Docstoc

Science Informs Us with Observat

Document Sample
Science Informs Us with Observat Powered By Docstoc
					Science Informs Us with Observation, Perception, and Photographs That Tell a Story
 

Unit Designer: Dianne Renton  Grade:  9‐12  Subject/Topic Areas: Special Education: Environmental Science  Anchor Work and Artist:  Untitled (Boy under Bridge) by Gregory Crewdson 
Funding provided by the Massachusetts Cultural Council 

 
Unit Overview 
In this unit, students uncover what they think  science, observation, hypotheses and  perspectives are.  Through experiences, they  discover that science is an ongoing process that  happens every day as we question, look for more  information, make observations, and make  informed guesses or hypotheses about what we  think something is.  They discover that what we  sense is affected by our prior knowledge and perspectives. Students uncover meaning in science through  immersion in their own observations, hypothesis making, and decision making in the science class with  carry over into their everyday lives.  Students also learn that decisions they make today effect the present  and potentially in the future.   

______________________________________________________________________________ 

 
Essential Questions  
1. What is science:  Is it information in a book?  Is it something that has been discovered?  Does it  change?  Stay the same? Is it happening around them?  Is it a part of their world?  Is it  relevant to them?  2. What is a hypothesis?    3. How does observation fit into their world?  What is “perspective” in science?    4. How does a picture tell a story?  What story does it tell?  Is the story the same for everyone?   How does this relate to science history?  Science today?   

  Objectives 
Students will be able to:  1. Make observations, raise questions and formulate hypotheses.    2. Communicate observations to their partner, small group or whole class.    3. Defend their hypotheses using the observations they made, and/or accept criticism if their  observations do not hold up to the critical comments.    4. Use language and vocabulary clearly and logically.  5. Use a camera to tell a story about the Housatonic River.    6. Work in a group to create a staged photograph in the Pittsfield environment.   

      1

Assessment 
 

       

Students are assessed daily using a scale of 1‐10 that has 2 points each for participation, focus,  following directions, staying on task and appropriate behavior.  This assessment is done quickly  at the end of each class with the student suggesting the number, teacher giving feedback, back  and forth until there is agreement. 

 
Prior Learning Required 
 

• • •

Biology  Ability to read and write at a minimum 3rd grade level  Oral fluency 

 
Vocabulary 
 

  Science      Observation    Perspective    Environment    Hypothesis    Staged Photograph  _____________________________________________________________________________________ 

 
Lesson 1    OBSERVATION Overview  
 

     

This lesson prepares students for making observations and gives them experience in  observation.  Students are able to draw upon their prior knowledge, apply their observation  skills, and self‐check. 

 
Essential Question  
 

 

What are inquiry skills? 

  Objectives 
Students will be able to:   1. Understand that observation is a scientific skill.    2. Pose questions and form hypotheses based on personal observations.   3. Identify reasons for inconsistent results.   4. Communicate with partners and class the results of their observations. 

 
Assessment  
      Students will reflect on the activity and write a journal entry.    Each student will assess his participation, focus, following directions, staying on task and  behavior on a 1‐10 scale with the teacher.  This will be recorded for class participation daily.  

    2

Vocabulary  
      Observation  Hypothesis, Hypotheses  Communication 

  Materials  
            Sufficient copies of Gregory Crewdson’s Untitled  (North by Northwest) for each group of 2     Sufficient copies of Crewdson’s Untitled (House  Fire) (See right)   Paper and writing implements for students to  record   observations.  

 
Engaging Experience 
 

     
 

Ask students what they think “observation” is.  Write answers on an overhead projector as they  are proposed.  Then have students do the activities.  

Activities 
1. Pair off students and give each pair a copy of the Crewdson postcard, Untitled (North by  Northwest.)    2. Designate one student in each pair as the Observer, the other as the Investigator.    3. Give the Observer 60 seconds to view the postcard.  (The Investigator does not look at the  picture.)   After 60 seconds, have the Investigator ask the Observer questions.    4. After about 3 minutes of questioning and writing down the observations, have each Investigator  create a scenario that reflects what s/he learned from the Observer.    5. With the information that the Investigators have, invite students to share with the whole class  their reconstruction of what they think was seen by the Observers.    6. Have students share the post cards.    7. Lead a discussion to uncover what the Observers did well, how Observers and Investigators  communicated, what each learned through the experience, what they would do differently the  next time, etc.    8. Ask the Investigators to discuss the process of investigation, communication problems, etc.  9. Ask the Observers about their experience making observations.    10. Ask again what they think observation is and put their answers on the overhead acrylic in a  column next to the earlier answers to this question.   11. Compare the differences between what they thought before the experience with and what they  understand after the experience.   12. Ask students to make a journal entry: “What do they think they learned from this experience?   How was it helpful to have this experience?”    13. Pass out another picture and reverse the roles of the students with Observers becoming the  Investigators and the Investigators becoming the Observers. Go through the process again.  14. When the process is complete, ask students to make another journal entry.    _____________________________________________________________________________________ 

   
 

3

Lesson 2    WHAT   Overview  
 

IS SCIENCE AND HOW IS IT COMMUNICATED?

           

A self‐written synopsis of the history of science will be told as a story to the students.  This is to  engage the students in appreciating how early science began through observation, just as  science is done today but without all the technology.  Students will understand the necessity of  communicating or passing on information for the benefit of later generations as well as others   living at that time. Students will feel connected to science through the simple early  communication of cave men.   

  Essential Questions  
 

1. How do I use/experience/see science in my daily life.    2. What is the importance of passing information along to others?   

 
Objectives  
 

Students will be able to:  1. Recognize that early man interacted with his environment.  2. Identify factors in an ecosystem that might be important to early man.   3. Communicate scientific ideas.  4. Fully participate in the activity, including discussions before and after the activity.   

 
Assessment 
 

       
 

Students reflect on the activity and write a journal entry.   Each student assesses her/his participation, focus, following directions, staying on task, and  behavior on a 1‐10 scale with the teacher.  Record this daily as “class participation.” 

Vocabulary 
    Communication: Sharing or imparting information with/to others through any media, including  oral, written, recorded, web based, magazines, books, etc.  

 
     

Materials   
 

Large construction paper, beige.   Red watercolor paint (to represent blood used for paint).  Charcoal to represent early cave man drawing material.   

 
Engaging Experience  
 

     

Tell students that they are cave dwellers, living about 25,000 years ago.   They know some  scientific information that they must pass on to other cave dwellers who may use the cave at a  later date.  

     
4

Activities 
 

1. Give students a piece of paper and tell them that it represents the sides of the cave.  Ask them  to pass a message along (without words) to future cave dwellers that will be preserved on the  cave wall.    2. Ask students:  “What kinds of methods might be used today to communicate scientific  information?”  3. As students complete their cave drawings, hang them on the classroom wall.  4. Have students write in their journals about communication in cave dweller days and today. Ask  them to compare/contrast the differences.     _____________________________________________________________________________________ 

 
Lesson 3     WHAT

IS SCIENCE?

 
Overview  
            Students experience meaning making from putting together bits of information (puzzle pieces)  first individually, then in small groups and larger groups.  They experience group work, group  dynamics, the importance of sharing information and ideas, and collaboration.  They also  observe carefully, piece together information, create  hypotheses, share ideas, and  communicate with others.  They experience the process of uncovering information, the process  of science.  

 
Essential Question 
 

 

 

What is science? 

 
Objectives   
 

Students will be able to:  1. Discuss what science, observations and hypotheses are.    2. Know that science changes over time as new information is uncovered.    3. Make observations.    4. Make hypotheses based on their observations.    5. Sort materials as similar, different, related, etc.  

  Assessment 
 

         

Students are assessed on their performance during class, which is based on participation in the  activity, including discussions before and after the activity.    Students reflect on the activity and write a journal entry.    Each student assesses her/his participation, focus, following directions, staying on task, and  behavior on a 1‐10 scale with the teacher.  Record this daily as “class participation.” 

          5

Vocabulary  
 

           

Science:  the process of uncovering information.  It is ongoing, changing. It employs the senses  for observation and experimentation.  Observation: the process of carefully watching, or looking, at something in order to find out  information.  Hypothesis:  a proposed explanation made on the basis of what evidence one has as a starting  point for further exploration, investigation and/or experimentation. 

 
Materials  
          A copy of Gregory Crewdson’s (Untitled) Boy  under Bridge (right) glued onto fiberboard and  cut into many jigsaw pieces.    Magnifying glasses.  Paper and pencil. 

 
Activities   
 

     
 

The important part of these activities is the discussion surrounding what is happening ‐‐  observations, hypotheses, changing hypotheses, communicating ideas, sharing information, and  doing science.   1. Have students start working individually. Give each a piece of the jigsaw puzzle.  Ask them what  the puzzle is.   
 

2. Repeat this several times. 
3. Ask students to join with someone seated near them and share information.  Follow with more  questions and more pieces, clues, or information.    4. Ask for more observations on what they think the puzzle is.    5. Have students work in groups of four.  Ask for their observations and hypotheses about what  they think the puzzle is.    6.   ventually, the whole class works together to uncover what the puzzle is about.   E 7. As students work, continue to use the science vocabulary words concerning what they are  doing: observation, hypothesis, communication and science.    8. When the puzzle activity is completed, ask students what they think the story is that the  photographer, Gregory Crewdson, is telling in the picture.  Encourage class discussion.   9. Ask students to work together as a class to come up with definitions of the vocabulary words  that have been used in class. Books may be used, if needed.    10. Write the student definitions on the overhead and have students copy the words and definitions  into their journals.    _____________________________________________________________________________________               
             

6

Lesson 4    LOOK
 

WHO’S TALKING NOW! 

Overview  
Students develop an understanding of perspective through role play, games, and discussion. 

 
Essential Questions 
1. What is the artist, drawing, etc. saying?  What is going on here?  If we disagree, who is right?   Do our experiences in life change how something appears to us?    2. What is perspective and how does that affect how we see things?  3. Is the message sent the same as that received?  Why or why not?   

Objectives 
 

Students will be able to:  1. Understand that observations are influenced by the background of the observer.    2. Recognize that art, pictures, science, and life can be interpreted differently by different people,  depending on their perspective.   3. Understand that each person has her/his own perspective through which s/he views all of  her/his environment.      

 
Vocabulary  
  Perspective: a particular attitude toward or way of regarding something; a point of view.  

 
Materials  
            Pound of hamburger on plate.  Pieces of paper with roles on them: “dog,” “McDonald’s worker,”“culinary arts student,”   “mother,” “Hindu person” (reveres cows), “fly,” “vegetarian,” “teenage boy,” “teenage girl,” “grandmother,” etc.  Overhead acrylics that represent optical illusions.    Crewdson poster of Untitled: Boy under the Bridge. 

 
Engaging Experience  
 

1. Place students in small groups of two or three.    2. Ask each group to pick a role to play out of a hat.    3. Ask each, in their role, to take three minutes to respond in their group to the pound of  hamburger.     4. Ask groups to share their responses to the hamburger with the class.    5. Lead a discussion of the various responses and the different perspectives.  

 
Activities 
 

1. Show students a picture that can be understood in more than one way (i.e., old lady, young girl,  Eskimo/Indian, light/dark contrast, etc.).   2. Ask: “What do you think this is?   Can you see anything else?  Can anyone see something else?   What else can you find in the picture?”   3. Project a variety of optical illusions with the overhead projector.  Ask: “What do you think you  see?  What did the artist mean?  What does this say?”    4. Discuss the concept of perspective: “What is it?  How does it change how we see something?”   

7

5. Display the poster of Crewdson’s Untitled (Boy under Bridge.)   6. Have students list in their journals what they see in the picture.    7. Next, ask what they think is going on in the picture.  “What do they think is happening?  Has  happened?  Will happen next?”  Accept all answers.   8. Give each student an index card and ask them to write one word that comes to mind when they  observe the Untitled (Boy under Bridge) poster.    9. Have each student pass their index card to the person on their left. Ask each to write a sentence  using the word on the card to describe the picture.    10. Ask each student to share their sentence with the class.  Lead the class to work together to  arrange the sentences in a logical order.     11. Give students a guided writing assignment on how they would change the Crewdson photo.  

8


				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:6
posted:12/17/2009
language:English
pages:8