GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE by grindin8839r

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									GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN
  COMPUTER SCIENCE




Department of Computer Science
   Montclair State University
                GRADUATE COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAMS
                      MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREES IN
                           COMPUTER SCIENCE

The Department of Computer Science offers a Master of Science Degree in Computer Science, and a Master of
Science Degree in Computer Science with Concentrations in Applied Statistics, Applied Mathematics, or
Informatics. The Department of Mathematical Sciences in conjunction with the Department of Computer Science
offers the Master of Science Degree in Mathematics with a concentration in Computer Science.

I. Introduction
The graduate program in computer science is designed for students interested in pursuing computer science
theoretically as well as practically at an advanced level. Three concentrations within the M.S. in Computer
Science allows for the study of complementary areas that are computer intensive. (Concentrations within the
M.S. in Computer Science are discussed below.) The program is designed to emphasize the foundations and
concepts of computer science as well as to introduce students to the new and developing areas of computer
science. Concepts are developed rather than just routine programming skills. The program prepares students for
professional work in the design and implementation of software systems, data base systems, operating systems,
artificial intelligence, graphics, image processing, parallel processing, simulation, and algorithms for discrete and
continuous structures that will aid in the solution of problems in science and business. The curriculum is designed
to allow students to develop the skills needed to achieve leadership positions in business, industry, and
government in computer science or related fields where computer science has become an important tool. The
program is also designed to prepare teachers of computer science at the middle school, high school and two year
college levels.

In addition to offering the M.S. in Computer Science, the Department of Computer Science also offers an M.S. in
Computer Science with concentrations. These concentrations consist of taking courses in a specialized area
complementary to computer science, or in a computer intensive area. The Department offers Concentrations in
Applied Statistics, Applied Mathematics and Informatics.

The graduate program in computer science began in 1978. At present there are fourteen full time faculty
members teaching computer science courses. The special interests of the faculty include algorithms, artificial
intelligence, automata theory, chaos theory, complexity theory, data bases, data mining, data warehousing, expert
systems, graphics, image processing, machine organization, architecture and hardware, design and management
information systems, neural networks, operating systems, object-oriented programming, parallel processing,
program verification, robotics, scientific computing, security, software engineering, and telecommunications. The
department has the advantage of having professional computer scientists as both faculty and visiting specialists.
The visiting specialists are drawn from the aerospace, chemical and pharmaceutical industries. This mix of
faculty affords the students the opportunity to obtain an education in practical and theoretical aspects of computer
science.
II. Computer Facilities
Montclair State's local network, MSUNet, is a fiber optic Ethernet backbone connecting all academic buildings
via high speed switches and routers. Within each building, faculty offices and computer laboratories are
connected via 10 BaseT Ethernet, as are many classrooms. The network currently connects a pair of Alpha ES45
servers for administrative computing; Sun Servers for mail, news and Web services, as well as hosting integral
teaching and learning technologies; Novell NetWare servers for file and print services, and Macintosh servers for
Web, academic, and administrative services. A seven-terabyte Storage Area Network (SAN) with two-gigabit per
second fiber switching fabric is installed and in operation for the administrative Alpha cluster, and will soon
provide high-speed centralized storage for all production servers. MSUNet is connected at T3 speeds to the
Internet.
GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE                                                                    2

Montclair State University has placed a microcomputer connected to MSUNet in every faculty office and has
provided a campus-wide information system for students, faculty, and staff. All students automatically receive
computer accounts which provide full Internet access and remain active as long as they are enrolled. Off campus
access to MSUNet and the Internet is provided through MSU-ISP, an MSU hosted Internet Service Provider that
is available to all students. On campus computing activities are carried out in microcomputer laboratories and
classrooms throughout the campus.

In addition, the College of Science and Mathematics (CSAM) maintains SCINet, a network of SUN Microsystems
computers using the Solaris operating system. SCINet currently (August 2003) includes the following equipment:

   Four multi-CPU SunFire 280R servers
   Four SUN D1000 StorEdge storage arrays with more than 800 GB of storage space
   Three SUN multi-CPU V880 servers dedicated to faculty and student research projects (part of the Center for
    Scientific Computing and Visualization)
   A SUN Enterprise 450 multi-purpose server
   Several SUN workstations providing Web, backup, and software distribution services
   A twelve-tape AIT library and changer for performing daily data backup rotation (using Veritas NetBackup)
   Fifty SUN workstations (comprising Ultra 10 models through Sun Blade 1000s).

SCINet provides access to the following services:

   A UNIX shell account with generous disk space for saving files and creating a Web page, available to any
    registered Computer Science student. This account offers a customizable UNIX computing environment for
    faculty and students and space for Web pages.
   Program development tools including Java, C++, C, Ada, Turing, Fortran 77, and Fortran 90, compilers,
    Prolog, and ML interpreters, a C-LISP interpreter/compiler, PHP, Perl, Tcl, and Rational Suite Development
    Studio.
   Microsoft development tools including Visual Studio, .Net, and Advanced Server.
   UNIX non-programming applications including SAS, S-Plus, Maple, MATLAB, Oracle Database, LaΤεχ,
    and Star Office.
   UNIX e-mail addresses via the shell accounts. This address provides a common directory for Computer
    Science professors and students to easily contact each other.

This software is available to students in the SCINet laboratory in RI 105. Many applications are also available
through remote access using a UNIX shell account.

Of particular interest to students in the Department of Computer Science are the laboratories in Richardson Hall.
These laboratories emphasize software for Computer Science courses and for General Education courses taught
by Computer Science faculty. Labs are open during the day and evening on weekdays (Monday through Friday)
and during the day on weekends. These hours are normally extended at the end of each semester. Student
laboratory assistants are on duty whenever the laboratories are open.

There are two laboratories and one technology-enhanced classroom in Richardson Hall:

        RI-105: This SCINet lab currently has twenty SUN workstations, each with at least 128 MB of RAM,
        and an HP workgroup printer. These workstations are connected to the SCINet servers and provide
        access to all software supported by SCINet (described above).

        RI-108: This technology-enhanced classroom contains twenty-eight networked Dell desktop computers
        running the Windows 2000 operating system and a workgroup printer. Software includes Microsoft
        Office XP, Maple, Java 2 Runtime Environment, Microsoft Development Network, Microsoft Visual J++,
        Microsoft Visual Studio, and Java Web Start. This laboratory is used primarily for introductory
        programming courses and the General Education courses.
GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE                                                                    3

        RI-103: This lab is maintained by the Department of Mathematical Sciences for use by students in that
        Department. It contains sixteen networked Macintosh G4 computers and a workgroup printer. Software
        on this network includes Microsoft Office, JMP, Maple, and True Basic.

Similar instructional computing laboratories are housed in several other campus buildings, including Dickson
Hall, Sprague Library, Partridge Hall, Chapin Hall, and the Student Center. Equipment is primarily networked
Pentium-based computers running Windows 2000. All support Microsoft Office. In addition, each lab provides
appropriate discipline-specific software. All labs are open to all students seven days per week, and all computers
are connected to MSUNet.

III. Computer Science Programs

The Department of Computer Science offers an M.S. in Computer Science, as well as an M.S. in Computer
Science with concentrations in Applied Statistics, Applied Mathematics or Informatics. These degree programs
are all 33 credits. In addition, the computer science faculty has developed a sequence of courses that constitute a
prerequisite program for students who do not have the appropriate background in computer science and/or
mathematics. Upon satisfactory completion of the prerequisite program, students are admitted to the Master of
Science program. The various Master of Science programs and the prerequisite program are discussed in
Sections V and VI.

IV. Entrance Requirements for Matriculation
Students may apply for matriculation into the Master of Science programs provided they can satisfy the university
entrance requirements and can satisfy the departmental requirements in mathematics and computer science.
(Deficiencies in some or all of the requirements are discussed in Section V.)

Applications must be submitted by July 1 in order to be guaranteed consideration for Fall Admissions.
Applications submitted after July 1 will be considered on a space available basis.

        A. University Application Requirements:
                1. Applicants must possess a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution with either:
                        a. a major in computer science or mathematics,
                        b. a major in science or engineering, or
                        c. another major with an overall cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 (B) or other
                            indications of the ability to complete the program.
                 2. Applicants are required to take the GRE aptitude test.
                 3. International students should check university requirements.

        B. Departmental Requirements:
                1. Applicants must have taken at least 15 undergraduate mathematics credits which should
                include:
                         a. discrete mathematics
                         b. linear algebra and probability, and
                         c. calculus.
                Deficiencies in mathematics are discussed in Section V.
                2. Applicants must
                         a. be proficient in the following computer programming languages:
                             i. C++ or Java
GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE                                                                    4
                            ii. Assembly Language (for some architecture)
                        A two-semester course sequence in an object oriented language or one year's
                        programming experience in industry will suffice for the first of these requirements. A
                        one-semester course in assembly language will suffice for the second.

                        b. have knowledge of
                            i. data structures
                            ii. computer architecture (CISC and RISC)
                        Deficiencies in computer science are discussed in Section V.

V. Prerequisite Program
The computer science faculty has developed a series of six courses that will enable applicants desiring to make a
career change or to complement their current career to obtain the necessary background in mathematics and
computer science in order to pursue a graduate degree in computer science. Students who have deficiencies in
some of the six areas and satisfy others may only be required to take some of the courses to make up their specific
deficiencies. Two sequences of three courses each have been developed that will enable students to obtain the
necessary foundations in computer science and mathematics.

The computer science courses are:

        CMPT: 505               Fundamentals of Computer Science I (Java) – 4 credits, Fall
        CMPT: 506               Fundamentals of Computer Science II (Assembler language, computer
                                architecture) – 4 credits, Spring
        CMPT: 507                Fundamentals of Computer Science III (Data Structures) – 4 credits, Spring

The mathematics courses are:

        MATH: 501               Mathematics for Computer Science I (Discrete Mathematics) – 4 credits, Fall
        MATH: 502               Mathematics for Computer Science II (Linear Algebra and Probability) – 3
                                credits, Spring or Summer
        MATH: 503               Mathematics for Computer Science III (Calculus) 3 credits, Summer

Deficiencies in computer science can be rectified by taking CMPT: 505, 506, and 507. It should be noted that the
computer science courses are accelerated computer science courses designed for the student to master he
necessary concepts for the graduate program rather than courses just to develop routine programming skills.
Deficiencies in mathematics can be rectified by taking MATH: 501, 502, and 503, which are accelerated
Mathematics courses. When required, these courses will be "prerequisite courses" on the graduate work program.
The sequence requires one academic year to complete (i.e., Fall, Spring, and Summer semesters) but can be taken
over a two year period. Applicants satisfying admission requirements but needing to make up some or all of the
work in the fundamentals of Mathematics and/or Computer Science (MATH: 501, 502, 503 and CMPT: 505, 506,
507) are granted deferred matriculation. Upon completion of the necessary courses with a minimum grade point
average of 3.0, students will be granted full matriculation.

VI. Degree Requirements
A. M.S. COMPUTER SCIENCE
In order to be awarded a Master of Science in computer science, a student must satisfy the following
requirements:
I. Computer Science                                                                                 21 s.h.
       Required core: CMPT 580, 581, 583, 594
GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE                                                                     5
        One of the following two-course sequences:
                CMPT 586, CMPT 592 (Database specialization)
                CMPT 596, CMPT 696 (Networking specialization)
                CMPT 584, CMPT 591 (System software specialization)
                CMPT 574, CMPT 575 (Visual computing specialization)
        One additional course selected from:
                CMPT: 570 to 599, 670 to 699, or MATH: 560
II. Computer Science, Mathematics and/or Statistics Electives                                       12 s.h.
       Courses selected from:
              CMPT: 570 to 599, 670 to 699
              MATH: MATH: 520 to 569, 580 to 599, 620 to 669, 680 to 699
              STAT: 541-549, 595, 640-649
              (Substitutions are allowed with prior written approval of the graduate advisor.)
Note: Every student must take CMPT: 580, 581, 583, and 594, which constitute the core courses in the computer
science program. At most six semester hours can be taken at the 400 level.
III. Culminating Experience
Every student must select one of the following options:
A. Comprehensive Examination. The Computer Science Comprehensive Examination is based on the required
core. Students are required to have a 3.0 grade point average and to have completed a minimum of 15 s.h. and at
least three of the four core courses in order to be granted permission to take the comprehensive examination.
Graduate School policy allows at most three attempts to pass the comprehensive examination
B. Thesis. A thesis is a written document describing significant computer-science research conducted under the
direction of a faculty thesis sponsor. To be eligible to write a thesis, the student must have completed the core
courses with a minimum grade point average of 3.3. A student who elects this option must register for CMPT 698
(Thesis) as one of his/her elective courses. Every thesis must be approved by a three-member thesis committee
selected by the student and chaired by the student’s thesis sponsor.
C. Masters Project. A Master’s Project is a substantial software-development project conducted either
individually or in a team, under the guidance of a faculty member. To be eligible to work on a project, the student
must have completed the core and to have a 3.0 or higher grade point average. A student who elects this option
must register for CMPT 697 as one of her/his elective courses. In order to use the project as a culminating
experience, the student must provide written documentation for his/.her portion of the project and make an oral
presentation about the project.
IV.     Grade Point Average.
The student must have an overall 3.0 grade point average, as well as a 3.0 grade point average for courses taken
in the Departments of Computer Science and Mathematical Sciences. Graduate school policy allows the student
to apply at most two C grades (C+, C, or C-) towards the Master of Science degree.
Note: Courses MATH: 501, 502, 503 and CMPT: 505, 506, 507 are not counted among the 33 semester hours
required for completion of any program in the Departments of Computer Science and Mathematical Sciences.


D. M.S. COMPUTER SCIENCE
                                       Informatics Concentration
In order to be awarded a Master of Science in computer science, with an informatics concentration a student must
satisfy the following requirements:
I. Computer Science                                                                                 15 s.h.
       Required core: CMPT: 580, 581, 583, 594
GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE                                                                    6
II. Informatics                                                                                      9 s.h.
        Three courses:
                Required: CMPT: 586, 593, 596
                Select one: CMPT: 592, 696
III. Business, Computer Science or Mathematics Electives                                             9 s.h.
                      Three courses selected from:
                              INFO: 503
                              CMPT: 570 to 599, 670 to 699
                              STAT: 541, 544, 548, 595, 645
                              MATH: 569, 584
Substitutions are allowed with prior written approval of the graduate coordinator.
Note: Every student must take CMPT: 580, 581, 583, 586 and 592, which constitute the core courses in the
computer science program. At most six semester hours can be taken at the 400 level.
IV. Culminating Experience
Every student must select one of the following options:
Comprehensive Examination. The Computer Science Comprehensive Examination is based on the required
core. Students are required to have a 3.0 grade point average and to have completed a minimum of 15 s.h. and at
least three of the four core courses in order to be granted permission to take the comprehensive examination.
Graduate School policy allows at most three attempts to pass the comprehensive examination
Thesis. A thesis is a written document describing significant computer-science research conducted under the
direction of a faculty thesis sponsor. To be eligible to write a thesis, the student must have completed the core
courses with a minimum grade point average of 3.3. A student who elects this option must register for CMPT 698
(Thesis) as one of his/her elective courses. Every thesis must be approved by a three-member thesis committee
selected by the student and chaired by the student’s thesis sponsor.
Masters Project. A Master’s Project is a substantial software-development project conducted either individually
or in a team, under the guidance of a faculty member. To be eligible to work on a project, the student must have
completed the core and to have a 3.0 or higher grade point average. A student who elects this option must
register for CMPT 697 as one of her/his elective courses. In order to use the project as a culminating experience,
the student must provide written documentation for his/.her portion of the project and make an oral presentation
about the project.
V.      Grade Point Average.
The student must have an overall 3.0 grade point average, as well as a 3.0 grade point average for courses taken
in the Departments of Computer Science and Mathematical Sciences. Graduate school policy allows the student
to apply at most two C grades (C+, C, or C-) towards the Master of Science degree.
Note: Courses MATH: 501, 502, 503 and CMPT: 505, 506, 507 are not counted among the 33 semester hours
required for completion of any program in the Departments of Computer Science and Mathematical Sciences
GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE                               7
VII. LIST OF COURSES

                             COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSES
              CMPT 574: Pixel and Image Processing
              CMPT 575: Introduction to Computer Graphics
              CMPT 576: Object Oriented Software Development
              CMPT 578: Artificial Intelligence
             *CMPT 580: Machine Organization and Architecture
             *CMPT 581: Systems Software Design
              CMPT 582: Theory of Automata and Formal Languages
             *CMPT 583: Computer Algorithms
              CMPT 584: Operating Systems Design
              CMPT 585: Topics in Computer Science
              CMPT 586: File Structures and Databases
              CMPT 587: Microcomputers and Interfaces
              CMPT 588: Programming Languages
              CMPT 589: Computer Simulation of Discrete Systems
              CMPT 590: Computer Simulation of Continuous Systems
              CMPT 591: Compiler Theory and Construction
              CMPT 592: Data Base Design and Implementation
              CMPT 593: Structured System Design and Analysis
             *CMPT 594: Software Engineering and Reliability
              CMPT 595: Computer Science Seminar
              CMPT 596: Principles of Data Communication
              CMPT 678: Neurocomputing
              CMPT 680: Parallel Architecture and Algorithms
              CMPT 683: Advanced Computer Algorithms
              CMPT 690: Independent Study in Computer Science
              CMPT 695: Seminars in Computer Science
              CMPT 696: Local Area Networks

* Computer Science Core Courses

                                  MATHEMATICS COURSES
              MATH 420: Differential Equations
              MATH 423: Introduction to Complex Variables
              MATH 425: Advanced Calculus I
              MATH 426: Advanced Calculus II
              MATH 428: Introduction to Topology
              MATH 431: Foundations of Modern Algebra
              MATH 433: Theory of Numbers
              MATH 436: Elements of Logic
              MATH 450: Foundations of Geometry
              MATH 460: Introduction to Applied Mathematics
              MATH 463: Introduction to Numerical Analysis
              MATH 464: Operations Research I
              MATH 465: Operations Research II
              MATH 469: Mathematical Modeling

              MATH 520: Set Theory
GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE                                            8
              MATH 521: Real Variables I
              MATH 522: Real Variables II
              MATH 525: Complex Variables I
              MATH 526: Complex Variables II
              MATH 531: Abstract Algebra I
              MATH 532: Abstract Algebra II
              MATH 535: Linear Algebra I
              MATH 536: Linear Algebra II
              MATH 537: Mathematical Logic
              MATH 540: Probability
              MATH 551: Topology
              MATH 554: Projective Geometry
              MATH 555: Differential Geometry
              MATH 560: Numerical Analysis
              MATH 564: Ordinary Differential Equations
              MATH 566: Partial Differential Equations
              MATH 568: Applied Mathematics I: Continuous
              MATH 569: Applied Mathematics II: Discrete
              MATH 580: Combinatorial Mathematics
              MATH 581: Graph Theory
              MATH 584: Topics in Operations Research
              MATH 690: Independent Study in Mathematics

                                    STATISTICS COURSES
              STAT 440: Statistical Methods
              STAT 441: Statistical Computing
              STAT 443: Introduction to Mathematical Statistics

              STAT 541: Applied Statistics
              STAT 542: Statistical Theory I
              STAT 543: Statistical Theory II
              STAT 544: Statistical Computing
              STAT 545: Practicum in Statistics I
              STAT 546: Non-parametric Statistics
              STAT 547: Design and Analysis of Experiments
              STAT 548: Applied Regression Analysis
              STAT 549: Sampling Techniques
              STAT 640: Biostatistics I
              STAT 641: Biostatistics II
              STAT 642: Introduction to Stochastic Processes
              STAT 645: Selected Topics in Statistics
              STAT 646: Multivariate Analysis
              STAT 647: Practicum in Statistics II
              STAT 648: Advanced Statistical Methods
              STAT 649: Independent Study in Statistics

VIII. GRADUATE ADVISOR

If you have any questions or would like additional information please contact:

Dr. James Benham
GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE   9
Graduate Coordinator
Department of Computer Science
Montclair State University
Upper Montclair, N.J. 07043
Phone:     (973) 655-7249 or 655-4166
E-mail:    benhamj@mail.montclair.edu


9/09

								
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