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					BBC

Learning Scotland

STOP, THINK, WONDER
Autumn 2007

Tuesdays 04.00–04.15 18 September to 27 November BBC Radio 4 digital (terrestrial, cable, satellite)

Programmes in this series may be purchased on CD. Contact BBC Schools Broadcast Recordings, telephone 08701 272 272. They are also available on demand on the BBC website for seven days post-transmission.

Curriculum for Excellence
These notes relate to re-transmitted programmes, and were conceived within the 5–14 framework. While the 5–14 terminology has been retained, teachers are encouraged to consider the content in terms of its contribution to promoting successful learners, confident individuals, responsible citizens and effective contributors.

© This publication contains copyright material: permission has been obtained for its contents to be copied or reproduced for use in schools and colleges.

Stop, Think, Wonder
Autumn 2007
Introduction 5–14 forward plans Judaism Programme 11 Programme 12 Programme 13 Sikhism Programme 14 Programme 15 Programme 16 Christianity Programme 17 Programme 18 Hinduism Programme 19 Islam Programme 20 Muhammad 48 Raksha Bandhan 44 Christmas The parable of the two sons 35 39 Guru Nanak Sikh boy The Langar 23 27 31 Passover Bar Mitzvah Abraham 9 14 19 3 6

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Introduction
Rationale
HMI inspections have shown that teachers have experienced some difficulties with the Personal Search aspect of 5-14 Religious and Moral Education. In order to support teachers in this aspect of the curriculum, the Scottish Executive commissioned Learning and Teaching Scotland to provide guidance on how personal search can be delivered through the exploration of religion. Learning and Teaching Scotland produced this guidance in the form of a book, Effective Teaching of Religious and Moral Education: Personal Search. This book was sent out to every non-denominational school in Scotland in the autumn of 2001. A similar book was sent to denominational schools. The book contains three main parts. 1 Staff development activities to help teachers think about what is meant by personal search and how it can be effectively delivered. 2 Reading to support the staff development activities. This reading discusses a definition for personal search, identifies a process for delivering personal search, and suggests strategies to enhance personal search in the classroom. 3 A number of teaching exemplars at different stages (P1–3, P4–6 and P7–S2) to demonstrate the process for delivering personal search. The process for delivering personal search consists of four stages. 1 Preparing the way. Teachers inform pupils of what is involved in a topic, and how the topic relates to previous work they have done in RME. 2 Finding out. Through exploration of a topic, pupils’ knowledge and understanding of a religious tradition will be developed. 3 Making connections. Pupils will be helped to connect important ideas in the topic to their own lives and the world in which they live. 4 Thinking it over. In the topic important personal search questions are identified which pupils are encouraged to think and reflect about. Teacher’s notes from the first series of Stop, Think, Wonder are also available online.

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Overview of the programmes
There are ten programmes in the series based around five religions – Judaism, Christianity, Sikhism, Hinduism and Islam. For each programme a theme, which relates to the world of the pupils and helps them to reflect, has been identified. Judaism Programme 11 Passover through which freedom is explored Programme 12 Bar Mitzvah which looks at growing up and coming of age Programme 13 Abraham and the mezuzah explores what is important to remember Sikhism Programme 14 Guru Nanak shows the importance of caring for others Programme 15 The theme of identity is explored through a story involving Guru Gobind Singh Programme 16 The Sikh Langar brings out the importance of service Christianity Programme 17 Christmas takes the theme of communicating good news Programme 18 The Parable of the Two Sons explores the themes of promises and obedience Hinduism Programme 19 The Hindi ceremony of Raksha Bandhan introduces the idea of caring for and protecting others Islam Programme 20 A story about Muhammad leads to discussion on the importance of role models In each programme pupils will be helped to find out more about the religion, connect important ideas to their own lives and to think over important personal search questions. They will be encouraged to stop, think, wonder.

The structure of the programmes
Each programme contains two key elements. 1 Pupils from primary schools talk about their own experiences and their ideas about issues central to the theme of the programme. 2 A story stimulates thinking and raises issues. Sometimes the story relates to the teaching of a religious tradition, and sometimes the story is grounded in the life and experiences of pupils. In addition, some programmes contain a poem, a song, an interview. Again the purpose of this is to stimulate thinking and reflection.

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How to use the programmes
1 The programmes for each religion should be used to support and complement a topic taught in RME. The programmes might be used to develop a topic such as family life and celebration in Judaism, or they might be used to stimulate thinking about a key issue such as obedience through looking at a parable of Jesus. 2 The programmes for each religion should be used to — develop pupil knowledge and understanding of religion. This will include both the practices of a religion and also important concepts and values in the religion. — develop pupil skills. These will include skills important in RME such as the ability to find out about religion, draw on personal experience, reflect, make a personal response, apply religious teaching to their own situation, work together in groups and listen to the views of others. — promote positive attitudes. These will include attitudes such as showing respect and concern for others, and appreciating the importance of what people believe and how they put into practice their beliefs. 3 For each programme a number of teaching ideas and activities are suggested which relate to the stages of the process for delivering personal search. Ideas are given under the headings of finding out, making connections, and thinking it over. Teachers will wish to identify which of these activities are appropriate for their class and also the order they wish to use them in. It is not expected that teachers would use them in the order given in the notes for each programme, but it is likely that teachers will move backwards and forwards between each of the stages of the process.

Assessment
Assessment is an integral part of the learning and teaching process. All that pupils say and do provides evidence for teachers of pupils’ learning. In RME, — listening to pupils involved in group discussion, — talking with individual pupils, and — looking at pupil responses to specially devised tasks are helpful to teachers when making judgements about pupil progress. It is important that teachers should be clear about what is being assessed in terms of knowledge and understanding and/or personal search skills. In the planning grid for each programme suggestions are given regarding formal assessment.

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Forward plan
Programme 11

Religious and Moral Education
Levels B/C

Attainment outcome: Personal Search Passover

Strands and targets

Key terms and concepts

Resources

Assessment

OWR level B: Celebration ‘be able to connect selected festivals with appropriate stories, such as Passover’ OWR level C: Celebration ‘understand some of the symbolisms of customs associated with Passover PS level B: Ultimate questions ‘develop the confidence and ability to express their own questions about God, suffering, death etc. in response to their awareness of religion or their own life experiences’

Celebration Freedom Happiness/sadness Passover Terms connected with the Passover celebration, such as Matzah Chamatz Seder Charoset Haggadah

Teacher’s notes and worksheets Books about Passover Children’s version of the story of Moses Artefacts connected with Passover Websites such as hppt// www.holidays.net/ passover Materials for making and doing

‘Finding out’ activities will provide evidence of pupil knowledge and understanding of the Passover story and the symbolism of Passover customs Worksheet 1 will provide evidence of pupil awareness of the importance of Passover Worksheet 2 will provide evidence of pupil awareness of Passover celebrations and the ability to draw on their own life experiences

Programme 12

Bar Mitzvah
Key terms and concepts Resources Assessment

Strands and targets

OWR level C: Celebration ‘understand the significance of customs associated with Judaism’ PS level C: Natural world ‘Reflect, with support, on the natural order of the human life-cycle, birth and growth in association with religious ceremonies marking these stages’

Ceremony Bat and Bar Mitzvah Stages in life Life as a journey

Teacher’s notes and worksheets Books and posters which include information about Bat and Bar Mitzvah Bar Mitzvah artefacts such as prayer shawl, yamulkha, Bar Mitzvah certificate Hebrew alphabet Certificates pupils have been given

Worksheet 3 will provide evidence of a pupil’s knowledge and understanding of Jewish customs at Bar Mitzvah Listening to pupils talking about the ‘Thinking it over’ questions will provide evidence of pupils ability to reflect and express opinions about the human life cycle

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Programme 13 Abraham
Key terms and concepts

Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

Strands and targets

Resources

Assessment

OWR level C: Customs ‘understand the significance of customs associated with Judaism’ PS level C: Ultimate questions ‘Recognise that religion is essentially about ultimate questions’ PS level C: Ultimate questions ‘Be able to listen to the views of others and express their own with growing articulateness’

Belief Abraham Shema Remembering

Teacher’s notes and worksheets A mezuzah Objects from home that help people remember Objects which focus on remembering, such as a poppy, a flag, a wedding photograph or pictures of a war memorial or gravestones The story ‘Abraham and the idols’

All the ‘Finding out’ activities should help teachers come to a conclusion about pupils’ abilities in understanding the significance of the custom of touching the mezuzah The programme involves much discussion, especially in the work involved in Worksheet 6. This should help teachers observe the ability of pupils to listen to the views of others and express their own

Programme 14

Guru Nanak
Key terms and concepts Resources Assessment

Strands and targets

OWR level B: ‘Be familiar with a few stories associated with key figures’ PS level C: reflect with support on the ‘Show awareness and concern for the needs of others in the local community’

Guru Nanak Punjab Sadness Rupees

Teacher’s notes and worksheets Books about Sikhism and Guru Nanak Map of India

Worksheet 8 Pupils could talk or write about one group in the community that needs support and suggest what they might do to help

Programme 15

Guru Gobind Singh
Key terms and concepts Resources Assessment

Strands and targets

OWR level C: ‘Know about one or two key figures’ PS level C: Natural world ‘Be able to listen to the views of others and express their own with growing articulateness’

Guru Guru Gobind Singh Turban Sari

Teacher’s notes and worksheets Books about Sikhism and, in particular, the story of Guru Gobind Singh Books containing information and pictures of the five sacred symbols of Sikhism

Pupils could write a newspaper article about the life of Guru Gobind Singh Observe pupils in group discussion

Programme 16

The Langar
Key terms and concepts Resources Assessment

Strands and targets

OWR level C: ‘Understand the significance of customs associated with particular religions’ PS level C: ‘Recognise that there are different points of view’

Gurdwara Langar Sewa Guru Granth Sahib

Teacher’s notes and worksheets Books about Sikhism and the langar Pictures of the Guru Granth Sahib

Worksheet 12 Observe pupils in group discussion

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Programme 17 Christmas
Key terms and concepts

Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

Strands and targets

Resources

Assessment

Christianity level B: Celebration ‘Be able to connect Christmas with appropriate stories from the life of Jesus’ PS level C: Ultimate questions ‘Be able to listen to the views of others and express their own with growing articulateness’

Gospel (Good News) Christmas Communication Angel (Messenger)

Teacher’s notes and worksheets Children’s Bible Nativity scene Tape of carols or Christmas music Selection of Christmas cards

‘Finding out’ activities and Worksheet 13 will provide evidence of pupils’ ability to connect Christmas with the story of Jesus’ birth. Listening to pupils respond to ‘Thinking it over’ questions will give evidence of pupils’ ability to listen and to express their own views.

Programme 18

The parable of the Two Sons
Key terms and concepts Resources Assessment

Strands and targets

Christianity level B: Sacred writings ‘Know more stories about Jesus the Teacher’ PS level B: ‘Understand at a simple level concepts such as respect for others’ ‘Respond to those ideas in stories and discussion of real incidents’

Jesus Parable Promises Obedience

Teacher’s notes and worksheets Parable of the Two Sons (children’s version) Making and doing materials

Worksheet 16 will provide evidence that pupils know and understand the parable. Scenario and poster activity in ‘Thinking it over’ section will show the ability of pupils to respond to concepts.

Programme 19

Raksha Bandhan
Key terms and concepts Resources Assessment

Strands and targets

OWR level C: ‘Understand some of the symbolism of customs and stories associated with a major festival’ PS level C: ‘Be able to listen to the views of others and express their own with growing articulateness’

Krishna Raksha Bandhan Rakhi Thali

Teacher’s notes and worksheets Books about Hinduism and Raksha Bandhan Pictures of Krishna Wool for making rakhis Ingredients for making sweets

Question pupils about their poster depicting the story of Krishna and how Raksha Bandhan came about. Observe pupils in group discussion.

Programme 20

Muhammad
Key terms and concepts Resources Assessment

Strands and targets

OWR level C: ‘Know about one or two key figures’ PS level C: ‘Recognise that there are different points of view’

Muhammad Makkah (Mecca) Quraish Idols

Teacher’s notes and worksheets Books about Islam and Muhammad Map of the Middle East and Arabia Pictures of the Ka’ba

Pupils could write a newspaper article about the life of Muhammad. Observe pupils in group discussion.

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Programme Eleven Passover
— Transmission date 18 September 2007

Programme synopsis
The programme includes — pupils talking about special times of celebration in their family. — a story about a Jewish family preparing for and celebrating Passover. — children from Iraq and Kurdistan now living in Glasgow talking about what they miss about their own countries and their thoughts about living in Scotland. — pupils talking about sad and happy times in their lives and their feelings at such times. The story explores the preparation for and the celebration of Passover through the eyes of the children of the family, Rachel and Michael. It emphasises the key theme of the celebration – freedom, and the fact that although the celebration remembers a happy occasion it is tinged with sadness because freedom only came about through suffering.

Background information
Passover is an important Jewish festival which takes place in the spring. It is also known as the festival of unleavened bread and the festival of freedom. It commemorates the escape of the Jewish people from Egypt where they were slaves. As part of the preparation for Passover a Jewish family ensures that all products containing yeast are removed from the house. The house is thoroughly cleaned. Often just before Passover, children are given a candle and a feather. They have to search round the house to make sure that there are no remaining products with yeast in them (chametz). The candle helps children to see in dark corners and the feather is used as a brush. During the Seder meal, the story of the escape from Egypt is told. The meal is eaten in a special order (Seder means order) and the table is set in a special way. On the table is a special plate – the Seder plate. The items on the plate help to remind the family of the events of the escape under the leadership of Moses. These include the following. — A lamb bone, which reminds Jews that before they left Egypt, they had to put lamb’s blood on their doorpost so that the plague ‘passed over’ their house and didn’t kill their children. — Maror, bitter herbs such as horseradish, as a reminder of the harshness of slavery. — Charoset, which is a mixture of apples, nuts, cinnamon, wine. This looks like mortar and reminds that the Jews used to make bricks for building Pharaoh’s palaces when they were slaves. — Something green such as parsley as a reminder that it is a spring festival. — A roasted egg (a hard boiled egg slightly grilled) to remind that Passover is a new start. — Matzah, which is unleavened bread, recalling the hasty flight of the Jews from Egypt. Also on the table are — salt water in which the parsley is dipped to remind of tears when the Jews were slaves. — ‘Elijah’s cup’, an extra cup of wine, because Jews believe that Elijah (a Jewish prophet) visits every Seder to wish everyone a year of peace and freedom. — a special book called the Haggadah which tells the story of the escape from Egypt.

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During the meal the story of the escape is told. This is done by the youngest child asking four questions and the reply to the questions tells the story of the escape. The celebration is a happy occasion — songs are sung, games are played. Everyone sits comfortably to remind them they are free from slavery. It is a celebration of freedom. However, it is remembered that the time is also sad because there was suffering. The Egyptians suffered through the plagues and as the story of the plagues is told a drop of wine is spilled for each plague.

Before the programme
Preparing the Way When introducing the topic teachers might refer to previous topics where celebrating a festival in the family have been a major focus. In addition, as part of the preparation for the topic pupils will need to be aware of the story of Moses and how the Jewish people escaped from Egypt.

Follow-up activities
Finding out There are several activities which could be used to help pupils explore the story of the escape and the celebration today. These include the following. 1 2 Listening to the story of Moses and the escape. Drawing up a wordbank for the slaves which would describe the work they did and their feelings. Add contrasting words reflecting how they might have felt after their escape (see Worksheet 1). Producing a collage telling the story of Moses and the escape. Enacting a search for chametz. Looking at and talking about how a Seder plate is used in the Passover celebration. Drawing and labelling a Seder plate, showing the items which are placed on the plate. Enacting the four questions asked by the youngest child, and the answers to them. Listening to and singing Passover songs. These can be found on websites about Passover. Finding a recipe for charoset, and making some.

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 Eating some matzah. 11 Playing the game of finding the last piece of matzah (afikomen). 12 Identifying, with support, the parts of the celebration which are happy and those parts which are sad (see Worksheet 2).

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Making Connections

Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

1 After listening to pupils in the programme talking about their experiences of family celebrations pupils might talk about their own experiences, talking about what was being celebrated, how it was celebrated, why it was an important family occasion and what they enjoyed most about the celebration. 2 Pupils might listen again to part of the story which focuses on preparing and getting ready for Passover, and talk about what it means to prepare for something and share experiences of preparing for a special occasion. 3 Passover remembers a happy time (freedom) but also sad things (suffering). Pupils might talk about what has been one of their happiest times and why it made them happy. They might draw on their experiences to explain what makes people sad, describing how people show their sadness (see worksheet 2). Thinking it over 1 Teachers might encourage pupils to discuss in groups what freedom means. Pupils might be asked to think of times they wanted to do something but were not allowed. Why weren’t they allowed to do it? How did they feel? Does being free mean people can do anything they like? They might discuss what it means to be a slave. Do they think that anyone should be kept as a slave? Why, or why not? What things do they think everyone in the world has a right to? (They might include having a place to live, going to school, having enough food and so on.) Pupils might complete the following statements. ‘ I am glad I have the freedom to….’ ‘ I wish everybody had the freedom to…’ 2 Pupils might listen again to the children from Kurdistan and Iraq and talking about the reasons why they had to leave their own country. They might try to imagine what it must be like coming to and living in a strange country. They might draw up a list of ways they could help such children.

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Stop, Think, Wonder Worksheet 1

Freedom: escape from slavery
Imagine you were a Jewish slave in Egypt who escaped and became free. Fill in the spaces below to show how your life changed. My life as a slave As a slave every day I had to Draw a picture of you working as a slave

How did being a slave make you feel? Choose one of the words below and draw a circle around it. miserable angry frightened

Say why you chose that word.

My life as a free person Now I am free I can Draw a picture of you doing something you couldn’t do when you were a slave

How did being a free person make you feel? Choose one of the words below and draw a circle around it. pleased overjoyed worried

Say why you chose that word.

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Stop, Think, Wonder Worksheet 2

Passover: happy and sad
‘Passover is a happy time, but it is also a time to remember some sad things.’ Passover: Happy List as many things as you can which make Passover a happy time. Passover: Sad What sad things are remembered at Passover?

My Life: Happy Write about a time you were happy. How did you show your feelings?

My Life: Sad Write about a time you were sad. How did you show your feelings?

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Programme Twelve Bar Mitzvah
— Transmission date 25 September 2007

Programme synopsis
The programme includes — pupils talking about being grown up. — a story about a Jewish boy, Peter, exploring his thoughts and feelings as he prepares for and celebrates his Bar Mitzvah. — pupils talking about times they have had to prepare for a special event. — a song, ‘Just one life’ about special times in life as a person grows up.

Background information
When a Jewish boy reaches the age of 13 he is said to have become Bar Mitzvah. ‘Bar Mitzvah’ means ‘son of the commandment’. At 13 every Jewish boy, whether he goes through the ceremony or not, has the responsibility of doing his best to live according to the Jewish faith and keeping God’s rules and commandments. The Bar Mitzvah ceremony is the occasion where he publicly accepts his responsibilities within the Jewish community. From now on he is regarded as an adult and he will be counted as part of the minyan, the quorum of ten males which is needed for a service to take place in the synagogue. For girls there is a ceremony, Bat Mitzvah (daughter of commandment) which takes place when a girl is 12 years old. Bat Mitzvah reflects the fact that the religious role of women is focused in the home — Shabbat and many of the festivals are home based. At the Bar Mitzvah ceremony, the boy will have to read in public from part of the Jewish Scriptures in Hebrew at the synagogue service. He will have spent several months preparing for his Bar Mitzvah, learning about the responsibilities of being an adult male Jew and also learning to read the portion of the Torah (Jewish Scripture) aloud in Hebrew. Hebrew is the language of the Torah and synagogue worship. He will practise using the yad – a pointer used to read from the Torah. It can be quite a nerve-racking occasion. The preparation can be a bit like getting ready for a wedding, with sending out invitations, planning a special meal and buying gifts and new clothes. Family and friends will have travelled far to be with the boy on this special day. People will wish him mazal tov (meaning good luck). On the day, family and friends will come early to the synagogue. All the women, and children under 13, will sit in the women’s section (often the gallery) wearing their best clothes and hats. The boy and his father will be seated with his other close male relatives in the front row of the men’s section. They will be wearing their tallith (prayer shawl), yamulkah (skull cap) and best suits for the occasion. When the boy is called up to read his portion of the Torah he will be accompanied by his father. This is usually a very emotional moment. At the end of the reading there is a sense of relief that all has gone well. Often after the ceremony, the boy will be given a certificate to mark the special occasion. After the Bar Mitzvah ceremony there is often a family celebration. Parents and friends will give him presents. The boy at this celebration usually makes a brief speech thanking everybody for coming and for their gifts, and thanking his parents for their love and support.

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Before the programme
Preparing the way When introducing the topic teachers might refer to previous topics where important times in the journey through life, such as a birth or a wedding, have been explored. The programme should be used in conjunction with further work looking at what goes on during the Bar Mitzvah ceremony.

Follow-up activities
Finding out Some of the following activities might help pupils to learn more about and appreciate the importance of Bar Mitzvah for the Jewish community. 1 Look at some of the artefacts connected with Bar Mitzvah. These might include a yad, a mini torah scroll, yamulkah, a tallith, Bar Mitzvah cards, and Bar Mitzvah certificate. A wall frieze of drawings of these items might be produced or the items themselves might be displayed. The pupils can write short notes of explanation. See also Worksheet 3. 2 Design an invitation to be sent to friends inviting them to a Bar Mitzvah. The invitation will need to include the boy’s name (a Jewish name), the time and place of the Bar Mitzvah (usually a Saturday in a synagogue) and details about the party celebration after the ceremony. 3 Write out an announcement of a Bar Mitzvah (like a wedding announcement) for a local newspaper. 4 Use a computer to design and create a Bar Mitzvah card. 5 Look at the Hebrew alphabet and talk about how it differs from the English alphabet. Pupils might try to write their own names in Hebrew. 6 Discuss, in groups, what the Bar Mitzvah boy might say in his speech at the party after the ceremony. Perhaps some pupils would like to actually deliver the speech. 7 Listen again to the story in the programme, and discuss the feelings of all those involved (Peter, David, mother and dad) before, during and after the Bar Mitzvah. What did each do to make it a happy, important family occasion. Making connections 1 Listen to the song at the end of the programme and ask children to talk about the important events in their life so far. What do they think has been the most important? Why? Pupils might write a brief story titled ‘The most important day in my life’. See also Worksheet 4. 2 Look at a Bar Mitzvah certificate. Ask the children about times they have received certificates. Why were they given it? What does it say about their abilities and achievements? How did they feel when they received it? Where do they keep it? If they have more than one certificate, which one do they think is the most important? Why? A class display of certificates might be organised.

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Thinking it over

Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

Teachers might encourage pupils to discuss some of the following issues in small groups and report back their views. 1 What can a teenager do that a P4–5 child is not allowed to do? What’s the difference between a teenager and a child? What’s the difference between a teenager and an adult? What does it mean to be grown up? What is there to look forward to about being grown up? What is there to be apprehensive about? What big decisions have to be made when you are an adult? Do you think it will be easy? Why, or why not? 2 At what age is a person regarded as being grown up? Adults sometimes say that being grown up means acting in a responsible way. What does this mean? In what ways does the Bar Mitzvah boy have to behave in a responsible way? How might he be helped? 3 People often have a special celebration when they ‘come of age’. Have you been to such a celebration? Did you send a card or give a gift? Do you think it is a good idea to have a special celebration to mark becoming an adult? Why, or why not?

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Stop, Think, Wonder Worksheet 3

The Bar Mitzvah ceremony
Look at the four drawings below. Each of them has something to do with a boy’s Bar Mitzvah. Match each drawing to one of the sentences below. Each sentence has some gaps. Fill in the gaps using some of the words in the box on the right (you won’t need all the words).

Yad 12 English head certificate

Tallith 13 Hebrew arm medal

This object is called a

.

It is a special pointer which helps the boy follow the words when reading at the Bar Mitzvah ceremony.

When the boy reaches the age of x he has his Bar Mitzvah. He will wear special items including a yamulkah which he wears on his .

This object is the scroll the boy has to read from. The words are in the language and he has to read it aloud.

After the ceremony the boy is given a to remind him of this very special day in his life.

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Stop, Think, Wonder Worksheet 4

Special occasions: Bar Mitzvah boy
In the story Peter said ‘tomorrow is a big day’. 1 Why was his Bar Mitzvah a big day for him?

2

Look at the words below. happy nervous scared excited sad

Put a ring around one word which you think would show how Peter might have been feeling the night before his big day. Explain why you have chosen that word.

3

On his big day Peter had to — wear special Jewish clothes, — read aloud from the Jewish Bible in Hebrew, — give a speech at a party. Which do you think was the most important thing he had to do? Why?

What do you think was the hardest thing he had to do? Why?

My Special Day Write a story about a big special day in your life. Explain why it was a big day. Describe what happened and explain how you felt on that day. Draw a picture on the back of the worksheet about your big day. Give the picture a heading.

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Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

Programme Thirteen Abraham
— Transmission date 2 October 2007

Programme synopsis
The programme includes — pupils talking about ‘objects’ they have brought into school which remind them of something important. — a story about two boys, Craig and Michael. The story looks at how we all have ways of reminding us of something important. Michael belongs to the Jewish faith and the story shows how the mezuzah in his house serves him and his family as an everyday reminder of something important about their faith. A photograph of Craig’s granddad helps Craig to remember the good times he spent with him, even though remembering can sometimes be upsetting. — a song about what’s important, and the different ways we remember.

Background information
Abraham is regarded as the Father of the Jewish Nation. According to the biblical story Abraham lived in the city of Ur. The people of Ur worshipped many gods. Abraham came to believe in one God (monotheism). For Jews the belief in one God is central to their faith. This belief is expressed in a verse in the Jewish Bible and is regarded as a statement of faith. It is called the Shema. Shema means ‘hear’ which is the first word of the statement. The words of the Shema begin ‘Hear O Israel, the Lord our God the Lord is One and you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your might.’ Remembering the Shema is important to Jews. One way of bringing this belief regularly to mind is by touching a mezuzah. The mezuzah is one of the outward symbols of Judaism. It means ‘doorpost’ because it is a small rectangular box which is pinned to the upper right doorposts of Jewish homes. It contains a parchment which has the Shema written on it in Hebrew. A mezuzah can be made of wood, plastic or metal. Putting it on doorposts fulfils a biblical commandment found in the book of Deuteronomy in the Jewish Bible. This states that the words of the Shema shall be written ‘upon the doorposts of your house and upon thy gates’. Jewish people, as they enter or leave their house, touch the mezuzah and put their fingers to their lips. Every time they do this it reminds them of the belief that there is one God and to love God and to keep God’s laws. The front of the mezuzah is usually decorated with Jewish symbols and has written on it in Hebrew the word Shaddai, meaning almighty. Note the mezuzah is an important symbol for Jews. When a mezuzah is purchased from a retailer selling artefacts for schools it will be the outward case only. It will not contain the scroll on which the Shema is written.

Before the programme
Preparing the Way Teachers might refer to the work in Programme 11, and remind pupils how Passover helps Jews remember how they were slaves but eventually became free. Building on this idea of remembering will be a useful introduction to this programme.

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Follow-up activities
Finding out 1 Pupils might be shown a mezuzah. Rather than be told what it is, they could think of questions to ask about it such as what it is, where it is placed, what it contains, how it is used. Then, through listening to the story in the programme, they can be encouraged to find out the answers to their questions. 2 Pupils might make a mezuzah out of cardboard or a matchbox, decorating it with Jewish symbols. The finished work can be used to create a display. 3 Pupils might copy out, on a scroll they have made, the first part of the Shema. Encourage them to use their best handwriting. 4 Pupils might listen to the story of Abraham and the idols. This story is about how Abraham came to believe that there is only one God. (The story can be found in Out of the Ark published by Simon and Schuster or A Tapestry of Tales published by Collins.) Making connections Because the mezuzah is a reminder, ‘remembering’ is the key idea in this programme. 1 Discuss some of the things pupils have to remember to do every day. They might compile a class survey asking if they ever forget to eat, drink, tidy their rooms, put away toys, clean teeth and so on. A bar graph of the results might be made and the result sorted into two groups – things that are easy to remember and things that are hard to remember. 2 Talk about how pupils feel if someone forgets their birthday? Have they ever forgotten something important like a parent’s birthday, or forgotten to do their homework or to visit a friend. How did they feel? 3 Listen to the pupils in the programme talking about a special object they have which works as a reminder. If any children have something similar they might bring it into school and put it on display, with a brief note explaining what it reminds them of and how they feel about the item. 4 Ask children to carry out a survey amongst family, friends and teachers about any objects they possess which act as reminders. 5 Listen to the story, and discuss why Craig liked to have a reminder of his granddad and why his mother found it hard to have this reminder on view in the living room. 6 Talk about reminders of special family occasions (photographs, video recordings, special ornaments, holiday souvenirs, scrapbook and so on) and about the kinds of reminders shared by the whole community (poppies, gravestones, war memorials, flags and so on). Photographs of some of these might be used to stimulate discussion. Ask the children to complete Worksheet 5. Thinking it over 1 Teachers might use Worksheet 2 to encourage pupils to think of their own ‘shema’ statement for making the classroom a happy place to work in. Statements could eventually be written on scrolls and displayed or placed in the mezuzahs made earlier. 2 Pupils might discuss whether they think it is a good idea for people to have a statement which they remind themselves of every day. What might be a good statement for their homes? 3 Discuss the phrase ‘a treasured memory’ with pupils. Why can memories be like treasure?

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Stop, Think, Wonder Worksheet 5

Remembering
1 Write down what each of the following helps people remember. The first is done for you. A poppy helps people remember those who have died in a war.

A poppy

A holiday souvenir

A photograph

A flag

A gravestone

2

Draw a picture of something you possess which helps you remember something important. Under your picture write down what it helps you remember.

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Stop, Think, Wonder Worksheet 6

An important statement
Your group has been asked to think about a statement which would, if everybody in the class kept it, make the class a happy place to work in. 1 Which of the following statements do you think would be best? Place a tick beside it. Start the day with a smile. Always be willing to say you are sorry. Never moan and grumble when asked to do something. Never argue and answer back. Show respect to everybody. Compare your answer with other groups in the class. Which was thought to be best? Write it down here.

2

3

Discuss in your group what you could do to help pupils remember this statement every day. Write down your suggestion below.

4

Listen to all the other suggestions. Have a class vote to decide which is the best suggestion. Write it down here.

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Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

Programme Fourteen Guru Nanak
— Transmission date 9 October 2007

Programme synopsis
The programme includes — pupils talking about the importance of showing care and why they should give up their time to care for others. — a boy learning about the importance of caring after hearing a story about Guru Nanak. — pupils talk about their ‘sensory’ garden financed by Children in Need. The story is situated in a contemporary family setting. Randeep and his mother are discussing whether to spend his pocket money on buying a new CD or giving it to Children in Need. After hearing the story of Guru Nanak and how he used his money to help those who were poor and hungry, Randeep decides to do something for Children in Need.

Background information
This is the first of three programmes set within the context of the Sikh religion. It explores the values of caring and sharing by focusing on the life of Guru Nanak, the first of the ten gurus of Sikhism. Nanak established the Sikh religion in the fifteenth century in the area of modern day Pakistan and north-west India, known as the Punjab. The fifteenth century was a time of great tension and conflict between Hindus and Muslims. Nanak believed that this was harmful to both Hindus and Muslims. He felt that both religions contained some of the truth about God but that their rituals were clouding the truth they were both trying to teach. The best way to find God he believed was to be still and meditate. Nanak believed that it was impossible to love God without also loving humanity, so he taught that people should be kind to one another and share what they have with others. Most of the stories of Nanak’s life are not contained in the Sikh scriptures but in collections of popular anecdotes. Some stories show his concern for the poor and needy such as the story of the Twenty Rupees. For Nanak, however, the important thing was how you behaved, how compassionate you were and what you did to bring about justice and a better society. In their daily lives, Sikhs believe they have three responsibilities which affect how they should live their lives. The first is Nam Japna – thinking about God by reading the scriptures. The second is Kirat Karna – earning a living and taking part in honest work. The third is Vand Chhakna – sharing one’s time, energy, abilities and earnings with those in need.

Before the programme
Preparing the way Teachers should refer here to any previous work pupils may have done on Sikhism. They should discuss with pupils what they will be doing and what they will be learning. Pictures of Sikhs could be shown and pupils’ attention drawn to key aspects of Sikh dress such as the turban and the patka. Teachers should tell pupils a little about Guru Nanak and where he lived. Pupils should also be introduced to some of the words and phrases they will hear in the programme such as guru, Punjab, sadhus, rupees, dhotis, turban and patka.

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Follow-up activities
Finding out 1 After the programme teachers might ask pupils: Why did Randeep want to go to the shops? Of what did his mum remind him? What is Children in Need? After hearing the story about Guru Nanak what did Randeep decide to do? 2 Show pupils pictures of Sikhs, both adults and children. Draw their attention in particular to the turban worn by adult Sikhs and the patka worn by children. Why do they think adults and children wear different forms of headgear? 3 Most Sikhs today still live in the Punjab. Show the children a blank map of India and make particular reference to the area of north-west India known as the Punjab. 4 In the story 3 important aspects of Guru Nanak’s teaching are described. They are: Nam Japna – keep God in mind at all times Kirat Karni – earn an honest living Vand Chhakna – give to charity and share with others. Talk to pupils about the importance of these for Sikhs and the difficulties they might have in upholding them. 5 Working in groups, pupils could find out as much as they can about Children in Need. 6 Ask the pupils to complete Worksheet 7. Making connections 1 Nanak’s father didn’t like the way Nanak spent his time. As a result they often had disagreements. What disagreements have the pupils had recently with their parents? What were they about? Who was at fault, them or their parents? How did the disagreements get resolved? 2 What are they expected to do at home to help out? Do they enjoy helping? Why or why not? 3 What things do we share in the classroom? Using Worksheet 8, pupils could make two lists – one for the things shared in the classroom and one for the things shared by the whole school. 4 What do the children do to help others? Ask about the reasons why they do things to help others, as well as finding out what they actually do. Are there times when they have done something to help others without being asked? Thinking it over Teachers might encourage pupils to discuss some of the following issues in small groups and report back on their views. 1 Why do you think people are willing to spend time and energy helping others? Is it possible to help everyone who needs help? How do we decide who to help? Do you think we should help people we don’t know? Why? Is it more important to help people we know than people we don’t know? Why or why not? 2 Why do people sometimes disagree? Are the causes of a disagreement always easy to put right? Why or why not? Is it important to try and make up after a disagreement? Why? Once a disagreement starts what do you think people should do to make sure it doesn’t get worse?

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Stop, Think, Wonder Worksheet 7

Guru Nanak
1 Why was Guru Nanak’s father worried about him?

2

Why did he give him 20 rupees?

3

What did Nanak do with the money?

4

How did his father react when Nanak got home?

5

What was Guru Nanak’s reply?

B B C Learning Scotland Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

Stop, Think, Wonder Worksheet 8

The Things we Share
What things do we share? Make two lists, one containing the things shared in the classroom and one containing the things shared by the whole school. Discuss your lists with others in the class.

Shared in the classroom

Shared in the whole school

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Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

Programme Fifteen Sikh Boy
— Transmission date 16 October 2007

Programme synopsis
The programme includes — pupils talking about the uniforms they wear for different occasions. — a Sikh story called ‘The donkey and the tiger’. — pupils talking about the effects of meeting people with uniforms. — a Sikh boy talking about his beliefs and practices. The story, ‘The donkey and the tiger’, is about a donkey which nobody took any notice of until Guru Gobind Singh covered it with the skin of a tiger. It shows how outward signs and symbols of identity can hide what people are like on the inside.

Background information
In the Indian tradition, the term ‘guru’ is used mostly to mean a spiritual guide or teacher. However, within Sikhism it is only used to describe the ten gurus, Guru Nanak and his nine successors. The tenth and last guru was Guru Gobind Singh. He gave the Sikhs their distinctive external appearance, with its five sacred symbols, as well as the uncut hair and the turban. He died in 1708 and before his death declared that after him Sikhs were to look upon the scriptures, the Guru Granth Sahib, as their guide and the symbolic representative of all ten gurus.

Before the programme
Preparing the way Teachers should refer to the previous programme and any other work children may have done on Sikhism. Using a map, remind the class about India and the Punjab area. Identify the key words that pupils will meet in this programme, including Guru Gobind Singh, guru, turban and sari.

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Follow-up activities
Finding out 1 After the programme teachers might ask pupils questions like the following. What were the pupils at the beginning of the programme talking about? Who was the main character in the story? Do they know what the word ‘guru’ means? 2 Using the brief notes above tell pupils about the word ‘guru’ and about Guru Gobind Singh. ‘Singh’ means lion and is the name given to all male Sikhs when they become full adult members of Sikhism. Women are called ‘Kaur’ meaning princess. 3 Ask pupils to complete Worksheet 9, which is about the story. 4 Ask pupils to look up the word ‘identity’ in a dictionary or thesaurus and write down some of the different ways in which the word is used. Help them to clarify the differences through discussion. Which meaning applies most in the story? 5 Ask pupils to complete Worksheet 10. Sikhs have a strong sense of identity represented by five symbols which in Punjabi begin with the letter ‘K’. From books in the classroom or in the library find out what the five symbols represent and why they are important to Sikhs. The five symbols are: Kesh (uncut hair covered by the turban) Kangha (a comb symbolising personal hygiene) Kara (a steel bracelet symbolising faithfulness to God) Kaacha (knee-length breeches symbolising purity) Kirpan (a short sword representing resistance against evil). Making connections 1 On what occasions do the children wear uniforms or special clothes? How do they feel when they are wearing them? 2 Ask the pupils to write descriptions of themselves. What are their good points, bad points, thoughts and feelings? 3 Children can draw and write a description of someone else in the class. Can others guess who they are? Thinking it over 1 According to the Guru the town in the story was full of people who appeared to be one thing but who, underneath, were something else altogether. What do you think he meant by this? 2 When you look in a mirror you see what other people see when they look at you. You just see the outside. Is that who you are? Are you the person that other people think you are? Do your friends and family really know you? 3 When we talk about what people are like, we refer to their ‘personality’. What does that mean? 4 The story talks about people changing. Do you think people can change? What makes you say that?

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Stop, Think, Wonder Worksheet 8 9

The Donkey and the Tiger
1 Guru Gobind Singh saw three people in the market — a musician, a wealthy lady and a trader. Each of them was wearing a special item of clothing. When he saw the items the Guru concluded that they represented certain personality characteristics. Write down the correct items of clothing and personality characteristics underneath each of the three people the Guru met. Use the words and pictures in the box to help remind you about the story. Trader Musician

performed good deeds holy fair

Lady

2

What made the Guru think that the three people were not what they appeared to be?

3

What was the plan that the Guru thought up to teach them a lesson?

4

What lesson do you think the musician, the lady and the trader learnt from their experience?

B B C Learning Scotland Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

Stop, Think, Wonder Worksheet 10

The Five Symbols of Sikhism
Drawing

Description

Kesh

Kangha

Kara

Kaacha

Kirpan

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Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

Programme Sixteen The Langar
— Transmission date 30 October 2007

Programme synopsis
The programme includes — pupils talking about helping others in the community. — a story of how pupils in one school go about resolving their rivalry with a neighbouring school. — pupils talking about how they could make their own school more welcoming. — a poem. The story involves a situation of rivalry between two neighbouring schools. After visiting a langar, a group of children in one school decide to hold a langar and invite children from the other school to join them. By meeting and eating together they begin to put right their problems with each other.

Background information
A Sikh place of worship is called a gurdwara, which means ‘the house of the guru and the dwelling place of God’. The most sacred thing and the centre of attention in the gurdwara is the Guru Granth Sahib, the Sikh scriptures. Granth means collection. Sahib means lord or master and represents the Sikh way of expressing respect. Attached to the gurdwara is a free kitchen, the Langar. The idea of the Langar probably goes back to Guru Nanak. Everyone, Sikhs and non-Sikhs, are welcome at the Langar. Usually after a religious service in the gurdwara, there will be a vegetarian meal offered in the Langar to which all are invited. For Sikhs it expresses the importance of sewa or service. It also demonstrates the principle of vand chakna.

Before the programme
Preparing the way Teachers should refer to the earlier programmes on Sikhism or other work done by the children on Sikhism. Identify for pupils the key words they will meet in the programme such as gurdwara, Langar, sewa and Guru Granth Sahib.

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Follow-up activities
Finding out 1 At the beginning of the programme, what examples did pupils give of helping others in the community? 2 Through questioning and discussion, get pupils to retell the story of David and Amrit. Make sure they bring out the main elements, including the problem between the two schools, David’s visit to the Langar, the decision to hold a Langar in their own school and what happened as a result. 3 Ask pupils to complete Worksheet 11. 4 Ask pupils to write down the following Sikh words and explain what they mean. Gurdwara Guru Granth Sahib sewa Langar 5 Working in groups, pupils should prepare a report entitled ‘Our visit to the Langar’. They could listen to the programme again and consult books in the classroom and in the library. If possible some contact with the Sikh community through a visiting speaker or a class visit to a gurdwara would be ideal. Making connections 1 Talk with pupils about times they have received and shown hospitality, and how they felt when going somewhere new for the first time. How can being welcomed help? Visitors might be invited to the class (perhaps Sikhs from a local gurdwara) and a welcome prepared for them. 2 Talk with pupils about their experiences of serving others. When and how did they do this? How did people respond? How did they feel? Pupils could write an account of one such time. 3 Pupils could identify the talents they have which could be used to help others. A class list of talents and how these can be used to help others could be produced. (Worksheet 12 can be used for this.) Thinking it over Teachers might encourage pupils to discuss some of the following issues in small groups. 1 Is it important to make sure visitors feel welcome? Why or why not? How do we make people feel welcome? How might visitors to your school be made to feel welcome? 2 What do we mean by the word ‘service’? In what different ways might people ‘serve’ others? Do we have a responsibility for other people? Why or why not? Can serving others sometimes be done for selfish reasons? Is it harder to give money or give time to help and serve others?

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Stop, Think, Wonder Worksheet 11

The Langar
1 Why do you think there was trouble between Eastside and Springside schools?

2

What is the Langar? According to Amrit’s father who is allowed to visit the Langar?

3

Amrit’s mum suggested holding a Langar at school and inviting pupils from Springside. Why did David and Amrit think this was a bad idea at first?

4

Was the Langar they held at school a success? How do we know?

B B C Learning Scotland Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

Stop, Think, Wonder Worksheet 12

My Special Talents
What I am good at

How I can help others

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B B C Learning

Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

Programme Seventeen Christmas
— Transmission date 6 November 2007

Programme synopsis
The programme includes — pupils talking about how and why they keep in touch with family and friends, especially at Christmas. — a story about a boy, Jack, attending a Christmas Eve Service in Church, dreaming about how the birth of Jesus would be communicated today. His dream focuses on a reporter trying to obtain a ‘scoop’ of the story of the birth of Jesus. — pupils talking about good news they have received.

Background information
The programme centres on communicating the good news of the birth of Jesus. The word ‘Gospel‘ means good news. Christians regard the birth of Jesus as good news. They believe that Jesus is a gift from God to humankind, who is good news because he shows people how to live and he taught a message of love for all. Pupils might be helped to begin to understand how Christians feel about the birth of Jesus. There are two aspects of communication which might be explored with the pupils. The first is how the good news of the birth of Jesus was communicated at the first Christmas and to whom it was communicated. According to the gospel story, the first to hear about the birth of Jesus were the shepherds and the wise men (who may have been astrologers). Shepherds at the time of the birth of Jesus had a very low status. They were despised because the religion regarded their occupation as unclean. The story of how the good news was communicated to the shepherds is found in Luke’s Gospel chapter 2, which tells of how they saw a vision of angels telling them to go to Bethlehem to see the infant child. The word ‘angel’ means a messenger. The angels’ visit to the shepherds was a sign that the good news of Jesus was for ordinary people, even those who were of low status. The story of the wise men is found in Matthew’s Gospel chapter 2. The good news, according to the gospel account, was communicated to the wise men by a special star in the sky, which the wise men believed was a sign that a special baby was to be born. Stars and angels emphasise that for the Gospel writers, the birth of Jesus was a supernatural event. The second aspect of communication is that Christians continue today to tell the story of the birth of Jesus and spread their belief Jesus is a special gift. They do this in a variety of ways such as singing carols, sending cards with a message, reading the story from the Bible about the birth, having special services at Christmas (especially Christmas Eve and Christmas Day), creating nativity scenes and producing nativity plays for children to take part in. In these and other ways the Christmas story is still communicated today.

Before the programme
Preparing the way Pupils will be familiar with Christmas and the Christmas story, and teachers will be able to draw on this knowledge when using the programme.

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Follow-up activities
Finding out The programme might be used to reinforce pupil knowledge and understanding of the Christmas story. Pupils could be encouraged to explore the following ideas, and Worksheet 13 can be used to extend this into written work. 1 Listen to the programme, list the main characters the reporter wanted to communicate with and discuss their part in the story of the birth of Jesus. 2 Investigate the different ways the Christmas story is communicated today. Listen to some carols and other Christmas music. 3 Look at cribs and nativity scenes. Pupils could make figures for a nativity scene and place them in a simple stable made out of a box. Then tell the story as the figures are put in place. 4 Discuss the children’s experiences of watching or participating in a nativity play. 5 Listening to stories about the birth of Jesus from a children’s Bible. 6 Look at a selection of Christmas cards and ask the children to choose their favourites. Which ones seems to emphasise the Christmas message? 7 Talk about memories of a church service or a school assembly on the Christmas theme. Making connections Pupils might 1 listen to the programme and identify all the modern communication techniques the reporter used to try to tell about the birth of Jesus. 2 talk about how they keep in touch with family and friends at Christmas. 3 share experiences of long distance communication such as telephone calls, using a computer to send messages and greetings, and so on. 4 discuss why the birth of a baby is good news and consider how they would communicate the birth of a baby today to friends and relatives. Worksheet 14 can be used to develop this idea. 5 talk about the phrase ‘good news’, and about times they have received exciting news. How did it make them feel. How did they share their excitement with others? Worksheet 14 will also help here. You could ask pupils to design a newspaper headline for their ‘exciting’ news. Thinking it over Pupils in groups might think about the following. 1 What is the best way of keeping in touch with people you know? Is it important to make contact with friends and relatives at Christmas? Why? What would happen if you didn’t? Would that be a good thing or a bad thing? Why? Why is keeping in touch with people a way of showing you care about them? Should you send Christmas cards to people even if you see them nearly every day? 2 If Jesus was born in the modern world, what different ways could be used to communicate the news? Which way do you think would be best? In the Bible story the first to hear the news were the shepherds and the wise men. Who do you think would be first to hear the news today? Why? 3 In the story, Jack’s father says that a nativity scene ‘reminds us of what Christmas is really about’ and Jack says ‘Jesus being born is good news’. What do you like best about Christmas? Why? Do you agree with Jack’s father? What do you think Christmas is ‘really about’? Why do Christians say the birth of Jesus is ‘good news’?

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Stop, Think, Wonder Worksheet 13

Communicating the Christmas story
Today people hear the story of Christmas in different ways. Look at the following ways and answer the questions. Singing Carols My favourite carol is A Nativity Scene Write down what you see when you look at a nativity scene.

I like it because

Reading from the Bible Read the sentence and fill in the gaps. At Christmas bible readings about the birth of Jesus tell of the visits of the s and the w m to the baby J .

Nativity Play Write a sentence about a time you were in or watched a nativity play.

Sending Christmas Cards A good message for a Christmas card would be

A good picture on the front of a Christmas card would be

because

On the back of this worksheet draw your picture for your card.
B B C Learning Scotland Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

Stop, Think, Wonder Worksheet 14

Communicating good news
1 Tell of a time you received some good and exciting news. What was the news?

How did you feel when you heard the news?

Who was the first person you told?

Why did you tell them first?

2

Imagine your mum has just given birth to a baby girl – your baby sister. You are both very pleased. She asks you to tell some friends and relatives about the good news. There are several ways you could tell others about this news. You could e-mail, or text, or telephone, or visit, or write a letter or send a card. For each of the people below, write down the best way to tell them the news. Your aunt who lives in Australia: . . .

Your granddad who lives in the next town and is a bit deaf: A lady your mum works with who lives round the corner: Your best friend who will be at school: .

Now choose one of these people and, thinking about the way you decided to communicate with them, write down what you would say.

B B C Learning Scotland Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

B B C Learning

Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

Programme Eighteen The Parable of the Two Sons
— Transmission date 13 November 2007

Programme synopsis
The programme includes — pupils talking about times they have pleased their families, and making and keeping promises. — a story about two sons, David who promises to do something but in the end is unable to keep his promise, and his brother Jack who said he couldn’t do it but who in the end did. — pupils talking about how important it is to think carefully before making a promise, and their experiences of letting someone down.

Background information
The story in the programme is based on a parable Jesus taught, the Parable of the Two Sons. This can be found in Matthew 21, verses 28–31. In the parable a father asks his elder son to go and work in the vineyard. He refuses to go. Later the son changes his mind and goes. The father also asks his younger son to go to work in the vineyard. He promises to go, but doesn’t. Jesus asks his listeners which of the two sons did what the father wanted. A parable is a story based on everyday life which illustrates a religious or spiritual point. This parable is about who will enter God’s kingdom. Jesus is teaching that people who talk about how well they observe God’s laws, but who actually don’t, will not enter God’s kingdom. Such people, Jesus was implying, were the religious people. However, people who were not very religious but who responded to the teaching of Jesus pleased God and would enter God’s Kingdom even if they were sinners and outcasts. This teaching made Jesus very unpopular with the religious leaders at that time. The message of the parable is that it’s better to do something and not talk about it than to say you will do something and then not do it. For primary pupils the emphasis should be on the importance of keeping promises and not letting people down. These concepts show respect for other people.

Before the programme
Preparing the way Teachers might, in preparing for this programme, refer back to parables of Jesus which have previously been explored such as the Parable of the Good Samaritan, The Parable of the Lost Son and so on. They should remind pupils of the teachings of these parables.

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Follow-up activities
Finding out 1 Pupils might listen carefully to the story in the programme in stages, and identify the part played in the story by each of the sons. Worksheet 15 will be useful for this. 2 Pupils might listen to a children’s version of the Parable of the Two Sons and be asked to suggest a title for the parable. They should explain why they think it is a good title. 3 Pupils might make a mask with a happy face on one side and a sad face on the other. Tell the parable again, and ask the pupils to use the mask to show the feelings of the father as the story progresses. For example, when the elder son says he won’t go to the vineyard the sad face is held up. 4 Using Worksheet 16, pupils might discuss what the parable means and how it relates to the story in the programme. 5 Pupils might talk about what the younger son should do, having broken his promise to his father. They could perhaps make a ‘saying sorry’ card with a picture on front and a message inside. 6 Working in groups, pupils could make up their own modern version of the parable and act it out for the class. Making connections 1 After listening to pupils in the programme talking about their experiences of making promises and letting people down, pupils might discuss and share experiences of — making and keeping promises. Can they think of a time when they asked someone to make a promise? What was it? Was the promise kept? How do they feel if someone breaks a promise and lets them down? Have they ever broken a promise? Why? How did they feel? What did they do about it? — pleasing parents. What have they done which pleased their parents? Why did it please them? Have they ever done anything which displeased their parents? Why did it displease them? 2 Pupils might think about promises people make which are very special, such as wedding vows. They could think about the promises made when joining an organisation such as cub scouts or brownies. Talk about how easy it is to keep these promises. 3 Working in groups, pupils might think of a promise they could make to a parent or a friend or their teacher. These could be displayed.

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Thinking it over

Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

1 Teachers could ask pupils, working in small groups, to discuss some of the following issues and report back their views. — What is a promise? What is the difference between making a promise and keeping a promise? Which is easier, making a promise or keeping it? Do you think it is ever right to break a promise? Why or why not? — What does the parable say about how a person should behave? 2 Ask pupils to think about the scenario below, or a similar one, and to discuss it in groups. Every Friday night after school, your best friend tells their mum that they are going to your house for tea. But they aren’t. They are going to the park with some other friends. Their parents don’t like them going to this park. It is not a pleasant place. Your friend makes you promise that you won’t tell their parents this. What would you do if — you met their mum on the street one day and she said how pleased she was that your friend went to your house for tea on Fridays, and that next Friday it would be nice if you went to their house for tea. — one day his mum rang your house on a Friday and asked to speak to your friend? 3 Actions speak louder then words. Pupils might discuss how the parable and the story in the programme illustrate this saying, and talk about what the saying means. Do they agree with it? Working in groups, they might design a poster to illustrate this idea.

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Stop, Think, Wonder Worksheet 15

David and Jack’s Day
Listen carefully to the story in the radio programme. Fill in the chart below and write what David and Jack said and did in the day. David At breakfast Jack

At school

Immediately after school

Back home

How do you think each boy felt at the end of the day? Who do you think Dad was most pleased with at the end of the day? Put a tick in the column and say why.
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Stop, Think, Wonder Worksheet 16

The Parable of the Two Sons
Listen to the Parable of the Two Sons and answer the questions below. 1 Match each son to one of the sentences. Elder son made a promise but didn’t keep it pleased his father let his father down was obedient

Younger son 2

How do you think the father felt about the younger son? Choose one of the words below and put a circle around it. Angry Worried Disappointed Annoyed

Why do you think he felt like this?

3

Which brother was like Jack and which brother like David in the radio programme.? Draw a line between the names. Complete this sentence.

Elder Son Younger Son

Jack David

4

I think the meaning of the Parable of the Two Sons is

5

Have you ever said you would do something but didn’t. How did you feel?

When you did something which pleased your mum and dad, how did you feel?

If you have ever let down a friend, write about how you felt then.

B B C Learning Scotland Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

B B C Learning

Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

Programme Nineteen Raksha Bandhan
— Transmission date 20 November 2007

Programme synopsis
The programme includes — pupils talking about the importance of getting on with other members of their family. — a story about a Hindu family preparing to celebrate Raksha Bandhan. Asha is determined to do everything properly when it comes to carrying out the ceremony. We also hear one of the stories concerning how Raksha Bandhan came about. — pupils talking about whether they have been in a situation of having to protect members of their family.

Background information
In a Hindu family the male members have a duty to care and protect the female members. This practice is celebrated each year during the month of August in the festival of Raksha Bandhan. Raksha means ‘protection’ and Bandhan means ‘to tie’. At the festival sisters tie a ‘rakhi’ around their brother’s wrist. It will often be made of red, gold or white silk but there are many variations. In return brothers give gifts to their sisters such as a sari, some money or sweets. The rakhi can also be placed around the wrist of another member of the family or a close friend who is regarded as a brother. Krishna is probably the most popular image of God for Hindus. His name means black or dark and images of him are usually dark in colour or blue. He is the eighth avatar or incarnation of the God Vishnu. Hindus believe that Vishnu comes into the world as an avatar when it is threatened by a crisis and can only be saved by divine intervention. He is the hero of the popular Hindu scripture known as the Bhagavad Gita. There are many stories about Krishna. One story, ‘Krishna and his Two Sisters’ is particularly associated with the festival of Raksha Bandhan. Krishna’s two sisters were very different from one another. Subhadra, his real sister, was always grumbling and complaining especially about Draupadi, Krishna’s adopted sister. Subhadra was jealous of Draupadi and thought that Krishna paid more attention to Draupadi than to her. When one day Krishna cut his hand it was Draupadi who looked after him and bandaged his hand.

Before the programme
Preparing the way Teachers should refer to any previous work on Hinduism and draw pupils’ attention to some of the key words they will meet in this programme, including Krishna, Raksha, Bandhan and rakhi. Show pupils some pictures or images of Krishna.

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Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

Follow-up activities
Finding out 1 Talk with the pupils about the beginning of the programme. What were the pupils talking about? In what ways did they think they could show that they cared about their family? 2 Listen to the story again and ask the class to record the steps that Asha went through when carrying out the ritual of Raksha Bandhan. 3 When she got up in the morning Asha performed ‘puja’. Ask pupils to use books in the classroom or in the library find out what puja is and how Hindu families practise it. 4 Ask pupils to complete Worksheet 17. 5 Working in groups, ask pupils to prepare a poster depicting the story of Krishna and how the ceremony of Raksha Bandhan came about. 6 Ask pupils to work in groups to find another story about Krishna. Groups should then tell the rest of the class what their story is about and act it out. 7 Pupils might make wrist bands by plaiting wool or ribbon together. 8 Pupils could get involved in making Indian sweets (bafri) using sugar, water, dried milk and dessicated coconut. Making connections 1 Talk with the pupils about the relationship between a brother and a sister. What makes it special? 2 Asha and Rajeev sometimes did not get on. Talk to the class about whether they all get on with their brothers and sisters? Are there things that annoy them? Do they annoy their brothers and sisters? How do they show they care for them? Have they ever really needed their big brother or sister’s help for something? Ask them to talk about what happened. At this point, you could ask them to complete Worksheet 18. 3 Ask pupils to think of an occasion when they have cared for and protected someone. Talk about why they might need to be protected. How might this be done? 4 Talk with the pupils about times when they have been given gifts. On what occasions do we usually give gifts? Whom have they given a gift to recently? Thinking it over Teachers might encourage discussion on the following issues. — Is it always easy to love and care for brothers and sisters? Why or why not? — Are there times when it is difficult? Can you give any examples? — What is the difference between family and friends? — What should we do if we do not like someone but we meet them every day? — What can we do if we think someone doesn’t like us? — Is it possible to get on well with everybody? Should we try? — Is it important to give presents to people you love? Why? How else could you show you care for them? — Is it important to always buy an expensive gift? Why or why not? — What do people mean when they say ‘it’s the thought that counts’? Do you agree?

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Stop, Think, Wonder Worksheet 17

Raksha Bandhan
1. Write out the meaning of the following words: Barfi Rakhi Raksha bandhan Thali 2. Why do you think Asha wanted to perform the ritual of Raksha Bandhan ‘properly’ this year?

3.

Why was her friend Mala surprised at this?

4.

When they hugged what did Rajeev whisper in her ear?

5.

Why was Asha so happy after the ceremony?

B B C Learning Scotland Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

Stop, Think, Wonder Worksheet 18

Relationships
Sometimes Asha and Rajeev didn’t get on. However, they did love and care for each other. Below, describe the different feelings that you have for your brother, sister or friend.

Things I like about my .

Things I don’t like about my .

How I show that I care.

A special time help.

when I needed

B B C Learning Scotland Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

B B C Learning

Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

Programme Twenty Muhammad
— Transmission date 27 November 2007

Programme synopsis
The programme includes — pupils talking about the role models they look up to and why. — a story from the life of Muhammad. The story is situated in Makkah at the time of Muhammad. An old woman has decided to leave Makkah because she is frightened by all the unrest there caused by Muhammad’s preaching. As she reaches the city gates she meets a stranger who offers to carry her bags to the next city. — a song about heroes. — pupils talking about who they would go to for advice.

Background information
When Muhammad was a young man he went to work in the city of Makkah for a rich widow called Khadijah. His job was to look after the camels and caravans. Even at that time Makkah was a very important city. In particular it was home to the Ka’ba, the sacred house said to have been built by Abraham. It was filled with pagan idols worshipped by Arabian tribes who visited Mecca regularly on pilgrimage. When he was 25 years old Muhammad married Khadijah. As a result he became a wealthy and respected member of the city’s society. However he was uncomfortable with the pagan worship which went on in Makkah and spent more and more of his time in the hills and mountains meditating. On one occasion about the age of 40, while meditating in a cave outside Makkah, Muhammad received his first message directly from Allah. He was to receive many more over a period of years. Muslims believe these messages make up what is now known as the Qur’an. Due to the success of his preaching, the leading tribe in Makkah, the Quraish, became worried. If Muhammad’s message was accepted it would result in the abolition of all their idols, equality between slaves and masters and oblige them to share their wealth with the poor. As a result the Quraish threatened to punish anyone who welcomed Muhammad and his message.

Before the programme
Preparing the way Teachers should refer to any previous work done on Islam. Identify some of the key words they will meet in this programme, including Makkah (Mecca), Muhammad and Allah.

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B B C Learning

Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

Follow-up activities
Finding out 1 Through questioning and discussion, encourage pupils to retell the story in their own words. 2 Ask pupils to complete Worksheet 19. 3 Give pupils a blank map of the world and help them to identify the area of the world where Islam began. Ask pupils to colour in the area. Do pupils know of any other countries where the majority of the population are Muslim? 4 In groups, ask pupils to find out what life was like in pre-Islamic Mecca from books in the classroom and from the library. Some groups could focus on the tribespeople and others on the merchants. Making connections 1 Ask pupils who they look up to and admire? What is it about a particular person that they admire? Worksheet 20 can be used here. 2 Ask pupils to bring in a poster or photograph of a person they admire and to give a talk to the class about them. 3 Ask the class to work in groups to discuss the qualities of a good role model. Make a class list of these. You could create a class display entitled ‘People we Admire’. Thinking it over Teachers might encourage discussion on the following issues. 1 Is it important that we have ‘role models’ to look up to and examples to follow? Why or why not? Is it important that people have some kind of guide on how to live? Why or why not? Who or what guides and influences you? 2 Should we allow anyone or anything to tell us what to do and how to live our lives? Why or why not? How much should we allow others to influence us? When might it be better to think for ourselves? 3 How do we decide what is the right thing to do? Where might we go to find advice on what to do? How do we decide what advice is worth following? Are you a role model for anyone? Are you a good role model? What makes you think this? What might others learn from the way you live your life?

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Stop, Think, Wonder Worksheet 19

Muhammad
1 Why was the old woman planning to leave Makkah?

2

How did she think Muhammad was persuading people to follow his religion? What evidence did she offer to support her view?

3

How did the old woman react when she discovered that the man she was talking to was Muhammad?

4.

What decision did the woman then make and why?

B B C Learning Scotland Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007

Stop, Think, Wonder Worksheet 20

People I admire
Write about three of the people you admire. Who they are What I admire about them

Who they are What I admire about them

Who they are What I admire about them

B B C Learning Scotland Stop, Think, Wonder Autumn 2007


				
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