Summer Internship by domainlawyer

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									Southeast Missouri Regional Tech Prep Internship Program

Schedule
June 13
Monday 8:00 – 11:30 Introduction Overview Foundations of Integration 11:30 – 12:30 Lunch 12:30 – 4:00 Program I Introduction

June 14
Tuesday 8:00 – 11:30 Program I Activities

June 15
Wednesday 8:00 – 11:30 Program I Conclusion

June 16
Thursday 8:00 – 11:30 Program II Activities

June 17
Friday 8:00 – 11:30 Program II Conclusion

11:30 – 12:30 Lunch 12:30 – 4:00 Program I Activities

11:30 – 12:30 Lunch 12:30 – 4:00 Program II Introduction

11:30 – 12:30 Lunch 12:30 – 4:00 Program II Activities

11:30 – 12:30 Lunch 12:30 till Completion Lesson Plan Writing and Project Conclusion

The Concept
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Our proposal centers on bringing in academic teachers to a vocational school for a one week internship rather than employment in business and industry. The academic teachers would choose two of four vocational programs and spend two days of intense hands-on activities within the programs. The fifth day of the program would be an overview of vocational programs and the development of lesson plans that integrate academic and vocational objectives. We feel this would develop the cooperation between academic teachers and vocational teachers, allow for the development of integrated lessons, and increase the number of participants in the Internship program.

Goals
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GOAL 1: Promote the Tech Prep Concept. GOAL 2 Provide professional development and leadership training necessary to meet all Tech Prep goals. GOAL 3 Develop curriculum and instruction for workforce education. GOAL 4 Assist students in making education career choices. GOAL 5 Develop Business, Education, and Community Partnerships. GOAL 6 Improve student competencies in academics, particularly in the areas of math, sciences, communication skills, critical thinking, and problem solving skills. GOAL 7 Increase student enrollment in secondary and postsecondary education and/or apprenticeship training programs. GOAL 8 Improve qualitative and quantitative evaluation systems to demonstrate accountability.

Objective 1
Provide a seamless education path, including early career exploration, starting in secondary school and leading to an associate degree with expanded/enhanced competencies beyond current secondary school and associate degree programs.
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Objective 1A: Seamless curriculum pathways ensure students are prepared for higher education. Objective 1B: Attainment of competencies leads to employment in technology based careers. Objective 1C: Curriculum responds to changing labor market needs. Objective 1D: Curriculum will reflect early career education and lifelong learning needs.

Objective 2
Expand the enrollment of Tech Prep students to better serve Missouri's labor market needs.
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Objective 2A: Fifteen percent of all 11-12th grade students in public education will be enrolled in Tech Prep by the year 2000. Objective 2B: Sixty-six percent of students completing the high school portion of Tech Prep will directly enroll in stateassisted colleges and universities by the year 2002. Objective 2C: Twenty-five percent of students enrolled in Tech Prep will be from groups traditionally underrepresented in technology-based occupations.

Objective 3
Ensure that teaching and learning reflects the needs of all students.
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Objective 3A: Teaching and learning reflects an applied, inquiry-based, problem-solving approach. Objective 3B: Curriculum reflects a competency based profile.

Objective 4
Maximize the opportunities afforded by all relevant initiatives, resources, and participating partners.
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Objective 4A: Create new and enhance existing partnerships among business, industry, labor, community organizations, and education. Objective 4B: Capitalize on available regional, state, and federal resources/initiatives to enhance Tech Prep's success. Objective 4C: Continue successful consortia functions and consortia governance structures.

The Program would:
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Allow 50 to 60 academic teachers to have hands-on experience in one to four vocational programs and develop a better understanding of what CTE is all about Allow the development of 100 to 120 lesson plans that have all the appropriate components and that integrate academic and CTE curriculum Develop a great lesson plan resource bank that could be accessed by teachers throughout the state

Participants
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The Southeast Missouri Tech Prep Consortium

Area College  North County Unitec  Perryville CareerTech  Arcadia Valley CareerTech  Cape Girardeau Career Center

 Mineral

2005 Participating Schools
Arcadia Valley Career Center Cape Central Middle School Cape Central Junior High Cape Central High School Cape Girardeau Career Center Jackson High School John Evans Middle School Marquand-Zion High School Meadow Heights R-II Mineral Area College North County Middle School Notre Dame High School Perryville Area Career Center Perry County Middle School Perryville Elementary School Perryville High School Ste Genevieve Middle School Ste Genevieve High School St. Pius High School Valle Catholic Schools Woodland High School

CTE & Academic Integration
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Participants are required to incorporate the CTE experiences into your existing lesson plans. The idea is to not create all new lesson plans, but to incorporate the CTE activities into three of your current lessons.

Sample Lesson Format
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Class: Instructor: Subject Area: Curriculum Objective: CTE Competency: Content Standard Alignment: (Missouri Show-Me Standards) Process Standard Alignment: (Missouri Show-Me Standards) Sub-skills: Learner Activity: Assessment Activity Method of Assessment: Resources: Reflection/Lesson Evaluation:

Welding Technology
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Welding class participants were educated on proper usage of a TIG and MIG welder as well as cutting and soldering of metals. Participants were able to utilize their new knowledge to construct a personal metal art project. This was a problem solving project for an individual to learn to design and complete a simple work of metal art product.

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Welding Technology
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Students were able to recognize and identify basic safety procedures. Students were able to identify and discuss the basic steps in sketching and constructing isometric drawings. Students recognized and identified the types of metal needed to complete their projects. Students were able to figure a “bill of materials” with prices given. Students were able to transfer measurements from a working drawing to metal and weld. Students developed a sense of teamwork by assisting each other by cutting, bending, and fabricating. Students utilized their creativity and sketching abilities. Students were given instruction and practice in using the basic hand tools necessary for welding fabrication. Students were given instruction and practice in basic lay out and interpretation of working drawings. Students developed appropriate safety procedures. Students became aware of shop and personal safety hazards around them, and performed proper shop clean up procedures.

Auto Collision Technology
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Students were educated on shop management and safety procedures. Students learned sub-straight preparation techniques. Students were educated on various paint gun techniques. Students participated in applying primers, basecoats, vermilion custom colors as well as final clear coats. Students learned the different types of undercoats and their particular uses.

Building Trades
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Students were educated on appropriate shop and workplace safety procedures Students learned the basic wiring principles including electrical math Students participated in a lesson that used previously learned math skills to apply square foot formulas to actual construction applications Students learned proper safety procedures for tools such as a circular saw and a jig saw Students learned the importance of following blueprints and the application of construction tools Students participated in building a step stool that utilized skills such as use of power tools, reading a tape measure, correctly using hand tools, and reading blue prints.

Graphic Communications
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Students learned the definition of graphic arts and its role in the community Students learned proper shop safety techniques Students learned about work orders and how they are filled out appropriately Students learned hands on calculating of paper cuts and cutting paper on hydraulic knife Students developed an understanding of Page Maker and In Design computer programs that are used in the graphic communications workplace Students participated in a lesson in which they designed a business card from the computer program, printed sheet of card to be shot in dark room, making negatives, making plates for use on printing press, printing of cards on press, proper cutting of cards on hydraulic knife, and computing job cost Students designed a T-shirt Students made a screen for printing Students participated in printing T-shirts

Program Evaluation and Comments
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Would you attend this program again next year or favorably recommend it to a colleague? Why or why not? What did you like best about the internship program? What did you like least about the internship program? Will your experiences during the program assist you in developing your curriculum? Will your experiences during the program allow you to change any teaching methods or assist you in changing some of your curriculum? Has your perception of Career Technical Education (vocational) changed as a result of the Internship? If so how? What are the next steps that need to be taken to encourage academic and CTE integration of curriculum? Would you consider working with a CTE instructor on a joint lesson during the coming year? Why or Why not?


								
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