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ARCTIC EXPEDITION TO COME ALIVE

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					ARCTIC EXPEDITION TO COME ALIVE FOR GLOBAL AUDIENCE AT GOOGLE EARTH
London, Monday 2nd February 2009: The Catlin Arctic Survey – which sets out on a 1,000km survey of the floating ice in the Arctic Ocean is to be brought alive to 500 million users of Google Earth it was announced today.

The launch of Ocean in Google Earth has added a new dimension to the popular site and by teaming up with Catlin Arctic Survey it enables users to follow the expedition and plot its progress across the surface of the frozen sea as it heads to the North Geographic Pole.

The new feature will allow users to see information from the exploration team directly from the Arctic Ocean as well as see photos and video. In addition there will be articles by the world's leading scientists, researchers.

Catlin Arctic Survey will be one of the first expeditions to feature in Oceans at Google Earth and is the first to feature the Arctic Ocean sea ice environment.

During the expedition the ice team will be conducting a series of scientific programmes to help understand what is happening to the Arctic Ocean‟s sea ice which scientists believe is disappearing fast. Speaking about the partnership, expedition director Pen Hadow said: “My passion for the Arctic Ocean is matched only by the urgency of our need to understand how it works within the global Earth system. Ocean in Google Earth will enable a global audience to follow the progress and findings of the Catlin Arctic Survey.” For more information contact Rod Macrae on 0781 402 9819 or email rod@catlinarcticsurvey.com

NOTES TO EDITORS: 1. Information, Images and Video - There is comprehensive information about

the Catlin Arctic Survey and a Media Centre at www.catlinarcticsurvey.com. This includes biographies, background and images. To download high-resolution images, visit our media centre on the website. The password is mEt2adRu

All images may be used without charge, on condition that polar photographer Martin Hartley is credited: Martin Hartley – www.martinhartley.com Video footage of the Catlin Arctic Survey team during trials last month and on previous polar expeditions is available on request.

2.

Google Earth combines satellite imagery, maps and the power of Google's

search service to make the world's geographic information easily accessible and useful. There have been over 500 million unique downloads of Google Earth since the product's launch in June, 2005. Google Earth can be downloaded for free at http://earth.google.com/

3.

The Catlin Arctic Survey will set out in late February 2009 from a position off

northern Canada on a route to the North Geographic Pole. More information about the project, the adventure and the science can be found at www.catlinarcticsurvey.com

4.

The Arctic sea ice acts as a „reflective heat shield‟, reflecting 80% of incoming

solar energy, but it is disappearing quickly and the sea water below absorbs energy, resulting in thermal expansion, unpredictable weather patterns and rising sea levels. During the 20th century sea levels rose between 10 and 20 centimetres (IPCC's 3rd Assessment Report), and a further increase of between 20 and 80 centimetres could lead to as many as 300 million people being flooded each year. (Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change) 5. The Arctic sea ice currently covers almost three per cent of the Earth‟s

surface. The permanent central region of the Arctic Ocean‟s ice cover has receded at a rate of up to 10% per decade since 1979 (US National Snow and Ice Data Centre). Last year‟s summer melt saw Arctic sea ice plummet to its lowest level since satellite measurements began. The permanent ice, present year-round, is declining at a rate of at least 300,000 square kilometres (116,000 square miles) per decade (NASA). This is the equivalent to an area the size of the United Kingdom, Italy, or the Philippines and greater than the size of California. 6. Scientific and research organisations engaged with the Catlin Arctic Survey

include: Dept of Applied Mathematics & Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge; Dept of Oceanography, Naval Postgraduate School, US Navy; ICESat

Mission, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA; Met Office, UK; Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Department, University of Alberta. 9. Funders of the Catlin Arctic Survey include: Catlin Group Limited (Title

Sponsor), WWF International, Nokia, Panasonic, European Climate Exchange, Hill & Knowlton, Rix and Kay Solicitors LLP, Triplepoint, Polar Capital Partners, Jenrick CPI, Climate Friendly, Brother, S2 Partnership.