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					ASSESSEE SUPPORT KIT
Northern Territory Human Services Industries

Human Services Training Advisory Council, 2002

Assessee Support Kit
Northern Territory Human Services Industries is a publication of:

Human Services Training Advisory Council GPO Box 1557, Darwin NT 0801 phone (08) 8981 2550 fax (08) 8981 9822 email admin@hstac.com.au web site www.hstac.com.au

Research and writing:
Teams For Tasks Phone: 0419 427 012 Email: graepars@gmail.com

 Human Services Training Advisory Council October 2002

Information in this kit has been gathered from reliable sources and Human Services Training Advisory Council has made strenuous efforts to ensure its accuracy. However, neither Human Services Training Advisory Council nor its consultant make any representations as to the accuracy or correctness of the information contained herein.

CONTENTS
Introduction
Why this kit? A helping hand How the kit is organised

PAGE

1
1 2 3

Part One: Assessee Information
What is assessment? Am I part of the NT Human Services Industries? What if I … ? Will assessment be useful to me?

4
4 6 9 11

Part Two: Assessee Guide
Important Steps Getting your evidence ready When the assessment happens Contact people Notes

13
13 16 20 22 23

Part Three: Support Person Information
Introduction Who is a support person? What does a support person do? What knowledge does a support person need? What skills does a support person need?

24
24 24 25 26 26

Part Four: Sample Competency Standards Part Five: List of Technical Terms

27 29

INTRODUCTION

Why this kit?

assessment of work skills
This kit has been developed by Human Services Training Advisory Council to help people who may be interested in seeking assessment of their work skills for the human services industries. Assessment can enable people to gain recognition for skills developed through previous work and life experience. Successful assessment provides the assessee with credentials (statement’s of attainment or qualifications) that are recognised throughout Australia.

about Human Services Training Advisory Council
Human Services Training Advisory Council is a Training Advisory Council (TAC) for the human services industries including community services, correctional services, health and local government. TACs exist to help their industries to implement the National Training Framework. The framework is designed to make Australian industry more productive and efficient. Assessment is an important part of the framework. If you have opened this kit, there is a good chance that you have already contacted Human Services Training Advisory Council and expressed an interest in assessment. You are free to contact Human Services Training Advisory Council as often as you like, even if you ultimately decide that assessment is not for you. If the cost of long-distance telephone calls is a problem, Human Services Training Advisory Council will accept your reverse charge calls.

Phone: 8981 2550 Fax: 8981 9822 Email: hstac@hstac.com.au 1

Assessee Support Kit

Introduction

A helping hand
Assessment can offer valuable opportunities for people with skills in the human services industries, but assessment is not a pushover. Most assessees will need a helping hand at some stage.

Wherever you come across the helping hand icon in this kit, you will be reminded that Human Services Training Advisory Council is happy to talk with you about any aspect of assessment.

The signpost icon points the way to related information elsewhere in the kit.

This icon is used throughout the kit as a reminder of the benefits of assessment.

Phone: 8981 2550 Fax: 8981 9822 Email: hstac@hstac.com.au 2

Assessee Support Kit

Introduction

How the kit is organised
The kit contains five parts.

Part One — Assessee Information
This part contains background on the assessment process, competency standards, the Northern Territory human services industries, and reasons for seeking assessment.

Part Two — Assessee Guide
This part is a step by step guide to researching, preparing for and participating in assessment.

Part Three — Support Person Information
This part contains information for people who may be requested to provide support to assessees.

Part Four — Sample Competency Standards
This part contains extracts from nationally endorsed competency standards for the human services industries.

Part Five — List of Technical Terms
This part gives meanings of technical terms commonly used in this kit.

Phone: 8981 2550 Fax: 8981 9822 Email: hstac@hstac.com.au 3

PART ONE ASSESSEE INFORMATION

What is assessment?
a nationally recognised process
Assessment is a nationally recognised process in which assessees (candidates for assessment) are assessed against a set of clearly stated performance criteria known as competencies.

leading to nationally recognised credentials
Successful assessees are awarded credentials (statement’s of attainment or qualifications) that are recognised in all states and territories. Such credentials may be useful in obtaining employment, or in advancement in an existing workplace. They may also be useful if you want to move from one industry to another.

Credentials gained through assessment are identical to nationally recognised VET credentials.

equivalent to other post-secondary credentials
Credentials gained through assessment are identical to, and have the same value as, credentials gained through course work or training in Australia's Vocational Education and Training (VET) system (sometimes called TAFE). For example, if you gain a Certificate Level 2 as a result of assessment, it is identical to and has the same value as a Certificate Level 2 gained through a VET or TAFE course.

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Assessee Support Kit

Part One — Assessee Information

based on competencies
Competencies are skills — things you can do — acquired through work experience, life experience or study. If your skills are assessed as matching identified performance criteria within competency standards, you are assessed as competent. If your skills are assessed as not matching the performance criteria, you are assessed as not yet competent. Sets of competencies may appear in the following formats:  industry competency standards
 industry-endorsed requirements (eg. licensing).

To see what competencies look like in written form, turn to 'Part Four — Sample Competency Standards'.

carried out by qualified assessors
Assessments are carried out by qualified assessors (people who have been assessed as competent in accordance with the national assessor competencies). Their key roles include:     conducting the assessment explaining the assessment process to the assessee involving the assessee in discussions about the most appropriate type of evidence to demonstrate the assessee's competence making decisions about the most appropriate type of evidence that can be accepted as valid, reliable and authentic.

Although qualified assessors are experts in assessment processes and techniques, they may need assistance to assess some specialised skills. In such cases, an assessment team may be used. Assessment teams comprise an assessor plus an industry expert familiar with the specialised skills.

includes Recognition of Prior Learning.
Assessment against the sets of competencies called course learning outcomes is often called Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL). RPL is simply one form of assessment. It follows the same rules.

Phone: 8981 2550 Fax: 8981 9822 Email: hstac@hstac.com.au 5

Assessee Support Kit

Part One — Assessee Information

Am I part of the Human Services Industries?
Are your skills, experience or interests relevant to any of the following areas of the community services, correctional services, health and local government industries?

Aged Care Services – Alcohol and Other Drugs Services –

Nursing assistant, support worker, carer, personal care assistant, home care assistant, field officer, care assistant, accommodation support worker, care team leader. Case worker, detoxification worker, family support worker, health education officer, drug and alcohol counsellor, outreach worker, support worker, welfare worker. Ayurvedic lifestyle consultant, shiatsu practitioner, traditional Chinese medicine remedial massager, remedial massager, western herbal medicine practitioner, homoeopathy practitioner, naturopath. Volunteer ambulance officer, community ambulance officer, ambulance officer, intensive care paramedic, mobile intensive care paramedic, station officer, station supervisor, branch manager, team leader, team manager and clinical team leader. Childcare assistant, family day carer, recreation assistant, nanny, youth leader, group leader, special assistant, out of school hours coordinator, service manager, service director. Community development worker, community worker, project worker, neighbourhood centre manager. Community support worker, caseworker, welfare support worker, detoxification officer, outreach officer, cottage parent, case support worker, residential support worker. Custodial officer, probationary officer, youth worker, administrator, coordinator, finance officer, correctional services officer, supervisor. Dental technician, dental prosthetist, dental assistant, dental radiography assistant, oral health educator.

Alternative Health Care Services –

Ambulance Services –

Children’s Services – Community Development Services – Community Services – Correctional Services – Dental Services –

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Assessee Support Kit

Part One — Assessee Information

Disability Services –

Nursing assistant, support worker, carer, personal care assistant, home care assistant, disability support worker, client assistant, school support officer, family support worker, residential aid, disability support officer, personal care giver, lifestyle support officer, job coordinator, assessor, case manager, support facilitator. Case manager, business development consultant, employment consultant, job watching consultant, job search trainer, marketing consultant, new apprenticeship consultant, recruitment officer, training and development consultant. Kitchen hand, food service worker. Therapy assistant, occupational therapy aide, physiotherapy aide, speech pathology aide, nutrition assistant. Cleaner, domestic assistant, hospital assistant, house keeping assistant. Porters, food assistants, wards persons, orderly, personal care worker. Maintenance assistant, janitor, handy person.

Employment Services –

Health Support – (Food Services) Health Support – (Allied Health Services) Health Support – (Cleaning Services) Health Support – (Client/ patient Services) Health Support – (General Maintenance Services) Health Support – (Ground Maintenance Services) Health Support – (Health Pharmacy Services) Health Support – (Laundry Services) Health Support – (Nutrition Services) Health Support – (Operating Theatre Services)

Assist gardener, grounds person.

Pharmacy assistant, pharmacy technician.

Laundry assistant, laundry manager. Diet aide, nutritional assistant.

Theatre orderly, theatre wards person, operation assistant, surgical dresser.

Phone: 8981 2550 Fax: 8981 9822 Email: hstac@hstac.com.au 7

Assessee Support Kit

Part One — Assessee Information

Health Support – (Pathology Services) Health Support – (Sterilization Services) Health Support – (Stores Services) Health Support – (Transport Services) Lifestyle and Leisure Services – Local Government –

Pathology assistant, laboratory aide, special reception assistant.

Sterilizing assistant.

Stores assistant, store person, pharmacy aide. Courier, driver, patient transport officer.

Leisure officer, recreational activities officer, community leisure officer, diversional therapist, day support disability officer, activities officer. Town planners, town clerks, environmental health officer, environmental health worker, administrator, supervisor, service coordinator, community development officer, recreation officer, youth officer, human resource manager, finance officer, parking inspectors, ground maintenance officer, gardener, horticulturalist. Mental health worker, outreach worker, rehabilitation assistant, support worker, welfare worker, health education officer, caseworker. Housing assistant, tenant worker, clerical worker, client services, community housing worker, property worker, housing manager, indigenous housing worker, policy worker, community development worker, senior client services officer, training manager. Telephone counsellors, youth help line, alcohol and other drugs, men’s help line, gay and lesbian help line, domestic violence help line. Juvenile justice youth worker, youth officer, shift team leaders, senior youth worker, juvenile justice officer, section supervisor.

Mental Health Services – Social Housing Services –

Telephone Counselling – Youth Services –

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Assessee Support Kit

Part One — Assessee Information

What if I … ?
am currently employed
It is possible to be assessed in your workplace as part of your job. Some employers have qualified assessors on staff and are very supportive of the assessment process. Other employers may not be so well-informed. Human Services Training Advisory Council may be able to assist in negotiations with your employer.

don’t have access to a workplace
Depending on the skills to be assessed and any equipment required, it may be necessary to have access to a workplace. If you have problems gaining access to a suitable workplace, Human Services Training Advisory Council may be able to assist. Depending on what facilities are needed, you may have to pay some costs.

am a full-time student
Anyone is eligible for assessment, including full-time students. In many cases, assessment can reduce the time taken to complete requirements for postsecondary qualifications.

live out bush
Depending on the skills to be assessed, you may be able to undertake distance assessment. This will involve presenting evidence of your competence to an assessor who is not physically present. Such evidence might be presented in writing or via teleconferencing or video, or in another suitable form.

Assessment is a flexible process that focuses on your skills.

have a disability
Assessment is about what you can do. Depending on the skills to be assessed, evidence of competence can take a variety of forms. If you anticipate difficulties in preparing or presenting your evidence, or in communicating with your assessor, you may seek assistance from a support person.

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Assessee Support Kit

Part One — Assessee Information

speak English as a second language
Assessment is about what you can do. Depending on the skills to be assessed, speaking English as a second language may not be an issue. You may wish to be assisted by a support person or interpreter.

have trouble reading and writing
Assessment is not necessarily based on written materials and written tests. Depending on the skills to be assessed, evidence of your competence may be presented in a workplace demonstration, in oral discussion or question and answer, or via video. You may wish to be assisted by a support person.

am not sure if I have time
Preparing for and completing assessment involves a commitment of time and energy. As you find out more about what’s involved, think about how much time it will take. Weigh this against the benefits a successful assessment might provide.

am not sure if I can afford it
Assessors and facilities used in assessment may need to be paid for. Sometimes employers or other agencies will provide free access to facilities or assessor time. In many circumstances, however, individual assessees will have to make a payment. Human Services Training Advisory Council may be able to help some assessees with strategies for keeping costs to a minimum, or in brokering access to facilities at reasonable cost.

can't find a qualified assessor who is familiar with my work
Human Services Training Advisory Council can assist you with finding an assessor who is familiar with the Northern Territory human services industries. In some cases, the assessor will need to be assisted by an industry expert who is familiar with the skills you use. This is called an assessment team. Human Services Training Advisory Council can locate industry experts to work with qualified assessors in assessment teams.

want a support person to help me
Although he or she cannot do the assessment for you, a support person (sometimes called a mentor or ally) can assist you. Depending on your particular needs, there are many ways in which a support person may be able to help. The most appropriate support person will be someone who knows you and who understands the assessment process. Human Services Training Advisory Council may be able to help you to locate someone suitable.

Phone: 8981 2550 Fax: 8981 9822 Email: hstac@hstac.com.au 10

Assessee Support Kit

Part One — Assessee Information

'Part Two  Assessee Guide' contains information to help you prepare for assessment, including detailed information on evidence. The kit also contains information for support people. It's in 'Part Three  Support Person Information'.

Will assessment be useful to me?
Assessment may be useful if any of the following headings apply to you.

I’m looking for a career change
Some people find assessment useful in helping them to progress within their industry or to move into a new industry. Changes in the workplace often result in people learning and performing skills that were not part of their original job. For example, many people in non-computing occupations acquire high-level computer skills and a strong interest in computers. Assessment can enable people to gain credentials for their new skills.

Do you want some advice on whether assessment can help you? Contact Human Services Training Advisory Council. We will accept reverse charge calls.

I’ve been working for a while but I don’t have any qualifications
Some people acquire skills that are never acknowledged with a qualification. Such skills might be gained on the job or through life experience. Having these skills assessed can result in the award of credentials, which count towards qualifications.

I’m out of the work force and I want to get in
Assessment can play a part in helping people to build up their CVs and confidence to enter or re-enter the work force. Skills gained through previous full-time or other work, volunteer work, or life experience, can often be assessed against employment-related competencies.

I’d like to try out other jobs in my workplace
Assessment can help people to move within their workplace by recognising skills that may not be apparent in their current job, or by recognising their skills in their current job in a way that demonstrates their readiness to take on new challenges.

Phone: 8981 2550 Fax: 8981 9822 Email: hstac@hstac.com.au 11

Assessee Support Kit

Part One — Assessee Information

Assessment can provide unexpected career breakthroughs.

I’m looking for a stepping stone to post-secondary study
Most post-secondary courses have entry requirements. Assessment can help people to meet course entry requirements, providing an alternative to bridging courses.

I’d like to have a nationally recognised credential
Through assessment, people with significant experience and skills may be able to cover all requirements for a nationally recognised credential, such as a certificate or diploma. Where assessment affirms competency in most but not all performance criteria required for a credential, the remaining criteria can be assessed after further training or study.

I’d like to identify gaps in my skills
Some people seek assessment after they have been working in an occupation for a while but believe they have some gaps in their skills. Assessment against competencies may help to locate gaps that can be addressed through formal or informal training.

my industry is introducing new licences or credentials for practitioners
From time to time, industries require practitioners to obtain a new licence or credential. Many practitioners already have most or all of the skills required for the licence or credential and do not want to undertake further training to teach them what they believe they already know. Assessment provides a way of checking practitioner competencies against licence or credential requirements and identifying any gaps.

assessment is easy to access in my workplace
Assessment is likely to be useful if an employer has made it readily available. This is an indication that the employer is using assessment to ascertain skills that may be related to career paths within the organisation.
Human Services Training Advisory Council supports assessees in the assessment process because as a Training Advisory Council, Human Services Training Advisory Council is committed to assessment as a way of recognising, developing and consolidating the skills of people in our industries.

Phone: 8981 2550 Fax: 8981 9822 Email: hstac@hstac.com.au 12

PART TWO ASSESSEE GUIDE

Important steps
Let's say you have decided to explore the possibility of being assessed. How will you go about it? Here are some suggestions.

locate relevant competencies
These might be:   industry competency standards industry-endorsed requirements (eg. licensing).

They might be located:    through a TAC, especially Human Services Training Advisory Council through a training organisation, such as a TAFE college through your workplace.

Human Services Training Advisory Council can help track down competencies relevant to your skills. If they don’t exist yet, we’ll tell you so.

assess yourself informally
When you have obtained relevant competencies, informally assess yourself against them. How do you think you rate? Competent? Not yet competent? Be fair on yourself  not too hard and not too soft. You might want to show the competencies to someone who knows you and your skills.

Phone: 8981 2550 Fax: 8981 9822 Email: hstac@hstac.com.au 13

Part Two — Assessee Guide

locate a support person
Some people are happy to undertake the assessment process alone. Others prefer to have a support person to assist them. The best support person is someone who knows you and your skills, and understands the assessment process. In some cases, Human Services Training Advisory Council may be able to help you locate a suitable support person. Support people are sometimes called mentors or allies. A support person may be able to help you by:        offering encouragement and moral support assisting in communications with your assessor helping you to understand the assessment process assisting in communications with Human Services Training Advisory Council helping you to compile evidence helping with arrangements for a skills demonstration in the workplace language interpreting.

It is not essential to have a support person.

In this kit, 'Part Three — Support Person Information', has been designed to help support people in their role.

choose an assessor
The easiest way to check out assessor availability for skills for the human services industries is through Human Services Training Advisory Council. You may be able to locate a qualified assessor in your workplace.

Phone: 8981 2550 Fax: 8981 9822 Email: hstac@hstac.com.au 14

Part Two — Assessee Guide

talk with your assessor
Here are some points you may wish to cover in discussions with your assessor:           the type(s) of evidence you will present assessor fees and who will meet them access to facilities, equipment and materials, if required when and where the assessment will happen how long the assessment will take the credential you will receive if assessed as competent if necessary, arrangements for the assessor to travel to a specified location if necessary, arrangements for distance assessment date, time and duration of assessment appeal procedures.

If you have a support person, you may want them to be involved in discussions with your assessor, or to carry out the discussions on your behalf.

identify costs
The assessment process involves cost. Sometimes, costs will be met by employers or organisations supporting assessment. Depending on circumstances, the assessee may have to consider the cost of:     access to specialised facilities or equipment, possibly including travel and accommodation access to communications teleconferencing, email) evidence-gathering assessment) assessor’s fee. (eg. for distance of assessment performance (eg. for phone, distance

videotaping

In some cases, Human Services Training Advisory Council will be able to assist by brokering access to facilities and equipment, or other support. If you are unclear about cost, please contact us.

Phone: 8981 2550 Fax: 8981 9822 Email: hstac@hstac.com.au 15

Part Two — Assessee Guide

Getting your evidence ready
about evidence
The purpose of evidence is to demonstrate that your skills match specific competencies or performance criteria. Nationally endorsed industry competency standards contain a section which identifies appropriate types of evidence for the specific skills being assessed. Assessment often involves more than one form of evidence. Some forms of evidence require the assessor to be physically present while others do not. Some forms of evidence require writing while others do not. The following headings describe some types of evidence.

Well-organised evidence is the way to demonstrate your competence.

live demonstration
If you intend to demonstrate your skills while your assessor observes, you will need to:     make sure the demonstrated skills match the relevant performance criteria make sure you have timely access to any required venue, equipment or materials confirm arrangements with your assessor confirm arrangements with relevant others, especially your support person.

video
If you intend to demonstrate your skills on video, you will need to:       make sure the skills demonstrated match the relevant performance criteria have access to video equipment and a skilled operator make the video in a suitably lit indoor or outdoor area ensure that the videotaping session is free from interruption have any necessary equipment or materials on hand if other participants are required, ensure that they can be present at the required time. Phone: 8981 2550 Fax: 8981 9822 Email: hstac@hstac.com.au 16

Part Two — Assessee Guide

oral discussion/question and answer
Depending on the skills to be assessed, an oral discussion or question and answer session may be an alternative to a written test. The assessor may talk with you in person or via distance communication technology. Your preparation might include:    talking with your assessor about likely discussion points or questions studying the performance criteria and anticipating likely questions practising answering relevant questions asked by your support person.

If you need help to plan your evidence, contact Human Services Training Advisory Council. We understand the issues.

written portfolio
If you are assembling a written portfolio, make sure that its contents match the competencies required. All you need is enough information to demonstrate your competence. More is not necessarily better. You may wish to include:        examples of your work that are relevant to the performance criteria photographs, graphics, letters, proformas, reports or policies copies of relevant qualifications credentials including awards, certificates and

employer references that relate to the performance criteria relevant testimonials from clients or members of work teams an explanatory note with each item or group of items, explaining how they relate to the performance criteria a contents page.

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Part Two — Assessee Guide

product or result of your skills
This is the end product of your work. It is important to be able to demonstrate that it is the product of your work. If the product has been produced by a team, your role in the team needs to be explained. In compiling this form of evidence, think about:   how you will present the product or result of your skills how you will explain/demonstrate the relationship between the product and performance criteria.

role play
This involves acting out your skills. Although it may sound straightforward, it requires as much preparation as other forms of evidence. Make sure that you are comfortable with the idea of role-play before deciding to use it to present evidence. Preparing for a role-play is likely to involve:       approaching other people to participate, and clarifying what is expected of them making sure that other people understand their roles and their importance in your assessment making sure that other people are capable of performing appropriately in the role play thinking about how you might demonstrate your skills in a role play that presents typical situations thinking about how you might demonstrate your skills in a role play that presents an unusual situation making sure everyone is present in the right place at the right time.

Preparing evidence for assessment may take time and effort. The payoff is a nationally recognised credential.

Phone: 8981 2550 Fax: 8981 9822 Email: hstac@hstac.com.au 18

Part Two — Assessee Guide

simulation
Simulation is not the same as role-play. It involves simulating a real-life situation so that you can demonstrate your skills. Simulations are often used to demonstrate skills used in emergency or high-risk situations, such as survival or life-saving skills. Simulations tend to involve several people, often using expensive equipment. If you intend to use this kind of evidence, you will need to think about:   how you will obtain access to the necessary equipment how you will organise other people to do whatever is required.

Many people associate assessment with exams or tests they did in their schooldays. Qualified assessors are trained to make assessment as fair and anxiety-free as possible. Human Services Training Advisory Council can help you to locate an appropriate assessor.

performance reports
Performance reports from other people, either orally or in writing, can be included in evidence. Such people may be supervisors, members of work teams, or clients. If you intend using this kind of evidence, you will need to think about:    making sure that reports are relevant to the performance criteria collecting written reports and forwarding them to your assessor arrangements for the assessor to communicate with people providing oral reports.

Evidence focuses on what you are good at.

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Part Two — Assessee Guide

When the assessment happens …
what if I don't understand the assessor's instructions?
Say so. It's important that you do understand. Ask questions to clarify what your assessor means. For example:    What do you mean? Do you want me to do it this way? Is this what you want me to do?

what if I want to communicate through my support person?
Depending on the skills being assessed, you may be able to communicate with the assessor through your support person. If English is your second language and fluency in English is not one of the competencies being assessed, it would be appropriate to communicate through your support person. If your support person is bilingual and understands the assessment process, he or she may act as a language interpreter during assessment.

‘Part Three – Support Person Information’ is designed to assist support people.

what if I panic or freeze?
Tell your assessor and/or your support person what the problem is. It may be possible to go ahead after you have had time to collect your thoughts. If that is not possible, it is important for you and your assessor to have a clear understanding of what has gone wrong. This may be helpful if you want to try again later.

what if I want feedback?
Your assessor is required to give feedback on your performance, whether or not you successfully achieve all competencies.

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Part Two — Assessee Guide

what if I am assessed as not yet competent?
This does not mean that you have failed. Your assessor will explain why you were found not yet competent and what you might do to make your performance competent next time. If you want to be assessed again at a later date, you do not have to be re-assessed for skills in which you have been assessed as competent.

what if I don't want to be assessed by a particular assessor?
If you are being assessed against a nationally endorsed competency standard, the only requirement is that you be assessed by a qualified assessor. If you are not comfortable with your assessor for some reason, you can seek to be assessed by another qualified assessor.

Human Services Training Advisory Council can help you find another assessor.

what if I have to be assessed by a team?
In some cases, the assessment will be carried out by a qualified assessor plus an industry expert. The assessor remains in charge of the conduct of the assessment. The industry expert may be involved in asking questions, observing a demonstration, or evaluating your evidence in some other way.

what if I want to appeal?
You may appeal against the conduct of your assessment if you believe it has been conducted unfairly. Appeals against being found 'not yet competent' are inappropriate unless the assessment process has been inadequate or unfair. Your assessor is required to tell you about the mechanism for appealing.

You’ve contacted Human Services Training Advisory Council five times already but something is still bugging you? Don’t stay stuck. We don’t care if you ring us ten times!

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Part Two — Assessee Guide

Contact people
NAME POSITION CONTACT DETAILS

Phone: 8981 2550 Fax: 8981 9822 Email: hstac@hstac.com.au 22

Part Two — Assessee Guide

Notes
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PART THREE SUPPORT PERSON INFORMATION
Introduction
In the context of assessment, a support person is someone who helps an assessee to participate in the assessment process. You may be reading this Guide because an assessee or someone else has approached you to support an assessee. It may be that the assessee wants someone to act as a sounding board, or to provide specific assistance in their preparations. Perhaps the assessee is an Aboriginal person, or someone who speaks English as a second language. Perhaps the assessee has a disability.

Who is a support person?
A support person might be:      a family member or relation a friend a work colleague a supervisor or employer a lecturer, teacher or trainer.

Your support may help an assessee to gain a valued credential.

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Assessee Support Kit

Part Three — Support Person Information

What does a support person do?
What a support person may be asked to do depends very much on the assessee's needs in her or his assessment situation. Here are some possibilities:    be present during the assessment help explain the assessment process to the assessee help the assessee gain access to workplace facilities or equipment required for the assessment provide access to distance communication equipment eg. phone, fax, email, teleconference facilities negotiate with employers or others on the assessee's behalf assist with scheduling arrangements help the assessee to assemble an evidence portfolio help with communications where the assessee and the assessor come from different cultural backgrounds advise and assist the assessee to gather and present evidence in the most appropriate form agreed by the assessor be a language interpreter facilitating oral communications between assessor and assessee.



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Whether you do one, none or all of the above depends entirely on the assessee, his or her assessment situation, and your own preferences.

If you are thinking about being a support person for an assessee, please feel free to contact Human Services Training Advisory Council. We will accept reverse charge calls.

Phone: 8981 2550 Fax: 8981 9822 Email: hstac@hstac.com.au 25

Assessee Support Kit

Part Three — Support Person Information

What knowledge does a support person need?
Ideally, the support person will be familiar with:    the assessee personally the assessment process the assessee's skills.

If you are not familiar with all of the above, you can still be an effective support person. The main thing is to understand the assessee's situation and to be supportive of their interest in assessment.

If you are not yet familiar with the assessment process, you could start by reading 'Part One  Assessee Information' and 'Part Two  Assessee Guide'.

What skills does a support person need?
The range of skills will vary depending on the situation of the assessee and the skills being assessed. Good communication skills will often be important. Other relevant skills may include:       organising, brokering, negotiating clarifying verbal instructions clarifying written instructions communicating across cultures speaking a second language expressing empathy.

Phone: 8981 2550 Fax: 8981 9822 Email: hstac@hstac.com.au 26

PART FOUR SAMPLE COMPETENCY STANDARDS
The examples in this section are short extracts from nationally endorsed industry competency standards for several areas of the community services, correctional services, health and local government industries. They are included to give you an idea of the way competencies are written. If you want to track down competencies that apply to your skills, contact Human Services Training Advisory Council. The extracts may or may not be relevant to your skills or occupation.

control the conduct of an activity
These competencies are part of a unit in the Regulation and Compliance stream of the recreation industry.
ELEMENT PERFORMANCE CRITERIA

Assess conditions for an 1. Participant status and condition is assessed as activity suitable for the activity. 2. Environment, facilities and equipment are in accordance with requirements for the activity. 3. Safety and other risks are assessed and confirmed as within acceptable levels prior to commencement of the activity. 4. Appropriate action is taken assessment of the conditions. based on an

design props
These competencies are part of a unit in the Set Manufacture/Workshop stream for the entertainment area of the cultural industry.
ELEMENT Contribute creative ideas PERFORMANCE CRITERIA 1. Ideas show imagination, creativity originality, flair and

2. Ideas are technically feasible and demonstrate awareness of parameters and constraints 3. Ideas demonstrate effective use of materials and technology 4. Modifications are negotiated and agreed.

Phone: 8981 2550 Fax: 8981 9822 Email: hstac@hstac.com.au 27

Assessee Support Kit

Part Four — Sample Competency Standards

Develop and stage exhibitions
These competencies are part of a unit in the Exhibition stream of the museums area within the cultural industry.
ELEMENT PERFORMANCE CRITERIA

Identify exhibition’s purpose, All internal personnel have input and agreement is aims and rationale reached on exhibition’s subject matter, style, objects to be used and intended audience reaction. A rationale for the final objectives is provided. External input is sought where practical. Agreed purpose, aims and objectives are feasible in terms of time, locale and resource constraints. Draft project management timeline and budgets are prepared and communicated to all relevant parties.

Maintain horse health and welfare
These competencies are part of a unit in the racing area of the recreation industry.
ELEMENT PERFORMANCE CRITERIA

Provide non-specialist health Changes in the behaviour of an individual horse are care observed and reported. Injuries or symptoms of illness in an individual horse are observed and reported, particularly with reference to urine and stools. Variations in the feeding and watering pattern of an individual horse are observed and reported. A horse’s temperature and pulse can be taken and reported. Stable procedures for reporting treatment needs and applying first aid treatment, having regard to the safety of the horse and handler, are followed.

Human Services Training Advisory Council can help track down competencies relevant to your skills. If they don't exist yet, we'll tell you so.

Phone: 8981 2550 Fax: 8981 9822 Email: hstac@hstac.com.au 28

PART FIVE LIST OF TECHNICAL TERMS
Ally Assessment another name for a support person checking evidence of an assessee's skills against competency standards Assessee candidate for assessment Assessor person qualified to assess in accordance with national assessor competency standards Certificate a type of nationally accredited credential Competence assessee's ability to perform skills to a level which matches nationally industry-endorsed competency standards Competency abbreviation for competency standard competency a standard for measuring skills, nationally endorsed by the standard industry in which the skills are used Human Services Human Services Training Advisory Council, the Training Training Advisory Council for the Northern Territory Community Advisory Council services, Correctional Services, Health and Local Government industries Credential award which recognises an assessee's attainment of specific performance criteria or competency standards, often issued as a statement of attainment, a certificate or a diploma Diploma a type of nationally accredited credential Evidence demonstration of performance to be matched against performance criteria or competency standards learning outcomes performance criteria in some VET or TAFE courses mentor another name for a support person performance criteria statements identifying skills to be demonstrated for attainment of a competency standard or one of its elements RPL Recognition of Prior Learning, a form of assessment which assesses the skills of assessees against learning outcomes in VET (TAFE) courses support person someone who helps an assessee participate in the assessment process TAFE Technical and Further Education, which is an aspect of VET VET Vocational Education and Training, the national training system

Phone: 8981 2550 Fax: 8981 9822 Email: hstac@hstac.com.au 29