Docstoc

112syllabusS08

Document Sample
112syllabusS08 Powered By Docstoc
					Chem 112, Brookhart

Clark College

Chemistry 112: Integrated Chemistry Spring 2008, Clark College Lecture: Lab: Conference: M/W, 11:00-12:30 in SCI 122 Th, 12:10-2:00 in SCI 119 F, 11:00-1:00 in SCI 119 Th, 2:10-3:00 in APH 101 F, 10:00-10:50 in SCI 123 (item 6352, section AK) (item 6355, section AL) (item 6356, section BL) (item 6353, section AM) (item 6354, section BM)

Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in Chem 111 or equivalent. Instructor: Susan Brookhart Office: SCI 118 Phone: (360) 992-2419 Campus Mailbox: APH 203 (please, no papers under my door) E-mail: sbrookhart@clark.edu Website: http://web.clark.edu/sbrookhart/

Office hours: Monday, 10-10:50 Tuesday, 8-8:50; 11-11:50 Wednesday, 10-10:50 Thursday, 8-8:50 or by appointment Textbooks & Materials: Required:  General, Organic and Biochemistry, A Guided Inquiry, M. Garoutte, Wiley & Sons. ISBN 0-471-76359-4.  Goggles (one set was provided to you as part of your class fee for Chem 111. If you no longer have those goggles, please purchase another set in the bookstore. If you are new to the series, we will give you one pair of goggles in the lab.)  Lab packet, available in the Bookstore.  Access to the internet from home or from one of the many computer labs on campus. Optional:  Chemistry: An Introduction to General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry, K. Timberlake, Prentice Hall. ISBN 9780805330151. Please note: you must have access to this textbook, whether you borrow a copy from me, purchase one, or access one through library reserves. If you choose to borrow one from me, you will sign it out and if you don’t return it at the final exam, you will receive an Incomplete in the course, which will become a grade of F on July 10, 2008, if you have not returned the textbook by that time. Course overview Chem 112 is designed for students seeking 2-year degrees in the Health Occupations fields. This course will give the Health Occupations student an introduction to the language and

Syllabus

Spring 2008

Page 1 of 8

Chem 112, Brookhart

Clark College

concepts of organic and biochemistry, emphasizing the role of chemicals in the functioning of the human body. College Wide Abilities The College Wide Ability groups are skills that the college faculty wants our graduates to develop while at Clark College. They include: Information Technology, Communication, LifeLong Learning, Effective Citizenship, Critical Thinking, and Global/Multicultural. While focusing on our course material, we will develop skills necessary for developing Critical Thinking abilities. Critical Thinking is fundamental to success in science, which includes the disciplined process of conceptualizing, applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating information. Information is gathered from or generated by observation, experience, reflection, reasoning and communication. The collaborative nature of the class will promote solid Communication skills and encourage the enthusiasm necessary for Life Long Learning. Chemistry 112 Learning Objectives, General:  Develop basic organic and biochemistry knowledge. (Critical Thinking)  Collaborate with small groups of peers to develop concepts and test models. (Communication, Critical Thinking, Life-Long Learning, Effective Citizenship)  Effectively communicate using the language, concepts and models of chemistry. (Communication)  Solve organic and biochemistry problems using a variety of methods. (Critical Thinking)  Safely and accurately use a variety of laboratory techniques. (Critical Thinking, Communication, Life-Long Learning) Some of the topics we will explore in this course include:  Structure, nomenclature, and reactions of fundamental organic compounds  Isomerism  Structure and biological function of: o Carbohydrates o Lipids o Amino acids & Proteins (including enzymes) o Nucleic Acids  Metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids  Proper lab techniques & experimental design College-Wide Withdrawal Policy (from http://www.clark.edu/how_to_enroll/registration/change.php) If you find it necessary to withdraw from a class or the college, you must complete the necessary forms at the Registration Office within the specified time period. The withdrawal is effective on the date the completed forms are received. Do not assume you will be dropped for non-attendance. The following policies and procedures apply to withdrawals:
  

A class officially dropped before the tenth day of instruction will not be entered on your transcript. After the tenth day and through the seventh week of the quarter, classes formally dropped will be posted to your transcript with a withdrawal grade of "W.” No withdrawals will be accepted after Friday of Week 7. (May 23)

Syllabus

Spring 2008

Page 2 of 8

Chem 112, Brookhart

Clark College

(Students unable to withdraw by the end of the seventh week of the quarter due to extenuating circumstances should contact the Dean's Office by the end of the last scheduled class day) Refund deadlines: 100% refund: Apr. 11; 50% refund: Apr. 25 Students with Disabilities If you have a disability and need an accommodation, please speak with me outside of class to discuss your specific request. A request for accommodation may require that documentation of the disability be reviewed by the Disability Support Services. DSS can be contacted at 360.992.2314 (360.992.2835 TTY) and they are located in PUB 014. (http://cf.clark.edu/HoursLocation/normal/disabilitySupportServices.cfm) You need not disclose to me the specifics of any disability that you may have, but any accommodations must come through DSS and special accommodations are not retroactive. If you think you may need accommodations, please arrange for those at the beginning of the term. General Expectations As you explore chemistry, you will be drawing upon and expanding your critical thinking abilities and communication skills. Your success in these endeavors will be assessed through completion of in-class work, homework assignments, midterm exams, and a final exam. You should expect to spend at least 10 to 14 hours per week outside of class. I expect you to engage fully in all class activities. You will find your studies in chemistry to be more enjoyable and also easier if you view this as a collaborative pursuit to be enjoyed with the help and company of your classmates and your instructor. Ask questions! Ask them during class, during office hours, or via e-mail. Ask questions of me and of your fellow students. Your peers are often the ones who can best explain difficult concepts. Academic Honesty The scientific community is built upon collaboration with peers for support and guidance. As stated above, I not only encourage you to work with other students, I will often require it. However, any work that you hand in must be your own work, written in your own words. You should always be prepared to explain the rationale behind your work. Any cheating or plagiarism incidents will handled on a case-by-case basis and will result in a failure on an assignment and possibly failure in the course, or removal from the class or the college, as defined in the Clark College Student Code of Conduct. The Code can be found in the General Information section of the Clark College website (www.clark.edu) or can be obtained from the Office of the Vice President of Student Development. If you have any doubts at all about the line between collaboration and cheating, please ask me before it becomes a problem for you. Attendance Come to every class meeting on time. Within the collaborative paradigm, punctuality constitutes an important courtesy to your classmates. If something unusual occurs that requires you to miss or be late to more than one class, please speak with me about it.

Syllabus

Spring 2008

Page 3 of 8

Chem 112, Brookhart

Clark College

Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning During most class meetings, you and your classmates will work through one of the “ChemActivities” from your workbook. I ask that you not work on the ChemActivity or any related material before coming to class; rather, it is to be a collaborative discovery. Your responsibility is to come to class having reviewed all of the previous material and worked all of the Exercises from the ChemActivity that you completed in the previous class. I will assign groups and the memberships of your groups will rotate occasionally, at my discretion. Each class period, each member of the group will fulfill one of the following roles. The roles are to rotate daily: Group manager: Manages the group. Ensures that each member of the group is participating, that everyone understands the concepts as they are being discussed, and that no one is speeding ahead of the others. As the instructor, I will respond only to questions from the manager. Presenter: Answers questions in class discussions. Presents concise oral reports to the class or to other groups when I request them. Recorder: Keeps a record of the group’s activity on a separate page to turn in at the end of class. Reflector: Observes and comments upon group dynamics & behavior, making suggestions for changes that will improve the learning process. Homework In addition to general studying and two required on-line discussions, you will have three main types of homework: Weekly Worksheets (10 points each) Each week, you will download (from Blackboard) and complete a homework set, which you will turn in at the beginning of class on Mondays. (Occasionally, this due date may change to Wednesdays; I will let you know in advance) Note: You are responsible for thoroughly correcting your homework. I will post solution sets on Blackboard. You will need to access these solution sets, check your work, and make sure you understand the solution to each problem. Daily Exercises At the end of almost every “ChemActivity” in your workbook, you’ll find a set of Exercises. Each time you complete a ChemActivity, you will complete all of the Exercises for that activity before the following class meeting. I’ll post the solutions on Blackboard. Reading and Suggested Problems On a separate document you will find a list of reading assignments and suggested problems from your textbook. You must complete the reading; the information from your workbook is not sufficient. I strongly suggest that you work through most of these suggested problems, especially those covering topics with which you need some extra help. Please note that the answers to the odd-numbered questions are at the end of each chapter. Quizzes Expect a quiz at the beginning of most conference sections. The quiz will cover the Exercises from the ChemActivities that you completed during the week. Electronic Resources Announcements, homework assignments, lab handouts, and solution sets will be posted on Blackboard. Please visit frequently.

Syllabus

Spring 2008

Page 4 of 8

Chem 112, Brookhart

Clark College

Grading Participation 5% You are required to be a participating, collaborative member of the class. If you do not participate fully in the in-class work, I will count you as absent for the day. You are allowed one “free” absence, to account for illness or other conflicts. See p. 4 for details. I will drop both your lowest score on your weekly HW assignments and your lowest quiz score. Details of lab grading will be explained in the lab. You will take three exams this quarter. We’ll discuss the details of those exams as they approach. Final Exam: Weds., June 18, 10-11:50

Homework & Quizzes Lab 3 midterm exams Final Exam

20% 20% 30% 25%

If your score on the final exam is higher than your score on one of your three midterm exams, I will replace that mid-term score with your final exam score. Final grades: 90-100 % 80-89 % 70-79 % 60-69 % Below 60%

A B C D F

  

I may choose to lower the cut-offs on this scale. (+) grades are in the top 2% of a grade range (no A+ grades are allowed at Clark) (-) grades are given to those in the bottom 2% of a grade range.

Make-up work No make-up exams or late homework assignments will be allowed. I will handle extenuating circumstances on a case-by-case basis (including those of student-athletes), if you discuss your issues with me in advance.

Syllabus

Spring 2008

Page 5 of 8

Chem 112, Brookhart

Clark College

HW #1, due Friday, April 11 Part I: Introductory e-mail (Fri., April 11) Please write me an e-mail (sbrookhart@clark.edu) introducing yourself in paragraph form. The subject line should include your name and “Introduction, Chem 112.” As you write, assume that your audience (me) is actually interested in you, which I am. Include (but don’t limit yourself to...)        Your name & what you like to be called Why you are in this class (be specific!) A description of your most recent chemistry class (who? when? where? what? grade?) What you hope to get out of this class (more than just 5 credits and a good grade—think about what else you hope to accomplish) What you anticipate your greatest challenges in this class will be Anything else you’d like me to know This text: “This is the correct e-mail address for me, Your name. I give you, Susan Brookhart at Clark College, permission to send private information about my grades and progress in Chemistry 112 during Spring term 2008 to this address, your e-mail address.”

If you were in my Chem 111 class, include this information instead:       What you think that you did well in Chem 111. What you would like to improve this term, and how you plan to improve. What you are eagerly anticipating about this term. What you are dreading about this term. Anything else you’d like me to know This text: “This is the correct e-mail address for me, Your name. I give you, Susan Brookhart at Clark College, permission to send private information about my grades and progress in Chemistry 112 during Spring term 2008 to this address, your e-mail address.”

Part 2: Blackboard Orientation (Friday, April 11) 1. Visit the e-Learning pages on the Clark website. (Go to www.clark.edu and, from the “Quick Links” drop-down menu, choose “e-Learning.”) 2. Click on the “Current Students” link and browse the “e-Learning Student Resources” section, to familiarize yourself with the available support. You can also learn here how to log into your Blackboard course. 3. Log into your Chem 112 Blackboard course. 4. Check your personal information and make sure that the e-mail address that is listed for you is the one that you want me to use to send grades & personal information. Change your e-mail address as necessary to receive full credit for this assignment.

Syllabus

Spring 2008

Page 6 of 8

Chem 112, Brookhart

Clark College

Tentative Schedule of Topics & Assignments

Lab Week 1 (April 7) Safety, Nomenclature, Functional Groups Hydrocarbon reactions Alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids & esters Isolation of Lactose

Lecture Topics Bonding review; Alkanes, Isomers (Chapter 10) More on isomerism, alkenes, polymerization (Chapter 11) Properties & Reactions of organic molecules (Chapters 10-13) Carbohydrates (Tollen’s test demo) (Chapter 14) Lipids (Chapter 15) Proteins, amino acids (Chapter 16) Enzymes (Chapter 16) Nucleic Acids Protein synthesis lecture (Chapter 17) Energy, nutrition, and metabolism

Chem Activities 28

Exams & other HW #1 due Fri., Apr. 11

Week 2 (April 14)

30, 31

Week 3 (April 21)

32 33 Exam 1: Mon., Apr. 28 34 35 36 Exam 2: Mon., May 12 38 39

Week 4 (April 28)

Week 5 (May 5)

Diffusion Experiment

Week 6 (May 12) Week 7 (May 19) Week 8 (May 26) No class Mon. Week 9 (June 2) Week 10 (June 9)

Diffusion Experiment Diffusion Experiment Carbohydrate Kinetics Polymer Lab Lab exam, checkout.

Exam 3: Mon., June 2 Glycolysis (Chapter 18) Citric Acid cycle Electron Transport & Oxidative Phosphorylation (Chapter 18) Final Exam: Weds., June 18, 10:00-11:50
Spring, 2008

40 41 42

Syllabus

Page 7 of 8

Chem 112, Brookhart

Clark College

Emergency Information In emergencies, students should do the following: 1. Inclement weather or emergency information Go to www.clark.edu or call 360-992-2000 as your first means of getting information. The College does send notices to radio and television stations, but the College’s web site and switchboard are the official platforms for the most accurate information. 2. Immediate emergency communication alert To receive immediate notice on emergencies, you can register your cell phone number to receive text pages and your email address to receive email messages. To do this, go to www.flashalert.net . Select “Subscribe” on the left, and follow the instructions. Mass communication will also be sent to all college employee phones and computers. 3. Fire Alarm Evacuate the building through closest exit; evacuation maps are located in the hallways. Take personal belongings only if it is safe to do so. Remain at least 50 feet from the building. Notify others of evacuation. Do not re-enter building until instructed to do so. 4. Parking Lot Identifiers New parking lot identifiers using colors and numbers have been assigned to all Clark parking lots. To help emergency or security personnel locate you, please refer to these identifying features. 5. Security Escort Security Officers are available for escorts please call 360-992-2133.

Syllabus

Spring, 2008

Page 8 of 8


				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:12
posted:12/15/2009
language:English
pages:8