Outlines of a Cognitive Musicology

Document Sample
Outlines of a Cognitive Musicology Powered By Docstoc
					  Outlines of a Cognitive Musicology 

Ole Kühl, M.A. Royal Academy of Music, Aarhus; Center of Semiotics, Aarhus University. 
Email: semok@hum.au.dk 
Per Aage Brandt, prof., dr. phil. Center of Semiotics, Aarhus University; Case Western 
Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.
Outlines of a Cognitive Musicology

Music is a form of symbolic communication. Through music we share vital 
information about ourselves and the world. We feel that music is talking to 
us, even if it does not produce a well defined referential content: music 
moves us emotionally, bodily and mentally. 
Cognitive science offers a new perspective on the content structure of the 
musical message: musical experience can be seen as embodied. According to 
such a view, music is drawing on pre‑verbal layers of meaning. 
Musical structure (as dealt with in traditional musicology) belongs on the 
objective side together with the socio‑cultural background‑framing (which is 
the topic of ethnomusicology and popular music studies). But, furthermore, 
the functional structure of the process “making‑sense‑of‑music” has stable 
properties across individual and cultural boundaries and can be described 
objectively. 
Such a description would not only make cognitive musicology a sparring 
partner for neuromusicology, providing interpretative models for empirical 
data; it would also offer the possibility of grounding musicological tools in 
human cognition. 
1. Defining the Field of Study 

             Musical experience           Background framing 




                                               1: Situated 
            Embodied     Emotional 
                                               2: Socio‑cultural 

                    Mental                     3: Personal 




Cognitively we experience music as imagined movement (“gesture”) and as 
emotional and mental activity. These three levels of response interact with 
each other in certain ways. The musical experience is framed in ways that are 
mostly shared ‑ the situation and the socio‑cultural history ‑  as well as in 
more personal ways.
2. The Musical Sign Function                         The relations between the three main 
                                                     components of the musical content structure can 
                                                     be determined through a semiotic analysis, in 
                                                     which the signfunction is seen as having an 
                                                     expressive level and a content level. 
                                                     The musical phrase is an auditive event 
       Musical                                       (expression level), which iconizes an imagined 
       phrase                                        gesture (content level). This means that we 
                                                     experience musical events as internalized 
                                                     movements or gestures (mental imagery). 
            IC                                       The expressive gesture, while being a common 
                                                     denominator between several aesthetic modes, is 
Auditive          Gesture                            itself a signfunction. It has movement in space 
 event                                               and time as the expressive level and emotion 
                                                     (affect) as content level: The movement 
                     SY                              symbolizes an emotion. 
                                                     The experience of an emotional content brings to 
        Movement             Emotion                 mind the idea of a subject who is part of an 
                                                     unfolding story. The symbolic linking of an 
                                                     auditive event to an emotional content through 
                                                     expressive gesture indicates a narrative in which 
                                IN                   gesture/emotion is embedded. 
                       Agent            Narrative    This “sign‑cascade” sums up the musical 
                                                     experience in a semiotic perspective, bringing 
                                                     together the gestural, the emotional and the 
                                                     narrative level of the music. Neurobiological 
                                                     evidence as well as theories from cognitive 
                                                     science confirm this view.
3. Temporal Architecture of Musical Cognition 

                      Narration 
                                                                     Integration 


                      Gestures 
                                                                Binding 

                 Auditive stream 


Music is not an amorphous entity without generic structure, but, being humanly organized, it is 
subject to certain biological constraints. These constraints are not only determined by the ear, but also 
by the temporal organization of the brain. 
Although it largely remains a mystery how afferent and efferent streams, memory systems and other 
cognitive functions interact with each other in the temporal dimension, there is considerable evidence 
supporting the view that the temporal architecture of the brain is tuned into interaction with the world 
on a meso‑level. Temporal activities, such as talking, gesturing and making music, seem to be 
organized around what is sometimes called the 3‑second window. 
According to this view, human cognition stratifies the flow of temporal perception in three layers. On 
the micro level there is a perceptual stream of discrete auditive units or musical sounds. These are 
organized ‑ through binding ‑ into musical phrases or gestures, which constitute the meso level. The 
gestures are then integrated in higher order structures and become parts of musical narratives. 
Both of these processes, the binding and the integration, show strong top‑down influences.
4. Conceptualizing Music 


Musical thinking is preverbally organized, and it is reasonable to assume that a 
number of well‑known cognitive functions are involved. Among these are 
categorization, which is a simple biological function found in many species, 
proto‑narrativity and some form of conceptual integration process also known 
as blending. 
The blending model employed here is adapted from Fauconnier & Turner to 
include situatedness, introduced from the base space via the relevance space. 
a) The musical notation system can be explained as a blended structure: The 
melodic curve in one input space maps onto a temporal schema in the other. 
Overall tonal and metric structure from the relevance space stabilizes the blend. 
b)  The musical sign functions will be conceptually integrated in the following 
way: Gesture maps onto emotion, and they are integrated as inner subjective 
movement in the virtual space. Informed by the overall musical narrative, some 
understanding of the musical phrase emerges in the blend.
4a. The Musical Phrase 


            Base space                    Presentation                     Reference 




              Jazz! 




                                Relevance                 Virtual space 




                       Metric/harmonic 
                       organization          Blend 




                                                                                        space­building 
                                                                                        projection 
                                                                                        mapping 
                                                                                        emergence 
4b. Conceptualization in Music


           Basespace               Input space I                     Input space II 




            Music                   Gesture                           Emotion 




                        Relevance space             Virtual space 



                          Narrative                   Agency 


                                    Blend 


                                   Musical 
                                   phrase 
                                                                                       space­building 
                                                                                       projection 
                                                                                       mapping 
                                                                                       emergence 
           5. Preverbal Meaning Construction 



                Rhythm                             Body gesture 
             Text elements                       Semantic content 
Musical      Metrical form                         Spatial maps        Musical 
 Object          Phrase 
                                                                       Experience 
                                                Expressive Gesture 
             Vocal quality                      Affective resonance 
            Specific elements                   Acquired memory 




                                   Semantic 
                                 construction
Musical Semantics 
The structure of musical semantics can be described in the following way: 
We have an outer presentation of sounding causes, which can be called the musical 
object, and an inner representation of effects, which we call the musical experience. 
Salient features of the music will resonate in the human body in certain ways: 
    •Rhythm resonates as body gesture (“Dancing in Your Head”) with 
    emotional valence. 
    •Text elements evoke specific semantic content. 
    •Metrical form is experienced as spatial maps, routes through space. 
    •Musical phrases are expressive gestures. 
    •The quality of the human voice has strong affective resonance. 
    •Certain elements in the music will call upon acquired personal or cultural 
    memory. 
Some of the elements that arise as musical experience seem to map onto each 
other, forming meaningful networks and emerging as musical semantics. These 
processes need more detailed study. (The list is far from complete but merely 
shows some of the more common examples.)
Literature: 
1)  Daniel Stern (1985, 1998): The Interpersonal World of the Infant, London. Antonio Damasio 
    (1999): The Feeling of What Happens, London. 
2)  Rolf Inge Godøy and Harald Jørgensen (2001): Musical Imagery, Lisse. 
3)  Louis hjelmslev (1961): Prolegomena to a Theory of Language, Madison. Umberto Eco (1976): 
    A Theory of Semiotics, Chicago. 
4)  John Blacking (1973): How Musical is Man? , Seattle. 
5)  Ernst Pöppel (1994): “Temporal Mechanisms in Perception” in: International Review of 
    Neurobiology 37. 
6)  Lawrence M. Zbikowski (2002): Conceptualizing Music, Oxford. 
7)  Colwyn Trevarthen (1994): “Infant Semiosis” in Winfried Nöth (ed.): Origins of Semiosos, 
    Berlin. 
8)  Gilles Fauconnier and Mark Turner (2002): The Way We Think, New York 
9)  Per Aage Brandt (2004): Spaces, Domains and Meanings, Bern.