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					CTE/FCAT CONNECTION
Agritechnology 1

Project 3
Animal Reproduction

Course #: 8106820 Grades 10-12

1. PROJECT CONNECTION Teaching Components; Project Summary; Instructional Focus; Rigor/Relevance Framework/Project SPS 2. PREREADING CONNECTION Understanding Concepts of Animal Reproduction 3. READING CONNECTION A Sheep Named Dolly 4. MATH CONNECTION Reproductive Cycles of Agricultural Animals 5. SCIENCE CONNECTION Reproductive Anatomy 6. PRESENTATION CONNECTION Animal Reproduction Awareness

www.career-connection.org

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PROJECT CONNECTION
Title: Program Area: Course Title: Timeline for Use: Grade Level: Duration of Project: Submitted By: Animal Reproduction Agriculture Education Agritechnology 1 (8106820) Beginning of Course 10 – 12 15 – 20 Hours Brett Brandner and Farrah Johnson

Essential Question: 1. Why should producers have a working knowledge of livestock reproduction? 2. Compare and contrast the different methods of livestock reproduction. 3. Explain how animals reproduce. Lesson Summary Students will participate in a variety of activities to have a better understanding of animal reproduction and current methods used in the agricultural industry. This includes basic reproduction vocabulary, researching a reproduction method and analyzing a marketing problem. This project includes creating a model of a reproductive tract of assigned animals. Reading, math, science and writing activities in FCAT format are included. Instructional Focus Lesson Topic: Language Arts Strands: Math Body of Knowledge: Science Strands: Rigor/Relevance Framework

Animal Reproduction Reading Process; Communication. Algebra; Statistics. Life Science.

K N O W L E D G E

T A X O N O M Y

Evaluation

6

Synthesis

5

C Assimilation

D Adaptation

Analysis

4

Application

3

Comprehension

2

A Acquisition

B Application

Awareness

1 1 Knowledge in one discipline 2 Apply in discipline 3 Apply across disciplines 4 Apply to real world predictable situations 5 Apply to real world unpredictable situations

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PROJECT CONNECTION (continued)
Bibliography “Dolly the Sheep and GMOs” http://www.american.edu/projects/mandala/TED/dolly.htm

Learning Targets - Knowledge, Reasoning, Skill, Product K-Define: fertilization, copulation, embryo, scrotum, testicles, ovum, uterus, cervix, vagina, estrus, ovulation, gestation, parturition, mitosis, meiosis, artificial insemination, heritability K-Identify: How animals reproduce. What does each part have to do with reproduction. K-Identify: What are the various methods of reproduction in animals. R-Evaluate: Evaluate the success rates of different reproduction methods. R-Compare: Compare natural reproduction, embryo transfer, cloning, and articficial insemination R-Calculate: Determine when animals will give birth based on length of gestation and breeding dates. S-Demonstrate: Proper insemination techniques P-Create a breeding program for a producer P-Simulate what a rancher could do to improve reproductive efficiency

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PRE-READING CONNECTION
Title: Essential Questions: Understanding Concepts of Animal Reproduction • Does the student demonstrate consistent and effective use of interpersonal, grade-appropriate, academic, and workplace vocabularies, (figurative, idiomatic, and technical) in reading, writing, listening, and speaking? • Does the student use a variety of strategies to determine meaning and increase grade-appropriate vocabulary for reading? • Does the student determine the main idea or essential message in text, analyze organizational patterns, and explain their impact on meaning in text? • Does the student use background knowledge and graphic representations to make and confirm predictions of content, purpose, and organization of a reading selection? 12.05 Compare and select appropriate breeding methods for different agricultural enterprises. 12.06 Explain the reproductive cycles of commercially important animals. 12.07 Identify signs of animal pregnancy, parturition, and infertility. LA.1.4.2 Selects and uses strategies to understand words and text, and to make and confirm inferences from what is read, including interpreting diagrams, graphs, and statistical illustrations. LA.910.1.6.4 Categorize key vocabulary and identify salient features. e50 Understand and use a variety of organizational formats such as compare/contrast, cause/effect, inductive/deductive, most important to least important, and least important to most important. e53 Apply personal or objective criteria for evaluating informational, persuasive and literary materials. A – Acquisition

Performance Tasks:

Sunshine State Standards (LA, MA, and SC):

Essential Skills (e, m, and s):

Rigor and Relevance (quadrant):

Instructions to Teacher: Distribute copies of the Vocabulary List and Concept Map student handouts. Instruct the students to define each of the vocabulary words; then complete the concept map for reproductive processes. The concept map does not include the anatomical vocabulary from the list. Once the class has completed the vocabulary and concept map, review them both.

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Instructions to Students: Complete the vocabulary definitions and apply the reproductive processes to the concept map. Review the definitions and concept map when you have completed them. Instructions for Learning Styles Accommodations: May work in assigned pairs if necessary; allow extra time at home when needed. Assessment for Activity: Students exchange papers, check for completeness. Approximate Length of Time for Activity: 90 minutes. Materials Needed: Vocabulary List; Concept Map. Resources Needed: Internet Access; Modern Livestock Textbook; Dictionary. Activity: Define reproduction vocabulary and complete the reproductive processes concept map. Students will use textbook and other resources to complete the concept map, Attachments: Vocabulary List; Concept Map; Vocabulary Definition - KEY; Concept Map - KEY

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Vocabulary List For the following terms, students should compete the attached KIM chart. 1. fertilization 2. copulation 3. embryo 4. scrotum 5. testicles 6. ovum 7. uterus 8. cervix 9. vagina 10. estrus 11. ovulation 12. gestation 13. parturition 14. mitosis 15. meiosis 16. artificial insemination 17. heritability

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K Key Word

I Information (definition of word)

KIM Chart

M Memory Cue

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READING CONNECTION
Title: Essential Questions: A Sheep Named Dolly • Does the student analyze information including the author’s purpose and point of view in a variety of texts to construct meaning and understand how they affect the overall message? • Does the student make and confirm inferences? 12.05 Compare and select appropriate breeding methods for different agricultural enterprises. 12.06 Explain the reproductive cycles of commercially important animals. 12.07 Identify signs of animal pregnancy, parturition, and infertility. LA.A.1.4.4 Applies a variety of response strategies, including rereading, note taking, summarizing, outlining, writing a formal report, and relating what is read to his or her own experiences and feelings. LA.910.1.7.8 Use strategies to repair comprehension of grade-appropriate text when self-monitoring indicates confusion, including but not limited to rereading, checking context clues, predicting, notemaking, summarizing, using graphic and semantic organizers, questioning, and clarifying by checking other sources. e34 Use ideas from journals, class discussion and literary criticism to write a paper that expresses a personal opinion, sustains a controlling idea, or uses specific evidence from literary texts to support an opinion. e35 Apply the information gathered from technical texts in real-life situations. e53 Apply personal or objective criteria for evaluating informational, persuasive and literary materials. e60 Relate situations, events, and characters in a reading selection to personal experience. e72 Evaluate the way an author uses language and text characteristics such as plot, setting, theme, character, point of view, genre etc. to evoke a response in a reader. e94 Use response journals to jot down ideas from reading literary texts. B – Application

Performance Tasks:

Sunshine State Standards (LA, MA, and SC):

Essential Skills (e, m, and s):

Rigor and Relevance (quadrant):

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Instructions to Teacher: Hand out the article “Dolly the sheep and GMOs” and allow sufficient time for the students to read silently, using the “X Marks the Spot” activity. If you do not have enough copies for the students to write on the article, give each student some sticky notes. After giving students enough time to complete the activity, lead a discussion, having students share the parts of the article they marked and why. Hand out FCAT Reading/Extended Response form and have students complete. Lead class discussion on how this cloned lamb has changed animal science reproduction. Instructions to Students: Read “Dolly the sheep and GMOs.” While reading, use the “X Marks the Spot” symbols on the reading copy or on a sticky note the teacher will give you. Be prepared to discuss why you marked the parts you marked. Then, answer the question on the FCAT Reading/Extended Response form. Participate in the class discussion of this cloned lamb and share your opinion on the subject. Instructions for Learning Styles Accommodations: Allow students to read out loud as needed. Assessment for Activity: RUBRIC - FCAT Reading/Extended Response. Approximate Length of Time for Activity: 90 minutes. Materials Needed: X Marks the Spot Symbols Sheet; “Dolly the Sheep and GMOs” Article; FORM FCAT Reading/Extended Response; RUBRIC - FCAT Reading/Extended Response. Resources Needed: Activity: Students will read the “Dolly” article and answer the FCAT Reading/Extended Response question, then discuss how cloning has changed animal science reproduction. Attachments: “Dolly the sheep and GMOs” article; X Marks the Spot Activity; FORM - FCAT Reading/Extended Response; RUBRIC - FCAT Reading/Extended Response.

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FORM - FCAT Reading/Extended Response
Extended Response questions usually require up to 10 minutes to answer. A complete answer is worth 4 points. A partial answer is worth 1, 2, or 3 points.

How has the cloning of Dolly the Sheep affected animal science and current methods of reproduction

Give details from the story to support your answer.

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RUBRIC - FCAT Reading/Extended Response Score Description
The response indicates that the student has a thorough understanding of the concept and has provided a response that is accurate, complete, and fulfills all the requirements of the task. Necessary support and/or examples are included. The response indicates that the student has an understanding of the concept and has provided a response that is accurate and fulfills all the requirements of the task, but the required support/details are not complete. The response indicates that the student has a partial understanding of the concept and has provided a response that includes information that is essentially correct but the information is too general or too simplistic. Some of the support and/or examples may be incomplete or omitted. The response indicates that the student has very limited understanding of the concept and the response is incomplete, may exhibit many flaws and may not address all requirements of the task. The response is inaccurate, confused, and/or irrelevant, or the student has failed to respond to the task.

4

3

2

1 0

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Dolly the sheep and GMOs
Dolly, the cloned sheep, was born in Scotland on July 5, 1996 and raised the stakes of cloning, bringing the world closer to the possibility of human cloning. Within the past four years cloning animals is now becoming common practice within the past four years, with the arrival of five generations of cloned mice, calves cloned both in Japan and the U.S., Tetra the monkey, and most recently, the five piglets. The key dilemma is just how far technology will go before a human is cloned, not to mention ethical issues that surround this science. Both an American doctor and a South Korean researcher have already created a human embryo, but both said they destroyed it. Add to this other genetically modified organisms (GMOs) that are being produced for economic benefit, and the economic, environmental and moral issues abound. Although GMOs today pertain mainly to food and seeds, the key issues are the environmental and health effects GMOs will cause while countries pursue the economic benefits, how GMOs will be traded and what risk consumers are willing to take. The reality of GMOs began with a sheep named Dolly. Dolly was created by Scottish scientist Ian Wilmut and was the first mammal in history to be cloned from an adult cell. Since her donor cell came from the udder of a six-year-old sheep, which reminded Wilmut of Dolly Parton, he named her Dolly. He and his team used a cloning technique called nuclear transfer, where the donor cell is fused with an egg stripped of its nuclear DNA. The embryo was then implanted in a third surrogate sheep, who bore Dolly. Although Dolly is a clone, she is not a true genetic clone of one sheep, since she does not have precisely the same genetic makeup as the adult sheep she was cloned from. This is because Dolly’s cells, from the adult udder’s sheep, are not the same as the egg, with which it was merged. It was shown that at least 99.5% of her cells came from the egg. Therefore, there can be physical differences between the two animals (Cloning Report: Dolly's Mixture 1). It is also appearing Dolly is suffering from cellular aging, developing twice as fast as a normal sheep. It was discovered her chromosomes are shorter than normal sheep of the same age (Cloning Report: Clones May Grow Old Before Their Time 1). Reproductively Dolly has had four healthy lambs. Last year she had one baby, named Bonnie. This year she had triplets, who remain unnamed. All offspring of Dolly have been conceived naturally, fathered by David, a Welsh mountain ram. This was to demonstrate Dolly can reproduce naturally and to check for any unexpected genetic changes in offspring. Mice Since the birth of Dolly, there has been a plethora of other cloned animals. U.S. researchers in Honolulu, Hawaii successfully cloned 5 generations of mice using a new micro-injection technique, different than Dolly's technique. All of the babies were healthy and reproductive (Researchers Clone First Mammals from Adult Cells Using New Technique 1). Cows Cows were the next link in mammal cloning. In 1998 Japanese researchers cloned eight genetically identical calves to boost country's beef and dairy industries using techniques similar to Dolly's. Japan could use this method for economic benefit, "duplicate[ing] cows that are proven to be ideal milk and meat producers," said the researchers (The Perfect Cow 1). Besides animals, GMOs include food and seed biotechnology, which allows scientists to modify (transfer single or small groups of genes) crops, fruits and vegetables in order to develop foods with beneficial traits, such as improving taste, speeding up the ripening process and increasing resistance to

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insects. Globally there were over 69 million acres of GMO crops planted in 1998, 15% in developing countries (GMO Fact Sheet). It has been estimated that as much as 60% of food products currently sold in the U.S. contain some mix of GMO and organic products (GMO Fact Sheet). Currently no special labeling is required for products containing GMOs, since the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the U.S. does not regulate food products based on the process in which they were created. Only foods whose nutritional value or composition has been significantly altered or contain allergens require mandatory labeling (GMO Fact Sheet). Ethics In short, the issue of cloning comes down to ethics. Almost everyone, even Wilmut, believe human cloning is out of the question. "There is no reason in principle why you couldn't do it [with humans]. All of us would find it offensive." (Right or Wrong 1) In addition, there are so many unknowns: Could clones be allowed to clone themselves? Would it be a tool for the rich? And it is pertinent to remember that clones would not be exact replicas; they will develop differently because of different environments. Recently a South Korean infertility clinic of Kyunghee University Hospital in Seoul, led by researcher Lee Bo-Yon, said he had cloned a human embryo, but destroyed it. If cloning of humans were allowed, at least one Harvard-educated physicist announced in 1998 that he was ready to set up a clinic to clone human babies and predicted up to 200,000 human clones per year could be produced once his technique was perfected. But for now human cloning remains an unpracticed and taboo issue. Cloning of animals is already reality. The possibilities for health research include being used for research to prevent cancer, AIDS, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, leukemia, Parkinson's, and Alzheimer's (Researchers Clone First Mammals from Adult Cells Using New Technique 1). It could also improve our understanding of cellular and molecular activities in ageing and provide organs for transplant. But these uses also present numerous ethical dilemmas that are far from resolved.

The Trade & Environment Database http://www.american.edu/projects/mandala/TED/ted.htm Article found at http://www.american.edu/projects/mandala/TED/dolly.htm updated 2000

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MATH CONNECTION
Title: Essential Questions: Reproductive Cycles of Agricultural Animals • Can the student apply and demonstrate the different way numbers are represented and used in the real world? • Can the student describe, analyze, and generalize a wide variety of patterns, relations, and functions? 12.06 Explain the reproductive cycles of commercially important animals. MA.E.1.4.1 Interprets data that has been collected, organized, and displayed in charts, tables, and plots. MA.912.A.2.1 Create a graph to represent a realworld situation. MA.912.A.2.2 Interpret a graph representing a realworld situation. MA.912.S.3.1 Read and interpret data presented in various formats. Determine whether data is presented in appropriate format, and identify possible corrections. m05 Understand the best procedures for statistical data collection, organization, and display including making estimates and predictions and drawing inferences. m36 Understand the characteristics of measures of dispersion (i.e. range, mean deviation, variance, and standard deviation). m42 Understand the concepts and applications of quartiles (i.e. distributing groups into four equal frequencies) and percentiles (i.e. distributing individuals into one hundred groups of equal frequency). C – Assimilation

Performance Tasks: Sunshine State Standards (LA, MA, and SC):

Essential Skills (e, m, and s):

Rigor and Relevance (quadrant):

Instructions to Teacher: Lead a class discussion as to the reproductive cycles of major agricultural animals. Make sure to include gestation and estrous cycles and ideal breeding times. Terminology should be reviewed from pre-reading connection. A brief discussion or demonstration of live breeding or Artificial Insemination would also help in this lesson. Make a transparency of the Estrus Cycles And Reproductive Traits and have students create chart on their own paper or construction paper. After discussion, pass out worksheets to each student. For the last question, each student will need a piece of computer/construction paper, rulers and markers.

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Instructions to Students: Upon the completion of the class discussion, copy the chart provided by transparency on your own paper. This chart will assist you in answering the worksheet questions. Instructions for Learning Styles Accommodations: Group work as needed. Assessment for Activity: Answer key. Approximate Length of Time for Activity: 90 minutes. Materials Needed: Reproductive Cycles Worksheet; Estrus Cycles and Reproductive Traits Transparency; Reproductive Cycles - KEY; Construction Paper; Markers; Rulers. Resources Needed: Textbook. Activity: Complete the worksheet dealing with animal reproduction. Attachments: Reproductive Cycles Worksheet; Estrus Cycles and Reproductive Traits Transparency; Reproductive Cycles – KEY.

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Reproductive Cycles Work Sheet Complete the following: 1. We notice a cow in heat on June 21, when will her next heat cycle begin? 2. A gilt is in standing heat on April 3, when will she next come into heat?

3. On March 1, we notice a mare has just come into heat, when should we breed? 4. If we bred a ewe on April 1, when will she kid?

5. When will a heifer bred on July 1 give birth? 6. A mare that foals on March 1 was bred when?

7. When was a sow bred if she farrowed on August 29? 8. If we want a cow to calve on March 20, when should we breed her? 9. A ewe that comes into heat on May 4 will go out of heat on what day? 10. A cow coming into heat on November 1 will go out of heat on what day? 11. On paper provided by the teacher, create a bar graph depicting the various livestock animals and the pregnancy length in days.

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SCIENCE CONNECTION
Title: Essential Questions: Reproductive Anatomy • What are the processes involved with the different types of reproduction? • How are the unique specializations found among cells able to promote and enable the specific function of various cell types? • How can the genetic makeup of a parental generation be used to predict the genetic makeup of offspring? 12.06 Explain the reproductive cycles of commercially important animals. SC.F.1.4.1 Knows that the body processes involve specific biochemical reactions governed by biochemical principles. SC.F.1.4.2 Knows that body structures are uniquely designed and adapted for their function. SC.F.2.4.1 Understands the mechanisms of asexual and sexual reproduction and knows the different genetic advantages and disadvantages of asexual and sexual reproduction. SC.912.L.14.33 Describe the basic anatomy and physiology of the reproductive system. s02 Identify and understand the structure and parts that comprise the systems (i.e. cardiovascular, nervous, lymphatic, muscular, etc) and regions (i.e. head and neck, upper limb, thorax, abdominopelvic, back, and lower limb) of the human body. s14 Understand that sexual reproduction involves the union of special sex cells that are usually produced by two separate parents with half of the genes coming from each parent allowing for a high degree of genetic diversity. Most plants and animals use sexual reproduction. s42 Understand the chemical reactions involved in cell functions (e.g. food molecules taken into cells are broken down to provide the chemical constituents needed to synthesize other molecules). s63 Understand that asexual reproduction involves the production of offspring from a single parent organism with all the genes coming from that parent. Asexual reproduction occurs with unicellular organisms and some plants.

Performance Tasks: Sunshine State Standards (LA, MA, and SC):

Essential Skills (e, m, and s):

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Rigor and Relevance (quadrant):

B – Application

Instructions to Teacher: Teacher will lead discussion with the class dealing with the reproductive tracts of major agriculture animals. Identification of all parts including major hormones and chemical reactions should be included. Also, explanations of what all parts do in the reproductive process should be covered. Students should be given copies of the reproductive handouts provided in this lesson. Upon completion of this part of the lesson, students will be given different colors of play dough or other types of modeling clays and build a scale reproductive tract of the chicken, horse, bull, or boar (dogs, cats, etc can be used if they are a better fit for a specific curriculum. Instructions to Students: Using the modeling clay provided, build a scale reproductive tract of the assigned animal. Each part should be a different color and a key should be provided. An acceptable scale can be 1 inch equals 1 foot. Instructions for Learning Styles Accommodations: Allow students to work in groups as needed. Assessment for Activity: RUBRIC – Building a Structure. Approximate Length of Time for Activity: 180 minutes. Materials Needed: Reproductive Organ Handouts; Modeling Clay - Different Colors (play dough may work, but will dry out). Resources Needed: Textbook (depending on what is used in a specific program). Activity: Students will build a model reproductive tract out of modeling clay. Attachments: Reproductive Organs Transparency Masters; RUBRIC - Building a Structure.

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PRESENTATION CONNECTION
Title: Essential Questions: Animal Reproduction Awareness • Does the student locate, gather, analyze, and evaluate written information from print and electronic sources for a variety of purposes? • Does the student research and organize information for oral communication and integrate appropriate media into presentations for a variety of purposes including entertainment, information, persuasion, or technical? • Does the student use speaking and questioning strategies for understanding, interpreting, applying and evaluating? • Does the student organize, classify, and synthesize research information effectively? 12.03 Describe desirable characteristics of breeding and market animals. 12.06 Explain the reproductive cycles of commercially important animals. 12.07 Identify signs of animal pregnancy, parturition, and infertility. 12.08 Describe approved care for newborn animals. LA.A.2.4.1 Determines the main idea and identifies relevant details, methods of development, and their effectiveness in a variety of types of written material. LA.C.3.4.3 uses details, illustrations, analogies, and visual aids to make oral presentations that inform, persuade, or entertain. LA.910.1.7.3 Determine the main idea or essential message in grade-level or higher texts through inferring, paraphrasing, summarizing, and identifying relevant details. LA.910.5.2.2 Research and organize information for oral communication appropriate for the occasion, audience, and purpose (e.g., class discussions, entertaining, informative, persuasive, or technical presentations). SC.F.2.4.1 Understands the mechanisms of asexual and sexual reproduction and knows the different genetic advantages and disadvantages of asexual and sexual reproduction. SC.G.1.4.1 Knows of the great diversity and interdependence of living things.

Performance Tasks:

Sunshine State Standards (LA, MA, and SC):

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Essential Skills (e, m, and s):

e10 Prepare and deliver individual speeches by gathering information, rehearsing, making eye contact, speaking loudly enough, delivering information in a well organized fashion, and appealing to the needs of the target audience. e15 Discriminate important ideas from unimportant ideas while reading. e24 Summarize, synthesize and organize information while reading. e46 Apply, extend, and expand on information while reading. s13 Understand ecology as the study of the interactions and relationships of organisms with their living and nonliving environments (i.e. the ecosystem, communities, and populations). s14 Understand that sexual reproduction involves the union of special sex cells that are usually produced by two separate parents with half of the genes coming from each parent allowing for a high degree of genetic diversity. Most plants and animals use sexual reproduction. s63 Understand that asexual reproduction involves the production of offspring from a single parent organism with all the genes coming from that parent. Asexual reproduction occurs with unicellular organisms and some plants. D – Adaptation

Rigor and Relevance (quadrant):

Instructions to Teacher: Partner students and randomly assign a reproduction method for them to research. It is up to each teacher to determine what species of animals to include or limit. After groups have assignment, instruct objectives of the project. Each group should submit a poster about their animal reproduction method. It should include 1) what animals are most successful with this method, 2) the pros and cons of this method, 3) ethical concerns with this method, 4) the scientific explanation of the method, and 5) care of newborn with this method. This is to be graded by the rubric provided. Students should produce posters to aid their presentation of the method to class. The students should be assigned presentation times based on the size of the class. The focus of the presentation should be to inform classmates about the method they researched and to increase the awareness of the pros and cons. If class size is large have groups research methods with different species, for example difference in horse, cattle, sheep and swine. Instructions to Students: You will be randomly assigned partners and topics. It is up to each group to determine what animal to focus on. After researching this reproduction method, your group will be responsible for creating a poster and presenting a 5-7 minute presentation to the class. Also include if this is the best reproduction method for your species, why or why not.

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Each group should submit a poster about their animal reproduction method. It should include 1) what animals are most successful with this method, 2) the pros and cons of this method, 3) ethical concerns with this method, 4) the scientific explanation of the method, and 5) care of newborn with this method. This is to be graded by the rubric provided. The poster should highlight information on this method to be used as a visual aid in the presentation to class. The class presentation should include all major points highlighted in the criteria. You should keep the focus of the presentation on improving the awareness of this method, the pros and cons of this method. Instructions for Learning Styles Accommodations: Allow students to work with peers for support. Assessment for Activity: RUBRIC - Posters; RUBRIC - Oral Presentation. Approximate Length of Time for Activity: 3 days of class time. Materials Needed: Livestock and Reproduction Methods; Poster Board; Card Stock; Printer Paper; Markers. Resources Needed: Modern Livestock Textbook; Internet Laboratory; Magazines. Activity: Student groups will research a reproduction method and create a poster to aid their presentation of the method to class. The focus of the presentation will be to inform classmates about the method they researched and to increase the awareness of the pros and cons. Attachments: Livestock and Reproduction Methods; RUBRIC - Posters; RUBRIC - Oral Presentations.

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Science Model Rubric
Building A Structure : Animal Reproduction

CATEGORY Function

4
Structure functions extraordinarily well, holding up under atypical stresses. Accurate information taken from several sources in a systematic manner. Appropriate materials were selected and creatively modified in ways that made them even better. Great care taken in construction process so that the structure is neat, attractive and follows plans accurately. Explanations by all group members indicate a clear and accurate understanding of scientific principles underlying the construction and modifications.

3
Structure functions well, holding up under typical stresses. Accurate information taken from a couple of sources in a systematic manner.

2
Structure functions pretty well, but deteriorates under typical stresses. Accurate information taken from a couple of sources but not systematically.

1
Fatal flaws in function with complete failure under typical stresses. Information taken from only one source and/or information not accurate. Inappropriate materials were selected and contributed to a product that performed poorly. Construction appears careless or haphazard. Many details need refinement for a strong or attractive product.

Information Gathering Construction Materials

Appropriate materials Appropriate materials were selected and were selected. there was an attempt at creative modification to make them even better. Construction was careful and accurate for the most part, but 1-2 details could have been refined for a more attractive product. Explanations by all group members indicate a relatively accurate understanding of scientific principles underlying the construction and modifications. Construction accurately followed the plans, but 3-4 details could have been refined for a more attractive product. Explanations by most group members indicate relatively accurate understanding of scientific principles underlying the construction and modifications.

Construction Care Taken

Scientific Knowledge

Explanations by several members of the group do not illustrate much understanding of scientific principles underlying the construction and modifications.

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