are delighted to announce the start of what we hope will be a very exciting friendship with St. Amedeus School in Moshi, Tanzania. We hope that this link will benefit everybody in both communities and will be extremely worthwhile. St. Amedeus is in Moshi, a small town in Northern Tanzania, at the foot of Mount Kilimanjaro. The school is currently being built by a priest called Father Wili from the local church in Moshi. He has previously built another school in the same district which has been very successful (and is where many of the photographs are from.) They are hoping to open their doors to about 300 pupils in January 2008. Students will come to the school from local primary schools and the surrounding area. It will be a mixed school and have pupils aged 11 to 16. Therefore we have the chance to be involved right from the start and to be a big part of something really special. In Tanzania almost 50% of the population live on less than $1 a day. Education is the key to providing hope for these people’s future. However only 80% of the population attend primary school and just 4% attend secondary school. It is easy for all of us there to take education for granted. We are very fortunate to go to a school as special as Francis Holland, where we are presented with so many opportunities. These children in Tanzania also long for that chance. As Father Wili says “all the children are very eager to learn”. By building a new school we will be able to give more children that chance. In a recent letter we received from Father Wili he said, “I told them (the children) about the new secondary school and they showed me all the stones which they had collected for our and their new school.” So far St. Amedeus has one store and a living room for staff. They have just started building the classrooms, and work on the dining hall, science labs, library, administration, staff houses and dormitories (as some pupils will board) will commence shortly. Therefore there is a lot to be done and our support is vital to help them achieve their aims. Continued on back page ...

From the Headmistress Dear Parents, We are delighted to welcome several new members of staff this term: Ms. Hack is the new Head of Geography. Miss Linforth joins us in the Biology department and will also be running “Green Fingers Club”. In the MFL department, Miss Derguesse joins us from Whitgift School, Croydon, and will be teaching French and German. Mrs. Barker will be teaching History and also A level Government and Politics. We wish them every happiness and success at FHS. Mrs. Norman will go on maternity leave at the end of the spring term, and, from April, Miss Tucker will be promoted to Head of the Physical Education Department. Many congratulations also to Ms Murugan who has been awarded an MA in Mathematics Education from King’s College London. Congratulations to all who were involved in South Pacific at the end of last term. This was a memorable production, involving a cast of 37 girls, from IIIrds to UVI, and a backstage team of more than twenty girls. The superb musical accompaniment was directed by Mrs Rolfe Johnson. I am most grateful to the many parents and colleagues who gave so much time and energy to ensure its success. As ever, thanks are due to the outstandingly talented and tireless director, Mrs. Oakley. Girls are currently rehearsing plays for the inter-form drama competition, which will be held during the School Birthday on Wednesday 7th February. Parents are most welcome to attend the elimination round heats for the drama competition, which will be held after school, as listed in the spring term calendar. I am delighted that Summer Camp
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2007 has already more than exceeded its sponsorship target of £3,500. This will enable us to provide a truly wonderful week’s holiday in July, free of charge, to those children selected by Westminster Social Services. My thanks to Mr. Chiverton and to the Summer Camp Committee for all their work towards this charitable initiative. We are most grateful to the Parents’ Association for supporting Summer Camp 2007 and for also buying a portable drum kit for the music department. This term, the Parents’ Association is organising a 1940s supper quiz evening. Following the

huge success of last year’s social event, early booking is advisable, because tickets are necessarily rationed! 1940s dress is optional and I have been assured that supper will not be too authentically austere. Our joint concert with Harrow will be held on Tuesday 20th March. The choir will perform Verdi’s Requiem. Please contact Mrs. Rolfe Johnson if you would like to attend.

Mrs. V.M. Durham
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– IN AID OF ‘MIJWAN WELFARE SOCIETY’
her day starts even before dawn. She milks the cow, collects it in small urns and sets about delivering it to neighbours near and far. She dare not spill a single drop since this is the only source of income that her family of eight has. Her hands shiver in the biting cold, she has no shoes to keep her warm, but she doesn’t complain. She scurries home, sweeps the house, lights the fire so that her mother, who has walked two miles to fetch potable drinking water, can make a thin broth that will see the family through the day. become bitter and cynical. Not Kaifi Azmi - he left his comfortable life in Bombay as a successful film lyricist and settled down in Mijwan, a tiny village in which he was born. It was a village frozen in time – there was no road, no electricity, and no school. Kaifi Azmi dedicated himself to uplifting the village single-handedly by founding ‘Mijwan Welfare Society’. Upon hearing this heart-wrenching story I immediately wanted to embrace Kaifi Azmi and cry buckets for all his endless effort, for his tireless work, and for inspiring me to help these underprivileged individuals. After two nights of ‘Black Comedy’, I could confidently say that the success of this play lay in the dedication, hard work, endless effort, commitment, motivation and enthusiasm of my entire team. The cast performing Black Comedy. This is the story of almost every poor girl in the villages of India. At the tender age of ten, she is expected to be a surrogate mother to her younger siblings. There is no question of her going to school because she is required to do all the housework. Daughters are regarded as burdens because they are to be ‘disposed of’ in marriage, and demands for dowry are increasing every day. It was in such a scenario that the famous Urdu poet Kaifi Azmi, whom I consider to be my grandfather, decided to step in twenty years ago. A paralytic stroke that handicapped him on the entire left side of his body would have made a lesser man sink into depression, and give up on life to I am very proud to announce that we have raised £1675.57. With all our hearts, we hope and pray that the proceeds collected will help the girls to continue standing shoulder to shoulder with their brothers, and only then will we believe that we have accomplished our biggest achievement. Before I sign off, I would like to say a heart-felt thank you on behalf of my entire team to all who donated so generously; to our Headmistress, Mrs. Durham; to the teachers for their continuous support throughout this production, and to every single person who became a part of this process that has sought to bring about freedom, equality and justice to the villages of India. Namrata Goyal, UVIKO Director

BLACK COMEDY

The cast of Black Comedy present a cheque to Mijwan Welfare Society.

SIXTH FORM ACADEMIC AND MUSIC SCHOLARSHIPS 2007-2009
Many congratulations to the following girls, who have been awarded scholarships for 2007 – 2009: Sixth Form Academic Scholarship: Letty Key Sixth Form Academic Exhibitions: Leah Sidi and Sophie Hytner Sixth Form Music Scholarship: Kate Hobden Sixth Form Music Exhibition: Sophie Hytner

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Music
For many years the music department, namely Mr Thorne, has carried a full drum kit from the music department to St Cyprian’s for all the school concerts. We were thrilled when the Parents’ Association gave the department some money last term and we were able to buy a portable kit. This also means that the Pink Ladies can be accompanied by a full kit and at the same time percussion lessons can take place on the traditional kit. So, a huge thanks to the Parents’ Association. Christmas in the music department started when members of the Senior Chamber Choir sang in the Museum at Lords Cricket Ground for the Marylebone Society’s Christmas party. It was a fascinating place to sing, with excellent acoustics, and we were met at the door by a large cardboard cut out of Shane Warne!

News

Effort, Achievement & Contribution to School

Autumn Term - 2006
Form
IIIJ IIIM IIIS LIVJ LIVM LIVS UIVJ UIVM UIVS LVD LVG LVM UVC UVK UVP LVIAD LVIHB LVISJ LVIJW UVIAA UVIRC UVIJG UVIKO

Effort

Achievement

Contribution

Miriam Sandler-Chadwick Olivia Boothman

Mo Langmuir Ruby Adler Clara Carbajo Charlotte Prinsley Rafaela Elliston Pamela Johnston Katherine Arnot Isobel Apter Isabelle Foss Candice Von der Wehl Sumayya Ahmad Celeste Chipperfield Gillian Rolet Kate Hobden Leah Sidi Mackie Siebens Gabby Lewis Deborah Blausten Charlotte Richardson Harriet Liley Coco Ishida Sophie Bellon Gibbons Charlotte Paton

Nancy Hervey-Bathurst Zoe Silkstone Numaira Choudhary Lucy Collins Xanthe Hirst Mizuki Yamada Rebecca Bowen Lotte Elton Emma Swycher Meera Rokad Olivia Hutton Sabina Assam Amy Fass Sabrina Brown Leila Jahanshahi Pandora Morris Nicola Myers Maheema Chanrai Jayna Halai Eliza Doherty Danielle Rolet Leila Alamouti Resham Tulsiani Chloe McLain Thea Waxman Rebecca Lumley Tilly Power Romy Peires Jasmine Evans Kim Tance Catherine Beagent Isabel Ogden Violet Farkas Dorothy Bourne Bianca Tristao Parisa Mohajerani Rosanna Tredwell Phoebe Robertson Emily Seward Rosanna Wakefield Francesca Shellim Alexandra Byrne Ashleigh Mindel Hannah Kent

The Senior Choir at Lords Five choirs and the string orchestra were involved in the school Carol Services on the last Wednesday of term. As usual, we started with a candlelit procession of the medieval “Hodie” and on the insistence of UVI – (“it’s our last Christmas”) the Senior Choirs sang several carols from Britten’s “Ceremony of Carols”. Some wonderful solo items from Harriett Liley, Phoebe Cope and Danielle Rolet, and some majestic organ playing from both Ollie Lallamont and Helen Smee, made it a very special service. The following morning the UVth and VIth form singers went to the Butterworth Centre in St John’s Wood to sing and play Christmas music. The
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girls were wonderful with the patients, and although we were there to give them some Christmas cheer, we also all learnt a great deal from our visit. We intend to do some more for this centre later in the year.

Five o’clock that day, and time to leave for the Lansdowne Club to perform an evening of Carols, Christmas music and readings for the members. The girls looked, sang and read beautifully and they were real ambassadors for the school. We raised £550.00 for their charity, The Richard House Children’s Hospice. The term ended with our traditional church service, and it was quite a relief to be singing “Hark the Herald”! A very busy half term, but a very rewarding one. Mrs Rolfe Johnson Director of Music
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The Senior Choir performing at the Lansdowne Christmas Charity Concert

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South Pacific

“south PaciFic? Isn’t that a bit un-P.C.?” “Racialism, sex tourism, is it really suitable for a girls’ school?” “Where are you getting the male dancers from?” These were a few of the raised eyebrows we got in response to our decision last summer to produce South Pacific. It’s the first Rodgers and Hammerstein piece that the RolfeJohnson/Oakley team has attempted, and with a cast of thirty-seven drawn from the first year to the Upper VIth, a live band, and backstage teams totting up to well over forty in number, this production kept over seventy children and about twenty adults busy for three nights, from November 29th to December 1st 2006. Let’s just say it was a very big undertaking. But as Luther Billis loves to say, “I like a project, don’t you? Get the picture?” But it was fun, a lot of fun. And to anyone who suggests its treatment of the darker themes is sugar-coated and tasteless, I say think again. Far from endorsing racial exclusion by sweeping it under a froth of high kicks and false smiles, this play exposes how destructive cultural divides and inequality can be. Emile and Nellie may find a bridge; but Cable’s
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treatment of Liat is downright nasty. Liat’s innocence can never be restored, and her mother Bloody Mary’s dream of an American meal ticket is left in tatters. Too late does Cable realise how despicable his behaviour has been, and he reacts angrily in song, railing ironically against the way “You’ve got to be carefully taught to hate and fear” anyone who isn’t like you; prejudice isn’t in-born, but learned. Leading lady Nellie Forbush hails from Little Rock Arkansas; ironically, just eight years after the musical premiered in 1949,

this same city was to explode, when nine black students challenged racial segregation in schools by attempting to enrol at Little Rock Central High School, only to be blocked by the governor of Arkansas, who brought in the state’s national guard. Musically, South Pacific is a great piece - what Mrs Rolfe Johnson calls a classic fifties musical, where the chorus plays as important a role as the leads in generating dramatic momentum. It has fantastic sing-along tunes, and tender

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scoring. By about half term, numbers like “There is Nothing Like a Dame” and the haunting “Bali Ha’I” had already escaped the rehearsal room, and could be heard in the corridors of Francis Holland during time-off moments. Theatrically, it presents interesting challenges for us to get our teeth into: how to manage location changes and where to seat the audience in Francis Holland’s irregularly hexagonal, domed hall, with no theatre wings or backstage areas to speak of; or how to create a convincing chorus of Sea Bees, the naval Construction Batallions who built and fought their way across the Pacific during America’s bitter war of attrition following the bombing of Pearl Harbour in 1941. The latter required a bit of research. Fortunately the battalions of builders working on the reconstruction of the old Abbey National HQ in Baker Street provided a useful source of cheerful chappies, perhaps bemused to find themselves more looked at than leering. Throughout rehearsals the girls enjoyed the Shakespearean irony of girls pretending to be guys singing how unique girls are; or the girls’ chorus claiming they are all going to “Wash that man right outta m’ hair” and then cheerfully abandoning their resolve to proclaim joyously that “She’s in love, she’s in love, she’s in love……”. Girl power? Yeah, right! Mrs Rolfe Johnson and I want to extend huge “luvvie” thank yous to the following: • The brilliant live band, led by Ollie Lallamont on piano, Peter Thorne on keyboard and trumpet, and Ellie Rolfe Johnson on lead violin • Expert choreographers Jo Cohn and Sue Drummond for bringing those

fantastic set-piece routines to life • Director’s assistants Gail Cornish and Michael Smee for lots of wise advice • The fabulous team of mums who helped to create the costumes, headed by Kate Langmuir; and Maria Dickens, Jo Green and especially mum Penny Thexton for charity shopping, ferreting about in the drama cupboard, labelling, mending, ironing and overseeing the backstage “organised” chaos in the wardrobe department • The Art department and caretaker Vic for creating the set (and clearing up afterwards under the direction of facilities manager Mike) • Parent Girdhar Mulchandani for lending us wonderful period props, and Vic France for collecting them all • Parent Geoffrey Marx for providing lots of last minute vital little extra costume items

• Technical expert Bill Parker for designing and rigging the show and training an enthusiastic team of Lighting and Sound girls to add magical extras to authenticate the world of the play • Colleague Jocelyn Needham and mum Vale von der Wehl for beautiful forties style hairdos and make-ups • Dan Rolfe Johnson and Phillip Price for photographs and publicity materials • And finally, but not least, to the brilliant Stage Crews: wardrobe, makeup, sound, lighting and backstage, under the leadership of Camille Sidi, assisted by Helen Smee without whom Mrs Oakley really would have gone completely bonkers! Mrs. Oakley Director

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Miss Addinall completes 25 years at Francis Holland School
on thursday 23 November, the school held a celebratory evening party for Miss Addinall, who at the end of last summer term had completed 25 years at the school – or, as Mrs. Durham amusingly put it, 75 terms! It was a delightful evening attended by some 100 people, including three (past and present) Headmistresses of the school and many, many colleagues from every year of Miss Addinall’s time at the school. It is a great tribute to her that so many people travelled (in some cases) huge distances to be there and mark her arriving at this very special milestone, and the atmosphere was one of laughter and conviviality. All the speeches mentioned her kindness, her steadfastness, her manifold abilities, and her immeasurable loyalty and dedication to the school. What would we do without her? Fortunately, this is a question which there is no need to address at present, and we all look forward to the next milestone! Mrs. Forde Senior Mistress Mrs. Durham, Mrs. Parsonson, Miss Addinall and Mrs. Low celebrating Miss Addinall’s 25 years of service to the school.

autumn Was a very busy term for charity fund-raising in the school. We had the sponsored walk in October where the stars of the show had to be all the beautiful dogs who arrived for an afternoon promenade in the park. The LVth have raised a large sum of money for Breast Cancer Care, and Black Comedy raised £1,700 for the Mijwan Welfare Society. Other forms have been involved in various fund raising activities during the term. We have also started our fund-raising for the Amedeus School in Moshi, Tanzania. The Help Fund has raised over £10,000 this academic year and this sum does not take into account all the fund raising activities which have taken place this week. Thank you, everyone, for your hard work. Miss Last, Mr. Clayton, Miss Gustave and Mrs. Elderkin Help Fund Committee

Help Fund

Miss Addinall’s cake, prepared by the school chef, Stephen King

The Drama Competition Wednesday February 7th, 2007
the annual drama comPetition offers an opportunity for girls interested in Drama to gain experience of choosing, directing, writing, designing for or acting in a play of their own choice. In theory, the plays are produced entirely by the girls themselves, without staff involvement, though younger girls may seek help from their Sixth Form Prefects. Plays for the Final are chosen by a Drama Panel, comprising one girl from each Tutor Group in the year groups participating, two members of staff and the girls in the LVI who study Theatre Studies at AS. There are three evenings of elimination rounds in the week before the Competition: plays must be at performance standard to be considered for the Final. The Competition takes place in February of each year. There is an external Adjudicator, and this year we are delighted to welcome back Mrs. Rosemary Goodman, who retired recently from teaching Speech and Drama at Francis Holland School, and who currently works as an actor and director in St. Albans. Prizes are awarded for best play, best director, best production, best actress, and possibly for best supporting actress. Miss Williamson Head of English and Drama
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the end oF term assembly in December was an emotional event! Not only did the school participate in a rendition of The Twelve Days of Christmas in traditionally energetic style, but Mrs Piercy announced a new school prize that she has most kindly donated as her leaving gift to the school. The new school prize, to be called “the Polished Corner Cup”, with reference to our school motto, is to be awarded annually every Christmas to the girl in the school who is deemed to have made the most significant contribution to charitable endeavours and to the school’s Help Fund. The first outstandingly worthy recipient of this prize is Charlotte Paton, UVIKO, who is a member of the Head Girls Team. Charlotte has for seven years been involved in innumerable charitable initiatives - including the Besom project - and has spent time during her summer holidays working with under-privileged children in New York. Many congratulations to Charlotte – and our enduring thanks to Mrs Piercy. Mrs. Piercy presents the Polished Corner Cup to Charlotte Paton

The Polished Corner Cup

The Duke of Edinburgh Award
many congratulations to the following girls have been awarded Bronze and Silver Duke of Edinburgh certificates: BRONZE: Ayesha Ahmed Hasti Safavi Shakira Chanrai Kate Hobden Valentine Miller Charlotte McVeigh Chloe Rosser Emily Brockmann Catherine Utting Hannahn Roeg Amy Fass Lucy Casey Letty Key Iona Denniston Mikaela Pedlow Sabrina Brown SILVER: Marie El-Khazen Sophie Lumley Julia Seal

VIth Form English trip to Dennis Severs’ House

dennis severs’ house is a truly original conception; it teaches history through sensory perception, and removes the all too familiar glass windows and red ropes from the museum experience. Each room of this terraced Spitalfields house is historically accurate, whilst being immaculately disarranged - the remnants of meals fill the kitchen and dining room, and the beds are artfully unmade - so as to give the impression that the fictitious Jervis family have recently vacated the house. Dennis Severs, the eccentric collector behind the house, sought to create a social and historical timeline from 1725 to 1919, leaving clues as to the changing family fortunes of the Jervises, so that the visitor moves upwards through the house, and forwards though time. Severs himself described the house as a ‘collection of atmospheres,’ and this, perhaps, is what makes the experience so engaging and unique. The rooms are beautiful by candlelight, full of aromatic fragrances and thick with wood smoke. The house has been described as ‘poetic’ and ‘post-materialist,’ and these terms seem appropriate; Severs’ still-life drama is about immersing ourselves in the past as if it were the present, and about being as lost in another time as we sometimes seem to be in our own time. Like poetry, the house requires interaction in order to complete itself; without the visitor’s senses the house would remain a time capsule, rather than a feast for the imagination. For the UVI English group visiting the house, this was certainly part of the appeal of the experience. The period of the house was both relevant to our study of William Blake, and a fascinating comment on the imagination. Like a good book, Dennis Severs’ house skilfully crafts verisimilitude; artefacts become usable, paintings are tactilely brought to life and, perhaps vitally, a museum in the form of a house becomes a home. The house is more of a time machine than a time capsule, and its effects are transcendental; the huge success of the house creates a wonderful, living epitaph for its age, the history of the Spitalfields area and for Dennis Severs himself, as well as being one of the most enjoyable ‘educational’ experiences to be had. Lucy Clark, UVIKO

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many congratulations to the following for their results in the UK Senior Mathematical challenges: Bronze certificates: Josephine Walton UVI Anupriya Jhawar UVI Sophie Lumley LVI Maheema Chanrai LVI Maheema Chanrai

UK Senior Mathematical Challenges

Tanzania School Link
Continued from front page ...
As our first project we had a lunch time of card making to send Christmas Cards out to the children at the existing school in Moshi. It was very successful with lots of really beautiful cards being made, which are currently en route to Tanzania. It was great fun and we are sure that the children will really appreciate them. They may even be the highlight of their whole Christmas. We also raised almost £700 at the Carol Concert (half of which is going to St. Amedeus, the other half to a local London charity, Camden Crossroads). In addition to this, the Upper Sixth also spent a really enjoyable afternoon singing carols in Marylebone Station raising money for the new school in Tanzania. We have got off to a really fantastic start with this new initiative, which we hope will progress and give rise to all sorts of new and exciting opportunities and become a large part of the Francis Holland community. Deborah Joseph Head Girl

Gold certificate: Certificate for Best in School: Mrs. Walker Head of Mathematics

Reminder to Parents

Parents oF girls wishing to give up extra-curricular activities should notify the School Office, in writing, by half term for discontinuation to be effective from the beginning of the following term.

INTERNET AWARENESS
a reminder to parents to be vigilant of their daughters’ use of the internet. Use of the Web in school is closely monitored and sites deemed to be unsuitable are blocked. However, we are aware that some sites where girls register and post personal information are not always secure and are, therefore, open to misuse. Mr. P. Phillips Head of ICT
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Future Dates for your Diary
Wednesday 7th February Mon 12th – Fri 16th February Tuesday 20th March Drama Competition and School Birthday, ends 3.30pm (approx) Spring Term Half Term Orchestral and choral rehearsals at Harrow (coach leaves FHS at 1pm) Verdi Requiem Speech Room, Harrow – 7.30pm Wednesday 28th March Thursday 29th March Parents’ Association 1940s evening – 6.30pm Speech and Drama Evening – 6pm – 8pm

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