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How to Use KIDS COUNT Data Houston Conference on Children June 15

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					 How to Use KIDS COUNT Data
                 Houston Conference on Children
                         June 15, 2005

Frances Deviney, PhD                         Eva DeLuna Castro, MPA
KIDS COUNT Director                            Senior Budget Analyst

                      Center for Public Policy Priorities
Center for Public Policy Priorities                         www.cppp.org
                      Training Objectives

   • Access the KIDS COUNT data from the
     CPPP website
   • Examine the data for your county, region,
     and Texas
   • Understand (some) data limitations
   • Make your point using KC data in
     combination with other state/local data

Center for Public Policy Priorities         www.cppp.org
                Why Do You Want Data?


                     • To describe a problem

                      • To answer a question

                       • To help set priorities

                       • To monitor changes


Center for Public Policy Priorities               www.cppp.org
           What Can the Data Tell You?


    • Magnitude of the Problem – Number and
      Rate (Profiles)
    • Scope of the Problem
      (Rates; Change over time)
    • Relative Standing (Rankings)



Center for Public Policy Priorities    www.cppp.org
       Getting Started: County Profiles

   • Yearly County Profiles can tell you the
     magnitude of the problem you are examining
     & the relative standing of your county
     compared to other counties.

   • TX KIDS COUNT Data Profiles from the
     “State of Texas Children 2004” Fact Book
     http://factbook.cppp.org

Center for Public Policy Priorities      www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
    Getting Started: Change over Time



       Texas KIDS COUNT Interactive Database
              http://kidscount.cppp.org




Center for Public Policy Priorities     www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
Center for Public Policy Priorities   www.cppp.org
              What You Should Know to
                    Use the Data

   • Percentages

   • Rates (Numerators, Denominators)

   • “Problems” with Small Numbers

   • Considerations when Making Comparisons


Center for Public Policy Priorities     www.cppp.org
             Things to Remember When
                  Looking at Rates
   • Percentages are calculated as follows:
       # Babies at Low Birthweight (LBW) ÷ # Live Births
         = % of population

   • Sometimes, useful to represent these numbers as
     rates:
       35 babies born at LBW ÷ 5892 live births = .9%
       As a rate per 1,000 births, .9% = 9 LBW births per 1,000 live
         births

   Caution: Looking at rates alone can sometimes mask key
     information needed to fully understand the problem

Center for Public Policy Priorities                      www.cppp.org
             Things to Remember When
                  Looking at Rates

   • Hypothetical Scenario
       – Outreach & education to reduce the incidence of
         low birthweight babies in your region

   • 2 different approaches to the problem
       – Focus on the counties with the greatest need,
         regardless of differences between sub-populations
       – Focus on the sub-populations most in need across
         counties


Center for Public Policy Priorities              www.cppp.org
       Low Birthweight Example

        Low Birthweight Data
                                            Rate per
                          Number             1,000
                             Births      LBW Births

       County A                 10,000   140     14.0

       County B                 10,000   110     11.0

Center for Public Policy Priorities                www.cppp.org
     Low Birthweight Example (cont.)
                                      Number            Rate per
                                         Births   LBW    1,000
                                                         Births
      County A White                      6,000    60        10.0
               Black                      4,000    80        20.0
                    Total                10,000   140        14.0

      County B White                      9,000    90        10.0
               Black                      1,000    20        20.0
                    Total                10,000   110        11.0


Center for Public Policy Priorities                        www.cppp.org
           Considerations when
                     Looking at Rates


Center for Public Policy Priorities     www.cppp.org
        What’s Up With Chambers County?

                                                           Juvenile Violent Crime Rate
         Rate per 100,000 15-19 year-olds




                                            500
                                            450
                                            400
                                            350
                                            300                                                  Harris
                                            250                                                  Chambers
                                            200
                                            150
                                            100
                                             50
                                              0
                                                  1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001


Center for Public Policy Priorities                                                               www.cppp.org
                      Juvenile Violent Crime
                           (Numbers)
                 1993      1994      1995      1996      1997      1998      1999      2000      2001


  Chambers        2         1         6         12        9         4         3         4         7
  (Number)

  Chambers       3106      3159      3256      3277      3266      3227      3181      3614      3181
  (Pop 15-19)




  Harris        1613      1618      1478      1204      1016       869       787       745       749
  (Number)

  Harris        356,465   361,487   366,356   374,555   379,898   384,745   390,116   421,768   390,116
  (Pop 15-19)




Center for Public Policy Priorities                                                     www.cppp.org
             Things to Remember When
                  Looking at Rates

   • Rates can change dramatically for smaller
     counties or smaller categories with a small
     shift in raw number

   • Depending upon your interest, you may be
     better served by examining:
        – the change in raw # over time
        – how current data compare to the state, nearby
          counties, or similar counties based on
          demographics & geography
Center for Public Policy Priorities              www.cppp.org
             Things to Remember When
                Looking at Rankings


       • Rankings are based on the Rates
           –Thus, they are subject to the same
            considerations as described above
                • Ranking can change dramatically for
                  smaller counties or smaller categories
                  with a small shift in raw number


Center for Public Policy Priorities                   www.cppp.org
             Things to Remember When
                Looking at Rankings
    • In a state with 254 Counties and varying
      demographics & geographies, what does it
      mean to be ranked 127th on an indicator?
         – Depending upon your interest, you may be better
           suited to look at:
              • the change in raw # over time
              • how current data compare to the state, nearby
                counties, or similar counties based on demographics &
                geography

Center for Public Policy Priorities                       www.cppp.org
             Things to Remember When
                Looking at Rankings

   • A very good ranking can give a false sense of
     confidence, and leave some feeling like
     there is no work left to be done

   • A very poor ranking can give the feeling that
     the task is insurmountable, and funds are
     better spent in an area where improvement
     seems more likely

Center for Public Policy Priorities        www.cppp.org
Examples: Using Texas Kids Count data in Budget
                Policy Analysis
  Policy Analysis Assignment #1: Estimate the impact of S.B. 1
    (General Appropriations Act), 2005 Session, on Harris County CHIP
    caseloads and funding.
  Research involved:
  1) From Kids Count database, get information showing that Harris County CHIP
     caseload is about 19% of Texas’ total enrollment in CHIP
  2) From S.B. 1 (or CPPP), get information on total funding approved for CHIP
     ($610 million for 2006; $791 million for 2007), number of children funded at
     that level (362,175/398,630), and annual cost per child ($1,683/$1,985). While
     you’re at it, get same info for 2004/2005.
  3) Make one assumption: that Harris County CHIP enrollment will continue to be
     about 19% of the state total. Apply this share to the information you have for
     2004-07. Results?
Center for Public Policy Priorities                                     www.cppp.org
     Estimated CHIP Enrollment and Spending in
                  Harris County

      $200                                                                                     100,000

                                                                               $150.4
                                                                                               80,000
      $150
                                                            $115.8
                  $99.5                                                                        60,000
      $100                           $88.7
                                                                                               40,000

       $50
                                                                                               20,000

      $-                                                                                       -
                  2004                2005                  2006                 2007


                   CHIP Spending in Million $ (left axis)          Enrollment (right axis)



Center for Public Policy Priorities                                                          www.cppp.org
    Policy Analysis Assignment #2: Estimate the impact of
        S.B. 1 on Harris County foster care caseloads and
                           payments.

  Research involved:
  1) From Kids Count database, get information showing that Harris County paid
     foster care clientele [unduplicated] is about 14.9% of the state total; foster care
     payments are about 14.6% of state total. (Average of 2003 and 2004 data.)
  2) From S.B. 1 (or CPPP), get information on total funding approved for foster care
     payments ($377 million for 2006; $356 million for 2007), and number of
     children funded at that level (18,522/19,257 average monthly FTEs). Get same
     info for 2003/2004/2005.
  3) Make two assumptions: that Harris County caseloads and payments will at least
     keep their same share of state total as in 2003 and 2004; and that Kids Count data
     are similar enough to what’s in S.B. 1. Apply this share to the information you
     have for 2003-07. Results?
Center for Public Policy Priorities                                          www.cppp.org
    Estimated Foster Care Clientele and Payments
                   Harris County

        $60.0                                                                               6,000
                                                    $50.5       $53.9          $50.9
                     $48.9
                                    $44.2
        $45.0                                                                               4,500


        $30.0                                                                               3,000


        $15.0                                                                               1,500


         $-                                                                                 -
                      2003           2004           2005        2006            2007


                Foster Care Payments in Million $ (left axis)   Foster Care Clients (right axis)



Center for Public Policy Priorities                                                      www.cppp.org
                   Other Useful Websites

    • Annie E. Casey Foundation – CLICKS data
      http://www.aecf.org/kidscount/

    • Health & Human Services Commission
      (birth, death, vital statistics data)
      http://soupfin.tdh.state.tx.us/

    • State Demographer (population data)
      http://txsdc.utsa.edu/
Center for Public Policy Priorities        www.cppp.org

				
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