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					JSP 770

TRI SERVICE OPERATIONAL AND NON OPERATIONAL WELFARE POLICY

Issue 1 – 31 July 2007 MINISTRY OF DEFENCE Directorate Service Personnel Policy

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TRI SERVICE OPERATIONAL AND NON OPERATIONAL WELFARE POLICY
JSP 770 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................. 4 Section 1 - Introduction ............................................................................. 4 Section 2 - Aim ......................................................................................... 4 Section 3 - Conceptual Framework ........................................................... 5 Section 4 - Definition of Welfare ............................................................... 6 Section 5 - Categories of Welfare ............................................................. 6 Section 6 - Levels of Welfare Support ...................................................... 7 Section 7 - Entitlement to Welfare Support ............................................... 7 Section 8 - Responsibility and Accountability............................................ 8 Section 9 - References ............................................................................. 8 Part 1. NON OPERATIONAL WELFARE ................................................. 13 Chapter 1 - MOD, SERVICE COMMAND AND UNIT RESPONSIBILITY ............................................................................................................... 13 Section 1 - MoD Responsibility ............................................................... 13 Section 2 - Command Responsibility ...................................................... 13 Chapter 2 - DELIVERY OF WELFARE ................................................... 25 Section 1 - Introduction ........................................................................... 25 Section 2 - Common Factors .................................................................. 25 Section 3 - Joint Unit Provision ............................................................... 28 Section 4 - Overseas .............................................................................. 29 Section 5 - Education .............................................................................. 30 Section 6 - Other Categories .................................................................. 31 Section 7 - Welfare Organisations .......................................................... 32 Annex A - SINGLE SERVICE PROVISION ............................................ 33 Annex B - WELFARE ORGANISATIONS ............................................... 39 Chapter 3 - CHILDREN, YOUNG PEOPLE AND FAMILIES .................. 42 Section 1 - General Principles ................................................................ 42 Section 2 - The Children Act 2004 (CA04) .............................................. 43 Section 3 - Safeguarding Children (Including Child Protection) .............. 43 Section 4 - Disabilities and Additional Needs.......................................... 44 Section 5 - Child Support ........................................................................ 44 Section 6 - Care of Under 8s/Childcare .................................................. 45 Section 7 - Adoption and Fostering ......................................................... 45 1 Version 1 – 31 Jul 2007

Section 8 - Other Children‟s Services ..................................................... 46 Section 9 - Domestic Violence ................................................................ 47 Chapter 4 - MEDICAL ............................................................................. 48 Section 1 - Introduction ........................................................................... 48 Section 2 - Medical and Dental Care ...................................................... 48 Section 3 - Medical Welfare .................................................................... 49 Section 4 - Long Term Sickness ............................................................. 50 Section 5 - Transition from Service Protocols ......................................... 50 Annex A - TRANSITION FROM SERVICE PROTOCOLS ...................... 52 Chapter 5 - WELFARE AND COMMUNITY SUPPORT FUNDING ........ 55 Section 1 - Introduction. .......................................................................... 55 Section 2 - Public / Non Public Funding. ................................................. 55 Section 3 - Other Funding. ...................................................................... 55 Section 4 - Use of the Defence Estate .................................................... 56 Section 5 - Secondary Duties - „Stand Behind‟ Policy ............................. 56 Annex A - SERVICE WELFARE PROVISION FUNDING ....................... 58 Chapter 6 - CHARITABLE ORGANISATIONS........................................ 63 Section 1 - Introduction ........................................................................... 63 Section 2 - Confederation of British and Ex-Service Organisations (COBSEO) .............................................................................................. 63 Section 3 - Details of Charities................................................................ 63 Annex A - CHARITABLE ORGANISATIONS – TRI SERVICE ............... 64 Annex B - SINGLE SERVICE CHARITIES-ROYAL NAVY / ROYAL MARINES. …. ......................................................................................... 68 Annex C - SINGLE SERVICE CHARITIES - ARMY. .............................. 72 Annex D - SINGLE SERVICE CHARITIES - RAF................................... 74 Part 2. DEPLOYMENT WELFARE SUPPORT ......................................... 75 Chapter 1 - DEPLOYMENT WELFARE PACKAGE ................................ 75 Section 1 - Introduction ........................................................................... 75 Section 2 - Aim ....................................................................................... 75 Section 3 - Effects................................................................................... 76 Section 4 - Funding of Provision ............................................................. 77 Section 5 - Managing Expectations ........................................................ 78 Section 6 - Delivery ................................................................................. 78 Chapter 1 - DEPLOYMENT WELFARE PROVISION FOR DEPLOYMENTS OUTSIDE THE UK ...................................................... 80 2 Version 1 – 31 Jul 2007

Section 1 - Eligibility ................................................................................ 80 Section 2 - Exceptions ............................................................................ 80 Section 3 - DWP(O) and LOA ................................................................. 80 Section 4 - DWP(O) Components ........................................................... 81 Section 5 - DWP(O) Provision ................................................................ 82 Section 6 - DWP(O) Planning ................................................................. 85 Section 7 - Considerations ...................................................................... 86 Section 8 - DWP(O) EVALUATION AND REVIEW ................................. 87 Annex A - TELEPHONY ......................................................................... 89 Annex B - E-MAIL AND SMS TEXTING ................................................. 91 Annex C - FORCES MAIL....................................................................... 93 Annex D - AUDIO VISUAL ...................................................................... 96 Annex E - INTERNET ............................................................................. 98 Annex F - PRINTED MATTER AND BOARD GAMES .......................... 100 Annex G - LIVE ENTERTAINMENT ..................................................... 101 Annex H - OPERATIONAL FITNESS EQUIPMENT (OFE) .................. 102 SHOPS ................................................................................................. 103 Annex I - LAUNDRY AND SHOWER FACILITIES ................................ 105 Annex K - FAMILY WELFARE GRANT ................................................ 106 Annex L - FAMILIES CONCESSIONARY TRAVEL ALLOWANCES .... 108 Chapter 2 - WELFARE PROVISION FOR OPERATIONAL DEPLOYMENTS WITHIN THE UK ....................................................... 112 Section 1 - Background ........................................................................ 112 Section 2 - Eligibility Criteria ................................................................. 112 Section 3 - DWP(UK) Provision ............................................................ 113 Section 4 - Funding ............................................................................... 114 Section 5 - Managing Expectation ........................................................ 115 Section 6 - Evaluation and Review ....................................................... 115 Annex A - TRACKING AND DISPOSAL OF EQUIPMENT PURCHASED WITH THE WELFARE GRANT ............................................................. 117 Annex B - DWP(UK) PLANNING GUIDELINES ................................... 119

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INTRODUCTION
Section 1 - Introduction 0001. The nature of military activity and way of Service life set Armed Forces communities apart from many areas of civilian society. The critical connection between welfare and operational effectiveness affirms that the support provided for Service personnel and their entitled family1 is “core” Armed Forces business. Section 2 - Aim 0002. The aim of this JSP is to define MoD‟s welfare policy and direct and provide guidance to Commanders at all levels as well as welfare specialists and unit budget managers on the provision of both operational and nonoperational welfare to entitled personnel both at home and overseas. The JSP will also give guidance on how welfare is to be funded. 0003. This JSP, which is complemented by single Service regulations/instructions/guidance (listed in Section 8), will adopt a tri-Service approach, define best practice and use a common definition throughout. Indeed, the principles of welfare2 that underpin the tri-Service welfare policy are applicable across the 3 Services and are reflected in this publication. These are: a. To underscore the primacy of the Chain of Command, which is responsible for the welfare support of those under command and their entitled families. b. To provide a widely recognised and accessible personal and community support structure which secures and improves the wellbeing of serving personnel and their families, and in doing so, optimises the military capability and motivation of Service personnel. c. To provide welfare support, in both operational and nonoperational areas, to secure the well-being of all Armed Forces personnel.

1

An entitled family is defined as a spouse or civil partner and any dependent children in accordance with the Personal Status Category Definitions as defined in DIN2005DIN02-186- The Introduction of Civil Partnerships . 2 Principles of Welfare are contained in the DCDS (Personnel) Personnel Policy Guidelines Issued 15 Sep 06

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d. To have in place, ready for immediate activation when Armed Forces personnel are deployed to operational theatres, balanced, resourced operational welfare packages. e. To provide overseas, as far as is practicable, through Service specialist welfare organisations, the services that are normally available in England and Wales. f. To provide, as far as practicable, appropriate aftercare for demobilised reservists. g. To limit, as far as practicable, those factors that are detrimental to the well-being of Armed Forces personnel. This JSP will also address the provision of welfare support in joint units to ensure that all entitled personnel receive adequate levels of welfare support regardless of their service or unit. However, it is recognised that the individual Services will deliver some aspects of welfare policy in a unique way that satisfies the exigencies of the particular Service. JSP 770 will highlight the different approaches in delivery where appropriate. 0004. The JSP is in 2 parts: a. Part One deals with the principles of welfare and focuses on non operational welfare both at home and overseas. b. Part 2 deals exclusively with operational welfare (Deployment Welfare Package) both home and overseas. Section 3 - Conceptual Framework 0005. MoD has a duty of care to ensure that welfare support measures are in place where practicable, wherever personnel are required to serve, that provides the timely and effective assistance necessary to maintain operational effectiveness. Welfare is therefore MoD core business. 0006. Welfare is a broad concept that has both a direct and indirect bearing on almost every aspect of military activity. It concerns the wellbeing and motivation of personnel from each of the three Services, both individually and collectively and in every sense: physical, material, moral and social. It also encompasses the serving person‟s entitled family and the entitled civilians working in support of the military when overseas (for the benefit of this JSP more commonly known as the Service Community3). Welfare is not an end in

3

The Service community is defined as UKTAP personnel, UKBC‟s, Royal Gibraltar Regiment, Gurkhas, Service

dependants, Reservists, Veterans and Cadets.

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itself but a key element of the moral component of fighting power and hence operational effectiveness. 0007. The MoD cannot operate in isolation and its welfare provision must take account of UK Government legislation and changes in society. It must also acknowledge the special and changing circumstances of Service life and ensure that those for whom the MoD has responsibility should not be disadvantaged in any way; under normal conditions they should be entitled, as a minimum, to the same support as any other citizen of the UK4.

Section 4 - Definition of Welfare 0008. The MoD‟s definition of Welfare is: The provision of a widely recognised and accessible personal and community support structure that secures and improves the wellbeing of serving personnel and the Service community, is capable of adapting to societal, legislative and operational change and, in so doing, optimises the military capability and motivation of all Service men and women. Section 5 - Categories of Welfare 0009. For the purposes of this JSP, welfare is divided into 3 categories: a. Personal Support. Personal support encompasses advice and counselling on a wide variety of individual and family circumstances, such as relationship difficulties, bereavement, harassment, addictions, financial difficulties and military separation. b. Community Support. Community support is that support provided to individuals, groups and families throughout the military community and in some instances, particularly overseas, to the employed civilian. It will include amenities such as community centres and clubs, retail, leisure, educational, recreational and sporting activities, pre-school groups and youth activities. c. Aftercare. Aftercare is the provision of support to the exService community.5

4

Subject to any immigration controls imposed by the Home Office. Aftercare for the ex-service community is not covered in any detail in JSP 770.

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Section 6 - Levels of Welfare Support 0010. Welfare is provided by a number of organisations. It can be broken out into distinct levels of support. a. Primary. Primary support is defined as the provision of welfare support generally available from within unit resources. Primary level support can be given by Commanding Officers, their Chain of Command and the unit administrative and welfare staff including pastoral and medical personnel. b. Secondary. Secondary welfare support is defined as that which cannot or should not be dealt with at the primary or unit level since it requires specialist trained staff. Such support is usually provided through the relevant Service Welfare Agency (NPFS//RMW/AWS/SSAFA-FH RAF) or provided through the statutory provision fulfilled by Local Authorities (LA). In overseas commands the Theatre Commander is, wherever practicable and manageable, responsible for the statutory authority in place of the LA in Great Britain. Section 7 - Entitlement to Welfare Support 0011. The matrix at Annex A provides details of those who are entitled to welfare support. a. Statutory. Statutory welfare provision is that which is provided by the state /local authorities as a result of legislation. Such support would include provision under the NHS and social services. b. Non-statutory. Non statutory welfare provision is that, in addition to the statutory provision and is provided by the Service. It compensates for the unique circumstances Service personnel and their families are in. Non statutory welfare includes, for example, HIVE, community centres, sporting facilities, messes and WRVS. Section 8 – Welfare Funding 0012. Welfare support is met from a number of funding streams including public funds Service non public funds and charitable sources. Throughout this document, the public funded (or core) activities are those for which funding is provided by the MoD, and the non public funded (non-core) activities are funded from other sources. Chapter 5 provides guidance on the financial framework. 7 Version 1 – 31 Jul 2007

Section 8 - Responsibility and Accountability 0013. Welfare is a function of command. Therefore, the Chain of Command is responsible for the welfare support of those under command and its community. Service personnel must be provided with an opportunity for face to face advice and guidance from their CO or his representative, when the need arises. The provision of information is an essential element of the command function and must be capable of reaching all individuals according to their particular requirements. Overseas commands, where possible, are required to comply with the spirit of appropriate UK legislation.

Section 9 - References 0014. JSP 770 should be read in conjunction with the following references:

a JSPs JSP 315 Service Accommodation Code JSP 342 Education of Service Children JSP 362 Defence Lands Handbook JSP 752 Tri - Service Regulations on Allowances JSP 753 Tri Service Regulations for Mobilisations of Reservists JSP 462 Financial Management Policy JSP 763 The MoD Harassment and Complaints Procedures JSP 464 Tri Service Accommodation Regulations (TSARS) JSP 477 British Forces Youth Service JSP 819 Conduct of Organised care for Children Under 8 in Overseas Commands JSP 820 MOD Disabilities and Additional Needs Policy JSP 834 Safeguarding Children (Currently in draft) b. DINS

DIN2007DIN02-193 Service Charities/Non Public Funds - Welfare Activities and Service Personnel Duty Status DIN2007DIN09-008 Activities that are not Covered By MoD's SelfInsurance Arrangements DIN2007DIN01-003 MoD Harassment Complaints Procedures 8 Version 1 – 31 Jul 2007

DIN2007DIN02-005 Revised Maternity Arrangement for Servicewomen DIN2007DIN02-101 Service Personnel and Veterans Agency (SPVA) DIN2007DIN09-012 Mixing of Public and Non Public Funds on the Defence Estate DIN2007DIN-100- Policy on the Care of Service Personnel Under the Age of 18 DIN2006DIN02-004 The Services Sound and Vision Corporation Operational Welfare Fund DIN200602-051 Forces Special Needs and Disability and Support Group DIN2006DIN02-167 - Status of Sports in the Service DIN2002DIN02-066-Insurance for Adventurous Training Activities DIN2006DIN02-154- Management of Royal Navy and Royal Marine Personnel on Long Term Medical Absence and Pregnancy DIN2005DIN02-148 RAF Equality And Diversity Directive DIN2005DIN02-186- The Introduction of Civil Partnerships

DIN2002DIN02-115 CRB Employment Checks

c. DEFENCE COUNCIL INSTRUCTIONS DCI GEN 191/03 MOD policy on Domestic Violence

d. PUBLICATIONS DCDS (Personnel) – Personnel Policy and Guidelines Issued 15 Sep 06 full reference required .Armed Forces Sports Policy Tri- Service Specialist Agreement on Mutual Working and Areas of Responsibility. 9 Version 1 – 31 Jul 2007

Army AGAI Volume 3 Chapter 81 (Welfare) Army AGAI Volume 3 Chapter 83 (Welfare of Families) Army AGAI Volume 3 Chapter 99 (Sickness Absence Management) Army AGAI Volume 3 Chapter 108 (Special Needs) Army AGAI Volume 3 Chapter 100 (Welfare Organisations) Army AGAI Volume 3 Chapter 110(Suicide Vulnerability Risk Management) RAF AP 3392 Vol 5 Leaflet 125 - Management of RAF Personnel on Term Sickness Absence Working Together to Safe guard Childrenwww.everychildmatters.gov.uk. AP 3392 Vol 2 Leaflet 24 – Community Support in the RAF RAF Community Support Policy Letter Series www.everychildmatters.gov.uk. RN “Equality, Diversity & You” booklet Army AGAI Volume 3 Chapter 100 (Welfare Organisations) Annexes: A. Entitlement to Welfare Provision Provided by the MoD

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ANNEX A TO INTRODUCTION OF JSP 770

ENTITLEMENT TO WELFARE PROVISION PROVIDED BY THE MOD Statutory Groupings Non Statutory √ Remarks

Regular Service Personnel Serving in the UK. Regular Service Personnel Serving Overseas MoD Civil Servants Serving in the UK. MoD Civil Servants Overseas Locations Reservists Forces when Mobilised and Serving in the UK Reservist when mobilised and Serving Overseas Cadets Whilst on Duty in the UK Cadets on Duty Overseas Royal Gibraltar Regiment Exchange Military

X

√

√

X

X

√

√

X

√

√

√

X √

√ √

REFER TO TACOS REFER TO MOU 11

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Personnel MoD Contractors Working in the UK

x

x

MoD Contractors Working in Operational Environments and Overseas Locations.

√

√

Refer to terms and conditions of contract. Statutory and Non statutory provision is generally provided whilst serving overseas and in operational environments

Service Entitled x Families living in the UK Service Entitled √ Families Living Overseas

√ √

Statutory provision provided whilst overseas

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Part 1.

NON OPERATIONAL WELFARE

Chapter 1 - MOD, SERVICE COMMAND AND UNIT RESPONSIBILITY
Section 1 - MoD Responsibility 0101. Responsibility for developing and coordinating welfare policies, including those that derive from government legislation lies with the MoD and specifically within Deputy Chief of Defence Staff (Personnel) (DCDS(Pers)) area. Any major changes in policy that affect the Armed Forces are made by the Service Personnel Board (SPB). The SPB membership consists of the three Service Principal Personnel Officers (PPOs) and ad hoc members as required. Policy implementation is undertaken by the relevant Service policy branches. The CJO for the PJOBs, and CinC Land for Land Command Overseas Detachments, are responsible for implementing and developing policies drawing upon full command support from the single Services. Within the MoD head office and DE&S, a nominated lead will draw upon support from the single Services. 0102. The formation of policy is a 2-way process. MoD will instigate and develop policy that results from Central Government legislation. However, the single Services are responsible for feeding up to the Centre best practice and lessons identified so that tri-Service welfare policy can be formulated or amended as appropriate. At working level this is achieved through the Welfare Working Group (WWG) which reports to the Services Welfare Steering Group (SWSG) for the formulation of policy and the provision of advice on matters of tri-Service welfare support. Membership of the WWG consists of representatives from each of the three single Service personal support organisations with other members being co-opted to the WWG as and when required. The Services Welfare Steering group (SWSG) whose members consist of OF5 representatives from PPOs and PJHQ, on behalf of DG SPPol and in consultation with the single Service PPO‟s staffs, coordinate tri-Service policy across the living accommodation, families and welfare areas on a worldwide basis. Specialist professional welfare business is managed through the Specialist Welfare Delivery Group, which develops and shares best practice in specialist welfare delivery. A diagram showing the reporting structure is shown at Annex A. Tri Service welfare policy will only be adopted with the agreement of all 3 Services. Details of the single Service welfare chains of command are at Annex B. Section 2 - Command Responsibility 0103. Commands/Formations/Units/Garrisons. Welfare is a function of command. The Commanders in Chief and theatre Commanders overseas are responsible for implementing policies within their own commands. There are 13 Version 1 – 31 Jul 2007

in addition, a number of agencies with specified roles to play that must be recognised and supported by the chain of command. The effectiveness of welfare support is dependent upon the direction and co-ordination of the work of the various specialist agencies, charities and volunteer groups at the appropriate (normally local) level. This is to be achieved through a formal structure of welfare management committees, and reinforced where practical by the co-location of specialists, services and activities. Unit budget managers should be consulted to ensure that public funds are only committed to MoD funded welfare elements and that value for money and affordability issues have been fully considered. 0104. Commanding Officer‟s Commitment to Personnel Under Command. Welfare support to all unit Service personnel and the Service community is the responsibility of the CO. This responsibility is exercised through the chain of command, utilizing specialist advisors and welfare workers, and by providing community support assets. Commanders at all levels are to: a. Provide and maintain as a minimum the standard of welfare and community support assets as detailed in Annex C. b. Establish a stigma-free welfare culture that encourages personnel to seek advice at the earliest opportunity through the chain of command or directly through unit welfare personnel. c. Provide or ensure access to welfare resources where normal civil society does not meet the need. d. Ensure that all appropriate personnel undergo training suitable to meet their welfare responsibilities. e. Ensure that all vital information, including full details of welfare and community support services, is communicated effectively to the Service community in a way that is suitable to meet their individual needs. This is to include details of the MoD‟s' Equality and Diversity Policy and MoD Harassment Complaints Procedures6, ensuring that the welfare needs of the parties to a complaint (complainant and respondent) are properly considered and that they are protected from the stresses of their situation, see Annex D. f. Seek specialist advice where necessary. Timely advice and guidance should be sought from higher authority where required. Potentially high profile and contentious issues should be referred to higher authority for consideration before unit action is taken.

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DIN2007DIN01- 003 MoD Harassment Complaints Procedures

JSP 763 The MoD Harassment and Complaints Procedures

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g. Maintain a close working relationship with specialist welfare organisations granting suitable access where required. The CO is to regularly hold formal welfare conferences run by unit welfare and specialist staff to address current welfare issues and ensure that a seamless and coherent welfare service is available. h. Include welfare requirements within preparations for all exercise and operational deployments; this should apply equally to mobilised reservists attached to the unit. i. Publish a Welfare Plan/Charter that sets out the unit welfare strategy. The document should cover, as a minimum entitlement, delivery, responsibility and funding framework. An example is at Annex E. j. Disseminate, as part of the induction process for personnel newly arrived at a unit the following information as a minimum: (1) Details of the welfare chain of command. Personnel should be made fully aware of whom they or their families can contact. (2) Assurances that the unit is a stigma-free welfare environment. (3) MoD‟s Equality and Diversity policy and the MoD Harassment Complaints Procedures. (4) Details of welfare facilities both on and off base. These should include at the very least, the HIVE and community centre; education and sports facilities; social and retail facilities; and youth and childcare facilities and activities. (5) Details of the Unit Welfare Charter.

0105. Confidentiality. A code of confidentiality is observed by those personnel providing specialist professional7 welfare assistance to Service personnel and its community. Disclosure of confidential information can only take place if the prior permission of the individual has been obtained. If prior permission from the individual is not given and the CO judges that there might be serious consequences as a result of not disclosing confidential information the matter should be referred to higher authority for advice. For example, such circumstances might be: a. b. Where there is a risk of harm to the individual or others. In order to prevent a serious criminal act.

7

The code that applies to specialist professional medical. Welfare and chaplaincy staff does not apply to Service personnel staff who operate to the need to know/staff in confidence principles.

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c. d. e.

If there is a serious contravention of military law. If there is, or is likely to be, a serious breach of national security. If the individual is no longer able to carry out their duties.

Annexes: A. Welfare Reporting Chain B. Single Service Welfare Chain of Commands C. Assets Available D. Welfare of Parties to Bullying and Harassment Complaints E. Unit Welfare Carter

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ANNEX A TO CHAPTER 1 OF PART 1- JSP 770

WELFARE REPORTING CHAIN

SPEG

PPO STAFF

SWSG

LAWG
Living Accommodation Working Group
Co-ordination and interpretation of policy for provision of SFA, SLA and substitutes worldwide; development and review of regulations; development of specific policy initiatives as directed by SWSG.

WWG
Welfare Working Group
Co-ordination and interpretation of policy for the provision of nonoperational welfare; liaison with external authorities; provide direction and management of triService welfare assets; share best practice in policy development.

FWG
Families Working Group
Identify issues that affect families and propose tri-service solutions; produce and monitor the Tri Service Action Plan.

SWDG
Specialist Welfare Delivery Group.
Forum for developing and sharing best practice in the delivery of specialist welfare, community support and related information.

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ANNEX B TO CHAPTER 1 OF PART I - JSP 770

SINGLE SERVICE WELFARE CHAIN OF COMMANDS 1. Royal Navy. Responsibility for developing welfare policy for the RN rests with 2SL who is a member of the SPB. Whilst 2SL has responsibility for policy, implementation rests with the chain of command. DACOS Welfare and Support is responsible for the development and dissemination of welfare policy within the Navy. 2. Army. Responsibility for developing welfare policy for the Army rests with the Adjutant General (AG) who is a member of the SPB. Whilst AG has responsibility for policy, implementation rests with the chain of command. The Directorate of Personal Services (Army) (DPS (A)) is responsible for the development and dissemination of welfare policy within the Army. 3. Royal Air Force. Responsibility for developing welfare policy for the RAF rests with DCINC Pers (AMP) Air Command who is a member of the SPB. Whilst DCINC Pers has responsibility for policy, implementation rests with the chain of command. DACOS Community Support is responsible for the development and dissemination of welfare policy within the RAF.

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ANNEX C TO CHAPTER 1 OF PART 1 - JSP 770

ASSETS AVAILABLE 1. Commanding Officers are to provide or facilitate, as a minimum, access to the following welfare assets for Service personnel and the Service community. Some assets will be provided at public expense, whilst others may be provided through non-public funds (Refer to Chapter 5 – Welfare Funding). 2. Personnel: a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. i. j. 3. Chain of Command Officers / SNCOs Unit Medical Officer Unit Welfare Officer (Army only) Chaplaincy (including Civilian Chaplains to the Military (CCMs)) Community Development Workers8 Specialist Welfare Workers (NPFS, RMW AWS, SSAFA-FH RAF) Unit Personnel Staff Equality and Diversity Advisers (EDAs)9 HIVE Information Officers

Facilities (JSP 315) a. Relevant offices and supporting services for unit welfare specialists. b. HIVE c. Education and recreation library/internet facilities (both within the JSP guidelines and the terms set out in the CRL contracts if applicable) d. Community centre e. Childcare facilities f. Catering, retail and leisure facilities g. Sports and training facilities h. Place of worship

8

RAF has separate CDWs – RN and Army integrate the CDW role within their welfare organisations, ie AWS/NPFS For military personnel only (including Reservists).

9

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ANNEX D TO CHAPTER 1 OF PART 1 – JSP 770

WELFARE OF PARTIES TO BULLYING AND HARASSMENT COMPLAINTS 1. Being a party to a complaint, and, in particular, one regarding bullying and harassment, given the sensitivities and emotions that this can involve, can place considerable strain on morale and health. 2. Commanders, or other officers, officially aware that someone is a party to a complaint, has a fundamental responsibility to consider their welfare needs and to protect them from the stress and strain of their situation. They must therefore ensure, without prejudice, that Respondents and Complainants are provided with the requisite level of support and guidance and that any welfare, pastoral and/or medical needs are being met. 3. Complainants may be upset at their alleged harassment, but may also be reluctant to take action, or be afraid of reprisals or other adverse consequences. Complainants who are reluctant to make a Formal Complaint because of the stress or anxiety this may entail should be advised to seek welfare, pastoral and/or medical help. Complaints of harassment must be assumed to have been made in good faith10 and every allegation of harassment must therefore be taken seriously from the outset, and suitable welfare provision and protection from adverse consequences provided. 4. Respondents may be shocked at being accused, fearful about the allegation‟s impact on their careers, and may be angry and emotional. Respondents can often feel harassed or victimized themselves once an allegation has been made against them. 5. Respondents must not be pre-judged and must not incur any penalty, or detrimental treatment, other than appropriate administrative or disciplinary action if found culpable. 6. Parties should be helped to view the situation objectively and work actively towards a solution. They should be discouraged from becoming entrenched, resentful and fixated on the problem rather than its resolution. JSP 763 (MOD Complaints Procedures) outlines the options for dealing with harassment. 7. In particular, parties to complaints must be protected from victimisation. Administrative or disciplinary action, as appropriate, must be taken against anyone attempting to influence, victimise, or retaliate against

10

The fact that a complaint is not upheld does not mean that it was made in bad faith. A complaint has only been made in bad faith where there is evidence that the Complainant has been dishonest, rather than, for example, because they were emotionally confused and upset.

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a Complainant or Respondent, or a witness, before, during or following an investigation. 8. If the Deciding Officer for a complaint considers that there is a risk of victimization, or of further harassment, he might decide, in accordance with the guidance given in JSP 763 (MOD Harassment Complaints Procedures), to separate the complainant and respondent pending the outcome of any investigation. Whilst this might relive some stress and anxiety, it could also bring additional pressures, such as domestic or professional upheaval, that could also require some welfare consideration. Every effort must be made to ensure that any separation is implemented fairly taking into account individual and environmental circumstances, and Deciding Officers should always consult with their higher authorities before taking such action. SOURCES OF ADVICE AND SUPPORT 9. Moral Support. Complainants and Respondents might initially turn for moral support to a family member, friend, line manager or work colleague or possibly their chaplain, unit medical officer or GP. 10. Welfare and other sources of support may be provided by: a. Commanders/Line Managers. b. Unit Welfare Staffs. c. Service Personnel Staffs. d. Padres/Chaplains. e. Service Agencies. Associated Service Welfare organisations, such as the Naval Personal Family Service and Royal Marines Welfare Service (NPFS & RMW), the Women‟s Royal Voluntary Service (WRVS), and the British Forces Social Work Service (Overseas) can offer confidential advice and support although they may not be able to offer detailed advice on the MOD complaints procedures. 11. Advice and Guidance on complaints procedures may be obtained from: a. Equality and Diversity Advisers. b. Assisting Officers – those personnel assigned or invited to provide help and support to Complainants and Respondents when it is anticipated that a Formal Complaint is likely to be or has been made. c. Commanders/Line Managers. d. Confidential Help Line 21 Version 1 – 31 Jul 2007

ANNEX E TO CHAPTER 1 0F PART 1 - JSP 770

UNIT WELFARE CHARTER INTRODUCTION 1. Service personnel are not merely civilians in uniform there are few groups in our society who are required by the nature of their duties to risk potential emotional or physical injury or expressly sacrifice their lives for the nation. Thus they form a distinctive group within UK society with support needs that greatly differ from many of those prevailing in civilian life. Welfare is recognised as an important and integral element of operational efficiency. MOD has a duty of care to ensure that welfare measures are in place, within the funding confines, wherever personnel are required to serve, that provide the timely and effective assistance necessary to maintain operational effectiveness. Welfare is therefore core MoD business and it will be delivered through a mix of public and Service non public funds and charitable sources. . COMMANDING OFFICERS' DUTY OF CARE AND COMMITMENT TO PERSONNEL UNDER COMMAND 2. Welfare and community support of all unit Service personnel and their families is the responsibility of the Commanding Officer (CO). This responsibility is exercised by the chain of command, using specialist advice and welfare assets as required. In particular, a CO is required to: a. Provide and maintain, as a minimum the standard of welfare and community support assets as detailed below. b. Establish a stigma-free culture that encourages personnel to seek welfare advice at the earliest opportunity through the chain of command, or directly through unit welfare personnel. c. Provide welfare resources where civil society does not meet the need. d. Ensure that all appropriate personnel undergo suitable training to meet their welfare responsibilities. e. Ensure that details of appropriate welfare services are communicated to all relevant personnel and their families. f. Where required, provide Service personnel with an opportunity for face-to-face advice and guidance, either personally or through a representative. 22 Version 1 – 31 Jul 2007

g. Ensure that MoD‟s Equality and Diversity policy and the MoD Harassment Complaints Procedures are widely publicised. COs should also consider the welfare needs of the parties to a complaint (complainant and respondent) and protect them from the stress of their situation. h. Intervene personally or through a representative to ensure individual welfare needs are addressed in an effective and timely manner. i. Seek specialist advice where required.

j. Maintain a close working relationship with specialist welfare staff, granting suitable access where required. k. Ensure all welfare is coordinated and effective.

WELFARE AND COMMUNITY SUPPORT ASSETS AVAILABLE AT UNIT LEVEL 3. Wherever practicable, the following minimum welfare assets should be available at unit level: a. Personnel: (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) b. Chain of Command Officers / SNCOs Unit Medical Officer Unit Welfare Officer (Army only) Chaplaincy (including Civilian Chaplains to the Military (CCMs)) Community Development Workers Specialist Welfare Workers (NPFS, RMW AWS, SSAFAFH RAF) Unit Personnel Staff Equality and Diversity Advisers (EDAs)11 HIVE Information Officers

Facilities (JSP 315) (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) Relevant offices and supporting services for unit welfare specialists. HIVE Education and recreation library/internet facilities Community centre Childcare facilities Catering, retail and leisure facilities

11

For military personnel only (including Reservists).

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(7) (8)

Sports and training facilities Place of worship

OTHER WELFARE PROVISION 4. Deployed Welfare Support where appropriate (refer to Part 2 of this JSP). 5. Welfare Information packages, induction courses, leaflets and guides (as per single Services). REFERRAL/ACCESS ROUTES TO PROFESSIONAL CARE 6. Personnel and their entitled families are encouraged to seek welfare advice or guidance through the chain of command or the appropriate welfare specialist directly. 7. The chain of command is to seek the advice of their welfare specialists where necessary. Case conferences (and reviews) involving all necessary welfare specialists should be convened where required, within the limits of confidentiality, and a record of discussions/decisions maintained. Individuals concerned should know that case conferences concerning them have occurred and they should be informed of what had been discussed and decided. 8. Timely advice and guidance should be sought from higher authority where required. 9. Confidentiality and the wishes of personnel are to be respected except in cases as detailed in para 0105. SUMMARY 10. The nature of military activity and way of life set Armed Forces communities apart from civilian society. The critical link between welfare and operational effectiveness affirms that the support provided for Service personnel and their families is core Armed Forces business. 11. Welfare is a function of command; therefore, the Chain of Command is responsible for the welfare support of those under command and its community. Service personnel must be provided with an opportunity for faceto-face advice and guidance from their CO or his representative, whenever the need arises. The provision of information is an essential element of the command function and must reach all individuals according to their particular requirements.

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Chapter 2 - DELIVERY OF WELFARE
Section 1 - Introduction 0201. The principles of welfare12 that underpin the Tri-Service welfare policy are applicable across the 3 Services. However, the 3 Services are responsible for delivering the policy in their respective organisations in a way that satisfies the needs of the particular Service In addition, provision overseas or on operations will differ to that delivered in the UK. This chapter will therefore outline non-deployed welfare provision both in the UK and overseas. Welfare provision when deployed on operations or exercises, overseas or in the UK is addressed in Part 2 of the JSP.

Section 2 - Common Factors 0202. Although it is recognised that, in many respects, the delivery of welfare policy differs between the Services, there are a number of common factors: a. Commanding Officer. Welfare is a function of command and, as such, COs have full responsibility for the welfare of the personnel and the Service community under their command. See Chapter 1. b. Officers/Warrant Officers/ NCOs. All personnel within the chain of command have a key role in identifying, advising and referring personnel regarding welfare concerns and issues. c. Chaplaincy. All Chaplains / Padres are to be actively involved in welfare support, principally in the context of pastoral care. Whilst they cannot offer specific religious care to members of a faith group different from their own or to those with no religion or belief, they are to offer independent advice and support to all personnel, including details of local faith group communities and centres of worship. They are to offer confidentiality according to their own Church discipline, advice and emotional support to all members of the Armed Forces and their dependants regardless of faith. The Armed Forces have appointed religious leaders (Civilian Chaplains to the Military (CCMs) from the Buddhist, Hindu, Jewish, Muslim and Sikh faiths to act as advisers on matters specific to those faiths. d. Medical Staff Medical staff are present on all major military establishments and provide primary healthcare to all serving personnel

12

Principles of Welfare are contained in the DCDS (Personnel) Personnel Policy Guidelines Issued 15 Sep 06.

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and where applicable their families. They are the professional interface with the local Authority (in the UK) and community health agencies. e. Personal Support. All military personnel and their families have access to trained specialist personal support staff through the single service specialist welfare organisations. f. Community Development Workers. CDWs are professionally trained civil servants whose primary role is to act on behalf of the Services to ensure that the Service Community has access to all the support to which it is entitled at local authority level. CDWs are to adopt best practice, comply with Government legislation and guidelines, and in doing so promote a stronger sense of community and wellbeing. g. HIVE. The HIVE is a publicly information service that provides information on local communities, relocation, education, housing, employment / training courses and health. It does so through face to face contact by trained HIVE Information Officers, a HIVE website and via leaflets available within the HIVE office. HIVE should be viewed as an essential element to the welfare strategy of a unit and commanders are strongly advised to ensure that this service is properly and fully utilised in accordance with the MoD Tri-Service HIVE Instructions. h. Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Families Association – Forces Help (SSAFA-FH). SSAFA - FH is a national charity helping Service and Ex-Service men, women and their families in need, suffering or distressed, regardless of age or condition. Some elements of SSAFAFH support are provided under MOD contract. The range of assistance available is diverse, including welfare, financial support, housing services and friendship visits. SSAFA-FH also provides professional health care and social work services (under contract to the MoD) to some of our forces and their families both in the UK and overseas. i. Confidential Support Line. The CSL is a free, contracted out service, operated by SSAFA, on behalf of the 3 Services. It offers totally confidential, non judgemental, guidance to the Service community. j. Council for Volunteer Welfare Work (CVWW). The council and its member organisations are recognised under a MOD Charter13. Members of the CVWW are voluntary organisations and facilities can be provided for them on encroachment terms. Volunteer workers are not public employees and therefore have no authority to commit public funds. The independence, initiatives and methods of work of the member organisations14 are respected in the Charter. While the

13 14

Army AGAI Volume 3 Chapter 100 (Welfare Organisations) Catholic Women's league, Church Army, Church of England Soldiers', Sailors' and Airmen's Clubs, Methodist Church Forces' Board, Mission to Military garrisons, Royal Sailors' Rests, Salvation Army Red Shield Services, Sandes Soldiers' and Airmen's Centres, Soldiers' and Airmen's Scripture Readers Association.

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emphasis and style may vary due to local circumstances and the differing ethos of each organisation, the following characteristics are noteworthy: (1) CVWW Centres. These provide an important 'nonmilitary' environment in which friendships can be formed outside the formal chain of command and from which CVWW Centre Leaders can play a referral role to the appropriate agency if an individual requires support. Centres may provide canteen and newsagent services but are non-commercial organisations. (2) Alcohol Free Environment. CVWW centres meet the desire of many commanders in establishing alcohol free facilities for their personnel. This characteristic is consistent with the aim of providing a social and spiritual welfare service. (3) Support to Chaplaincy and Christian Ethos. Suitably qualified workers within CVWW organisations may be used by Chaplains to take services and character training periods. Other activities in which they may be deployed include: Sunday School work, school assemblies, Bible study groups, Christian foundation courses, hospital visiting, Christian conferences, teaching weekends and local evangelistic events. (4) Support to Operations and Exercises. As the UK member of the European Christian Home Organisation for Servicemen (ECHOS), CVWW member organisations have provided workers for ECHOS homes in the Balkans since 1992 and in the Middle East. A canteen and welfare facility has also supported large scale exercises in European training areas (eg Poland) k. Women‟s Royal Volunteer Service. The WRVS is a large national welfare support organisation operating mainly on a volunteer basis, but with a dedicated full-time Service branch. This branch has a long standing agreement and commitment to provide trained field officers to major Army units, particularly those with a training role or that are stationed overseas (including Northern Ireland resident units). The field officers, who are selected for their maturity and practical experience, are concerned mainly with single and unaccompanied soldiers. They seek to provide advice, guidance, sympathy and practical support in a variety of ways. Although their approach is essentially non-military, they are part of a unit‟s establishment and are able to undertake a variety of tasks on behalf of the Commanding Officer which may extend to the provision of small scale clubs or leisure facilities. The WRVS provides the service to the MoD under grant in aid terms. Nevertheless, WRVS workers are not MoD employees and therefore have no authority to commit public funds.

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l. Unit Equality and Diversity Advisers (EDAs) All service units and establishments are required to have least 2 EDAs (an increasing number have a network of EDAs and Assistant EDAs), who are available to provide impartial advice on all aspects of Equality & Diversity and, in particular, procedures for making complaints of discrimination harassment or bullying. 0203. Explanation of single Service provisions is at Annex A. Although specialist welfare services are delivered differently across the Services, they all conform to common principles for achieving and maintaining professional standards. A tri-Service Specialist Agreement on Mutual Working and Areas of Responsibility exists to ensure a tri-Service commonality of specialist welfare provision. Section 3 - Joint Unit Provision 0204. J1 support overall, including welfare support, becomes potentially more difficult to manage in joint environments, where single Service differences can become exposed. The application of single-Service policies in each joint location is not always practicable, manageable in resource terms and may not offer best value for money. Furthermore JWP 1-00 (JOPA) does not fully delineate the division of responsibilities between Full Command (the PPOs) and the Operational Commander (OPCOM), and this impacts across more than just the operational theatres(OTs) and permanent joint operating bases (PJOBs). The policy for welfare provision within the differing joint units is as follows: a. Joint Units Under Single Service Command. The list under this section is not exhaustive but will include units within Joint Helicopter Command, Joint Force Harrier, Joint NBC Unit and will also be applicable to smaller organisations such as Army personnel attached to RM units. In all cases these units follow the policy of the single Service command or established welfare practices of the unit. However, subject to agreement single Services may make additional arrangements at their own expence . Nevertheless, single services should be prepared to offer specialist support as required. Commanders of joint units are to ensure that this policy is disseminated to all personnel through induction briefs and unit orders. b. MoD Main Building/DE&S. Mostly based in the UK, these personnel receive single Service welfare and community support. Therefore, the chain of command must ensure that they receive the support that they are entitled to. c. OTs. The non-formed joint units within the OTs will be addressed in Part 2 of this JSP. d. PJOBs (See also - Overseas Provision - Section 4). The circumstances within the PJOBs (including BIOT) are not necessarily conducive to single Service delivery. The CBFs in BFSAI, Cyprus and Gibraltar are Joint Commanders and are supported by a single Joint 28 Version 1 – 31 Jul 2007

Headquarters, whose J1 staff have theatre lead for welfare and community support. The remote PJOBs (BIOT and BFSAI) personnel are predominantly unaccompanied, but a small number of continuity posts in BFSAI are accompanied by families. Joint commanders are to formulate a Welfare strategy that reflects the requirements of this JSP and satisfies the needs of the Service Community as well as providing best value for money; they are to nominate the Welfare lead to deliver the required support strategy. Moreover, joint commanders are to ensure that their welfare strategy is suitably communicated to all personnel in theatre through induction briefs and unit orders. Section 4 - Overseas 0205. Overseas, Service personnel and their families should, where practicable, have access to the same welfare provision as those who serve within the UK. Commanders are to endeavour to replicate the services of those provided by the Local Authorities in the UK wherever practicable and manageable. In broad groupings the overseas locations can be summarised as: a. b. c. d. e. UKSC(G) and RESG, which includes broader Europe. OTs – covered in Part 2. PJHQ PJOBs (BIOT, BFSAI, Cyprus, Gibraltar ). Army ROW (BATUS, Belize, Brunei, Nepal). Def Dip including Attaches and BMATTs.

0206. The following welfare capabilities should be provided wherever practicable and manageable whilst in the overseas community: a. Community Policing and Safety. The Service police forces have obligations under agreements such as the Status of Forces Agreement (SOFA) to provide a primary policing service to Service personnel, their dependants, MoD UK-based Civilians and contractors employed under CONDO/CONLOG. These obligations include a number of direct and indirect tasks such as community safety, child protection, crime reduction. Service police policies and plans must consider the MoD Service community living both within MoD Service Families Accommodation estates or the local community. All personnel must feel safe and secure in their daily lives and within the environment that they work, live and socialise.

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b. Legal Services. In certain areas, the Army Legal Services provide a legal advisory service to serving personnel and their entitled families overseas. The extent of the advice is contained in QRs15 c. Probation Service to UKSC(G). A small probation service in UKSC(G) provides professional advice and support services to those authorities concerned with disciplinary proceedings involving both Service and civilian offenders. In addition, it is responsible for the statutory supervision of civilian offenders made subject to Community Service Orders. It also prepares reports for UK (and occasionally German) courts on Service and civilian defendants, and for family proceedings in the UK involving children. d. Health and Social Services. (1). Healthcare. The MoD will aspire to provide a community-based healthcare service that delivers a fully resourced service with effective and efficient medical supply, health promotion and health protection programmes aimed at all the Service community. Medical provision is to be easily accessible and responsive to the community‟s needs; for further details refer to Chapter 4. (2). SSAFA-FH Community Health and Social Services. On behalf of MoD, SSAFA-FH provides a contracted Community Health and Social Work Service to families serving overseas. This service is made up of health visitors, community midwives and social workers all of whom are professionally qualified. Social Workers provide serving personnel and their families with a professional, comprehensive and confidential service relating to children and families, including children in need, children with disabilities and adoption and fostering matters. In Germany the British Forces Social Work Service (BFSWS) is delivered in its entirety by SSAFA-FH. Section 5 - Education 0206. Service Children‟s Education (SCE). SCE is an agency of MoD which provides an educational service to meet the needs of dependant Service children from 3 to 18 years old, including the children of MoD UKbased civilians and sponsored organisations, when serving outside the UK. Where there is no SCE provision, the Children‟s Advisory Service (CEAS) provides an advisory service to Service personnel concerning the capabilities

15

Queens Regulations for the Army Chapter 7 Part 3

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of the local schools (Refer to Chapter 3 – Children Young People and Families).

Section 6 - Other Categories 0207. Welfare Provision to Service Personnel and Their Entitled Families Who Reside Away from Service Units. Service personnel and their entitled families who reside on or close to their units have ready access to the welfare support infrastructure that COs are required to provide. Traditionally, those who have chosen to live off base in private accommodation did so in the knowledge that they were distancing themselves from the traditional welfare envelope. Notwithstanding such decisions, it is to be recognised that there may be circumstances in which those individuals and dependants will require welfare support. Although it is impractical consistently to provide the same welfare support to those who chose to reside away from their unit in private accommodation, COs are to ensure that, at the very least, such personnel are presented with a comprehensive welfare information package. The package should include as a minimum contact details of the relevant welfare specialists and advice on what to do in given circumstances. 0208. Members of the Brigade of Gurkhas, Royal Gibraltar Regiment and Their Entitled Family. Members of the Brigade of Gurkhas, Royal Gibraltar Regiment and those whose terms and conditions of service (TACOS) differ from UK TACOS have, where practicable and manageable, a level of welfare provision tailored to take account of their different needs. 0209. Reserve Forces. Welfare support for Reserve Forces and their entitled families, when mobilised, should be aligned as closely as possible with that offered to Regular Service personnel to ensure that the specific needs of the Reservist are met. This is to include the support required by Reserve Forces and their entitled families before during and after mobilisation including: communication, pay and allowances, pensions, medical, return to work, injury, disability and death. Refer to JSP 753 (Tri-Service Regulations for the Mobilisation of Reservists) 0210. Personnel Under 18 and Recruits. The policy regarding the management and welfare of recruits and Service personnel under 18 years of age is contained in DIN2007DIN-100- Policy on the Care of Service Personnel Under the Age of 18. Although The DIN provides advice on the care of Service personnel under 18 years of age, much of the advice could be applicable to older personnel who are new to the Services. The DIN provides additional advice to Commanding Officers regarding the legal requirements associated with Service personnel aged Under 18 and, whilst maturity and experience vary considerably between individuals, it is clear that under 18s may be more vulnerable than those older, and their care may require particular attention.

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0211. Care Leavers. There will also be individuals joining the Armed Forces who are care leavers and therefore subject to the provisions of the Children (Leaving Care) Act 2000. This seeks to ensure that young people aged 16-21 years, or older, if in an agreed training or education programme, who have had a significant period of being looked after by a Local Authority (LA), continue to receive advice, support and befriending for a period of time after they cease to be formally looked after full time by the LA . Under 18s who are care leavers may not have the family support that others enjoy and this may make them more vulnerable. Commanding Officers are to follow the advice contained in DIN2007DIN-100- Policy on the Care of Service Personnel Under the Age of 18 0212. Defence Diplomacy and Embassy Staff. The single Services are responsible for the provision of personnel serving in designated defence diplomacy and embassy posts. We believe this should be a DOMA responsibility. It would be difficult for the single Services to provide welfare services to those on Diplomatic tours. The wording of this paragraph is cumbersome. 0213. Other. For those personnel who are Exchange personnel, Liaison Officers or International Officer students, welfare provision will be determined by the Memorandum of Understanding for Host Nation Support. 0214. Casualty and Compassionate Cases. For casualty and compassionate cases refer to JSP 751.

Section 7 - Welfare Organisations 0215. There are a number of recognised organisations that provide welfare support to the Armed Forces and its Service community. Some of these organisations are publicly funded but many are funded by other means. The matrix at Annex A to Chapter 5 identifies those that are publicly funded. 0216. In the UK there is a large amount of support, help and assistance out with the Service community. These organisations have a vital role to play in supporting Service / ex-Service personnel and community and commanders should seek assistance when necessary. Moreover, the existence of these services is to be advertised widely to the Service community. A list of these organisations is at Annex B.

Annexes: A. Single Service Provision B. Welfare Organisations

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ANNEX A TO CHAPTER 2 OF PART 1 TO JSP 770

SINGLE SERVICE PROVISION
1. All 3 Services have common welfare providers such as chaplins,medical staff and the Chain of Command. Welfare provision, which is single Service specific, is outlined below. PRIMARY LEVEL SUPPORT 2. Royal Navy: a. Divisional Officer. The Divisional Officer is available and accessible to offer advice on service, career, financial and other private matters being aware of the welfare organisations and funds available to assist ratings. 3. Army: a. Unit Welfare Officer (UWO). The UWO is responsible to the CO for the support, assistance and welfare advice given to personnel in the unit and their dependants. b. Regimental Administration Officer (RAO). The RAO is responsible for all aspects of personnel administration including personal and pay documentation, finance, clerical and staff support, unit education procedures, resettlement and the administrative aspects of the disciplinary process. Responsibility for G1 matters and personnel management rests with the Adjt. c. Regimental Career Management Officer (RCMO). The Regimental Career Management Officers will primarily deal with soldier career management related issues; officer career management will remain the responsibility of the unit adjutant.

4.

Royal Air Force a. Officer Commanding Personnel Management Squadron (OCPMS) OC PMS and the personnel staff are normally the focal point for specialist personnel advice on stations and can assist linemanagers and individual Servicemen and women who cannot resolve problems from within their own resources. 33

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SECONDARY LEVEL SUPPORT- SPECIALIST WELFARE PROVIDERS 5. Each of the three Services has its own specialist welfare provider. These organisations provide the Services with professional help and advice wherever appropriate. Serving personnel and their entitled family can access these organisations wherever they are serving. Although the organisations are Service specific, when serving in joint units, serving personnel and their dependants can access whichever welfare organisation is best suited to meet their particular need:

a. Naval Personal and Families Service and Royal Marines Welfare. The purpose of the Naval Personal and Family Service (NPFS) and Royal Marines Welfare is to support the Royal Navy, its personnel and families in peacetime and war by helping prevent or reduce the effects of personal difficulties especially those which arise as a result of Service life. The NPFS/RMW is made up of qualified and registered social workers plus trained fieldworkers, and youth and community support workers. NPFS/RMW offers a comprehensive social work service to RN personnel and their families; a proactive Community Service, a professional Service to the RN Executive and Divisional System; a link between the service person and their family in times of difficulty; and an Information Service including RNCOM (www.rncom.mod.uk). A diagram of the NPFS is shown at Appendix 1 b. Army Welfare Service (AWS). The AWS operates in mainland UK and in UKSC (G) and exists to provide professional support to individuals, families and the chain of command. Its roles include the provision of a confidential advice and counselling service, community support, and liaison with local authorities and support bodies. AWS (PS) is provided by a mixed organisation with 41 qualified civilians including 17 qualified civilian social workers of whom 10 are casualty key workers, 24 professionally trained civilian welfare workers and 74 professionally trained military welfare workers. At Divisional level and above all are professionally qualified civilians. The AWS establishment has recently been increased by 29 PS staff to support complex casualties and in recognition of the increase in workload. AWS Community Support (CS) is provided by a fully civilianised organisation with 136 qualified or professionally trained staff. A diagram of the AWS is shown at Appendix 2. c. Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Families Association – Forces Help (SSAFA-FH) Personal Support & Social Work Service RAF. SSAFA-FH Personal Support & Social Work Service RAF provides an additional social work support service, under contract, to RAF personnel and their families based in the UK. In particular it provides RAF personnel and their families with a professional social work service offering an all embracing service to the RAF community that is 34 Version 1 – 31 Jul 2007

outside the normal Chain of Command. With a Head of Service located at HQ Air Command the service‟s 46 staff includes fully qualified Social Workers and Personal Family Support Workers who are able to deal with a broad range of social support issues within the Service environment in a confidential manner. The service is a vital means of ensuring that RAF personnel and their families are not disadvantaged and, more importantly, that they are properly supported by a professional and confidential service that meets their needs. A diagram of the community support structure is shown at Appendix 3. Appendices: 1. Naval Personal and Family Service 2. Army Welfare Service 3. RAF Community Support Structure

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APPENDIX 1 to ANNEX A CHAPTER 2 OF PART 1 - JSP770 NAVAL PERSONAL AND FAMILY SERVICES

ACOS Pers FLEET DACOS Welfare & Support RNcom Website HIVE/Naval Families Fed Housing Staff

Director Royal Marines

Capt of Base Portsmouth

Capt of Base Faslane

Capt of Base Plymouth

Area Officer East & Overseas Social Work Team (East) Community Team

Area Officer North Social Work Team1 (North) Social Work Team2 (North) RM Team (North)

Area Officer West Social Work Team (West) Air Stations Team RM Team (South) Community Team

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APPENDIX 2 TO ANNEX A TO CHAPTER 2 OF PART 1 – JSP 770
HQ AWS

Colonel AWS SO2 AWS Chief Personal Support Officer Chief Personal Support Officer Chief Youth & Community Officer

DIVISION

Divisional Welfare Support Officer Divisional/District Personal Support Officer Personal Support Officer Unit Welfare Staff Divisional/District Youth & Community Officer

BRIGADE/ GARRISON
Brigade/Garrison Welfare Support Officer Casualty Key Workers Army Welfare Worker Community Development Workers

Unit Welfare Staff

Local Social Services Charities

Unit Welfare Staff

Local Soc Services Cha

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APPENDIX 3 TO ANNEX A to CHAPTER 2 OF PART 1 -JSP 770 RAF COMMUNITY SUPPORT STRUCTURE

DCINC Pers COS(Pers) ACOS Pers Pol(RAF) DACOS CS

CCDA CDWs

SO1 CS

SSAFA-FH SWPs & PFSWs

SO2CS(SWS)

SO2CS(C&I)

SO2CS(A&F)

SO3CS(SWS) WOCS(SWS)

WO CS

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ANNEX B TO CHAPTER 2 OF PART 1 - JSP 770

WELFARE ORGANISATIONS
MOD-FUNDED 1. Services Sound and Vision Corporation (SSVC). The Welfare support activities of SSVC include British Forces Broadcasting (BFBS) radio and television broadcasting to overseas locations where Service personnel are based. They are also responsible for Gurkha Radio and radio in Northern Ireland. For areas where broadcasting is not possible, a DVD service can be provided. SSVC are also responsible for the organisation of Combined Services Entertainment (CSE) shows. These services are provided through specific contracts. As a registered charity, SSVC also maintain the SSVC Operational Welfare Fund from which grants can be made. Details are available in 2006DIN02-004 The Services Sound and Vision Corporation Operational Welfare Fund. 2. Service Personnel and Veterans Agency (SPVA) The SPVA provides help and advice to veterans and is able to direct them to a range of government and charitable services. It also provides an integrated web-site and free helpline. The Veterans Agency can be contacted via the website on www.veterans.uk, DIN2007DIN02-101 Service Personnel and Veterans Agency (SPVA). 3. Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Families Association –-Forces Help (SSAFA-FH). SSAFA - FH is a national charity helping Service and ExService men, women and their families in need, suffering or distressed, regardless of age or condition. Some elements of SSAFA-FH support are provided under MOD contract. The range of assistance available is diverse, including welfare, financial support, housing services and friendship visits. SSAFA-FH also provides professional health care and social work services (under contract to the MoD) to some of our forces and their families both in the UK and overseas. , SSAFA is represented on the Confederation of British Service and Ex-Service Organisations (COBSEO) Executive Committee and also has a place on the Veterans Forum. www.ssafa.org.uk 4. Families Federations. The Naval, Army and RAF Families Federations exist to give the families of the respective Services an independent voice. This is normally by working with the Chain of the Command or central MoD staffs as well as representing families‟ views directly at ministerial level. The Federations also provide a sign posting service to help families find the information and assistance they may require. The Navy and RAF federations are publicly funded. The Army Families Federation is funded equally through public and non public sources. www.nff.org.uk / www.army.mod.uk / www.raf-families-federation.org.uk 39 Version 1 – 31 Jul 2007

5. Regimental/Corps Association. Each Regiment/Corps within the British Army ahs a small Headquarters (HQ) within the UK. These HQs provide the focus for personnel within their specific Regiment or Corps for aftercare when individuals leave the Army. Each HQ is notified by SPVA of all personnel being medically discharged and they then write to each individual to make contact, ideally just prior to the medical discharge. Once contact is established they will look to offer welfare support, or signpost to other organisations better placed to provide that support, depending on the specific requirements and circumstances of each individual. Other individuals leaving the Army on compulsory or voluntary discharge are encouraged to make contact with their Regimental/Corps HQ and once contact is established the HQs will serve as a „gateway‟ to aftercare support from a large number of exService welfare organisations. ORGANISATIONS NOT FUNDED BY MOD BUT HAVE ASSOCIATION 6. NAAFI. NAAFI provides catering retail and leisure services to the British Armed Forces and their families in some areas. It is NAAFI‟s aim to provide quality products, priced competitively, available consistently in attractive environments and served by trained, friendly efficient staff. In achieving this aim, the profits generated will be directed back to the Armed Forces for the welfare of Service personnel. NAAFI services are provided under contract. NON MOD FUNDED ORGANISATIONS 7. Citizen‟s Advice Bureau (CAB). The CAB service helps people resolve their legal, money and other problems by providing free information and advice from nearly 3,400 locations across the UK. CAB is a charitable organisation. It is reliant on over 21,000 volunteers and needs to raise funds to provide these vital services. The majority of their advisers are trained volunteers. CABs can be found in most towns in the UK. Contact details www.citizensadvice.org.uk. 8. Relate. Relate offers a wide range of relationship counselling services for couples, families and individuals. It supports people through all stages of their relationships and people can access the support individually or with others, face-to-face, on the phone or on the Internet. It is dependant on volunteers and therefore cannot always operate as extensively as it would wish. Because of the special circumstances in Germany, the Commands publicly fund relationship counselling. In GB the Army provides a single, initial counselling session with Relate (funded by non-public funds) where requested. Although not restricted to the Army, coverage in the other Services is not as wide. Contact details are www.relate.org.uk. 9. Samaritans. The Samaritans is a national charity with a network of autonomous local branches available 24 hours a day to provide confidential emotional support for people who are experiencing feelings of distress or despair, including those which may lead to suicide. Contact details are www.samaritans.org. 40 Version 1 – 31 Jul 2007

10. Refuge. Refuge is a local community support activity providing help and support to women and children escaping domestic violence. Refuge's network of safe houses provides emergency accommodation for women and children when they are most in need. There is a 24 hour Freephone National Domestic Violence Helpline that helps women find spaces in refuges across the UK. Contact can be made via the police and social services or the website at www.refuge.org.uk. 11. Red Shield Defence Services (RSDS). RSDS, a branch. of the Salvation Army, run a number of cafes on military units to provide a nonalcoholic recreational facility for Service personnel and families. The staff also provide a welfare referral and signposting service. 12. Stonewall. Stonewall works with a whole range agencies to address the needs of lesbians, gay men and bisexuals in the wider community. Its Diversity Champions programme offers advice support to over 250 organisations, including the Armed Forces and the Civil Service. Further details can be found at; www.stonewall.org

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Chapter 3 - CHILDREN, YOUNG PEOPLE AND FAMILIES
Section 1 - General Principles 0301. Providing suitable care for people is as fundamental a principle in the case of children, young people and families as it is for Service personnel and applies as much in the MOD context as it does for appropriate authorities in the UK. There is a clear difference in roles and responsibilities for care of children, young people and families between the UK and overseas: a. UK. MOD and Service support for the wider Service community is in addition to the routine delivery of services by the appropriate authorities. Local Authorities (in England) and devolved administrations (in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland) have the lead and the statutory responsibility for defined services, but the MOD can – and does – supplement this where appropriate. b. Overseas. Local circumstances will be shaped by the nature of Status of Forces Agreements (SOFA), MOUs, bilateral agreements and any other arrangements made between the MOD and the Host Nation. As a general principle, however, the MOD will seek to replicate overseas the level and range of supporting services that would reasonably be expected to be available in England, wherever it is appropriate and practicable to do so. The MOD will take the lead and, though very little UK legislation is extra-territorial, will seek to deliver services to the same statutory levels and in as consistent a way as possible. 0302. The definition of children, young people and families in a national context is driven by specific legislation and can vary depending on the circumstances; for example, the age of a child for access to services may depend, for example: on educational or employment status, on disabilities and additional needs and on the country of the UK in which they live. This, inevitably, has to be reflected in different MOD policies and therefore appropriate definitions are included in relevant JSPs and other policy documents. As a general rule, however, the following definitions apply: a. A Service child is a child for whom a serving Service person has parental responsibility and who will them self, therefore, be PStatCat 1 or 2; this is normally described as “dependent child”. It does not include PStatCat 3 or 4 where, though there may be some financial responsibility, the Service parent does not have parental responsibility and the child does not live with the Service person or in the Service community. b. A Service Entitled family is a serving Service person and their spouse or civil partner and any dependent children. 42 Version 1 – 31 Jul 2007

Section 2 - The Children Act 2004 (CA04) 0303. The introduction of CA04 in England has led to a significant change in the way in which services for children, young people and families are delivered. The overall aim is to encourage integrated planning, commissioning and delivery of services as well as improving multi-disciplinary working, removing duplication, increasing accountability and improving the coordination of individual and joint inspections in Local Authorities. In general Children‟s Trusts have been formed and Directors of Children‟s Services appointed to bring together all services, particularly the 3 core services of education, health and social work. Children‟s Commissioners have been appointed in each country of the UK, who will act on behalf of all children in each country in reviewing services and requirements and providing advice and guidance or taking up cases where necessary. 0304. Parallel structures and processes exist in the MoD in order to remain consistent with England, exploit best practice and reduce any discontinuity for Service families as they move between UK and overseas. A MOD Children‟s Board is in place with AG as Lead Member and with a supporting staff cell at HQ AG in Upavon. The MOD Children‟s Board and supporting Steering Group will provide overall guidance to Services, Commands and specialist agencies and organisations involved in delivering support or services to the Service community. Overseas Commands have developed Children and Young People‟s Plans (CYPP) in order to identify gaps in provision and new ways of delivering services in a more coordinated way. An overarching MOD CYPP also exists in order to capture common themes across Defence. Section 3 - Safeguarding Children (Including Child Protection) 0305. The protection of children in the UK is secured through the statutory requirements placed on all children‟s services providers, whether provided through local or national Government. These requirements are similar, but not the same, in the different countries of the UK. The main body for exercising child protection in England is the Local Safeguarding Children Board (LSCB) and similar Boards operate in overseas commands. LSCB in England are expected to include Service representatives wherever there is a significant Service population in the Local Authority area. There are similar arrangements in the devolved administrations. 0306. All staff that work with children and young people (and vulnerable adults) must have appropriate clearance to do so and suitable checks need to be completed by employers. MOD employees – both Service personnel and civilian staff – must receive clearances in accordance with the processes used in England, wherever they are serving. Further details are contained in the following publications: a. JSP834, Safe Guarding Children (currently in draft).

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b. Working Together to Safe guard Childrenhttp://www.everychildmatters.gov.uk/ c. DIN02-115 2005 CRB Employment Checks

Section 4 - Disabilities and Additional Needs 0307. Arrangements exist within the MOD to support and assist Service personnel and their entitled family who have disabilities and additional needs. There is an overarching Tri-Service policy and detailed single Service policies that give guidance on the range and type of assistance available and define the role of the single Services. In order for the MOD to meet its duty of care to Service personnel and their entitled family , it is mandatory for Service personnel to register the disability or additional need with their Service Assigning Authority. 0308. The Forces Additional Needs and Disability Forum (FANDSF) is a nonpublicly funded body which is administered and supported through SSAFA-FH. The aim of the FANDF is to keep Service families who have dependants with disabilities or additional needs in touch with issues that affect them, both within and outside Service life, and to provide advice, guidance and where possible additional support. 0309. Further direction and information can be found in: a. b. JSP 820 MOD Disability and Additional Needs Policy DIN200602-051 Forces Special Needs and Disability Support Group

Section 5 - Child Support 0310. The MoD has a policy of encouraging parents to fulfil their responsibilities for their children at all times, including financially. These responsibilities are made quite clear to all Service personnel who are parents. Service personnel fail to make proper provision for their children the Child Support Agency (CSA) has the statutory responsibility for making child support assessments. Although Deductions from Earnings Orders (used in the case of most employees) do not apply to Service personnel because of pre-existing legislation for deductions from their pay, an MOU with the CSA supports the use of Deduction from Earnings Requests for the same purpose. Within the constraints of Minimum Drawing Rates (the minimum amount a Service person can receive after deductions), these arrangements put Service personnel in the same position as any other parent in employment. 0311. The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) intends to introduce a new organisation for supporting parents where child maintenance becomes an issue. The Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission (C-MEC) 44 Version 1 – 31 Jul 2007

should be established in 2008 and will gradually take over the work of the CSA. The MOD will develop a MOU with C-MEC on the same basis as the existing MOU with the CSA. Interaction between the MOD and CSA is facilitated by a network of Forces Focal Points. Further information on this can be found in DIN2006DIN02-246 -The Child Support Agency Section 6 - Care of Under 8s/Childcare 0312. Ensuring that children are properly cared for remains a parental responsibility regardless of the use of collective or individual childcare or any other arrangements made by parents. It is recognised, however, that Service families – like all other families – need access to appropriate childcare and that, where appropriate, this childcare needs to be properly regulated. The MOD aim is to facilitate this either (in UK) in cooperation with the local authorities that have the lead or (overseas) as part of the overall welfare support provided to the Service community by Commands and MoD agencies. Funding of child care facilities is covered in Chapter 5. 0313. There are explicit standards for collective childcare for children under 8 years old in England and these requirements are replicated overseas. The requirements are laid down in JSP819. There are 2 regulatory bodies for the registration of such childcare overseas: the British Forces Early Years Service (BFEYS – mostly operating in NW Europe) and SSAFA–FH (mostly operating elsewhere overseas). Registration ensures mandatory requirements are met but also allows access to tax credits (Child Tax Credits and the childcare element of Working Tax Credits) where family income permits and, in the future, to the Armed Forces Childcare Voucher Scheme. Further guidance can be found in: JSP819-Conduct of Organised Care for Children Under Eight in Overseas Commands Section 7 - Adoption and Fostering 0314. There are many Service personnel who are both willing and well suited to the adoption and fostering of children and at the same time there is a great demand for places for children. Given the length of time the process can take and the circumstances of Service adopters/fosterers, with high mobility and service overseas, Service families can experience difficulties in dealing with Local Authorities, devolved administrations or other UK agencies. 0315. For adoption, the MOD has an agreement with SSAFA-FH to deliver an MOD adoption service through a SSAFA-FH Voluntary Adoption Agency. Service personnel are entitled to use any adoption service, generally through an appropriate Local Authority, but, given difficulties due to civilian unfamiliarity with their circumstances, may prefer the SSAFA-FH adoption service. The SSAFA-FH Adoption Agency can act directly for Service personnel or can provide assistance in dealings with other adoption agencies. Once adopted, a child becomes a dependant in exactly the same way as any other dependant child of a Service person. 45 Version 1 – 31 Jul 2007

0316. Fostering is in general a shorter term arrangement where a child taken into care is placed with a foster family on a temporary basis. The legal status is quite different and foster children are not dependant children. However, the MOD does not intend to stand in the way of such voluntary activity and will, where possible, support Service families in living their lives the way they want to. In particular, overseas commands have a need to identify and have available potential foster families in case they need to remove a child temporarily into care. This involves assessment and approval by command social work services and, where necessary, allocation of appropriate SFA. Further guidance on these matters can be found in: a. b. c. JSP 464 TSARS www.ssafa.org.uk . Adoption and Fostering DIN – to follow.

Section 8 - Other Children‟s Services 0317. Although not generally seen as welfare services, there are a number of other areas of support and service provision that directly affect the wellbeing of children, young people and families in the Service community. The most significant are education and health services, which will in any case become increasingly integrated under CA04. Whilst there is comprehensive policy direction on these services in other documents, they are summarised below: a. Education. Service Children‟s Education (SCE) provides a system of schools and educational support for entitled children overseas. Schools are based in Belgium, Belize, Brunei, Cyprus, Denmark, Falkland Islands, Germany, Gibraltar, Holland and Italy and they follow the English educational system and National Curriculum. Children‟s Education Advisory Service (CEAS) is responsible for the provision of help and advice to Service families about to be posted overseas or returning to the UK, including direct support for admissions and appeals for UK schools and, in particular, Special Educational Needs. In UK, Local Authorities and devolved administrations have the lead responsibility for all education matters. Further guidance can be found at: (1) (2) JSP 342 Education of Service Children Overseas www.ceas.mod.uk.

b. Health. Primary healthcare for Service families overseas is delivered through Service facilities or in combination with Host Nation facilities and local contracts where appropriate. Overseas commands and Service medical and dental staffs are responsible for providing a comprehensive Health Care service broadly equivalent to that provided in the UK by the NHS. In smaller or more isolated locations local arrangements will be made, typically through appropriate Host Nation 46 Version 1 – 31 Jul 2007

or international facilities. Referral for treatment can also be back to the UK for NHS services where this is the most appropriate option. In the UK, healthcare support for dependants is through the NHS, which has the lead responsibility and Service facilities are only used in a small number of cases where there is training value for the Service healthcare staff and where the spare capacity exists. Section 9 - Domestic Violence 0318. Domestic Violence. Although very dated, DCI GEN 191/03 MOD Policy on Domestic Violence is still the extant policy with regard to Domestic Violence. It is the intention to replace this DCI with a JSP in the future,

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Chapter 4 - MEDICAL
Section 1 - Introduction 0401. Health is a state of complete mental, physical and social well being. The MoD health policy16 is to ensure that every serving man and woman enjoys a level of health that is appropriate for the task that they are required to perform. The Defence health programme goal is to improve the operational capability of the Armed Forces and the confidence in health care by promotion, provision and maintenance. Section 2 - Medical and Dental Care 0402. In the home base, medical care is provided to uniformed service personnel by the Defence Medical Services. Medical care to MOD Civil Servants and entitled family members is provided by the NHS except in certain exceptions where dependants might be treated in a military primary care facility. 0403. For personnel posted overseas, medical care is provided free of charge to all resident military personnel, MOD Civil Servants and their entitled dependants. This includes provision of primary care services (General Practice, Including Occupational Medicine), secondary/tertiary care services (hospital level care) and aeromedical evacuation. Dental treatment for families overseas is provided to the same standards and criteria as under the NHS. This level of provision is normally available to those who are entitled and/or of dependent status. There are, however, exceptions and care is provided for parents or non-dependant children who travel to overseas commands in order to support families where at least one serving parent has deployed on operations. Notwithstanding, there is still a need to ensure that if the services cannot support the special needs of the visitor then authority be refused. Visitors will still require insurance cover and their European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) to cover any unforeseen circumstances. These could include instances where: a civilian specialist or other civilian medical services called upon; where drugs, which are not obtainable through normal Service medical channels, have to be purchased or when a passage on a medical aircraft is authorised, or referral to hospital (overseas commands) may be required. Antenatal and obstetric treatment is not available to non-entitled pregnant close relatives, except in a real and unforeseen emergency. Service personnel and those travelling with them are strongly advised to take out

16

DCDS(Personnel) Personnel Policy Guidelines – PPG 21

48 Version 1 – 31 Jul 2007

appropriate travel insurance before travelling anywhere at their own expense, as access to Defence Medical Services cannot be guaranteed even when locally available. 0404. In addition, the management of some chronic conditions could be compromised by an assignment especially overseas. Before deploying overseas, the assigned is to make a declaration concerning the health of their dependants. All long term medical conditions are to be declared in accordance with single Service procedures order to allow the receiving theatre to make an informed decision as to whether a chronic condition can be appropriately managed. Where a condition cannot be managed, a decision then has to be made, by the assigning authority, as to whether the assignment can go ahead. 0405. Adventurous Training and Sports. Military personnel undertaking correctly staffed and officially sanctioned adventure training and sports are entitled to all necessary medical care at public expense. However, in some countries where such activities take place, the civil health infrastructure cannot provide a suitable level of service. Private medical facilities that can provide the required level of Service might be available but proof of ability to pay is often required before treatment commences. Military teams venturing overseas therefore, are to be strongly advised to take out private medical insurance, Refer to DIN2002DIN02-066-Insurance for Adventurous Training Activities 0406. Reserves. For members of the reserve component of the Armed Forces, undertaking officially sanctioned military activity be it sporting, adventurous training or military training, medical support is provided at public expense up to the point where the individual is fit to be discharged home to the care of their own GP in the home base. However, long term health care is not provided by MoD to manage the long term consequences of injury or illness sustained by members of the Reserve component unless sustained whilst mobilised for operations, that responsibility lies with the NHS. JSP 753 Tri Service Regulations for Mobilisations of Reservists Section 3 - Medical Welfare 0407. Service personnel admitted to hospital may require welfare support. The Defence Medical Welfare Services (DMWS) are contracted to provide welfare services to Service patients both on operations and in some peace time locations17 on a constant basis. DMWS support is provided under the following categories: a. Welfare needs assessment b. Response to requests for welfare support c. Emotional and practical support

17

Current DMWS contract expires on 31 Mar 09

49 Version 1 – 31 Jul 2007

d. Liaison and referral to other agencies as appropriate Although DMWS provide a hospital welfare service, the patient‟s chain of command is expected to remain fully engaged in the needs of the Service person undergoing hospital care. Arrangements are in place (liaison Officers) for linkage between DMWS and single Service W=welfare organisations (NPFS, AWA and SSAFA). 0408. Dangerously Ill Forwarding of Relatives (DILFOR). DILFOR is an allowance designed to help ease the emotional and financial burden of close family members of a serviceperson who is unexpectedly admitted to hospital. To be entitled to DILFOR the patient must have a recommendation from the medical authority concerned that states that a visit from close family members would be in the best interest of the patient‟s recovery. DILFOR is available to provide travel and subsistence, enabling family to visit the Service person. Details of DILFOR are contained in Chapter 7 of JSP 751 (Joint Casualty and Compassionate Policy and Procedures). Section 4 - Long Term Sickness 0409. Each Service has in place comprehensive long term sickness policies that ensure that Service personnel who are long term sick are properly tracked managed and supported. The links to these publications are: a. Navy Management of Long Term Medical Absence and Pregnancy 18 b. Army Sickness Absence Management policy19. c. RAF Long Term Sickness Absence Management Policy Section 5 - Transition from Service Protocols 0410. Transition from service protocols aims to ensure the identification and ongoing support for those Service Leavers (SL) seen as being most vulnerable at the point of discharge from the services. The identification is based upon defined major disabling medical criteria, whilst the support is achieved through the closer working of MoD in-Service and post Service welfare groups. 0411. Whilst „DResettlement‟ furthers the provision for links to ex-Service charities, this protocol complements that potential support by ensuring the MoD formally helps the severely disabled SL engage with all internal and external available services. Again this is achieved through closer working, without any perceived break by the SL, in the continuity of support received.

20.

18

DIN2006DIN02-154 Management of Royal Navy and Royal Marine Personnel on Long-Term Medical Absence (LTMA) and Pregnancy. 19 Army AGAI Volume 3 Chapter 99- Sickness and Management 20 RAF AP3392 Vol 5 Leaflet 125 – Management of RAF Personnel on Term Sickness Absence.

50 Version 1 – 31 Jul 2007

0412. The protocol outlines the support available to SLs throughout their life, as a result of injury through service. It does not replace or diminish any alternative support provision available, like that from Regimental Associations etc. Indeed closer contact with these groups should be encouraged so as to facilitate the best possible outcome for the disabled SL. It may also hold the added benefit of identifying discharged personnel who have deteriorated since leaving and through that contact, they then facilitate a referral to Service Personnel and Veterans Agency Welfare Manager (SPVAWM), resulting in benefit from the protocol, albeit post the usual trigger dates. Annexes: A. Transition from Service Protocols

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ANNEX A TO CHAPTER 4 OF PART 1 – JSP 770

TRANSITION FROM SERVICE PROTOCOLS
1. Early identification by designated Service Welfare Staff (SWS) to support individuals deemed likely to be medically discharged due to severe physical/mental disablement. 2. Levels of disability are to be measured in accordance with the following status of eligibility: a. Major disablement arising in medical discharge for Regular and Reservists, in the categories set out below: (1) Severe complex multiple injuries; (2) Head injuries requiring extended hospitalisation; (3) Spinal cord injuries; (4) PTSD and similar traumatic psychological injuries; (5) Amputations; (6) Loss of sight/hearing; (7) Severe Burns; b. Delayed onset (physical or psychological) – same threshold as above;

3. It is recognised that there are specific issues with respect to Reservists and that particular efforts will be required to ensure that their needs are identified and addressed. (Includes injury whilst on Man Training Days). Moreover, in respect of the Commonwealth personnel who are subject to immigration control without recourse to public funds on discharge and may be ineligible for statutory support from UK local authorities or OGDs, specialist support arrangements may be required.

4. 3 months prior to discharge or immediately discharge is decided, if that date is later. SWS are to contact the appointed Service Personnel and Veterans Agency Welfare Manager (SPVAWM) using the approved Welfare 11 tri-Service proforma. It should be e-mailed to the central SPVA point 21to

21

SPVA Contact/alternative referral point: SPVA Welfare Support Office Room 6124, Norcross, Blackpool, Lancashire, FY5 3WP Telephone: 01253 333641 Fax: E-mail: Helen.O‟Brien2@veteransagency.gsi.gov.uk or Karen.Clinton@ veteransagency.gsi.gov.uk

01253 332235

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notify the impending medical discharge and provide case details identifying potential requirements for aftercare support to include as appropriate: a. b. c. d. e. f. g. Post discharge living arrangements Finances Employment Potential benefit entitlements Alcohol/drug dependencies Engagement with other welfare support services/charities For those subject to immigration control there may be a requirement to apply to the Home Office (HO) for „Indefinite Leave to Remain‟ h. Any other identified welfare support requirements 5. 1 month prior to discharge or immediately discharge is decided, if that date is later 6. SWS are to arrange an initial meeting with SPVAWM and the SL, involving the post discharge carer if necessary. They are to discuss mutually, proposals for a post discharge support package to include, as appropriate, those areas outlined at para 2 and to record the identified requirements and responsibilities. 7. Post Discharge a. Weeks 1 –11 (1) The SPVAWM and SWS are to proceed with the agreed post discharge package, in line with responsibilities determined at paras 2 and 3, which will include determined levels and frequency of contact. (2) Contact between SWS and SPVAWM is to be continued throughout Weeks 1 – 11 in order to discuss outcomes and determine areas of individual or mutual engagement to resolve casework issues. Throughout this period overall case responsibility remains with SWS until in-Service withdrawal is jointly agreed, involving the SL and family (scheduled at week 12), although the delivery of agreed front line practical support will be jointly addressed with SPVAWM. b. Week 12 – Transfer of responsibility (1) The SWS and SPVAWM are to undertake a home visit, involving the Veteran and immediate family in a case conference. This will affect an agreed transfer of welfare responsibility from, in-Service to SPVAWM or a deferment to

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a future specified date to attain optimum transition arrangements. The full details of areas discussed at this visit must be recorded, and responsibility for taking forward further work to assist the Veteran must be clearly identified against realistic timeframes.

8.

Post Transfer of Responsibility a. 4 to 6 Months Post Discharge. SPVAWM are to conduct 2 further home visits in months 4 and 6 (from the date of discharge), to assess progress under the agreed support package for the veteran and their immediate family, supplemented by a telephone contact in month 5. b. 7 to 12 Months Post Discharge. SPVAWM are to conduct visits in months 9 and 12 (from the date of discharge), supplemented by monthly telephone contact in other months. c. 13 to 18 Months Post Discharge. SPVAWM are to conduct 3 monthly telephone contacts during months 15 and 18 (from the date of discharge). d. 19 to 24 Months Post Discharge. SPVAWM are to conduct 6 month telephone contact during month 24 (from the date of discharge). e. Post 24 Months. Annual contact to be facilitated where needed via visit or telephone as agreed between all parties and in accordance with presenting welfare needs.

Throughout all stages support and intervention will be provided in a manner that aims not to create dependency but to promote positive and workable solutions to achieving independent living and employment opportunities outside of the services. It should recognise that as part of the Military Covenant the Services and the nation owe much to these medically discharged veterans and they should be offered as much assistance as possible to live as good a quality of life as possible, irrespective of any disabilities they may have.

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Chapter 5 - WELFARE AND COMMUNITY SUPPORT FUNDING
Section 1 - Introduction. 0501. Welfare is provided through a combination of public (core)and nonpublic(non-core) sources as well as (in the UK) Local Authority provision. Welfare support is separately delivered by a mixture of Service and civilian personnel and organisations, with varied levels of qualification and professional standing, against a variety of procedures and quality standards. Moreover, there is a combination of public and non-publicly funded facilities that is essential to the welfare of Service personnel and their dependants. There has been uncertainty, in many area, as to how provision is funded and this Chapter provides guidance to commanders and unit budget managers in this area. This Chapter should be read in conjunction with JSPs 368, 462 and 315 as well as single-Service regulations pertaining to Service non-public funds. The line between public and non-public funding is not always clear and, the aim of this Chapter is to bring clarity to this division of responsibility to ensure that public funds are properly protected only spent in approved areas. Notwithstanding this if there is any doubt, commanders should consult their single Service finance staffs before they commit public funds. Section 2 - Public / Non Public Funding. 0502. Annex A lists the Services‟ welfare provision that may be publicly funded. Although some welfare and recreational facilities are scaled for public funding, many have been funded through non-public sources such as the Nuffield Trust. This list serves to give commanders a flavour of how welfare support is funded. Moreover, even though there may be a provision for a facility in JSP 315, furnishing and equipping such facilities may have to be provided from non-public funds. Annex A is not to be taken as the authority to commit public funds it merely indicates the types of facilities and services that can be publicly funded. Funding approval should be sought through the unit budget manager before any commitment is made. . Section 3 - Other Funding. 0503. Commanding Officer‟s 'Officers Public Fund. The Commanding Officer‟s Officers' Public Fund (COPF) (or “COs Fund” in the Naval Service) has, within set parameters, traditionally been used to promote the smooth running and efficiency of a unit. In doing so, COs could purchase items, not normally available through the Department‟s' supply chain to boost the efficiency and smooth running of the unit. The 3 Services have their own specific regulations pertaining to the Fund; however, although a recent DIA audit was generally satisfied that money was expended within the spirit of the Fund‟s intent, it was recommended that the rules are harmonised and tri55 Version 1 – 31 Jul 2007

Service regulation is introduced .Action is being taken by the Centre. In essence, the principles of the Fund will remain sufficiently robust to comply with other Department regulations but still allow the CO scope for innovation in purchasing items that will benefit the individual requirements of his unit. 0504. Gainshare Policy. With the introduction of PAYD (Catering Retail and Leisure (CRL)), an element of profit made by the Commercial partner will be returned to the MoD as “gainshare”. Gainshare monies can be used by Commanding Officers to enhance welfare provision at unit/station level. The gainshare return will be split between the non-public and public funds on ratio 2:1 basis (2/3rds non public funds and 1/3rd public)). In the case of Germany, the share of NAAFI profits is paid in the form of dividend and is known as the Welfare Return. All welfare return goes to non-public funds. Commanders have a great deal of flexibility, within the single Service rules and regulations relevant to non-public funds, in the way that they utilise the non-public element of gainshare. The regulations on how the public element of gainshare can be spent are currently being formulated. A DIN will be published in due course. Section 4 - Use of the Defence Estate 0505. Encroachment. A number of welfare activities that are non-publicly funded operate from public buildings and, therefore, constitute an encroachment. An encroachment is the authorised temporary use of MoD land and buildings by off duty personnel, MoD civilian employees or Department associated bodies such as Cadet Forces and wives clubs as well as recognised recreational sporting and welfare purposes beyond agreed Service scales. The term does not include land or buildings used for the purpose of bringing a unit or establishment up to JSP scales or occupied under commercial lease or licence. Further guidance on encroachments can be found in JSP 362. 0506. Mixing of Public and Non Public Funding on the Defence Estate. Both government accounting regulations and JSP 462 make it clear that the Department has no delegated powers to incur expenditure of a novel or contentious nature without the prior approval of HM Treasury. DIN2007DIN09-012 Mixing of Public and Non Public Funds on the Defence Estate sets out the financial boundaries for the funding of buildings used for non-core Service activities on the MoD estate. The DIN highlights the regulations that are in place regarding the use of public funding on non-public buildings and facilities. Commanders should seek advice from single Service Customer Estate Organisations or Defence Estates for further guidance. Section 5 - Secondary Duties - „Stand Behind‟ Policy 0507. Any Service individual engaged, as part of their duties, in Service nonpublic funds activities in support of unit welfare obligations, would be acting in the course of their employment with MoD or the Armed Forces. As such the 56 Version 1 – 31 Jul 2007

MoD would be vicariously liable for an individual‟s actions in the pursuance of his/her duty. Nevertheless, MoD will not underwrite the activities of the nonpublic organisation and commanding officers and budget managers must ensure that the department is properly protected against any legal costs compensation claims and employment tribunal costs. It is essential that personnel read and fully understand DIN2007DIN02-193 - Secondary Duties that outlines the policy of this important issue.

Annexes: A. Service Welfare Provision Funding B. Charitable Organisations – Tri-Service C. Single Service Charities – Royal Navy/Royal Marines D. Single Service Charities – Army E. Single Service Charities – Royal Air Force

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ANNEX A TO CHAPTER 5 OF PART 1 - JSP 770

SERVICE WELFARE PROVISION FUNDING
(This list must not be used as the authority for the commitment of public funds) Serial 1 Welfare Provision Ship/Unit/Station Welfare Offices Provider Single Services Single Services The supported The Service Community The Service Community Remarks As per single Service requirements Regular/ Reserve and in accordance with JSP 315 Includes chaplaincy service(including officiating fees) and place of worship in accordance with JSP 315 Includes the Service community overseas and some training practices in the UK

2

Ship/Unit/Station Chaplaincy

3

Ship/Unit/Station Medical Services

Single Services/

4 5 6

Ship/Unit Regimental Career Management Officers Ship/Unit Regimental/Stn Administrative Personnel Single Services Specialist Personal Welfare Service

Single Services Single Services Single Services

Service Personnel in UK and the Service Community overseas Service Personnel Service Personnel The Service Community

RN – NPFS RM - RMW Army – AWS RAF – SSAFA (FH)

58

7 8

Deployment Welfare Support Community Development Workers (Civil Servants)

MoD RAF

The Service Community The Service Community

9

HIVE

Single Services Single Services

The Service Community The Service Community Service Personnel Service Personnel

10

WRVS

11 12

Education, training facilities, library Single and internet access Services Sports and training facilities Single Services

For Navy and Army CDW roles are subsumed within the NPFS and the AWS respectively. Office accommodation and associated equipment including IT support HIVE IO, office accommodation and associated equipment including IT support. JSP 315 (Funded through grant in aid). Accommodation from where the WRVS can operate. http://www.wrvs.org.uk JSP 315 Includes Services Sports Control Board. Refer to JSP 315 and sporting activities that exist to contribute to the unit welfare objectives. This will include the MoD‟s policy on stand in front (DIN2007DIN02-193 - Secondary Duties).Refer Also to IN DIN2006DIN02167 Status of sports in the Services and IDINn2006DIN02-066 Insurance For Adventurous Training Activities. JSP 362 Not withstanding CRL facilities normally furniture, coffee shop facilities for example would be non- publicly funded. JSP 315 Refer to JSP 315 , JSP 462 and JSP 362 .Activities that exist to contribute to the

13

Community Centre

Single Services Single Services

Service Community The Service Community

14

Community Activities (clubs etc)

59

15

Welfare Communication and information support structures

MoD and The Service single Services Community

unit welfare objectives. This will include the MoD‟s policy on stand – behind DIN2007DIN02-193 - Secondary Duties . MoD, Single Service Overseas, station, Garrison, unit: Internet/intranet material, guides newsletters, publications and continuous attitude surveys. Some facilities such as sports bars, coffee shops are not scaled and therefore not publicly funded. However, rest facilities (crew rooms) for example can be publicly funded. Refernce should also be made to SLA and MAC, SMAC and PFIs that may exist. JSP 315

16

Catering Retail and Leisure facilities

17

Childcare - day care and childminding provision.

Single Services

The Service Community with responsibility for children Service Community overseas Service Community The Service Community

Encroachments/lettings/New builds. The organisation will have to be self funded as far as operating costs are concerned. This will include salaries and equipment. JSP 315. Scale25 Queens Regulations for the Army

18

Legal Services

Army

19 20

CVWW British Forces Statutory Social Work Service Overseas

CVWW Overseas Commands

Public accommodation can be provided on an encroachment basis. Taking account of special arrangements for Northern Ireland

60

21

RELATE

Army

Overseas The Service Community The Service Community The Service Community

Army - publicly funded overseas, grant from non-public funds in UK for limited consultations Hospital based welfare service provided under contract Under contract. BFBS radio and television broadcasting to overseas locations where Service personnel are based. They are also responsible for Ghurkha Radio and radio in Northern Ireland. For areas where broadcasting is not possible a DVD service can be provided. SSVC are also responsible for the organisation of Combined Services Entertainment (CSE) shows. Under contract arrangements. Provision of BFBS radio and television broadcasting to overseas locations where Service personnel are based. They are also responsible for Ghurkha Radio and radio in Northern Ireland. For areas where broadcasting is not possible a DVD service can be provided. SSVC are also responsible for the organisation of Combined Services Entertainment (CSE) shows. UWO(TA) on mobilisation

22

23

Defence Medical Welfare Service(DMWS) St John and Red Cross SSVC

DMWS St John and Red Cross MoD Single Services

24

SSVC Operational Welfare Fund

SSVC

The Service Community

25

UWO (TA)/OSO/RRRW /NRPS posts

Army

The Reserve Forces

61

26

Service Accommodation

MoD/DE

Service Community The Service Community

27

Joint Service Housing Advice Office

Army

The Service Community

Families and Single Living Accommodation, Messes, Personnel not on duty to pay nonentitled rates in public accommodation such as messes and SLA. Welfare accommodation can be provided from misappropriated families‟ accommodation. JSHAO provides all Service personnel and their families with information and advice in order to encourage the consideration of civilian housing options whilst they are serving and when they are about to return to civilian life. JSHAO also provides help and information to ex-Service personnel who are still in Service Families' Accommodation. http://www.army.mod.uk/soldierwelfare/support agencies/aws/jshao/

28

Service Cotswold Centre

Single Services

The Service Community

Temporary housing for families of Service personnel from all 3 Services who may be between postings, retiring from the Services, be in need of a family holiday or weekend break or any other reason including welfare or emergency evacuation from overseas.

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Chapter 6 - CHARITABLE ORGANISATIONS
Section 1 - Introduction

0601. There are many Service/Ex Service Charities that exist solely to provide assistance to military personnel and their families in times of need or crisis. Many of these charities form an essential provision of serving and exservice personnel. Section 2 - Confederation of British and Ex-Service Organisations (COBSEO) 0602. COBSEO is established to represent, promote and further the interests of Service and ex-Service personnel of all ranks, and their and dependants by all practical, legal and proper means including: a. Exchanging and co-ordinating information internally.

b. When necessary, acting as a point of contact for external agencies to the members of COBSEO. c. Identifying issues of common concern, particularly welfare matters, and co-ordinating any necessary and appropriate action. d. Representing and supporting the needs and opinions of its member organisations, individually and collectively, at Central and Local Government levels and with other agencies. Section 3 - Details of Charities 0603. Lists of Service and Ex-Service charities are at Annexes A - D. Annexes: A. Charitable Organisations – Tri Service B. Single Service Charities -Royal Navy/Royal Marines C. Single Service Charities – Army D. Single Service Charities – Royal Air Force

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ANNEX A TO CHAPTER 6 OF PART 1 - JSP 770

CHARITABLE ORGANISATIONS – TRI SERVICE
1 The Annington Trust. The Annington Trust is a charitable trust to promote the efficiency of the Armed Forces of the Crown by providing for the recreation and general needs of Service personnel who live in married quarters. In addition, it promotes the welfare of the Armed Forces by providing for the general needs of those Service families in particular for the improvement of their recreational facilities. www.annington.co.uk 2. British Limbless Ex-Servicemen‟s Association (BLESMA). BLESMA is a National Charity specifically for limbless and paraplegic exService Personnel and their dependants and widows. The objectives of the Association are to promote the welfare of all those who have lost a limb or limbs or one or both eyes as a result of service to their country and to assist their dependants. Today, BLESMA is aiding thousands of amputees of all ages, from those who served during WWII, to recent conflicts and peace keeping missions. www.blesma.org

3. Commonwealth War Graves Commission. The Commission was established by Royal Charter in 1917. Its duties are to mark and maintain the graves of the members of the forces of the Commonwealth who were killed in the two World Wars. In addition it builds memorials to those who have no known grave and keeps records and registers, including a record of the civilian War Dead. www.cwgc.org 4. Erskine Hospital. Erskine Hospital is an independent charity providing a modern care facility for ex-Service men and women in the United Kingdom. It provides an unrivalled level of residential, nursing and dementia care in purpose-built homes and each year cares for more than 550 exService men and women of all ages, in permanent and respite care. www.erskine.org.uk 5 The Ex-Service Fellowship Centres. The Ex-Service Fellowship Centres is a charity that helps ex-Service and ex-Merchant Service men and women and their dependants who are in need. www.exsfc.org.uk 64

6. The Ex-Services Mental Welfare Society (Combat Stress). The Exservices Mental Welfare Society, also known as Combat Stress, is the only charity dedicated to giving care, comfort and reassurance, backed by skilled clinical support, to men and women of all ranks and all Services suffering from varying degrees of mental illness as a result of traumatic battle experiences. www.combatstress.org.uk

7. Haig Homes. The Douglas Haig Memorial Homes, known as Haig Homes, is a Charitable Housing Association with almost 1,200 houses, flats, maisonettes and bungalows throughout the UK. Some are subject to the nomination rights of the original service or regimental organisation which donated the funds for the building. Tenancies are allocated on the basis of suitability and need except where this would lead to unsustainable tenancies or unstable communities. www.haighomes.org.uk 8. The “Not Forgotten” Association. The association provides assistance to disabled ex-Servicemen and women in this country, particularly the elderly and frail. Although their essential needs may be provided for, The "Not Forgotten" Association is able to give them some of the "extras" which most of us take for granted, something to look forward to – something to make life worth living - by providing: televisions, holidays, concerts and outings. www.nfassociation.org 9. The Officers‟ Association. The Officers‟ Association is a charity dedicated to assisting officers who have retired or about to retire from Her Majesty‟s Armed Forces. The Association was founded in 1919 and received the Royal Charter in 1921. The Association‟s work falls into three main categories: employment, residential accommodation and benevolence. www.officersassociation.com 10. Queen Alexandra Hospital Home. The Queen Alexandra Hospital Home is a registered charity, providing a permanent home with devoted nursing and medical care for disabled ex-Servicemen and women. The Home is in Worthing and accommodates 60 long term residents. In addition it also welcomes ex-Servicemen and women for convalescence after hospital treatment, or provides two to four week short-term respite, with nursing and medical treatment, for carers. Anyone who has served in HM Forces at any time or in any capacity and requires residential care is eligible for admission. www.qahh.org.uk

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11. Regular Forces Employment Association. A charity founded in 1885, changed legal status in 1997 to a company limited by guarantee, but retained charitable status and adopted the trading title “RFEA Limited”. Its objective is to: Assist ex-regular Servicemen and women to find employment throughout their working life. Offer employment access to staff they can rely on. www.rfea.org.uk 12. Royal British Legion. The Royal British Legion is the UK's leading charity safeguarding the welfare, interests and memory of those who have served in the Armed Forces and their dependants. It provides financial, social and emotional support to millions, including respite and residential care homes, and its benevolence spans all age groups from the oldest to the very young. www.britishlegion.org.uk 13. Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen & Families Association - Forces Help. The national charity helping serving and ex-Service men, women and their families, in need. The range of services SSAFA Forces Help provides include housing, financial aid and advice, friendship visits and professional health care and social work services. www.ssafa.org.uk 14. St Dunstan‟s. St Dunstan‟s was established in 1915; St Dunstan's provide essential training and rehabilitation for ex-Service men and women who are now blinded due to war, age, accident or illness. This includes mobility training, cooking skills, IT training, sports and recreation, nursing and respite care. www.st-dunstans.org.uk 15. The Royal Star & Garter Home. The Royal Star & Garter Home aims to enable disabled or incapacitated ex-Servicemen and women to live as independently as possible, taking account of their wishes and capabilities. The Home does this through the provision of residential care in a spacious, homelike, caring environment, through high quality nursing care, expert therapy services, a wide range of activities and well trained and motivated staff. www.starandgarter.org 16. Scottish Veterans‟ Garden Association. Provides low-cost accommodation for disabled ex-Service personnel and Merchant Navy personnel. The SVGA has 596 houses in 43 districts throughout Scotland, the

66

majority within the Forth/Clyde valley. Priority is given to younger people, particularly those with families. www.army.mod.uk/soldierwelfare

17. King Edward VII's Hospital Sister Agnes. King Edward VII's Hospital Sister Agnes is an independent acute hospital. The Hospital has been a Registered Charity since 1930 and voluntary income plays a crucial part in enabling the Hospital to continue the charitable work started by Sister Agnes over a century ago. www.kingedwardvii.co.uk

18. War Widows Association. The War Widows Association is essentially a pressure group that exists to improve the conditions of war widows and their dependants in Great Britain. It works with a number of Government Departments petitioning for improvement in pensions, the administration of benefits and other issues affecting war widows. www.warwidowsassociation.org.uk 19. Forces Pension Society. There are 3 primary objectives of the Forces Pension Society: a. Secure equitable and justified conditions in the Armed Forces Pension Scheme for all ranks of the 3 Services both serving and retired and for their widows, widowers and dependants. b. Seek resolution of the iniquitous legacy issues, from which certain pensioners and their dependants continue to suffer. c. To advise and assist members of the Society on Service pension problems and related issues.

www.forpen.org 20. National Gulf Veterans and Families Association. Aims to support those who served in the 1990-91 and 2003 to date Iraqi/Gulf conflicts. Open to the armed forces and civilians as well as their dependants. www.ngvfa.com

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ANNEX B TO CHAPTER 6 OF PART 1 - JSP 770

SINGLE SERVICE CHARITIES - ROYAL NAVY / ROYAL MARINES.
1. The Royal Marines Benevolent Fund. The Royal Marines Benevolent Fund‟s principal purpose is to benefit persons who are serving or who have served in the Royal Marines, or their dependants, to relieve need, hardship or distress. The Fund was formed in 1997 and subsumed the following funds and their purposes: a. The Upton Kelly Memorial Fund. The aim of the fund is to relieve distress or necessity amongst officers who have served in the Royal Marines, officers' widows, and their dependants. b. Royal Marines Tercentenary Relief Fund. The purpose of this fund is to provide on death, from any causes, for either serving Royal Marines or a Reservist on duty, a sum of money for the widow or recorded next of kin to relieve initial financial problems. The sum of money authorised may be altered from time to time by the Trustees; the grant is currently £2,750. c. Royal Marines Welfare Fund. The fund may be used to relieve distress amongst serving and retired Warrant Officers, noncommissioned officers and men of the Royal Marines, their widows and dependants. d. Royal Marines Band Benevolent Fund. The fund is used to relieve needy or distressed, serving or retired RM Band Service ranks or their dependants. www.royalmarinesregimental.co.uk

2. The Royal Naval Benevolent Trust. From the day they join the Royal Navy or Royal Marines, all ratings and other ranks are part of the “RNBT family”, so are their wives, husbands and dependant children. For the rest of their lives they may seek help from the RNBT in times of need. They may be assisted in the following ways: Financial grants covering a wide range of individual needs. Regular payments to supplement the income of older people (annuities). Support to other organisations which assist the "RNBT Family".

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Care of older people at Pembroke House, the RNBT's own residential nursing home at Gillingham, Kent. Advice on welfare matters. 3. Alexandra House. Alexandra House in Plymouth is a charitable short stay care home for Service Children, mostly RN and RM, however it is also open to children of Army personnel. Principally it caters for the care of children following a marital breakdown. www.royal-navy.mod.uk 4. Greenwich Hospital. Greenwich Hospital is the Royal Navy's oldest charity. A Crown charity established by Royal Charter in 1694, it provides charitable support to serving and retired men and women of the Royal Navy and Royal Marines and to their dependants, including the education of their children. It does this through providing sheltered housing, pensions and grants to Naval charities. The Hospital owns the Royal Hospital School, a coeducational boarding school at Holbrook near Ipswich, principally for the children and grandchildren of Naval and other seafaring families. Also the Hospital makes some other educational grants. Serving members of the Royal Navy or Royal Marines are eligible for educational support from Greenwich Hospital at the Royal Hospital School. This support does not depend on whether or not they are eligible for Continuity of Education Allowance (CEA). www.grenhosp.org.uk 5 Seafarers UK. (Formerly known as the King George's Fund for Sailors) This is a national maritime charity - the only one which raises money for all seafarers and their dependants. Each year over £3 million is raised and distributed to benevolent organisations caring for anyone who has served at sea and their dependants who are in need, for example - fishermen, the Royal Navy and Royal Marines, the Merchant Navy etc - and their dependants. www.seabritain2005.com www.seafarers.uk.org

6. The White Ensign Association. The White Ensign Association is an independent charity staffed by former Royal Navy and Royal Marines officers. Founded in 1958 it provides a link between the Naval Service and the civilian world. The White Ensign Association is to assist and promote the interests of those who are serving or have at any time served in the: Royal Navy, Royal Marines, Royal Naval or Royal Marine Reserve, Women's Royal Naval Service or Queen Alexandra's Royal Naval Nursing Service. In particular it will provide: a. Financial Advice. In connection with investments, house purchase, insurance (including educational costs and school fees); pensions and commutation.

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b. Business Advice. For those seeking to establish themselves in trade or business; and giving suitable introductions to, any such persons seeking employment in finance, commerce or industry. c. General Information and Advice. To those leaving the Service and seeking to settle in civilian life. www.whiteensign.co.uk www.royal-navy.mod.uk

7. The Royal Naval Association. The Royal Naval Association (RNA) is the principal organisation for those who have served in the Naval Forces. It aims to foster comradeship and "esprit de corps". It also provides relief from conditions of need or distress, to persons and their dependants who serve in or have served in our Naval Forces. www.royal-naval-association.co.uk www.royal-navy.mod.uk

8. The RN & RM Children's Fund. This fund is the premier charity for providing help to children of serving and ex-serving personnel of the Royal Navy, the Royal Marines, the Queen Alexandra's Royal Naval Nursing Service and the reserves of those forces where children are in need, hardship or distress. Support can be in the form of one-off payments or long term support and care including support for children: in their own homes in children's homes and schools and in special needs establishments. www.rnrmchildrensfund.org.uk www.royal-navy.mod.uk

9 Women's Royal Naval Service Benevolent Trust. Every ex Wren or female serving, or former member of the Royal Navy, who joined the Service between September 1939 and November 1993 is automatically a member. Their dependants are also eligible for consideration of financial help. The financial assistance given by the Trust is varied and includes: a. Grants to help with arrears or debts, removal or travel cost, convalescence care, education, household goods and repairs, medical aids, medical fees and in some cases, funerals. b. Regular Grants to help those on low incomes.

Annuities for members of state pensionable age living on a low income. www.royal-navy.mod.uk

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10. The Association of Royal Navy Officers. ARNO is a charitable trust that provides assistance to all serving and former officers of the Royal Navy, the Royal Marines, the Queen Alexandra's Royal Naval Nursing Service, the Women's Royal Naval Service, and the Reserves of those forces, their spouses, former spouses, families and dependants, who are in need. The following are examples of assistance that has been given:

a. Nursing home fees and private medical expenses where the delay necessary under the NHS scheme would affect livelihood, or the care of others. b. c. Alteration, maintenance or redecoration of property. Alarm call systems and making good damage to a home

d. Help towards the provision of vehicles or equipment for the care of an invalid. e. f. Bursaries and the costs of special educational needs for children. Re-training costs to gain employment.

www.eurosurf.com/arno

11. Royal Sailors Rest. RSR - affectionately known as Aggies was founded by Dame Agnes Weston in 1876, providing Christian ministry and support to serving sailors, marines and their wives and families. Today RSR has Centres at Rowner in Gosport and in Helensburgh that support the local naval bases. RSR Rowner provides daytime support, recreation and NVQ courses for Service personnel and families from the nearby-married quarters estate. RSR Helensburgh (Braeholm) supports those who serve in Scotland and the Clyde Naval Base area with a centre, which has 17 family, double, twin and single en-suite bedrooms and is a great facility on offer to all members of the Naval Service, the Royal Naval Association and their families. RSR has also appointed ten Chaplaincy Support Workers (CSW), with the Royal Navy and Royal Marines. Information on their work and other special projects such as RN debt support and the Aggies phone card can be found at:

www.rsr.org.uk www.royal-navy.mod.uk

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ANNEX C TO CHAPTER 8 OF PART 1 - JSP 770

SINGLE SERVICE CHARITIES - ARMY.
1. The Army Benevolent Fund. The Army Benevolent Fund (ABF) is the Army's national charity and is committed to providing financial and practical support to soldiers, former soldiers and their families in times of need. It works in partnership with Regimental and Corps Benevolent Funds and in co-operation with other Service charities in identifying, investigating and primarily giving financial support to eligible cases in "real need". This support is given in two ways: a. Financial support is given to individuals through Regimental and Corps Benevolent Funds and normally takes the form of an ABF grant to supplement whatever the Regiment or Corps has the resource to provide. b. Help is also provided through the substantial financial grants which the ABF makes on behalf of all Regiments and Corps of the Army to the charitable organisations which provide for the special needs of the soldier, ex-soldier and his or her family. www.armybenfund.com 2. The Army Central Fund. The ACF is the Army‟s principal in-house charity. It is a non-public fund dedicated to the support of collective welfare projects not eligible for public funding. www.army.mod.uk

3. Royal Cambridge Home for Soldiers' Widows. The Royal Cambridge Home for Soldiers' Widows is a residential care home for women whose husbands have served in the ranks, single or widowed women who have themselves served in the Regular, Territorial or Reserve Army, Nursing Sisters and other female staff of the Nursing Yeomanry. Respite Care is also provided. Residents are encouraged to look after themselves as much as possible and to lead active lives and all individual needs are catered for. The Home is closely connected to The Royal Hospital Chelsea and is a registered charity. www.royalcambridgehome.org

4. Army Widows Association (AWA). The AWA, although totally independent, works closely with the MoD, including the Service Personnel 72

and Veterans Agency, and the Army policy branches. The Association aims are to offer friendship and support to widows and widowers; address issues relating to widows/widowers; raise the Army‟s awareness to widows/widowers issues and to liaise closely with other ex-service organisations. www.armywidows.org.uk

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ANNEX D TO CHAPTER 6 OF PART 1 - JSP 770

SINGLE SERVICE CHARITIES - RAF
1. The Royal Air Force Benevolent Fund. The Royal Air Force Benevolent Fund exists to provide assistance to those of the extended Royal Air Force Family who need support as a consequence of poverty, sickness, disability, accident, infirmity or other adversity. This extended family embraces all ranks, male and female, who are serving or have served in the Royal Air Force or its associated Air Forces, their widows, widowers and dependants. www.rafbf.org

2. Royal Air Forces Association (RAFA). Under its motto of „Comradeship, Welfare, Opportunities‟, RAFA provides support to both current and former members of the RAF, drawing on its network of branches worldwide as well as the RAFA Liaison Officers appointed on all RAF stns and in many other locations where RAF personnel are serving. www.rafa.org.uk

3. RAF Widows Association Association are:

Main aims of the RAF Widows

a. To offer support, comfort, friendship and advice to those newly bereaved whose spouse was serving in the RAF at the time of death. b. To work with the RAF and the MoD and to encourage them to recognise their responsibilities to their widows and to make widows an integral part of the Service community. c. To address matters relating to Royal Air Force Widows and their children. www.rafcom.co.uk/bereavement/widows

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Part 2.

DEPLOYMENT WELFARE SUPPORT

Chapter 1 - DEPLOYMENT WELFARE PACKAGE
Section 1 - Introduction “Welfare is not something to relieve boredom. The object is to cater for the whole needs of [individuals] and that must be planned as part of the Service[person]’s life with the object of stimulating [their] morale, ensuring [their] mental and emotional needs and physical fitness…” (Maj Gen Willans, 1940)22 2001 Welfare support is about strengthening and sustaining the morale of Service personnel, thereby contributing to operational capability. It encompasses the provision of a range of welfare enablers and should be viewed as a natural extension of good leadership. Deployment Welfare Support (DWS) Policy23 is the framework by which the MoD provides personnel with the fullest possible support to ensure their emotional and physical well being, set against and consistent with the operational environment and the availability of resources. 2002 Deployment welfare should not be viewed in isolation. It does not replace well established processes but plays a key role among a host of mutually supporting enablers in the delivery of operational capability. Neither can it be seen as a panacea or a means by which Service personnel who bring certain expectations of lifestyle from society and experiences are unreasonably featherbedded. The expectation in terms of DWS is very real and demands careful management by commanders. Welfare support should, therefore, be set at an appropriate level during its implementation to ensure that Service personnel are motivated to give their best as individuals and as part of teams. This is crucial for success if welfare support is to play its role in enhancing overall operational effectiveness. 2003 IJWP 1-00 is the source document for primary J1 doctrine. In turn, DWS Policy provides the detailed framework for commanders at all levels to implement effective welfare support during operations, exercises and other deployments. It is defined as the provision of support for the physical and emotional well-being of Service personnel deployed on operations, exercises and other military tasks. Section 2 - Aim 2004 The aim of the policy is to support the maintenance of the morale of Service personnel in order to optimise and sustain operational effectiveness.

22

Extract from address by Maj Gen H Willans, Director General of Warfare and Education, 1940. Formerly Operational Welfare Support (OWS) Policy.

23

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Section 3 - Effects 2005 DWS seeks to achieve the following effects: a. Communicate. To enable deployed Service personnel to retain contact with family and friends. b. Entertain. To provide for the leisure and relaxation needs of deployed Service personnel. c. Support. To provide for the physiological needs of deployed Service personnel. d. Connect. To provide support for the families of deployed Service personnel and facilitate the Service person‟s reintegration into the family unit. 2006 The successful application of DWS and achievement of the desired effects will require commanders and their staff to determine the Service need that exists at each location rather than, in the first instance, trying to identify how support will be provided. This will allow the implementing authority (PJHQ or the FLCs) the maximum freedom to provide the most efficient and cost-effective solutions to specific problems. 2007 Fundamental to this approach is the understanding that the Service need will change according to location and the stage of a deployment or operation24. In the early stages of an operation the need will be to ensure that personnel concentrate on the task and are not distracted. In more mature and isolated locations the application of the desired effects remains the basic requirement: However, once this need has been satisfied, additional provision further to improve the welfare of the individual will be appropriate and is retention-positive. Commanders, planners and policy staffs determining the DWS support needs of Service personnel are to be guided by the following principles: a. Welfare support is intended to enhance and sustain operational effectiveness. b. Operational need has priority over individual welfare. c. The aim of welfare spending is not to cosset the individual but to make sufficient provision for his or her welfare such that he or she can concentrate on the operational task in hand. d. The welfare of Service personnel is a command function and

24

In addition, the unique nature of maritime deployments is taken into account.

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key to sustaining the moral component. It is also important to ensure that individuals feel that their needs have been looked after from the perspective of job satisfaction and, ultimately, retention. e. There must be a level playing field wherever possible such that all Service personnel know and understand what support is available to them and that no group feels disadvantaged in comparison to another. f. In general terms, the provision of DWS means that individuals should not be disadvantaged financially or by lack of access to welfare equipments when deployed. If the perception is that a group is being disadvantaged then the rationale needs to be fully explained. g. Harmonised, common and agreed tri-Service procedures should be applied rather than ad hoc single Service solutions. Disparity in terms and conditions between personnel from different Services on operations have previously been identified as a significant irritant and must be eliminated wherever possible. Section 4 - Funding of Provision 2008 Particularly in the area of communications, individual aspirations are boundless and will increase over time as they do in civil life. Therefore, provision of facilities and services cannot be provided entirely by public funding, particularly overseas. The intent is to make basic provision through either the Deployment Welfare Package (Overseas)25 (DWP(O)) or the Deployment Welfare Package (United Kingdom) (DWP(UK)) and then to encourage external providers to offer additional facilities as appropriate. In doing so, the aim is to minimise the additional cost to the Service person that results from their being deployed on operations. It is important that this is both true and perceived to be so by Service personnel and overt competition is particularly useful to the latter. On overseas deployments there may be particular benefits in NAAFI‟s involvement in the provision of services to people on operations. 2009 Formal provision of DWP services must be subject to appropriate constraints, such as filtering of access to internet sites. These constraints are not appropriate where the service is offered as a private arrangement between a supplier and a Service person; and, of course, appropriate national laws apply to both parties. On operations overseas other constraints, primarily security, must be applied consistently regardless of whether facilities are MoD or privately funded. Local commanders must ensure that nonoperational communications can be managed e.g. for Op MINIMISE. This

25

Formerly the Operational Welfare Package (OWP).

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applies as much to the use of local mobile phone network SIM cards as it does to the provision of wired or wireless internet services. Section 5 - Managing Expectations 2010 As the DWPs become commonplace in the fabric of operations, exercises and deployments, it is vital that those involved in developing the policy and its implementation, delivery and use keep a firm focus on what the packages are trying to achieve. This involves „managing expectation‟ which demands full engagement of the chain of command in providing firm leadership at all levels. 2011 Whilst not an exhaustive list the following topics are considered key in managing expectation: a. Our people need to be aware of the „art of the possible‟ in DWP delivery - any limitations need to be highlighted and explained. During the Initial Phase of an operation the provision of the DWP is likely to be limited by logistic and operational restrictions. In addition, when engaged in war fighting those elements of the DWP(O) that are provided in static locations are unlikely to be available to units and formations who are engaged in high intensity operations. For maritime units, the pre-existing on-board DWP infrastructure can be activated at relatively little notice subject to operational restrictions. b. On occasion, for operational reasons, the delivery and availability of the packages (along with other support enablers) will need to be subservient to the overriding aim of the operation, exercise or deployment. c. Personnel need to understand fully what DWP provision is being made for their own welfare and that of their families. Service personnel must be properly briefed by the chain of command on available provision and any limitations, both before and during the deployment. d. It must also be understood that the DWPs are discrete packages and as such are separate from other areas of personnel support delivery e.g. J4 items such as food, personal military equipment and the provision of uniform etc. Section 6 - Delivery 2012 DCDS(Pers) Strat Ops and Manning is responsible for setting overall DWP policy in consultation with stakeholders i.e. Finance Directorates, PJHQ (specifically J1), and the FLC‟s Pers Ops divisions and PPO‟s staffs. DWP policy is interpreted and implemented by PJHQ and the FLCs and delivered through the chain of command. On PJHQ led operations the in-theatre

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responsibility for the DWP lies with the NSE/JFLogC. The J1 staff will provide DWP Standard Operating Instructions and offer policy guidance. 2013 Although the fundamental tenets of deployment welfare provision remain the same for deployments both in the UK and overseas the means of their delivery will differ due to the relative proximity to the home base, the duration of the deployment and the expected higher level of supporting infrastructure available to personnel on UK-based operations e.g. MACA deployments. Therefore, Chapter One details deployment welfare policy for deployments outside the UK, whilst Chapter 2 details policy for UK-based deployments.

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Chapter 1 - DEPLOYMENT WELFARE PROVISION FOR DEPLOYMENTS OUTSIDE THE UK
Section 1 - Eligibility 2201 The DWP(O) is provided to Service personnel26 and where appropriate contractors27, deployed on qualifying operations, exercises and other deployments. These are defined as: a. Operations overseas, expected to last for 2 months or more, with a designated name and under the operational command of PJHQ, for which a CDS directive has been issued. b. Maritime deployments, outside UK home waters, expected to last for 2 months or more. 2202 Other operations, exercises and deployments overseas, but outside North West Europe28, which are expected to last for 2 months or more, by formed and non-formed units under the operational command of either NATO, PJHQ or the single-Service Commands. This definition includes deployments (but not postings) to the RPJOBs29. Section 2 - Exceptions 2203 The DWP(O) is not provided in the following circumstances: a. Locations with a developed infrastructure, where most elements of the DWP(O) are already available to Service personnel. b. Locations where Service personnel are in receipt of Local Overseas Allowance (LOA), (see para 3). Section 3 - DWP(O) and LOA 2204 LOA is a non-taxable allowance paid to Regular and Reserve Service personnel in certain locations overseas. It is a measure of the amount by which average essential expenditure on day-to-day living in the overseas station differs from that in the UK, taking account of local lifestyle. LOA is not

26 27

Members of the Armed Forces and MoD Civil Servants. Policy for Contractor‟s access to DWP(O) is contained in JSP 567 – Contractors on Deployed Operations Policy. NW Europe defined as including NATO states plus the non-NATO Scandinavian nations. BFSAI and BIOT, each of which has a bespoke DWP(O) package that varies from some of the provision detailed in

28

29

this policy.

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intended to meet the very different needs of Service personnel on operations or exercises. As a rule and in circumstances that meet the above criteria, the DWP(O) will provide deployment welfare support and LOA will not be paid. However, in exceptional circumstances SP Pol Allces may allow for LOA to be issued alongside elements of the DWP(O), but at a reduced rate. Service personnel who are deployed from an overseas duty to an area where the DWP(O) is in place, will remain eligible for the payment of LOA for their permanent overseas duty station, in accordance with current tri-Service LOA regulations. Section 4 - DWP(O) Components 2205 The component parts of the DWP(O) are detailed by effect as follows: a. Communicate. (1) Telephony – Annex A.

(2) E-mail and SMS Texting – Annex B. (3) Forces Mail (including e-bluey etc) – Annex C. b. Entertain. (1) (2) (2) (3) (4) c. Audio Visual – Annex D Internet (including WiFi) – Annex E. Printed Matter and Games – Annex F. Combined Services Entertainment (CSE) – Annex G. Operational Fitness Equipment (OFE) – Annex H.

Support. (1) Shops (EFI and NCS) – Annex I.

d. e. f. g.

Laundry and Shower Facilities – Annex J. Connect. Families Welfare Grant – Annex K. Families Concessionary Travel Allowance – Annex L30.

30

Authority is contained in Chapter 4, paragraph 04.1139 of JSP 752 – Tri-Service Regulations for Allowances.

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h. i.

Rest and Recuperation31. Post Operational Leave32.

Section 5 - DWP(O) Provision 2206 As previously stated, the successful application of DWS and achievement of the desired effects will require commanders and staff to determine the Service need that exists at each location. Fundamental to this approach is the understanding that the Service need will change according to location and the stage of a deployment or operation. Table 1 is designed to inform decisions on DWP(O) provision. Table 1 - Key Enablers Required by Location
Enabler/ Location Early Entry33 Static34 Mature Theatre35 Seagoing Units EMF and Small Ops36 Isolated/ Remote (RPJOBS)37 (g) (a) Telephones (b) Provide (c) Provide (d) Local Provision SMS Texting E-mail If Possible Provide Provide Provide Local Provision Local Provision Internet Not Required WiFi Not Required Forces Mail Provide Provide If Possible Provide Local Provision Local Provision Provide Not Required Provide If Possible Local Provision Not Required Provide Provide If Possible Provide Not Required Provide Provide Provide Provide Provide (e) Provide (f) Provide Provide

31

Details of entitlement are contained in Chapter 5 of JSP 760 – Tri Service Regulations for Leave and Other Types of Absence. 32 Details of entitlement are contained in Chapter 3 of JSP 760 – Tri Service Regulations for Leave and Other Types of Absence. 33 Defined as a mobile unit or an austere or bare-base location at which Force Elements are based in the initial stages of a deployment. 34 Defined as a fixed area where non-mobile Service personnel will be located for a period of 3 months or more. 35 Defined as an established location at which the longevity of an operation has resulted in the provision of facilities and accommodation comparable to those found at a home unit. 36 Defined as those locations to which small numbers of personnel deploy on discrete operations. 37 Defined by their geographical remoteness. BFSAI and BIOT are currently the only recognised RPJOBs.

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Enabler/ Location

Early Entry38

Static39

Mature Theatre40

Seagoing Units EMF and

Small Ops41

Isolated/ Remote (RPJOBS)42

(a) TV

(b) Not Required

(c) Provide

(d) Provide

(e) Provide

(f) If Possible

(g) Provide

Radio DVDs/ games Newspapers / magazines CSE Shows/ Visits43 OFE45

Provide Not Required If Possible

Provide Provide

Provide Provide

If Possible Provide

Provide Provide

Provide Provide

Provide

Provide

Provide

Local Provision

Provide

Not Required If Possible

Provide

Provide

If Possible44

Not Required

Provide

Provide

Provide

Provide

If Possible

Provide

EFI/NAAFI – Shop EFI/NAAFI – Leisure On-line EFI/NAAFI Showers

Provide 46

Provide

Local Provision

Provide

Local Provision

Provide

Not Required Not Required Provide

Provide

Provide

Not Required

Local Provision If Possible

Provide

If Possible

If Possible

If Possible

If Possible

Provide

Provide

Local Provision (ship fit)

Provide

Provide

Laundry

If Possible

Provide

Local Provision

Local Provision (normally by contract)

Local Provision

Provide

38

Defined as a mobile unit or an austere or bare-base location at which Force Elements are based in the initial stages of a deployment. 39 Defined as a fixed area where non-mobile Service personnel will be located for a period of 3 months or more. 40 Defined as an established location at which the longevity of an operation has resulted in the provision of facilities and accommodation comparable to those found at a home unit. 41 Defined as those locations to which small numbers of personnel deploy on discrete operations. 42 Defined by their geographical remoteness. BFSAI and BIOT are currently the only recognised RPJOBs. 43 Only for deployments of greater than 4 months duration. 44 CSE shows may be provided for RN seagoing units at the discretion of CINCFLEET for units deployed from UK in excess of 4 months. 45 Only for deployments of greater than 4 months duration. 46 Either provision of EFI essentials pack-ups via unit QMs or through basic shop facilities.

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2207 For the purposes of DWP(O) provision a deployment can be divided into phases that equate to the PJHQ‟s Planning Cycle (Table 2 refers). These phases provide a structure and DWP(O) planning guidance against which welfare facilities should be provided; it is not intended for them to be rigidly imposed. The level of provision will be determined by the numbers and ratios of provision contained in this policy. Table 2 - DWP(O) Provision Phases and the PJHQ‟s Planning Cycle

Phase 1 2 3 4 5 6

DWP(O) Provision Planning Build-up Initial Follow-on Sustained Recovery

PJHQ Planning Cycle Plan Deploy Sustain Recover

2208 Limitations. It is important to note that during the Initial Phase, provision of the DWP(O) to Early Entry Forces is likely to be very limited, due to logistic47 and operational restrictions such as the Comd‟s Force Element Table priorities on the Desired Order of Arrival Staffing Table, war fighting and speed of deployment, along with INFOSEC requirements when speaking with contractors prior to the deployment. Maritime forces will be able to utilise on board OWP enablers where the tactical situation allows. In addition, those elements of the DWP(O) that can only be provided from static locations48 are unlikely to be delivered to units and formations engaged in the close battle, except where commanders have deployed with early entry DWP(O) packs49. Additionally, there will be occasions when the tactical situation determines a restricted access to the communications package for reasons of OPSEC. 2209 Maritime Deployments. Afloat elements of maritime components are likely to experience little difference in conditions on board when moving from exercise deployments to a declaration of an operational deployment. On the assumption that basic physiological needs are already catered for throughout a maritime deployment, the additional operational welfare requirements for maritime deployments should be considered as being at the Follow-on and Sustained Phases, where welfare needs are enhanced to the full package. Tolerable variation will have to be applied to take into account environmental limitations (notably those inherent in submarine operations) and the physical and practical limitations of life on board ship.

47

Experience has shown that DWP equipment competes poorly with transport for Battle Field stocks. In a joint operation, PJHQ J1 will adopt a demand push approach to its rollout and look to use commercial means where they are faster. DWP equipment will be positioned as far forward as is sensible prior to its construction/use. 48 Static locations are defined as fixed areas, where non-mobile troops will be located for a period of 3 months or more. 49 Early entry packs are outlined in para 12.

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Section 6 - DWP(O) Planning 2210 Planning activity for the delivery of DWP(O) is detailed in Table 3. Table 3 - DWP(O) Planning Sequence

Phase (a) 1

DWP(O) Provision (b) Planning

2

Build-Up

Considerations During DWP(O) Planning Activity (c) Direction to implement DWP(O) included in CDS‟ operational directive50. DWP(O) Instructions included in CJO‟s operational directive. Staff Check to confirm availability and delivery timescales for DWP(O). Theatre J1 Recce (as early as is feasible). Obtain authority to commit funds. Nomination and briefing of relevant Theatre Welfare Staffs51. Detailed planning for initial elements according to identified Service need. Planning to include an assessment of transport/infra/comms required to provide DWP(O)52. DWP(O) staff to be embedded in the J1/J4 chain and actively manage DWP(O) resources. Task Agencies to provide DWP(O) facilities. DWP(O) leaflet issued if required53. Families leaflet issued. Coordinate and monitor delivery of initial elements of the DWP(O). Detailed planning for follow on elements of the DWP(O) as identified through assessment of Service need.

Responsibility (d) DCDS(Pers) Strat OM /Current Crisis Team PJHQ/FLCs FLCs supported by PJHQ PJHQ/FLCs PJHQ/JTFHQ PJHQ/FLCs

PJHQ/FLCs/JTFH Q

PJHQ/FLCs/JTFH Q PJHQ PJHQ/FLCs FLCs/units PJHQ/FLCs/JTFH Q PJHQ/FLCs/JTFH Q

3

Initial

50

Operational Directives are not applicable to exercises where direction to implement DWP(O) and DWP(O) initiatives will need to be incorporated in orders e.g. Op Orders etc. 51 Theatre Welfare Staffs could be located in one or more of the JTFHQ/NSE/JFLogC. 52 Planning factors are to include the provision of Improved Tented Camps and Temporary Field Accommodation for relaxation purposes. A minimum floor area per person is scaled at 0.8m2. 53 DWP(O) leaflets are outlined at para 15.

85

Phase (a)

DWP(O) Provision (b)

4/5

Follow-On and Sustained

6

Recovery

Considerations During DWP(O) Planning Activity (c) Initial Theatre J1 visit to confirm, and where necessary revise and refine, delivery of welfare support. DWP(O) staff to coordinate CSE activities, if applicable. Issue theatre management policy to include regulations for use, accounting policy and auditing procedures. Coordinate and monitor delivery of follow on elements of the DWP(O). Audit stocks and maintain a record of DWP(O) equipment. Undertake conditioning boards and implement normal equipment accounting procedures. Equipment returned to UK or redeployed to another Op Theatre.

Responsibility (d) PJHQ/FLCs/SP Pol P and A/Lead Command

PJHQ/FLCs/JTFH Q

PJHQ/FLCs

Section 7 - Considerations 2211 In-Theatre Management of DWP(O). In-Theatre DWP(O) planning, management and policy is a responsibility normally vested in the NSE/JFLogC headquarters. It is important that the appropriate J1 staffs are included in its establishment at the outset of operations. Theatre DWP(O) Standing Operating Instructions and policy guidance are the responsibility of these staff. PJHQ normally defines the DWP(O) staff responsibilities for the NCC and JFLogC/NSE in the J1 Annex to CJO‟s operational directive for a given operation. 2212 Power Generation. Elements of the DWP(O) that do not have dedicated electrical power provided as part of the contract, should be powered from an existing military source. Where this is not practical, consideration should be given to providing power from a source procured locally. 2213 Limitations and Requirements for Expeditionary Forces. Forces that deploy rapidly and/or early at the outset of an operation54 are often mobile, in one location for only short periods of time and in an environment that might not be mature enough to support fully the provision of DWP(O). Similarly, personnel can be deployed away from a location that is fully provided with the DWP(O), such as a ship or assembly location. These early entry forces present a very demanding DWP(O) implementation challenge to meet the policy aspiration. Such circumstances will require the deployment of early

54

Spearhead/OLRT and Ld Cdo BG/Ld Airborne BG.

86

entry packs to provide amongst other elements, portable and rugged telephone and basic Internet e-mail facilities at the time the unit deploys. This is to ensure that the unit receives an adequate capability in the first weeks of an operation, as they will work and fight at such early stages that the theatres in question will invariably not have matured enough to support the provision of conventional DWP(O) communication packages. 2214 Small Detachments. Small detachments of eligible personnel are not to be disqualified from receiving elements of the DWP(O) simply because they do not meet baseline provision ratios. Deployments are to be assessed on a case-by-case basis and provision made in the most appropriate and costeffective manner. 2215 Medical Facilities and Establishments. The provision of welfare enablers for deployed Role 3 medical facilities is to be given early consideration by PJHQ staffs during the planning process. It is important that the DWP(O) is established quickly at these locations to provide for the needs of patients, staff and visitors in circumstances where the timely provision of welfare support has a critical part to play in the recovery and pastoral care processes. For operational casualties that are subsequently admitted to a Role 4 medical facility in the UK or overseas, a parallel package to DWP(O) is in place to ensure that those personnel are not avoidably disadvantaged either financially or practically as a result of their injuries. The Service InPatient Welfare Package primarily uses extant Tri-Service allowances to reproduce the DWP(O) effect, in addition to specific measures such as the continuation of Operational Allowance payments for eligible personnel. Further details of allowances payable are in JSP 752 – Tri-Service Regulations for Allowances; the patients‟ welfare package is not part of the DWP(O). 2216 DWP(O) Leaflets. It is important that Service personnel deploying on operations, exercises and deployments that qualify for the DWP(O) understand what provision is made for their welfare and the welfare of their families. In particular, commanders must ensure that any limitations in the delivery of the DWP(O) are highlighted and explained. One method of providing this information is through the issue of a welfare leaflet, which should be customised to suit the operation. Such leaflets may also be distributed electronically or posted on Service community websites etc. Distribution should be carried out by the mounting HQ in advance of deployment or, if this is not possible, direct to Theatre. Section 8 - DWP(O) EVALUATION AND REVIEW 2217 DCDS(Pers) Strat Ops and Manning will conduct a biennial review and evaluation of the DWP(O). The Directorate of Operational Capability Lessons Identified process will be used to inform the review process. Checks and balances at the tactical/operational level will be conducted at the PJHQchaired Joint Operations Personnel Working Group meeting (held every 4 months).

87

Annexes: A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. Telephony. E-mail and SMS Texting. Forces Mail. Audio Visual. Internet. Printed Matter and Games. Combined Services Entertainment. Operational Fitness Equipment. Shops. Laundry and Shower Facilities. Families Welfare Grant. Families Concessionary Travel Allowance.

88

ANNEX A TO CHAPTER 1 OF PART 2 - JSP 770

TELEPHONY
1. The delivery of telephone facilities is a high priority element of the DWP(O). As such, hand-held satellite phones should be made available for deployment to theatre with the activation of early entry forces. Where it is not possible to dispatch telephones on the commencement of an operation, or where early entry forces are unable to deploy with an DWP(O) early entry pack, telephone facilities are to be provided as soon as possible during the Initial Phase. Where the operation and infrastructure allow, full provision of telephone facilities are to be in place by the time the operation reaches the Follow-on Phase (normally over one month in theatre). 2. Telephones are to be provided on a planning ratio of one telephone per 40 personnel (1:40) for static locations and one telephone per 30 personnel (1:30) for manoeuvre forces. Additional telephones may be issued to groups of personnel where there are less than 30 personnel living in an isolated location where a requirement is identified. Where a location has an expectation of providing a surge capability to support manoeuvre forces, telephones are to be provided in commensurate numbers. 3. Personnel that are eligible for the DWP(O) are entitled to the following telephone allowances: a. 30 minutes of publicly funded telephone call time per week, or part thereof, to any destination, world-wide, including mobile phones for the complete duration of their deployment, including any periods spent on local R&R i.e. outside the UK. b. An additional 30 minutes of publicly funded telephone call time for personnel deployed over all or part of the Christmas period (defined as 22 Dec–2 Jan inclusive). 4. Where possible the following facilities should be provided:

Telephone booths offering a degree of privacy. Shelter from extremes of weather and the provision of an environment that allows the sustained and effective operation of DWP(O) equipment e.g. air conditioning. 5. The following protocols are to be observed: a. All contractor-owned equipment is to be accounted for and treated appropriately by unit staff. Unit Commanders are to ensure that the 89

equipment is audited on a monthly basis and, in the case of Joint Ops, this should be carried out by Theatre J1 Staff. b. Theatre staff are to ensure that a system is put in place to prevent the use of welfare telephones where OPSEC policy or the EMCON Plan dictates. In such circumstances the system must also prevent the use of mobile phones privately owned by Service personnel. Op MINIMISE must be rehearsed. c. Theatre administrative staff are to administer the issuing and reporting of welfare telephone cards in accordance with agreed procedures detailed in the contractor‟s service handbook. d. All personnel are to be made aware of the rules regarding the use of the welfare telephone service. The fraudulent use of the welfare telephone system will not be tolerated; fraud prevention measures are to be in place and appropriate disciplinary/administrative action is to be taken where evidence of fraud exists. e. PJHQ J1 is responsible for submitting requests for welfare telephone services for eligible operations, deployments or exercises under the command of CJO. The respective N1, G1 or A1 branch assumes this responsibility for eligible operations, deployments or exercises not under the command of CJO. Requests are to be made to the Project WELCOME Desk Officer, Global Communication Services (GCS) IPT, Operational Support Building, Hawthorn Site, 1001 Skynet Drive, Corsham, Wiltshire, SN13 9NP (Corsham Mil (96927) ext 3730/PSTL 01249 853728, DII e-mail DES-GCS-SD1a). f. Welfare telecommunications are delivered by a contractor. In setting up the agreement it is important that the contract should be robust enough to facilitate liaison between the implementing authority (e.g. PJHQ) and the contractor‟s nominated point of contact, prior to a deployment to discuss: (1) The number of contractor staff required to maintain levels of service. (2) Pre-deployment briefing and training. (3) Theatre specific issues, orders and instructions relevant to the contract. (4) Liaison and customer interface management. (5) Response times for repairs. (6) Spares holdings. (7) Contact and call-out arrangements.

90

ANNEX B TO CHAPTER 1 OF PART 2 - JSP 770

E-MAIL AND SMS TEXTING
1. The ability to exchange e-mail and/or SMS texts is of major importance to the deployed Service community. Subject to operational constraints, the early provision of e-mail and/or SMS text access is to be accorded priority in the J1 planning process. In most cases e-mail and Internet provision will be accessed through the same terminal and consequently this Annex should be read in conjunction with Annex E – Internet. 2. E-mail may be replaced with SMS texting in remote sites where standard infrastructure provision is not viable e.g. at Forward Operating Bases. The following e-mail and/or SMS texting facilities should be provided, at public expense, where the theatre infrastructure and environment allow: a. b. Facility to send and receive e-mail and/or SMS texts. Facility to compose and print e-mail off-line.55

c. E-mail access or TEXTLINK terminals should be provided on a planning ratio of at least one terminal to 40 personnel (1:40). Where a location has an expectation of providing a surge capability to support manoeuvre forces, e-mail or SMS texting facilities are to be provided in commensurate numbers. d. Because of the lack of opportunity to concentrate e-mail or SMS text access at base infrastructure sites for early entry forces, these minimum ratios will be breached from time to time when an early entry pack is used as the solution to support welfare activity in very immature theatres. 3. The following protocols are to be observed: a. Personal privacy of incoming and outgoing e-mail and SMS texts is to be maintained where possible and practical. b. Where e-mail facilities are accessed alongside Internet provision the terminals are to be regulated as detailed in Annex E. 4. Where the theatre infrastructure and environment allow, e-mail and/or SMS text facilities are to be provided during the Initial Phase of the operation (normally up to one month in theatre), or sooner if the situation allows and by

55

Terminals providing the on-line facility will be supported and maintained by the contractor.

91

mobile means if necessary. The aim is to provide full provision of e-mail and/or SMS text facilities by the time the operation reaches the Follow-on Phase (normally over one month in theatre).

92

ANNEX C TO CHAPTER 1 OF PART 2 - JSP 770

FORCES MAIL
1. The timely and efficient delivery of mail is one of the most important aspect of the DWP(O) and is to be given prime consideration during operational planning. Wherever possible, Forces Mail facilities are to be provided at the commencement of deployment. LETTERS AND PACKETS 2. As soon as the operational and logistical environment allow, letters and packets under 2 kgs should be despatched from BFPO London to the operational theatre. Facilities for parcels (those items over 2 kgs) may be made available during the Sustained Phase, subject to individual operational circumstances. 3. Personnel in receipt of the DWP(O) are eligible for the following: a. Free Forces Air Letters (FFALs). (1) Facility to send and receive FFALs (blueys) at public expense for the duration of their deployment. For Foreign and Commonwealth personnel serving with HM Forces, the facility only to send FFALs to their country of origin. (2) Facility for families and friends to send and receive FFALs at public expense for the duration of the Service persons deployment56. b. Concessionary Packet and Parcel Rates. Where the logistical environment is capable of sustaining the BFPO service (by either air or sea) packets or parcels may be sent from families or friends to Service personnel, or vice versa, at the Forces Concessionary Parcel Rate for the duration of the deployment. Details of this rate can be obtained from local Post Offices; in essence, it is of similar cost to that of sending the packet or parcel within the UK. Restrictions may be imposed on the postal service offered and the type, weight or volume of goods to be sent by post. This will be based on the nature of the deployment and the available Lines of Communication.

56

The sending of FFALs to an operational theatre at public expense is not available from outside the UK or at a

location where a BFPO is not established.

93

c. Free Pre-Christmas Mail Service. Facility for family and friends to send letters, cards or packets up to 2 kgs in weight over a 4-week period prior to Christmas (dates to be confirmed annually by BFPO). 4. The following services are to be provided: a. An in-theatre delivery system that enables all personnel to receive mail. b. A customer care facility including helpline (provided by BFPO).

c. Information leaflets describing the facilities that are available through the BFPO – obtainable at local Post Offices. 5. The importance of timely mail delivery to the maintenance of morale must not be underestimated. The flow and delivery of mail is to be kept under close review and commanders are to be made aware of any significant delays so that personnel can be kept informed. For Joint operations, the responsibility for planning lies with PJHQ, to coordinate with BFPO, DE&S and LAND; an SO1 (augmentee) from PCS will provide advice and direction to PJHQ J1/J4. ELECTRONIC BLUEY/FORCES POSTCARD/PHOTO BLUEY/FAX BLUEY 6. The electronic bluey (e-bluey), Forces Postcard, photo bluey and fax bluey are fast and flexible methods of delivering mail to and from the operational area. Where the infrastructure and operational situation allow, personnel in receipt of the DWP(O) should be provided with the following 57: a. Facility to write and send e-blueys, Forces Postcards and fax blueys, at public expense, for the duration of their deployment. Foreign and Commonwealth personnel serving with HM Forces can send ebluey to their country of origin. Facility to receive e-blueys and photo blueys at public expense, for the duration of their deployment. 7. Where possible the following services should be provided:

A delivery system that allows for an e-bluey, Forces Postcard, photo bluey or fax bluey to be delivered within 24 hours of being printed. A customer care facility including helpline and a BFPO website. 8. The following protocols are to be observed:

57

Where e-bluey, fax bluey, photo bluey and Forces Postcard services are not provided on board ship, email connectivity is normally available. E-bluey and fax bluey facilities should be provided on troop carrying ships whenever possible.

94

a. All contractor owned equipment is to be accounted for and treated appropriately by unit administrative staff. b. E-bluey, Forces Postcard, photo bluey and fax bluey equipment is not robust. A dust free environment will be required, shielded from extremes of temperature, supported by a good quality telephone connection and access to a reliable power supply. These factors are to be taken into account during the J1/J4 planning process. 9. Where the theatre infrastructure and environment allow, e-bluey/Forces Postcard facilities are to be provided as soon and as widely as possible and at the latest, within the Initial Phase of the operation.

95

ANNEX D TO CHAPTER 1 OF PART 2 - JSP 770

AUDIO VISUAL
1. TV Facilities. Personnel in receipt of the DWP(O) will be eligible for the following at public expense: a. During the Initial Phase of an operation and where practical, one TV, one DVD player, 10 DVDs, one gaming machine and 2 video games will be issued for every 30 personnel. Thereafter either DVDs or video games will be issued on a planning ratio of one per 50 personnel (1:50) per month. b. BFBS live TV broadcasting will be provided during the Initial Phase of an operation subject to: approved broadcasting rights; a practical and technically possible cost effective solution; where the operational and environmental situation allows. SSVC will provide either BFBS TV Channels 1 or 2 or both. Where Digital Terrestrial Television (DTT) transmissions are available, DTT set-top boxes will be provided for DWP(O) TVs at public expense. At sea, TV over Military Satellite (TOMS) or stabilised satellite TV receivers will be capable of receiving BFBS broadcasts whilst under a satellite footprint. Where BFBS live broadcasting cannot be provided, a BFBS DVD package will be provided. c. Large screen TVs or small projectors capable of projecting TV/DVD may be utilised for communal areas supporting large personnel numbers, e.g. field accommodation that does not support the provision of TVs and DVD players at the authorised ratios. Commanders are to consider the risk from indirect fire when planning such facilities. 2. Gaming Stations. Gaming Stations that are capable of playing both DVDs and computer games can be supplied, in lieu of DVD players. Computer games may be supplied in lieu of DVDs at the same ratio. 3. Radio Facilities. Personnel in receipt of the DWP(O) will be eligible for the following: a. One radio (capable of receiving the BBC World Service or BFBS transmissions) on a planning ratio of one for every 20 personnel deployed (1:20). Radios are to be provided during the Build-Up Phase of the operation. Speakers and amplifiers may be utilised for communal areas supporting large numbers of personnel.

96

b. BFBS live radio broadcasting (Channel 1 and 2) will be provided from the Initial Phase of an operation subject to the following: approved broadcasting rights; a practical and technically possible and cost effective solution; and if the operational situation allows. c. When the deployed force includes Gurkhas, consideration should be given to radio transmissions in Gurkhali. 4. Facilities On Board Ship. For personnel deployed afloat the provision of equipment to receive TV and radio transmissions is dependent on the technical feasibility of installing such facilities on board. Wherever possible, TV and radio facilities should be provided comparable to those ashore. Where live radio facilities cannot be sustained for the majority of a deployment, alternative means of entertainment may be provided at CINCFLEET‟s discretion. The purchase of MP3 players with docking stations can be considered but these are to be provided no more frequently than once every 3 years per ship/submarine at a ratio no greater than one player and dock per mess/messdeck (to include EMF when embarked).

97

ANNEX E TO CHAPTER 1 OF PART 2 - JSP 770

INTERNET
1. Access to the Internet is of growing importance to the deployed Service community. Subject to the operational conditions, the early provision of Internet access is to be accorded priority in the J1 planning process. In most cases internet and e-mail provision will be accessed through the same terminal and consequently this Annex should be read in conjunction with Annex B – E-mail and SMS Texting. The Internet may also be available to personnel with access to IGS terminals; however, the provision and use of IGS terminals is an operational matter outside the scope of DWS policy. 2. Publicly provided Internet facilities may be supplemented, where operational circumstances allow, by additional internet provision from commercial sources e.g. pay-per-use WiFi at EFI establishments. In such circumstances the decision to provide the service will be a commercial one to be taken by the service provider. However, contracts with commercial providers are not to be entered into without the authority of AD Ops, DCDS(Pers) Strat OM, who will consult with the Global Communications Services (GCS) IPT to ensure that the proposals do not breach the Skynet 5 exclusivity clause secured by the contractor for the provision of Beyond Line of Sight communications to the MoD58. 3. Formal provision of DWP services must be subject to appropriate constraints, such as filtering of access to internet sites. These constraints are not appropriate where the service is offered as a private arrangement between a supplier and a Service person; of course, appropriate national laws apply to both parties. On operations overseas other constraints, primarily security, must be applied consistently regardless of whether facilities are MoD or privately funded. Local commanders must understand and arrange that non-Operational communications can be managed e.g. for Op MINIMISE. 4. The following Internet facilities should be provided, at public expense, where the infrastructure and environment allow: a. Access to Internet sites e.g. banking, travel agents, shopping and education. b. Internet access terminals should be provided on a planning ratio of one terminal to 50 personnel (1:50). Remote sites housing more than 20 personnel should, where possible, have access to an Internet terminal. Where a location has an expectation of providing a surge

58

2005DIN04-017 dated Apr 05.

98

capability to support manoeuvre forces, Internet facilities are to be provided at a commensurate quantity. c. Because of the lack of opportunity to provide Internet access at base infrastructure sites for early entry forces it is likely that early entry facilities will deliver basic communications only, i.e. the ability to send and receive e-mails only and not the ability to access the Internet. 5. The following protocols are to be observed: a. Enduring theatres, where services are not made available from the central contract59, are to appoint a Welfare Internet System Manager, either as a duty for a suitably skilled Service person, or where appropriate, by employing a locally employed contractor (LEC) 60. Theatre J1 staff are to submit the request to PJHQ/FLCs for approval. Theatres whose communications are provided by contract will have dedicated technical support provided as part of that contract. b. All systems are to have a firewall installed and be virus protected. c. User Security Instructions are to be issued for each Internet access terminal. Security Instructions are to state that information accessed via the Internet is not to be above the classification of UNCLASSIFIED. Additionally, a „generic‟ Internet barring template is to be agreed and actioned by PJHQ J1 in consultation with GCS IPT. It is a local management responsibility to issue and enforce SyOps. d. Internet monitoring and content barring software is to be installed to reflect local legal, cultural and religious sensitivities. Theatre orders are to be put in place covering the prohibition of personnel from attempting to access sites displaying all types of pornography. All personnel are to be briefed that they face potential disciplinary or administrative action should they contravene these orders. 6. Where the theatre infrastructure and environment allow, Internet facilities are to be provided during the Initial Phase of the operation (normally up to one month in theatre), or sooner if the situation allows and by mobile means if necessary. The aim is to provide full provision of Internet facilities by the time the operation reaches the Follow-on Phase (normally over one month in theatre).

59

Currently provided by Paradigm Services Ltd. The appointment of a LEC is to take account of local security and social conditions.

60

99

ANNEX F TO CHAPTER 1 OF PART 2 - JSP 770

PRINTED MATTER AND BOARD GAMES
1. The provision of newspapers is an important welfare enabler as it keeps deployed personnel up to date with domestic and international news, and helps them to keep in touch with events at home. The provision of magazines, books and board games enables Service personnel to relax off duty. 2. Personnel in receipt of the DWP(O) will be eligible for the following at public expense: a. selection of newspapers on a planning ratio of one newspaper per 10 personnel per day. b. A selection of magazines on a planning ratio of one magazine per 5 personnel per month. c. A selection of books on a planning ratio of one book per 4 personnel per month. Books and board games are interchangeable and are provided by the Army Library Service61, via J1 staffs at PJHQ. Direction on the proportion of books to board games will be provided by the implementing authority (i.e. PJHQ or FLCs) on a case-by-case basis. 3. Where theatre logistics allow, newspapers, magazines and books are to be provided from the onset of the operation. Where the delivery of newspapers in a timely manner is not practicable, commanders should investigate local arrangements such as downloading and printing news summaries from the Internet. 4. The selection of newspapers, magazines and books is to take into account the Host Nation‟s cultural and religious sensitivities. Additionally, the provision of newspapers should be arranged to reflect the composition of the force; for instance Gurkha newspapers should be provided where appropriate.

61

The Army Library Service can also provide audio books and music tapes, in lieu of books.

100

ANNEX G TO CHAPTER 1 OF PART 2 - JSP 770

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
1. Live entertainment comprises Combined Services Entertainment (CSE) shows and personality visits („grip and grins‟). These have proved extremely popular with Service personnel and act as a de-stressor and morale booster and can aid in the relief from the operational tempo. 2 Where possible62, personnel in receipt of the DWP(O) will be eligible for one live entertainment show and one personality visit every 6 months, once the operation is in the follow-on/sustained phase, or sooner on the advice of the Jt Comd. Live entertainment shows and personality visits will only take place once there is a secure environment and the appropriate supporting infrastructure. The JFLogC/NSE J1 staffs are responsible for proposing to PJHQ the time window in which either a CSE show or a personality visit should take place. 3. CSE show formats may vary, however a broad variety of acts should be available to provide for as many tastes as possible. Musicians, ventriloquists, comedians, dancers and illusionists are all acceptable forms of entertainment but must take into account any local cultural sensitivities. 4. For PJHQ led operations, a generic Statement of Requirement, the responsibilities of the Designated Officer nominated to coordinate such activities and a summary of the contractual responsibilities of the contractor contained within the contract, can be found in the PJHQ J1 OWP Deployed Operating Instructions. For a Joint operation, PJHQ is the primary point of contact for SSVC (CSE) until Direct Liaison Authorised (DIRLAUTH) is authorised once a CSE show has been initiated. 5. Seagoing units will normally only be eligible for a CSE Show/personality visit once deployed from the UK for a period in excess of 4 months. Where possible and when the unit‟s programme allows, ships‟ companies/crews/EMF should be invited to attend pre-planned CSE events (e.g. HMS ENDURANCE/Mount Pleasant).

62

Due to cultural differences, diplomatic clearance and operational and environmental limitations, it may not always be possible to provide live entertainment.

101

ANNEX H TO CHAPTER 1 OF PART 2 - JSP 770

OPERATIONAL FITNESS EQUIPMENT (OFE)
1. The importance of regular physical exercise and recreation when deployed on operations cannot be overstated. Not only does this ensure that Service personnel maintain a level of combat/operational fitness, it will also enable them to retain fitness to help prepare them for their single-Service basic physical fitness tests and assessments. OFE also acts as an important de-stressor through the provision of equipment for recreational activities. 2. Personnel in receipt of the DWP(O) are to be provided with OFE packs at public expense. Fitness equipment packs are bespoke packages designed for the specific conditions of the deployment. Their content and size will be dependent on the following factors: (1) (2) (3) (4) The size of the force. The number of dispersed locations. How the force is deployed. The local conditions and facilities available.

3. During the Initial Phase of an operation it is imperative that units deploy with lightweight OFE packs that contain basic items, are easily transportable and do not require a power source (e.g. footballs and baseball sets). Once the operation has reached the Sustained Phase, with electrical power and appropriate supporting facilities available, items should include running machines, rowing machines, exercise bikes and multi-gym apparatus. The senior in-theatre Physical and Adventurous Training Subject Matter Expert, in liaison with theatre Logistic Support staff, is to advise on distribution of OFE pending theatre circumstances, co-ordinate maintenance provision and enforce health and safety requirements. 4. The Army (HQ LAND SO2 Indiv Trg (PAT)) is the lead Service for the provision of OFE and will establish procedures to enable the early provision of basic OFE packs63. Once in the Sustained Phase, HQ LAND is to provide bespoke solutions appropriate to the operation. In delivering OFE, HQ LAND is to ensure the effective management of all equipment, including effective equipment maintenance and repair, reserve stocks and a repair facility.

63

Liaison will be required between HQ LAND (SO2 Indiv Trg (PAT)) and FLEET (N1 PAT) to ensure that OFE for embarked forces deploying to an operational theatre in maritime units are properly catered for from the date of embarkation.

102

ANNEX I TO CHAPTER 1 OF PART 2 - JSP 770

SHOPS
1. A key welfare enabler for deployed Service personnel is the ability to purchase personal items that are not provided at public expense or available locally. MoD requires NAAFI to provide canteen and bulk issue services through the Expeditionary Forces Institutes (EFI) to the Armed Forces involved in operations, war and major exercise deployments, and the Naval Canteen Service (NCS) provided on some HM Ships. 2. The MoD‟s core requirements64 for NAAFI services in operational theatres and on board ship are for the timely and sustained provision of the following key items: (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) Toiletries. Confectionery. Cigarettes/tobacco products. Refreshments. Reading and writing material. Greeting cards/flower delivery service. Small electrical items e.g. personal entertainment/games.

(8) Other, non-specified items as the military situation dictates. 3. Personnel in receipt of the DWP(O) are to be provided with the facility to purchase the items identified as the MoD‟s core requirements. This list can be tailored, in conjunction with local J1 staffs, to meet the specific needs of deployed personnel. 4. NCS, where practical, will provide retail facilities support throughout a ship‟s deployment. EFI will provide retail facilities as soon as is logistically possible, with the overall aim of establishing a permanent service where possible. PJHQ J1/J4 staffs are to engage with EFI, at the earliest opportunity, to ensure that EFI equipment and personnel are allocated due priority on the Joint Force Element Table. During the Initial Phase, packs containing the MoD‟s core requirement items are to be available for

64 MOD Core Requirements of NAAFI Services – Principles and Requirements of NAAFI – SPB Paper 11/99

.

103

distribution and sale through the military supply system. This should be followed by the deployment of EFI staff to operate from temporary/mobile facilities until more permanent premises are provided. As the operation moves into subsequent phases EFI should endeavour to expand its product range. This might include the provision of a combined shop and leisure facilities. 5. NAAFI/EFI is the preferred supplier of retail and canteen facilities. The storage and delivery of EFI stock is a J4 responsibility (monitored by J1) and J4 provided infrastructure and utilities are required to provide suitable locations from which EFI can operate. In recognition of these subsidies, EFI prices for essential products in operational theatres will be matched to those found on the Tesco.com website. Prices for other products will be comparable to those charged by NAAFI in Germany.

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ANNEX J TO CHAPTER 1 OF PART 2 - JSP 770

LAUNDRY AND SHOWER FACILITIES
1. DWS includes provision to cater for the physiological needs of deployed Service personnel. Fundamental to this is the requirement to provide a regular and reliable laundry service and regular availability of shower facilities during all deployment phases. This will ensure both the personal hygiene and morale of Service personnel is maintained. 2. The provision of laundry and shower facilities is a J4 responsibility but delivery is to be monitored by J1 staff given the link between effective delivery and morale65. These services are normally provided, in the initial phases of a land-based operation, by RLC Mobile Bath Units. Subsequently they may be provided through contractor supported facilities. LAUNDRY 3. Personnel in receipt of the DWP(O) and deployed on land will be eligible for a 24 hour turn-around (where available) laundry of military and non-uniform clothing, towels and bedding at public expense, for the duration of their deployment. 4. Personnel in receipt of the DWP(O) and deployed aboard a ship/submarine will be eligible for the following: a. A monthly laundry allowance per month, under single-Service (Royal Navy) arrangements, in ships that have a contracted laundry facility. b. The use of laundry facilities, at public expense, in submarines and ships that do not have a contracted laundry service. c. Laundry facilities are to be provided from the onset of the operation or qualifying exercise. SHOWERS 5. Where possible, daily permanent shower facilities should be provided from the onset of an operation. Until permanent facilities have been provided, personnel in receipt of the DWP(O) should be issued with individual shower bags as part of the Early Entry Pack. .

65

The Fleet Laundry Contract for RN Major Warships is managed by FLEET N1 Pers Ops.

105

ANNEX K TO CHAPTER 1 OF PART 2 - JSP 770

FAMILY WELFARE GRANT
INTRODUCTION 1. The Family Welfare Grant is designed to assist Home Units in providing welfare support to families of Service personnel deployed on operations66. ELIGIBILITY 2. The Family Welfare Grant is available to commanders or their representatives at Home/Parent Units with at least 5 personnel deployed on operations, exercises or deployments for which the DWP(O) has been authorised. Home/Parent Units are defined as the base port, garrison, barracks, station or unit from which the Service person has been deployed. This would normally be the location where Service Families Accommodation (SFA) is located or where other forms of welfare support are available to families. This definition includes other organisations that have prime responsibility for deployed personnel, including Reserves. IMPLEMENTATION 3. Commanding Officers or their representatives are authorised to claim £1.00 per week for each of their deployed Service personnel who are in receipt of DWP(O) support. The chain of command is to determine how the payment should be made and are authorised to use this scheme in order to support activities at the home base that enhance communication or relieve hardships that have been generated by the deployment. 4. Commanding Officers at qualifying Home/Parent Units are also authorised to continue claiming Family Welfare Grant monies for operational casualties who are hospitalised outside of operational theatres. This eligibility will remain for the duration that a Service person remains an in-patient at either a hospital or a rehabilitation unit. 5. Commanding Officers may exercise judgement in determining the priorities for family welfare support. However, they will be required to ensure that expenditure is within the spirit of this policy and consistent with current guidance on financial propriety and regularity67. Examples of acceptable expenditure are:

66 67

D/SP Pol/2/45 dated 25 Apr 03. JSP 462 and the advice of BLB Budget Managers.

106

a. Provision of communications equipment (Internet facilities and telephone lines) for HIVEs and Community Centres. b. Meeting the cost of extended Community/Welfare communications (Internet line usage to the deployment operation area). c. Assistance towards the costs of producing and posting welfare information (leaflets, flyers and updates). e. Extension of HIVE opening hours.

f. Occasional provision of transport for attendance at briefings/meetings. g. Meeting costs of occasional childrens activities (e.g. provision of a crèche during family briefings/meetings). h. Provision of non-alcoholic refreshments at unit organised briefings/meetings related to the deployment. 6. Units should pay the allowance in recompense for a specific welfare activity. The invoice should be charged to or split between operation names and it is recommended that a nominal roll of those members of the Unit deployed should be retained with the invoice. Single Service advice is available from FLEET (NLM WS SO SO2 - 9380 27255), HQ AG (PS4(A) 94344 5953) and HQ AIR (DACOS CS - 95221 5640).

107

ANNEX L TO CHAPTER 1 OF PART 2 - JSP 770

FAMILIES CONCESSIONARY TRAVEL ALLOWANCES
1. A number of key welfare enablers have been identified by deployed personnel as being of great importance when separated from their families. One of those enablers was the ability for the families of Service personnel deployed on operations for extended periods to stay in contact with their parents, parents-in-law or their nominated NOK/Emergency Contact (EC). 2. The entitlement to Concessionary Travel68 for families of married accompanied Service personnel who are deployed on operations, exercises or deployments that attract the DWP(O), from overseas bases and from the UK is to be assessed at unit level at the start of the deployment/detachment. The assessment is to be based on the Service person‟s expected duration of deployment. This will be known as the „expected entitlement‟ and should be notified to the accompanying spouse with a warning that any change in the duration of the Service person‟s detachment could lead to an entitlement change. The concessionary travel entitlement is as follows: a. Service Personnel Stationed in the UK69. Families of married accompanied personnel stationed in the UK but deployed for 4 months or more are entitled to 2 extra warrants (or Motor Mileage Allowance (MMA) at the Converted Leave Rate (CLR) in lieu). This is to enable their families to visit their parents, parents-in-law or nominated NOK/EC in the UK. b. Service Personnel Stationed Overseas. The families of married accompanied personnel stationed overseas but deployed on operations elsewhere overseas for 4 months or more, will be eligible to the following number of return journeys to the UK at public expense provided the family remain at the overseas duty station other than for these eligible journeys: (1) (2) (3) (4) A projected tour of 4-6 months - one return journey. A projected tour of 6-9 months - 2 return journeys. A projected tour of 9-12 months - 3 return journeys. A projected tour of 12 months or more - 4 return journeys.

68 69

The sponsor for this policy is AD SP Pol Allces 1. Authority is contained in JSP 752, Chapter 4, paragraph 04.1139. Not applicable to Seagoers for whom single Service rules apply.

108

c. Shortened Operational Deployments. Should the expected duration of deployment be shortened by an early return to the overseas duty station, the „actual entitlement‟ to Concessionary Travel for Families may be less than the „expected entitlement‟, calculated at the start of the operation in accordance with Para 2 above. In these circumstances: (1) Any uncompleted journey remaining within the „actual entitlement‟ may continue. (2) Any completed journey within the „expected entitlement‟ but over and above the „actual entitlement‟ will be treated as entitled. No recovery action is to be taken. (3) Any journey, which has not been embarked upon, within the „expected entitlement‟ but over and above the „actual entitlement‟ booked in good faith prior to the announcement of the early return of the Service person from the operation, will no longer be funded from the public purse. The family may choose to continue with the journey at private expense. However, if cancelled, any cancellation costs will be met at public expense. (4) Any journey within the „expected entitlement‟ but over and above the „actual entitlement‟, booked after the announcement of the early return of the Service person from the operation is to be at personal expense and at no cost to the public. The public purse will not cover cancellation or any other costs. d. Transfer of Entitlement. Any or all of the entitled family journeys may be transferred to up to 2 close relatives for reverse travel from the UK. e. Travel to the Airhead. Return travel at public expense (warrant or MMA at CLR) from the overseas base to the overseas airhead is authorised for all Concessionary Travel for Families. Associated subsistence allowance or sleeper costs for these journeys are not authorised. f. Use of Eurostar, Eurotunnel and Sea Ferry Services. Families based in NW Europe are authorised to use sea, or subsurface, means as an alternative to reliance on Air Trooping (AT) flights. The following principles are to apply: (1) Travel from the overseas base in NW Europe to Eurostar and Eurotunnel rail stations or sea ports is at public expense (warrant or MMA at CLR). (2) Eurostar, Eurotunnel or ferry travel is to be in standard class. Reimbursement of fares is to be on an actuals basis. The imposition of any criteria relating to times of travel (and thus

109

price of ticket) may, through FLC authorities, be delegated to unit level. (3) Travel between the place of entry to the UK (i.e. Ashford, London Waterloo or the Channel ports) and the final destination in the UK is authorised at public expense (warrant or MMA at CLR). The notional cost of an AT flight cannot be claimed in conjunction with reimbursement of Eurostar, Eurotunnel or ferry costs. g. Use of Civil Air. The use of civil air as an alternative to the AT is authorised either where no AT service is provided from the Theatre in which the family is based or where it can be proved that civil air would be demonstrably cheaper for the return journey, when the whole journey is taken into account. In assessing the comparative costs of the journey by civil air against the notional AT journey the AT rates published each Jun in the Rates of Entitlement for Service Allowances should be used. The cost comparison is to be made between the total cost of the following journeys: (1) From the duty overseas base to the overseas civilian airport (cost of warrant or MMA at CLR), plus the actual civil air cost, plus the cost of travel from the civilian airport of arrival in UK to the final destination in the UK (cost of warrant or MMA at CLR) and the return. against (2) From the duty overseas base to the overseas AT departure airport (cost of warrant or MMA at CLR), plus the notional cost of the AT flight from that Theatre (see above), plus the cost of travel from London to the final destination in the UK (cost of warrant or MMA at CLR) and the return. Where the total return journey cost at (1) is less than (2) use of civil air may be authorised. Where (1) is greater than (2), use of civil air may be made but the total entitlement is to be capped at the figure at (2). h. Travel within UK. Return travel at public expense (warrant or MMA at CLR) between the place of entry to the UK (for those arriving from overseas) or the UK duty station (for those based in the UK) and the final destination in the UK is authorised for all Concessionary Travel of Families. Associated subsistence allowance or sleeper costs for these journeys are not authorised. i. Road Travel Under Other Arrangements. Concessionary flight entitlements may be converted to car journeys with MMA at CLR plus the notional cost of an AT flight. The notional cost of AT flights cannot, however, be claimed in conjunction with the reimbursement of Eurostar, Eurotunnel or ferry costs.

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3. Additional Welfare Arrangements for Personnel Deployed for 6 Months or More. Personnel deployed for 6 months or more are also entitled to transfer of the balance of any untaken Get You Home (Early Years) entitlement to the spouse.

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Chapter 2 - WELFARE PROVISION FOR OPERATIONAL DEPLOYMENTS WITHIN THE UK
Section 1 - Background 2301 UK-based operations are primarily focussed on Military Aid to the Civil Authority (MACA) which includes: a. b. c. Military Aid to the Civil Power (MACP)70. Military Aid to Other Government Departments (MAGD)71. Military Aid to the Civil Community (MACC)72.

Op TELIC has also identified a need to provide DWS for those Service personnel deployed in the UK in support of overseas operations. Section 2 - Eligibility Criteria 2302 The policy is designed for those Service personnel (i.e. Regular and Reserve) who are deployed away from their base location in Formed and Non-Formed Units73 in support of: a. A MACA operation which has: (1) (2) An operational name; Is supported by a CDS directive and/or MOD Ministerial authorisation; Is expected to last for 7 days or more from the date of deployment or pre-training.

(3)

Or

70

Support to the Civil Power in the maintenance of law, order and public safety (e.g. support to counter terrorism

opereations).
71

Assistance on urgent work of national importance or in maintaining supplies/essential services e.g. Op FRESCO

(provision of fire service support).
72

Provision of unarmed military assistance in the event of a localised natural disaster or major incident e.g. severe

flooding.
73

This includes augmentees who will by and large „bulge‟ an existing establishment infrastructure.

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b. Those Service personnel deployed away from their base unit in support of an overseas operation (for which DWP(O) is authorised and is supported by a CDS directive) but remain in the UK. Section 3 - DWP(UK) Provision 2303 DWP(UK) policy mirrors the principle adopted in the DWP(O) for overseas operations in that welfare support should be publicly funded. However, unlike the DWP(O), which by and large requires an infrastructure to be put in place e.g. telephones, internet, post, recreational facilities etc, DWP(UK) aims to utilise the infrastructure of the UK. 2304 UK operations by their nature are often reactive and can be called at short-notice. Therefore, the strategy adopted for Integrated Contingency Plans (ICP) operational welfare is to provide a policy that can be quickly implemented and allow commanders the flexibility to effect welfare support needs. 2305 The policy focuses on 3 means of support: a. Available Allowances. The use of appropriate and existing personal allowances to meet the needs of deployed personnel e.g. LSA. Personnel will be eligible for allowances, subject to the normal eligibility rules contained in JSP 752, from day one of their pre-deployment training or deployment for an operation. b. Life Support. Identifying and delivering a mechanism that will meet the needs of „life support74‟ facilities early in the operation. This will depend on various operation specific parameters (such as whether military sources are available or the facility needs to be contractually out-sourced) and; c. The Welfare Grant. (1) To provide welfare equipment via a publicly funded welfare grant. This grant provides a maximum of £5 per week (or part thereof) per eligible Service person75. It is to be paid collectively (i.e. not to the individual) and is to be available from day one of the operation or when pre-operation training commences. (2) Justification for its need, use and amount is to be decided by the Jt Comd based on the circumstances on the ground and

74

Identified as hot meals, showers, laundry, accommodation and operation-essential clothing. Where appropriate and during the initial phase of an operation, consideration should be given to providing up to 3

75

weeks‟ worth of welfare grant in advance to enable welfare equipments to be purchased .

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sustaining operational effectiveness76. Guiding principles on accounting for welfare equipments are at Annex A. A table setting out planning guidance for staff involved in the delivery of welfare provision for UK operations is at Annex B. 2306 The authority for payment of the Welfare Grant and where appropriate, the potential provision for out-sourced „life support‟ requirements is given by this policy. The Jt Comd (UK)‟s J1 staff in consultation with the single Service allowance policy divisions will propose the appropriate allowances. The allowance package will then be forwarded from the Jt Comd J1 staff to SP Pol P and A77 for approval as soon as possible and ideally during the preoperation planning phase. For those deployed in UK in support of overseas operations, discussions between SP Pol P and A, PJHQ and the single Services will determine appropriate allowances. Section 4 - Funding 2307 In the case of MACA operations, subject to HM Treasury‟s (HMT) agreement having been secured that welfare support should be publicly funded, MoD Fin Pol would view Welfare Support as forming part of the legitimate costs chargeable to a MACA operation. That being the case, where MoD Fin Pol acts as the focal point for coordination of costs and their presentation to the OGD, MoD Fin Pol would expect to issue at an early stage, and wherever possible before an operation goes „live‟, a finance instruction to authorise the capture and reporting of such costs applicable to the operation concerned. Operations carried out under the terms of Conflict Prevention are dealt with by DGRP DP+A and instructions issued accordingly. 2308 Payment for the provision of welfare support will be determined by the type of operation: a. MACA Operations. (1) A legitimate charge will be made by MoD Fin Pol to the OGD that has requested support. Initially, all costs associated with assistance provided under the terms of a MACA operation must lie where they fall. Subject to securing HMT approval that welfare support should be publicly funded, and where MoD Fin Pol acts as the focal point for coordination of costs and their presentation to the OGD, any such costs reported will, subject to their proper scrutiny and validation, be included as a legitimate

76

Individuals deployed on operations may find themselves spending long hours on duty or standing-by to take part in

activity. There is a requirement to provide welfare equipment (such as TVs and DVDs) to relieve boredom during these periods.
77

SP Pol Allces 1.

114

charge to the operation and reimbursement sought by MoD Fin Pol through the Financial Management Shared Service Centre (FMSSC). (2) At the outset of any MACA Operation, the OGD requesting assistance is to be informed that MoD (CT & UK Ops) will obtain Ministerial authority for assistance given at either the full, marginal or waived costs in accordance with JSP 36878. Because this is consistent with HMT rules there is no need to negotiate the charges to be levied in detail. That said, it will be vital for the customer OGD to note what charges will be made e.g. if applicable the welfare grant and allowances, and agree ownership and subsequent disposal of welfare equipment. (3) The full cost includes the basic salaries of the personnel deployed on the operation plus any other costs that arise as a direct result of the assistance given. The marginal cost rate excludes personnel salaries. (4) Overseas-led Operations. Costs will be charged to the Operation via the Conflict Prevention Fund or the Treasury Reserve as appropriate. Section 5 - Managing Expectation 2309 The aim, wherever possible, is to implement DWP(UK) at the start of an operation and this is to be considered during the operational planning stage. That said there may be circumstances such as short notice operations which may prohibit or delay welfare support provision at the outset of the operation. Comparisons may also be drawn between welfare support in UK and that provided by the DWP(O) that could lead to frustrations and allow morale to suffer. Commanding Officers on the ground must be fully aware of the need to „manage the expectation‟ of their people regarding welfare support. Section 6 - Evaluation and Review 2310 The Directorate of Operational Capability Lessons Identified process will be used to inform the evaluation and review process. 2311 DCDS(Pers) Strat OM will conduct a biennial evaluation and review of this policy in consultation with SP Pol P and A. Suggested amendments to this policy should be forwarded to AD Ops, DCDS(Pers) Strat OM. Annexes:

78

The MoD Guide to Repayment.

115

A. Tracking and Disposal of Equipment Purchased with the Welfare Grant. B. DWP(UK) Planning Guidance.

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ANNEX A CHAPTER 2 OF PART 2 - JSP 770

TRACKING AND DISPOSAL OF EQUIPMENT PURCHASED WITH THE WELFARE GRANT
1. Introduction. HM Treasury have authorised the £5.00 Welfare Grant per person per week as a legitimate charge to the public purse for the provision of operational welfare support to personnel in support of UK operations or based within the UK in support of overseas operations. The justification for the grant is the requirement to provide equipment to relieve the boredom experienced by personnel during long hours on stand-by or in anticipation of taking part in an activity. MoD Fin Pol is responsible for issuing the instructions for capturing any costs involved and in the recovery action from OGDs. However, the MoD are responsible for maintaining an auditable record of all items purchased, including tracking and final disposal action. 2. Initial Purchase and Tracking Instructions for Welfare Equipment. Authority for purchasing operational welfare equipment is normally delegated to Unit Commanders. As a result equipment may be purchased by a number of people in a number of different locations. This ad-hoc system could lead to equipment going missing and it is therefore essential that a comprehensive and robust recording system is put into place as soon as the either the operation or the training for the operation starts – whichever is the sooner. This process must record any welfare equipment purchased or any recreational trip taken. To ensure records are all encompassing, the Lead Command, which will normally be HQ LAND, is to put a system in place for each operation to track any welfare equipment purchased and detailing instructions for final disposal. Overall control must be maintained at Bde level, however if appropriate, individual Unit Commanders may keep their own separate records. Although the type of records may vary according to the size and type of operation a description of the item purchased, the value of the item, the current location and details of the authorising officer must be included. FINAL DISPOSAL OF EQUIPMENT 3. Although the MoD are not necessarily ultimately responsible for paying for equipment purchased from the Welfare Grant (depending on the type of operation), funding is still coming from the public purse. As a result, it has been agreed by HMT that once the operation is over the MoD can retain any items, which cost less than £5K, purchased using the Welfare Grant; however, the items must continue to be used for general use and not be issued to individuals; public rooms in messes and HIVES etc are ideal locations. The disposal of items costing more than £5K is subject to negotiation with MoD Fin Pol staffs. The Bde are responsible for dividing all 117

items purchased equally between the Services involved in the operation i.e. to FLCs. Items which are beyond economical repair should be written-off. Disposal instructions should be clearly annotated in the equipment register. 4. FLCs are responsible for developing an equitable plan to re-allocate the equipment they receive. They are to maintain a register detailing the equipment they have been allocated and showing final disposal locations. This document is auditable and should be made available if required. The equipment must continue to be used for welfare purposes and must be taken onto stores registers at the final location. FLEET, HQ LAND and HQ AIR must send a return to the nominated point of contact in the Lead Command detailing where equipment has been sent. 5. Once welfare equipment reaches its final destination it may still be recalled at any time in the future to support future UK operations, unless it has reached the end of its useful life. The Lead Command is to ensure they issue instructions to FLEET, HQ LAND and HQ AIR detailing the life of equipment clearly indicating when it is no longer required for future operations.

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ANNEX B TO CHAPTER 2 OF PART 2 - JSP 770

DWP(UK) PLANNING GUIDELINES
Unlike the DWP(O), where the Package‟s continuous deployment on recent operations has maintained staff planning and administrative continuity, the deployment of the DWP(UK) is practiced far less frequently. This may result in the loss of corporate knowledge and delay the effective implementation of DWS. The following guidelines, although not exhaustive, are therefore intended to highlight significant issues that will require consideration when planning for the deployment of the DWP(UK). SER ISSUE (a) (b) 1 Harmonisation SOLUTION (c) There should be an attempt to harmonise tour lengths between the Services during operational planning. REMARKS (d) The difficulties of harmonising tour lengths should not be underestimated. When harmonisation is not possible commanders should ensure that their personnel understand why it could not be achieved. For MAGD operations this grant must be negotiated between the provision provider (ie MoD) and the „customer‟ Department as the grant will be chargeable to the OGD requesting support.

2

Welfare Equipment

The allowance is a maximum of £5.00 per person per week or part week. This welfare fund is to be held centrally by the Operational Commander and used for the provision of welfare equipment such as hire of TVs, DVDs, gaming machines, and purchase of board games, sports equipment and sports facilities. Accounting for Welfare Equipment. The Joint Commander is to put a process in place to administer 119

welfare equipment purchased from the welfare grant so the equipments can be tracked centrally. This will ensure that: a. Their whereabouts is known and can be audited and; b. Allow equipments to be drawn forward for subsequent operations should the need arise. Clearly, availability will depend on any reasonable deterioration of the equipment over time and the practicality of recovering and redeploying welfare assets. When the welfare grant is provided from funding from an OGD, it is vital to agree the disposal intentions. The subject is to be raised and decided during initial negotiations between MoD and the OGD and promulgated. In these cases, the preferred option is that the welfare equipment items purchased will be retained by MoD. If MoD retention is not acceptable to the OGD, then the OGD will need to provide precise details of what types of equipments are to be returned, when and how and at no cost to MoD. Communications. The maintenance of family communications is a key welfare support component for personnel deployed from their home base. The provision of publicly funded telephone calls home is an important support to individual morale. There is a requirement to ensure that individuals deployed on UK operations

3

Telephone Calls

120

can maintain contact with their families. Individuals in receipt of subsistence allowances will also be in receipt of Incidental Expenditure (IE) which includes an allowance for telephone calls. Personnel occupying Service or field accommodation should be awarded IE which includes an element towards the cost of telephone calls. Accommodation Accommodation Standards. Standards The necessity of occupying sub-standard accommodation under field conditions is accepted but minimum standards in respect of personal space, access to lockers, showers etc require addressing. In establishing minimum acceptable standards factors such as shift-working, noise, and Health and Safety for drivers must be taken into account. Personnel will readily accept basic standards early in an operation but will expect to see conditions improve over time. Personnel on UK operations should, whenever possible, be accommodated in Service accommodation. Where this is not available and personnel are assigned sub-standard accommodation the standard of the accommodation should, wherever possible, be improved to meet that set out in JSP 315 Scale 5 - Training Camps. For the first 72 hours of short notice operations lesser standards are acceptable but

4

Laundry contracts must reflect the required turnover of clothing and the turnaround time should not exceed 48 hours. 24 – 36 hours should be the norm.

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all reasonable and practical steps that can be taken to improve living conditions are to be taken. J4 Staff to ensure that all personnel have access to showers once in every 24 hours as a minimum from the commencement of the operation. After 72 hrs: Laundry. Laundry of uniform, underclothes and towels is essential. Personnel on MACA operations are frequently in the public eye and the nature of their duties may necessitate frequent changes of clothing. IE allowance contains an element for Laundry and therefore individuals in receipt of IE will not normally be entitled to Laundry at public expense. Where an operation entails working in particularly dirty or unhygienic conditions the operational commander should request authority to launder working clothing at public expense. Individuals in Service accommodation or in field conditions are to be provided with laundry of uniform, underclothes, towels and bedding at public expense. Drying facilities are to be provided. In inclement conditions this facility may be required in addition to any laundry contract Suitable messing arrangements must be established as quickly as possible and hot food should be available within 24 hours of deployment. Unless operational conditions dictate otherwise, personnel should

5

Messing

122

6

Clothing and Equipment

have access to at least 2 hot meals a day. There may be a requirement for additional scales of clothing and equipment to be issued to individuals carrying out MACA tasks. Additionally, the Services have differing clothing scales. The clothing requirement will, therefore, need to be considered on a Service by Service basis. The Mounting HQ should review the clothing and personnel equipment scales required for the operation.

123