Session 3 - Hardt by domainlawyer

VIEWS: 14 PAGES: 14

									Siemens. Answers for Canada.

Transportation and Energy
Robert Hardt, Vice President, Industry Solutions and Mobility Divisions, Siemens Canada
December 8, 2008 – Toronto Forum for Global Cities

Page 1

Copyright @ Siemens Canada Limited 2008. All rights reserved

The challenge of climate change

1950 1975 2000 2015 2025 2050

2.5 4.1 6.1 7.3 8.0 9.2 World population (in billions)
Source: UN Population Division



Increasing growth in the world population and global economy. natural resources and increase in environmentally-harmful emissions.

 Corresponding depletion of

90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

Worldwide CO2 emissions (in gigatons per year)

 Without counter measures:
85 Gt

increase in annual CO2 emissions to around 85 gigatons in 2050.

42 Gt

2000

2020

2040 2050

Source: Stern Review

Page 2

December 8, 2008 – Toronto Forum for Global Cities

Copyright @ Siemens Canada Limited 2008. All rights reserved

The challenge of urbanization

Africa

15 25

36
48 Asia 17 24 37 51 Europe 51

Urban population in % 1950 1975 2000 2025

 The spread of urbanization calls

66 72 77 South America 44 64 79 87 North America 64

for attractive, environmentallyfriendly and economic transportation solutions in order to ensure the competitiveness and appeal of urban regions in the long term.

74 79
86 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 %

0

Source: UN 2006

Page 3

December 8, 2008 – Toronto Forum for Global Cities

Copyright @ Siemens Canada Limited 2008. All rights reserved

The answer is clear



From a global study sponsored by Siemens, the findings showed there is no question that the time for electricity (rail) to make a comeback to support urban transportation is now. challenge by a large margin, and is a key factor in city competitiveness.

 Transportation is seen as the single biggest infrastructure

 With air pollution and congestion emerging as the two top

environmental challenges, stakeholders predict a strong emphasis on mass transit solutions.
 Cites are more likely to focus on incremental improvements to

existing infrastructure, rather than new systems.

Source: GlobeScan and MRC McLean Hazel

Page 4

December 8, 2008 – Toronto Forum for Global Cities

Copyright @ Siemens Canada Limited 2008. All rights reserved

The answer is clear and so is the challenge

 Public transport is far

and away the most effective approach to transport from an environmental perspective.
 However, any major shift

would require behavioural change and an expansion of capacity.

Page 5

December 8, 2008 – Toronto Forum for Global Cities

Copyright @ Siemens Canada Limited 2008. All rights reserved

Velaro high-speed trains

 Converted energy consumption of

only 0.33 liter of fuel per seat per 100 km with 100% occupancy
 Mineral oil replaced with alternative,

environmentally-compatible coolant in the transformers (with Velaro E for example)
 Wooden floors from sustainable

forestry
 Environment-friendly refrigerant in the

HVAC systems

Only 0.33 liter per seat over 100 km

Page 6

December 8, 2008 – Toronto Forum for Global Cities

Copyright @ Siemens Canada Limited 2008. All rights reserved

Combino Plus - 100% low-floor streetcars

 Energy savings up to 30%

through regenerative braking system
 No wear on brake linings due to

electric braking
 Over 90% recyclable  Reduced noise emission

Eco-friendly space saver for congestion-free urban traffic

Page 7

December 8, 2008 – Toronto Forum for Global Cities

Copyright @ Siemens Canada Limited 2008. All rights reserved

Syntegra bogie

 Fully-integrated traction, running gear and

braking technology
 Energy-savings up to 26%, e.g. through

− Elimination of gearbox − Lightweight construction − Regenerative brake system
 Fewer emissions

(oil, braking dust, abraded matter, noise)
 Wear-resistant and easy maintenance

Energy-efficient, oil-free and lighter in weight

Page 8

December 8, 2008 – Toronto Forum for Global Cities

Copyright @ Siemens Canada Limited 2008. All rights reserved

Sibac ES mobile energy storage system

 Reduced pollutant and noise emission  Recovery and storage of braking

energy for acceleration
 Up to 30% reduced primary energy

import
 Annual CO2 emissions reduced by 50 t

(e.g. in a triple-articulated Combino Plus)
 No overhead lines required e.g. for

crossing city squares or underpassing structures

Stores valuable braking energy

Page 9

December 8, 2008 – Toronto Forum for Global Cities

Copyright @ Siemens Canada Limited 2008. All rights reserved

The answer is clear -- but what is the question?

 If technology was the answer –

the discussion would be completed.
 We have numerous clean options --

from electric light rail systems, to high speed maglev trains, to integrated traffic control solutions – all which reduce emissions and costs.
 However, the real question becomes,

not how or when do we deploy technology – BUT – is the political will and support in place – and are all stakeholders in agreement.

Investment, commitment and vision equals success. The cities of Edmonton and Calgary have proven it.
Page 10 December 8, 2008 – Toronto Forum for Global Cities Copyright @ Siemens Canada Limited 2008. All rights reserved

Rail is still the right answer

 We can directly impact around 26 gigatons of the annual energy-related CO2

equivalents (CO2e) of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions
 Around 5.3 gigatons of this can be ascribed to transportation-related emissions  At around 2%, railways account for the smallest component of all transportation

modes

44 Gt CO2e
18 Gt

5.3 Gt CO2e

Rail 2%
Water 10% Aviation 12%

Non energy-related GHG emissions (agriculture, forestry) Energy-related GHG emissions (particularly CO2)
5.3 Gt

Road 76%
26 Gt

Source: IEA World Energy Outlook, Vattenfall, Siemens

Total GHG emissions

Transportation-related GHG emissions

Page 11

December 8, 2008 – Toronto Forum for Global Cities

Copyright @ Siemens Canada Limited 2008. All rights reserved

Combining costs and efficiency savings is a win-win model

Intelligent solutions for more environmental sustainability:
Eurorunner 13 dB(A) quieter and up to 16% more economical Velaro Only 0.33 liter of fuel per seat per 100 km ZLS 901 Route setting system Fewer stops mean lower energy consumption Sitras SES Saves up to 300 tons CO2 due to recovered braking energy

Syntegra trucks Energy-efficient, oilfree and lightweight

Metro Oslo With 95% recyclability, valuable to the end

Transrapid 75% cleaner than an airplane at 400 km/h

Combino Plus Eco-friendly large space streetcar for congestionfree city traffic

Page 12

December 8, 2008 – Toronto Forum for Global Cities

Copyright @ Siemens Canada Limited 2008. All rights reserved

Sustainability drives productivity in industry

“When there is a benefit, people buy in. That is what leadership should provide: clarity on what it’s all about, rather than frightening people with potential problems. We have to simplify it to the fact that sustainability solutions provide benefits and enhance people’s lives.”
Robert Hardt

Page 13

December 8, 2008 – Toronto Forum for Global Cities

Copyright @ Siemens Canada Limited 2008. All rights reserved

Thank you.

Page 14

December 8, 2008 – Toronto Forum for Global Cities

Copyright @ Siemens Canada Limited 2008. All rights reserved


								
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