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									Raleigh Parks and Recreation Department Horseshoe Meeting 06-29-2006 Allen: Christopher Allen Angelone: Joe Angelone Argentati: John Argentati Ashcraft: Carol Ashcraft AW: Sue Adley-Warrick Barley: Greg Barley Beggs: Patrick Beggs Benda: Pete Benda Bickel: Linda Bickel Bishop: Erika Bishop Bowers: Susan Bowers Chris: Chris Smith Connors: John Connors Cook: Rodney Cook Cooper: Deborah Cooper Deans: David Deans Duncan: Jack Duncan F: Unidentified female speaker Farrell: Mary Alice Farrell Flynn: John Flynn Frank: Terry Frank Fuller: Candice Fuller Geiger: Travis Geiger [ph] Hailperim: Trisha Hailperim Harper: Robert Harper Hazouri: Sharon Hazouri Holtzman: Adam Holtzman Ivy: Susan Ivy Kabbendgear:Dikram Kabbendgear [ph] Kirkman: Benson Kirkman Kirschbaum: Jan Kirschbaum Knight: David Knight Koopman: Nick Koopman Leonard: Robert Leonard Little: John Little Marshall: Wayne Marshall Odom: Gary Odom Paschal: Richard Paschal Pender: Jan Pender Plack: Luci Plack Presnell-Jennette: Marsha Presnell-Jennette Ramschell: Craig Ramschell

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Reincke: Sawyer: Shouse: Singh: Smith: Taliaferro: Thorpe: Titchner: Tote: Veluski: Vigilante: Weis: Williams Winstead: Wooten:

Angela Reincke Amy Sawyer David Shouse Officer Singh Jeff Smith Jesse Taliaferro Denise Thorpe Leslie Titchner Walter Tote John Veluski Isabella Vigilante Vicki Weis Rudy Williams Robert Winstead Rachel Wooten

Kirschbaum: Welcome everybody to the special meeting of the Parks and Recreation Greenway Advisory Board. I’m Jan Kirschbaum, Chair of the Advisory Board. This is a special meeting for us to get input on the Horseshoe Farm Draft Master Plan. So at this step in the process, the Board is here to get a presentation about the plan from our consultant, and then to hear public comment. We will not be defining anything or coming up with our advice today. And so what will happen is that I’m going to introduce the chair and vice chair of the committee. They will introduce themselves and the people involved in this process, and then we’ll hear a presentation about what the plan looks like. Many of you have seen this before, but for those of you who haven’t, this will inform you as to what is going on. After that we’ll get first get comments from the individual Master Plan Committee members. They will each have the opportunity to speak if they so choose, and then from the general public. We have a sign up sheet out there. I hope everybody who wants to speak signs up. At
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the end of everyone’s comments, I will ask if there are any late comers who would like to speak. Then we will close the public comment and bring the matter back to the table. Again, I’d like to emphasize that we are not making decisions tonight, so let’s get started. I’d like to introduce Wayne Marshall and Pete Benda. Marshall: Marshall: Marshall: Should I stand? Please. Thank you Jan. I appreciate this opportunity and this wonderful turnout of people. It is a great turnout from the Board. I appreciate all of you being here also. Pete Benda is the vice chairman, and without him I could not have done this project, and I thank him publicly as I have thanked him many times privately for his assistance and guidance in helping us bring this committee to a conclusion and finishing our report. Thank you very much Pete for all of your help. I’m sure the committee feels the same way. I’d like to introduce people at the park’s system and starting with Mr. Duncan. He is the director of the parks. He has been of great help to us in guiding the committee and providing us with a large amount of information that was useful and helpful. And Dick Bailey is over here who brought forth a lot of knowledge and David Shouse. Benda: Marshall: David is over here. Okay David, I thank you for all of your assistance in conference time, meetings and discussions with us and guidance that you also gave us. And where is Shanna Davis.
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Benda: Marshall:

She is probably out in the lobby. She was helping us sign in. She was a great asset in providing detailed information to the committee and all the things that we did. And I would like to take and opportunity now, after thanking staff, for those in the committee starting on this side to stand up and introduce yourself. Is there anybody in that section? David?

Deans: Marshall: Weis: Marshall: Sawyer: Marshall: Benda: Marshall:

I’m David Deans. He was on the Master Plan committee. Do we have anybody else in this section? I’m Vicki Weis. And you? Amy Sawyer. Anybody else in this section? What about over here? and Jim Phillips. Those are the members who are here now and I suspect we’ll have others. Shanna Davis just walked in the back after signing up everybody. We appreciate her help to the very last minute on this. Again, thank you for all that you do. And then we have the HagerSmith consultants team who have prepared all this information and done literally hundreds of hours of work and consulting with staff, with the Parks Board, with the committee and with the public. They have been a great help. And Jimmy Thiem is over here if you would just stand up and let them see? I’ll know you’ll be in front of them a lot. And Jamie Loyack he was his assistant in charge, I guess I’d say—if there was a one, two punch, he was in charge. Jimmy

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did all the public addressing for us as all the committee and many of you in the public know and remember. Jan, is there anyone else we need to recognize? Kirschbaum: Nadeen? Marshall: Oh, Nadeen I went by you. Stand up so we can introduce you all as committee members. Sakowski : Marshall: I’m Nadeen Sakowski Thanks. I’m looking at Rodney [ph]. You can’t miss Rodney Cooke. [LAUGHS] Kirschbaum: And we have our council liaison, Councilor Jessie Taliaferro, and I think I saw a Councilor—Thomas Crowder? Stand please. Marshall: I will depart and take my seat, thank you.

Kirschbaum: And we will hear from Jimmy and Jaime. Jimmy Thiem: This presentation will be in two parts. In the first part we’ll just give you a brief overview of the property. In the second part we’ll just go through and describe the various features for the Master Plan. This is a view of the park property. It is 146 acres. Definitely a defining element of the park is the Neuse River, which borders it on three sides. You can see here roughly this is the northern end of the park. Access to the park is gained off of Ligon Mill Road from an existing road, off of Horseshoe Farm Road. And to this point, Ligon Mill Road would be up in this area here. Of course, Ligon Mill ties to US-401 North, just to the right, in this area. Here is another photograph of the park facility showing the general configuration. A lot of the existing area that is wooded around the perimeter is
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impacted by a floodway associated with the Neuse River. Here is a photograph looking from the north back to the site. This does a nice job of illustrating some existing facilities. There is an existing farm house here. The Master Plan recommends obtaining that farmhouse except for the addition which was felt incompatible. There is a pole barn out here, which the proposal was that that would be removed. And finally the second part, down in this area, is a proposal that that would be utilized in some sense from maintenance as the park develops. The surrounding perimeter of the property, as you can notice, is wooded. There is a piedmont levied forest area. This area has been designated as the significant natural heritage area in the North Carolina National Heritage Program. This was a key element in consideration of the development of the property. In addition, there are three wetlands on the property. There is a large wetland up in this area, a smaller one down in this one and an ephemeral wetland down in this location here. These two wetlands up in this area played a critical role in determining the overall allocation, space and use of space of the property. The center section of the property is field. There are 46 acres of field in this 146 acres of property. You will hear discussions tonight that reference these fields, because a lot of the activities are taking place in them. And because of the topographic conditions, there is, if you will, a slope or ridge right down through here that separates this area from these upper areas. This is called the lower field, and the field is referred to as a lower field. The two upper areas are roughly divided because of the use of an existing fence, which you’ll see later. We call those the north upper and the south upper fields. Rough sizes here—this is
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roughly about 22 acres, 14 acres and 10 acres. You can see in the upper corner that this is the road and access has been provided into the property. This is a drawing of the Master Plan. The main road is coming in to the property here. There is a roundabout that terminates. This is a first section of road, and then the road splits into two sections. One is servicing what we have called the park center in this area here. There is a second road which access down toward river oriented recreation area. This should give you an overall idea of the circulation of the site in terms of roads on the property. There is an extensive network of trails that run around the property. The intent was to provide trails that would allow people to circumvent the entire property so they could experience all parts of it. Also, it is an opportunity for walking, running and so forth. As we begin to go through the property, we’re going to look at particular areas, and so you’re going to begin seeing these blocks showing up. First of all we’re going to look at the northern portion of the property. If you went out there now, what you’d see as you come in—and this is photograph right here is a good illustration. This is actually looking on the existing road as you are leaving the property. There is a white, wooden rail - fence, and a row of crepe myrtles. It is a very strongly defining element of the property. This photograph here is on the other side of the fence, actually looking in a southerly direction. Again, this is just a large, open field area up in this location that is surrounded by woods. As you can see, the fields have been mowed and maintained as pasture.

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The plan calls for this area to be divided in to two fields. The field that you see labeled as meadow, the intention is that this will be used as a buffer for the surrounding residences, and in the photograph, you can see that this is an existing road that is in, and we have residences here, here and here right above the property. This will not be maintained in what you would call an athletic field-like addition. It will be left sort of wild and natural to encourage wildlife. The separation and to reinforce the buffer, there is a drainage way through here, and the proposal is to add some additional plant materials to reinforce the buffer between the existing residences and the main park property. The remainder of the field area down here will be used for open field playing area. No permanent facilities are proposed in this location. If things like field sports happen here, the proposal is that they would be temporary, like temporary backstops and so forth will be located. Part of the defining element of this open field area in this location is the white fence. The intention is that that white rail will be maintained around this area. You can see in this photograph the main road coming in with the roundabout here. We’ll be talking about the name of this road coming off which goes to the park’s center. You see this note here about public art. One of the components of this program is to have a public art program. The intent is that the public arts program would also incorporate the theme of environment, because the environmental aspects of this property have been an important part of the discussion during the Master Plan. The Master Plan shows some designated places for locations of art
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pieces, but it is also intended that there will be temporary installations, as well as looking for other opportunities to locate art throughout the park. We’re now going to move down into what is called the park center area, which is just south of there, and we will be talking about that. Again, this is another open field area with a view to the top—just looking up to the area where that pole barn I mentioned earlier is. That structure is proposed to be removed. Below you’ll see a picture of the existing farm house which is on the eastern side of this lower/upper field area. And to the left is a view looking from the upper field down into the lower field area, so it gives you an idea of the kinds of views that are available to you at the top of the slate. This is really the hub of activity for the park. When you come down the roundabout, you will come over and come down this road to arrive at this main circular area here. The main feature at this point is a building. This building is a building that houses two uses: an arts center and an environmental education center. This is designed to be a shared facility. The environmental education center is designed to have an auditorium/multi purpose room, office space, an outdoor viewing area and a library which would include interactive computers for reference. The art center side is designed to provide opportunities through classroom areas for various arts and crafts. The details for exact configuration of both of these buildings will be determined in the future as the buildings go into more detailed planning stages.

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As you move counterclockwise around this area you see the next major feature of this area, which is the group picnic area. There are two picnic shelters, each having capacity of 100 people. In the center between the two you’ll see a small building that is a restroom facility to serve those two buildings. These buildings sit right at the top of the slope and command a very prominent view out over the lower field area. To the right of that, I’ve proposed a couple of volleyball courts. This has been a very successful amenity relative to picnic areas, and so these are located in proximity to that, particularly when large groups, companies and so forth will be rented—the picnic shelters for weekends and gatherings. Just north of the volleyball courts is a playground area. This is seen as a playground that would accommodate a number of different age levels. One special feature that came up a number of times that was recommended for this was the possible incorporation of a climbing wall. The existing houses over here to the right, as I mentioned earlier, the intent is that the addition is considered to be somewhat incongruous with the base house which will be removed. Specific use of the house has not been determined. Discussion basically has evolved between potentially using it as an exhibit space with things related to the existing park/possibly a small administrative area or possibly storage. Associated with the environmental center are going to be two amphitheaters. One amphitheater is shown here in the corner. The capacity for this is roughly 50 to 60 people designed to be built into this hillside, which you see here. To give you an idea, this building sits probably about 25 to 30 feet
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above these wetlands, so this is quite a wonderful view from the center looking out over the wetlands area, and then the river is just right over here. So the main amphitheater will be designed for school groups/potentially for programs. If this was a successful element in the park we want it to have the potential for it to be expanded. A second amphitheater, which is a smaller, informal amphitheater, will be located somewhere down in the outdoor environmental area and it will be used for smaller classes and as an informal gathering space. We’re now going to move down into what is characterized as the river oriented recreation area, which is down in the southeastern portion of the land. Here are a couple of photographs of the area. The upper one is actually taken just east of the existing farmhouse—down the slope from it. As you can see, it has really sort of a very park-like look down in the area—low growing grass in a lot of the area and there are trees. It is really a very beautiful area along the river, and then below, a photograph of the river in that area. The road from the roundabout comes down the hill and terminates in a circle, which is designed as an offload area for canoes and kayakers. A primitive type launch area is designed right here. A series of wooden structures, similar to our other launches that had been used along the Neuse. The idea is to be low impact and minimize disturbances up to the shoreline of the Neuse River. There is a building right here which will be an office. It is contemplated that this facility would serve as a home for instruction and potentially canoe and kayak rentals.
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A small parking lot for about 20 cars is planned here, for kayakers who wish to drop off canoes and park in this area. The second building across the road is designed as a teaching facility, and this is really, if you will, a small picnic shelter that would have the opportunity for some audio visual capacity for teaching things around canoeing, kayaking, fishing and other topics that might be related to the area. This is a good point to pick up the trail system again and talk about the greenway. The Raleigh Parks Master Plan calls for the greenway to run along the Neuse River. In this case, the Greenway Trail is brought in through the park. This section of the trail would head South on the Neuse River, so as you approach it there is a bridge proposed here, which is proposed in association with the River Watch area. The trail will continue through the woods area, come out into the open field and then back into the woods. The intentions for the location of the trail was one, to minimize its area within this sensitive environmental areas and floodways and the Levee Forest, but at the same time to give the visitor who is traveling through there an experience of different aspects of the park environment. Two other features that are somewhat difficult to see on the plan, but if you look for them you can find. There was an interest in having a camping component. The Greenway System is going to be tied to the Mountains to the Sea Trail and possibly the East Coast Greenway Trial. Also there is some consideration we’ve heard from kayakers about having a place to stop off and potentially stay the night.

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There is a small group of primitive camping sites that have been located in this area. They would service people to stay from one to there nights in small groups. There would be restroom facilities up in this main building in this area, and these are the facilities that the campers would use. Again, a very primitive site basis and this would not have vehicular access. There is concern about the condition of the Neuse River banks, and concern if this park would be very, very popular, they wanted to discourage unlimited access. So what we’re looking for is to locate places where people can come out and view the river without having to have a lot of concerns about erosion and disturbances. There are a number of water places [ph] called observation from fishing stations, and they are designed to be low platforms—a wooden platform that would be built right at the edge of the river. These are places that people would be encouraged to come to and look at the river and fish without walking up and down the shoreline. There are some additional paths, some small, very, if you will low profile paths, which are also shown through these areas to allow people to move through this woodland area. At minimum we’re encouraging the path be at least 50 feet back from the shoreline. We move now up into the sort of northeastern section. This can be characterized as the environmental education area. This is a very dramatic area visually in the park, and really a key element of the interior is this large wetland area. This large wetland area is just right at the base of the steep slope. If you remember the earlier slide, we talked about the environmental education center
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sitting right at the top of the hill, and it sits right above this and looks down in to the woods. In fact, this is the slope area that sits between the open field area, and that center would be located in the wetlands area. Here again is another photo of the Neuse River along this section. Again, the focal point for this area is this large wetlands area here. Here is the environmental education center. A trail leads by the education center, passes the primary or largest amphitheater, comes down through this area where it comes to a combination of two sort of unique features. One is a butterfly area. This would be a meadow area that would be planted and maintained to encourage butterflies. Because this trail runs along the edge of the woodland area, it also incorporates a bird trail aspect, which would include interpretive signage as well as feeding stations and bird houses. As you come back into the woods area, you actually join a portion of the Greenway. You depart again onto this trail. There is a wetland teaching station in this location here, which has access to the wetland area. This would be a very low profile teaching station for instruction—no sanitary facilities. So basically, a half day kind of instructural center. The trail continues along and then at another point right before here [ph] it comes out again. There is another opportunity for construction or access out at the wetlands and also to take advantage of some very wonderful views down in the wetlands area. This path then continues up a slope to rejoin back in the vicinity of the parks area.
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And then we move into the center of the site. This is the lower field area—the 22 acre field that I mentioned earlier. This lower field area is a very strong, dominate visual element. When one walks into the park, when one gets just to the edge of the south upper field, there is a very large, expansive view of this open field area. Right now it is being maintained in a moat condition in the proposal for the Master Plan. So this will be used as an informal open field play area. Uses for this area are very similar to the smaller potion of the upper field area that we talked about earlier near the meadow. There will be organized activities and unorganized activities. The facilities will not be permanent to support that. The field will be mowed for safety and to promote these activities. The perimeters of this will be maintained to encourage wildlife. There will be a wildlife planting strip about 50 feet wide around the perimeter. This will be mowed occasionally—only occasionally, but will be maintained most of the time with a wildlife habitat and food source for the local wildlife in the area. That concludes my presentation. Thank you very much. Kirshbaum: Thank you very much. I want to thank everybody for the hard work—a lot of hours of meetings and work. In a minute I’m going to open this up to public comment. My hope tonight is that we’ll get as many ideas brought to the table as we can. With that in mind there will be some ground rules. Each speaker will have three minutes. As you stand at the podium you’ll see a little box with lights, and they to green, yellow, red. The yellow is a warning that you have about a minute left, and the red is stop. I would truly appreciate that you keep to that. There are a lot of people who want to speak tonight.
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As each speaker stands, I’d like you to stand up by yourself, where you live, and then say if you belong to any group or any groups of groups. If you are here with a group, if you could—the first person who speaks in that group, could identify them and have everybody stand who is with that group, that will help give us an idea of who is here. Typically Parks Board meetings are an hour to an hour and a half long. It won’t be tonight, but in the interest of keeping to our schedule, I’d appreciate it if you would refrain from clapping. Again, I would like this meeting to be an opportunity for people to speak whatever their idea may be. Sometimes clapping can be intimidating to people on different sides. It also slows down the meeting. We do have a couple of Parks Board members who have commitments after this, and we apologize in advance, but again our meetings aren’t typically as long as this one. If someone has very clearly expressed your point of view before you, it would be nice if you would not speak. This is not a polling meeting. We’re getting ideas. We’re not counting how many people say the same thing. That will not influence us. The Parks Board has already gotten a great deal of feedback on Horseshoe Farms, so what we’d really like to hear are comments and anything new and anything creative. But we don’t really need to hear about repetition tonight. Please recognize that the committee has worked really hard on this. The consultants have worked really hard on this. The staff has worked really hard on this. We must all be grateful for the effort. Tonight is not the night to comment

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on process. We will not be discussing that at our next meeting. That will be a council issue, so we are really looking for comments on the plan. Lastly, the sign up sheet is in front of me. If people do come in late after the sign up sheet has been done, I will ask at the end for walk-ins who would like to speak, and then we’ll close comments. Again, thanks for coming and thanks for all your work. I hope to hear some creative and new ideas tonight. Let’s get started. If people could come down to the front before their turn—I’ll call out three names, and we can line up and get started. First on the list is Kirk Yoo. And next will be… Howard: It is Carlton Howard. In the interest of limiting it, it is just going to be myself and Terry. Kirschbaum: I have one more thing. Sorry—I am very disorganized. I do want to recognize the Horseshoe Farms committee members first, and see if any of them would like to speak. Deans: My name is David Deans, I live at 4601 Westminster Drive. First of all I’d like to thank you guys for your service. It is a lot of work and I appreciate what it is. I want to urge you to recommend this plan in its current form. Our committee has spent months studying data, listening to the public input, discussing options of how to best utilize this magnificent piece of property. At the end of this process, our committee unanimously approved the plan. Before our committee, the city had a different committee of citizens which developed the Neuse River Regional Park Master Plan. Those citizens spent two years that outlined the relationship of

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different parks within this area where different parks served different needs according to their character and according to the need. The Horseshoe Farm Park Master Plan is consistent with their work. If the public needs more active recreation in the future, the planning process allows for master plans to be revised in the future to be modified. For the next 20 years, the city already owns community park land in this area that can accommodate the active recreation community park land that is currently undeveloped. The city can also acquire additional parklands as the population grows in this area. If the future public need is for more nature and wildlife viewing, I don’t believe it will be possible to remove the gymnasium, however if the future needs are for additional facilities, they can be placed. This is a special place. So please everyone side on less development, and please respect the years of work and study of two master planning committees. Thank you. Kirschbaum: Thank you. Sawyer: My name is Amy Sawyer and I attended all but one of the 20, plus Horseshoe Farm Park master planning meetings. I live at 2929 Horseshoe Farm Road. I’m a neighbor of the park, but I’m not an ____. I’ve been supportive of the idea of this park since I moved to Horseshoe Farm four years ago. I was born and raised in Raleigh and lived in Raleigh 30 of 42 years. I grew up playing in Raleigh parks, Kentwood, Pullen, Powel Drive and Lake Johnson. I have a BFA degree, Fine Art and Art Education, and I’ve worked as a professional artist for 20 years. For the past 10 years I’ve been working in the field of exhibit design, history exhibits are my specialty. In September I became the primary exhibit
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designer for the North Carolina Historic Sites, which is an agency of the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources. My job is to design museum displays and interpretive graphics for most of our 27 North Carolina historic sites. As a quick disclaimer, I’m not here as a representative of this agency and my views and opinions are not of the agency. I am here as a volunteer community resource in support of this park. This draft Master Plan allows for a unique blend of recreation, nature, parks and culture. I believe the concepts outlined in this plan point this park in the best direction for current and future residents of the community. This community has been here for a long time—long for the City of Raleigh. It has always been home to innovative, hardworking people. I’m going to read an excerpt from a 1922 History of Wake County book: There was, over near Rolesville, on the Neuse River, quite early in the 19th Century, one infant industry which was far ahead of its time. Several citizens of Wake County have recently given accounts of a cottonseed oil mill, near which pressed 10 gallons of oil in a day and produced much oil cake in great, cheese-shaped masses. They’re taken from something like a cider press. This innovative oil mill was later known, in the 1870s, as Dr. Miller’s Oil Mill, was located where the future canoe launch and greenway bridge and the park were. Apparently all that is left of the mill is a stone pillar in the riverbank, and the remnants of the mill pond are that ephemeral wetland. The residents still give accounts of this mill, which vanished before 1900. This community park can allow for current and future residents to learn about their community’s history. It can help preserve and strengthen this
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community’s identity long into the future. This park can be as innovative as that mill. We should add a new note in our community’s history. There is, over near Rolesville, on the Neuse River, one city park which is far ahead of its time. I ask you to respect this committee’s hard work. This planning committee carefully developed for uncommon experiences in an extraordinary place. This is what the community has been asking for all along. Please recommend this plan, as drafted for approval by the Raleigh City Council. Kirschbaum: Thank you. Weis: I’m Vicki Weis, member of the Master Planning Committee, and I live at 2901 Horseshoe Farm Road, and I was at all the meetings. At the May 25, 2005 meeting of the Horseshoe Farm Master Planning Committee, Jan Kirschbaum, your chairman, addressed our committee and told us we had to consider all forms of recreation for the park, active as well as passive. So for six months, from the public meeting on March 30, 2005, to the public meeting on November 16, 2005, we listened politely while the consultants led the discussions and park staff presented statistics on registrations for parks department programs, demographics on population projections for the northeast district, etc, etc. Obviously, to me, they were lobbying for revenue producing, programmable active recreation at the Horseshoe Farm. At the August 17, 2005 meeting, various program directors of the city park staff stood up and told the committee what kinds of facilities they would like to see in the park for their divisions. However, the committee heard an entirely different vision for the

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Horseshoe Farm Park from members of the public. Starting with the first public comment meeting on March 30, 2005. Although the Master Planning Committee was never given the opportunity to discuss the results of this meeting, HagerSmith did provide us with an eight page list of all the comments received, which were overwhelmingly in favor of keeping the park as natural as possible to preserve its existing special character. This trend continued through all 19 of our committee meetings. Every one of our committee meetings was open to the public, and all members of the public were welcome to speak before the end of each meeting. On occasion, we did have members of various athletic groups address the committee, such as the representative from Pop Warner football at the May 25, 2005 meeting. These individuals did not come to more than one meeting—did not give us any reasons why the Horseshoe Farm Park was specifically the best place for their activity or even indicate that they had ever been to the Horseshoe. Most of the public comments at the end of each meeting pointed out the special nature of the Horseshoe Farm and were consistently in favor of keeping the Horseshoe Farm a nature park focused on river oriented recreation and environmental education. This vision is also supported by the 2002 survey of Raleigh residents in tables 1 and 13 of appendix C of the Raleigh Parks Comprehensive Plan. In table 1, latent demand, the top seven items viewing wildlife, arts and crafts classes, picnicking with family, walking in natural areas, art shows and canoeing are all accommodated in this final draft Master Plan for the Horseshoe Farm Park. This final draft Master Plan also conforms to City
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Council-approved Neuse River Corridor Regional Master Plan, which I believe designated the Horseshoe Farm as a nature preserve. At the November 16, 2005 public meeting and during the 30-day public comment period, the overwhelming majority of comments that we received about the first draft Master Plan, requested that the Master Planning Committee remove the dog park, the indoor active recreation center and the tennis courts. Kirschbaum: It’s time to end. Weis: I’m almost finished. At the next meeting on December 7, 2005, the Master Planning Committee responded to the input received from the public and voted 8 to 5 to remove these three elements. In the end, we listened to the public, not the Parks Department. So this final draft Master Plan successfully fulfills the goal of the master planning policy to give the public more input and to be involved in their parks. Kirschbaum: Please sit down. Weis: I hope you will endorse it wholeheartedly. This is a good plan, and this is what the people want. Thank you. Kirschbaum: Next Master Plan Committee member? Sakowski: Hi. Nadeen Sakowski. I live on Battery Crest [ph] Road in Wake Forest, about a mile and a half from the park. Horseshoe Farms Park is indeed a unique area located in the midst of a burgeoning population. Its natural division between the upper and lower areas and affords the opportunity for compromise that other parks don’t present. However, the plan before us does not represent a compromise and instead blatantly ignores the fact that there are a large number of
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houses in the area that are underserved in terms of recreation. If you look at the developments about to be constructed, you’ll find even more houses are about to be built in its radius. We were supposed to build a park that served the growing needs of the city, and I fear we’ve failed. We have several nature parks in the area, and another in the works. That doesn’t diminish Horseshoe Park or make it less special, but it does remind us that there are other interest that have to be met as well. And the increasing demand is not the answer. Some of the elements removed from the park could well have been left and co-existed, leaving the character of the park with its woods and wetlands intact. The dog park, for instance, is one element whose removal makes little sense. The stated concern is that the turkeys and deer will be disturbed. With the dog park at the entrance, the majority of the dog owners will come to the dog park and leave and rarely walk the rest of the grounds with their dogs. Without a dog park, the dog owners will still come, but they will venture through virtually every inch of the grounds. The fact that the dogs will be leashed will mean nothing to the animals that smell and hear them. A dog park costs little to build and maintain. More importantly, the dog park represents much more to a lot of people than a place for dogs to play. People come to the dog park not just to socialize their dogs and give them off-leash exercise they so desperately need, but they also come because we are a community. Millbrook and Oakwood are outstanding successes, but two dog parks in a city our size is hardly adequate. Horseshoe can eliminate some of the
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overcrowding experienced at Millbrook and extend the experience to people in its radius. If you want to see a success, look at the Millbrook dog park. It’s the first place many new Raleigh residents find. It is a place where the young and old interact without barriers. A grieving dog owner comes to bemoan the loss of a family member; the sick come for moral support; the lonely come for companionship and new dog owners come to introduce their new friends. Not long after it opened, the News & Observer noted that if you want to find out what is happening in Raleigh, go to the dog park. It is truly a place where friendships and bonds are formed both by people and their dogs. We have a saying on our Millbrook tee-shirts, “It is a place where dogs bring their people to play,” and it is true. But there are too many people and too many dogs, and we’re missing too many opportunities to have similar success stories. Thank you very much. Kirschbaum: Thank you. Are there any other Master Planning Committee members? Marshall: Thank you Jan, Wayne Marshall, chairman of the Master Planning Committee. Having set with you, I know you’re going to have to make some tough decisions. I want you to understand that this committee work—it has been in session 15 months, but we worked diligently for about 14, I think. Pete, wouldn’t you agree with that? That was a long time and a lot of meetings. That is more than either Pete or I want to count. I want you to know that there was not unanimity in this committee many times. Many of the questions and many of the issues that were voted on came out 6 to 5. That is not 15, but we had several members who couldn’t be there and
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some who basically resigned out of frustration of another hearing with one side of the issue. However, I might add that the votes were very split. I caution this board to understand this. And the last night, we did have a unanimous approval of the committee after 14 months of the plan that you see before you. And we also had another unanimous vote that night. It was called a vote to adjourn. Many of us were tired, many of us had been beseeched upon and brought to bear with a great deal of public pressure. There were times when the issues became so entangled that there were many votes that came in at 6 to 5 or 4 to 7. I want you to respect this. As you go about making your decision, remember that there was great controversy on this committee. The Master Plan that you see before you had many elements removed, and many people in our community were not represented. Be careful, walk gently, and understand that what you give to the Council, they have to like also. Take to it what you feel is your part, but please do not understand that this master plan that is being brought to you represents unanimously what the Board wanted and what the members wanted, because many of them left. I think there were so many issues that came before this committee that were not represented by people who work, who have children and who need to use this park. They were not present. There were some who had the time and the energy and maybe retirement to be constant at the meetings and forever bringing forward their view, and I many cases it prevailed. But there are a lot of people who are denied usage of this 146 acre park—there are 24 acres in the low land
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that is not even going to be used for anything but looking at from the picnic shelters. Please take the time, I ask you, as chairman of the committee, to understand that there are a lot of people who were not represented in this discussion, but there were some persistent people who came every night to advise us of what we should be doing for them. I hope you recommend well. Kirschbaum: Thank you Wayne. That would be the last committee member. One more? Phillips: My name is Jim Phillips, and I’ll keep this very brief, but I wanted to say that I do have two kids and I feel like this park is representative and good for them. I think the open space—the preservation that we did is good for the Park Service, and I think it works well for what the city needs. We used the natural recreation areas and other areas of the city, and this is a pristine place and I think we need to keep it that way as much as possible. Kirschbaum: All right. On to the general public. Kirk Yoo? Yoo: Hi. Can the guys—or the folks from the Raleigh area kind of stand up? Basically, we want to thank you for letting us speak tonight. We’d like to get you all to consider putting disc golf on the Master Plan. Disc golf is a low maintenance, low cost addition to any park. It is low impact. It has a very low economic impact on both the Parks Department and the players. If you want to play you can spend as little as $6 and play for the rest of your life as long as you don’t lose your Frisbee. [LAUGHS] We don’t need much land to put in a course. I’ve heard that there are some portions of the park that aren’t going to be used. We could put in a great course in about 18 acres. It has an extremely low cost-per-user. For impact—for
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volume of traffic, our two current courses, Kentwood and Cedar Hills are a good indication that we need another course in the area. It has been more than 20 years since we’ve added a course to Raleigh, so we really do need another course. A single disc golf course can entertain more than 90 players at one time. As players we play virtually everyday, no matter what the weather. I’ve seen folks playing when ice is coming down, and that is just casual players going out to have some fun. Disc golf can work out fairly well for the parks because if it comes down to it we can actually put in a course at zero cost to the parks. We have been known to put in a course as quickly as one day. Disc golf can decrease any undesirable activity in underutilized areas of the parks. A good example is Charlotte having a park where they had some undesirable activity, the local community went to the park and said please do something about it or else close the course. They put in a disc golf course and virtually all the undesirable activity went away. Disc golf can serve as a source of revenue for Parks and Rec through disc rentals, disc sales and course usage fees. It is definitely a source of revenue for the city, county and states for taxes on food, gas and lodging, for permanent players and tourists, as well as sales tax from many retailers in Raleigh that sell this. I personally traveled to more than 37 places across the U.S. every year just to play disc golf. Thanks for your time. I hope you guys consider putting disc golf in the Master Plan.

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Frank:

Hi, my name is Terry Frank. I live at 3616 Willow Bluff Drive in Raleigh, it is off of Buffalo Road. I’m with the Raleigh Area Disc League, and also with the Raleigh Area Women’s Disc Golf Group, and I wanted to thank you for letting the public speak on this. I just wanted to reiterate on what Kirk just said and expand it by a little bit. Disc golf is one of the fastest growing sports in the country and has been for about the last 10 to 15 years. I know that a lot of people have the image of a Frisbee golfer is a kid in a tie-dyed shirt and some flip flops. But you may be surprised to know that over 40% of disc golfers are in their 30s or older. Our national sport, the Professional Disc Golf Association has thousands of members and quite a few of them are in their 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s—a lot of people pick it up in high school or college, but it is a lifelong sport. And the impact it has on the local parks is so low. I mean, we love the odd terrain, you know, weird trees and other parts of the park that wouldn’t necessarily be used for anything else. Disc golfers love anything weird—we’re there. For me personally, in the Raleigh area and disc golf’s availability was one of the reasons I moved here. I’m an attorney. I was one of those tie-dye wearing flip flop kids, but now I’m a lawyer and I still play disc golf. There are a little over 2,000 courses in the country now. Sixty of them are in North Carolina— Raleigh has two. Charlotte-Mecklenburg has added 13 courses since our most recent disc golf course here in the area. I, and another professional disc golf player, Mindy Snodgrass, started a group this year called the Raleigh Area Women’s Disc Golf Group, in an effort to try to get more women to play the

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sport. The response has been amazing. We’ve had over 50 different women come out and play. We give lessons. Unfortunately, we couldn’t play at Cedar Hills, because it was too crowded, so we moved out to Knightdale, which as more courses than Raleigh. Fayetteville has more courses than Raleigh. I just wanted to urge you to consider disc golf—adding a course to the park. It is a wonderful addition to any park, but we can work with any terrain, with what we’ve got—and there is a real need in this area. Kirschbaum: Next three speakers: John Connors, John Link, and John Argentati? . Connors: I need some help passing some information around to everybody. My name is John Connors. I’m with the Wake Audubon Society. I appreciate the opportunity to be here. Wake Audubon is a conservation organization with 1,200 members in Wake County. We are active. We have twice been awarded the Fred Fletcher Outstanding Volunteer Award from the Parks Department. I haven’t brought all 1,200 people with me, but there are some members here with me today if you would stand up? Our chapter has a long history with Horseshoe Farm Park. Our membership has served on both the Neuse River Regional Park Master Plan Committee and the Horseshoe Park Master Plan Committee. Wake Audubon is generally supportive of the draft plan, and we offer concrete suggestions where we think the plan can be improved. You’ll see those in the packet I gave you. We remain, however, wary of the planning process, because we are aware that
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some members of this board have actually been working to alter this draft. We feel compelled to address some of those concerns, as well as offer those suggestions. I first want to bring up the Neuse River Regional Park Master Plan. You should all become familiar with this document. In October 1995, the Neuse River Regional Master Plan Committee was convened and spent six months developing a conceptual plan describing recreational opportunities for the entire Neuse River Corridor. Wake Audubon had two people on that committee and it was approved by the City Council in 1996. Some of the recommendations include providing recreational activities without conflict—I quote. They identified Horseshoe Farms as having a Natural Heritage site. We know that. They had a designation of three general categories of recreational facilities and parkland: active, passive and nature reserve. I’m quoting here. Nature reserves are primarily selected because they contain unique environmental characteristics which provides secluded educational and interpretive opportunities related to the ecology of the area. They are essential for preservation of some wildlife species currently existing in the corridor. Several unique sites are identified in the inventory using Horseshoe Bend Park—slight name change. But then they go on to describe what Horseshoe Bend Park is. And once again I quote. Horseshoe Bend Park, as shown in this plan, centers around and expands out of Horseshoe Farms, a site already owned by the City of Raleigh. There is a pedestrian bridge to the Capital Area Soccer League and Perry Creek Greenway to the west, expands recreational opportunities and so forth.
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So this was identified as a nature reserve. That was the charge in 1996. Somehow in 2005 when the Horseshoe Farm Master Planning Committee was convened, they were asked to plan the park as a community park, and that is a very different set of guidelines. It is not the same as a nature reserve. The stage was set for the deep divisions among the committee members as already described, and as the community as a whole. Kirschbaum: Your time is up. Connors: We’ve experienced this changed designation as a betrayal of our expectations and all the hard work that we have put in on both these committees. You can read the rest of my comments. There are a lot of creative suggestions on how to make this plan better. Thank you for your time. Link: John Link, 2916 Neuse Rock Trial. My comment is simple. As a resident who is adjacent to the park, I appreciate what is there. My wife and I have been to most of the meetings. We appreciate the efforts that have been made to be considerate of the neighborhood. The one additional concern we have that does not get addressed by the planning committee is the traffic. It is a small road. As I get older I get more and more concerned about emergency situations and the ability of emergency vehicles to get into our neighborhood. I would encourage you to consider that before you put anything concretely into this. And by the way, I do not belong to any groups, unless you want to consider AARP, and I don’t think that even needs to be mentioned. [LAUGHS]

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I would like to address Wayne’s comment on the 6 to 5 vote because we were at the meetings. And while that is true in many cases—it represents the make up of the committee. It is NOT true of the public input. When you looked at the meeting that was held at Durant Road, it was not 6 to 5 input. After the public input was gathered, we saw votes change on the committee because committee members recognized what the public was asking for. And at that point we also saw members who resigned because their views were not being represented and their views were not represented by the public input either. It was your process to define public input, and we do appreciate all the consideration that you have given to the neighbors. Kirschbaum: Thank you. After John, Rodney Cook, Angela Reincke, Trisha Hailperim. Argentati: Hi, my name is John Argentati. I live at 2429 Lullwater Drive, and I am a member of the Wake Audubon Society. I’d like you to recommend the plan, largely as drafted, but with the changes that Wake Audubon has suggested to you. I do have a couple of concerns about some of the proposed changes to the plan. I am an athlete and I support athletics and I love dogs. However, I oppose adding tennis courts, a dog park and gymnasium to this precious natural resource. When some people see open space, they think of things like ball fields and dog parks and tennis courts. I am not one of them, and I am not alone. The fastest growing recreational activity in the United States is bird watching. Over 50 million Americans enjoy watching birds and other wildlife. There are a few places in Wake County where one can find wild turkeys and eastern spadefoot toads. Horseshoe Farms is one of them. I’d like to urge
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you to recommend the plan largely as drafted with the few changes that Wake Audubon recommended. Thank you very much. Kirschbaum: Next is Rodney Cook. Cook: My name is Rodney Cook, 5317 Quail Meadow Drive, North Raleigh. I am chairman of the Friends of Millbrook dog park, and I guess self-proclaimed expert on dog park behavior and its effect, because I have been, on a daily basis, for the past three years, to the dog park. I think people have concerns who have not been to the park, that I’d like to address. The dog park doesn’t change the character of nature. It’s not going to have the wild ducks or the frogs leave the area except for the one or one and a half acres that it sits on. The only structure you have is a fence, so that one and a half acre is affected. It is going to be crowded because the dog parks are very popular. But if you go to Millbrook, the woods all around Millbrook still have the same squirrels and the same rabbits that have been there forever. It does not affect the area. As a matter of fact, I contend it has a positive effect in that people in that area have dogs. About 1/3 of the households in North Carolina have animals. A lot of those people are just now learning what dog parks are and they are liking it. I hear it everyday; we get emails everyday at our website. People are going to Horseshoe with their dogs. It is that simple. It is a matter of whether or not they come to a park that has no facilities, no poop bags, and they just have no boundaries—they are allowed to go anywhere in the park. Or whether we provide a facility, right at the beginning, right as you come in that will be partially in the
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woods. It wouldn’t have to be more than an acre and a half. The only negative effect it would have, and that gentleman is right, is it would bring people there, but that can’t be a negative to this committee. I had told the City of Raleigh that my projections for Millbrook was that the biggest danger or problem they would have is overcrowding. That turned out to be the facts. No children, knock on wood, have been injured. It has been a great place for the socialization. I endorse everything Nadeen said. I don’t need to repeat all that, but it is a great park facility. The two that we have opened have been very successful. And I would like for the neighbors around there to realize that instead of having a negative impact it is going to have a positive impact. It is going to control where the people that bring their dogs go—either all over the park or to the one area in front. As far as affecting nature’s impact, it doesn’t. If you want to check on that, just go over to Millbrook and walk outside the dog park in the wooded areas. They are wooded areas the same as they always were. I ask you to consider that. I’ve got two seconds, so I’ll get out early. [LAUGHS] Kirschbaum: Angela…? Reincke: Good evening Madam, Chairman, members of the Board and Staff. My name is Angela Reincke and I’m the Land and Titlement Manager for Centex Homes. Our offices are located at 2301 Sugar Bush Road in Raleigh. As a matter of background, I have a landscape architecture degree from Perdue University, I have worked as parks planner for a 200,000 resident community. I was senior planner and principal planner for the Town of Apex and Cary respectively, and
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Raleigh Parks and Recreation Department Horseshoe Public Meeting 06-29-2006 Page 35

currently serve as Chair of the Apex Parks Advisory Commission, having been a member since 1999. As a professional, I appreciate the good work that Raleigh Parks and Recreation Staff and the members of this Board have done in providing parks, open space and recreation opportunities in this community. In addition, to having recently approved 150 acre nature park in Apex, I applaud the efforts of the committee and staff for their time and commitment to a project of this scope. As some of you may or may not know, Centex is currently building a new Master Plan Community called Highland Creek, which is located on the west side of 401, just north of the Neuse River Bridge. This community is approved to have approximately 1,100 homes and will contain over three miles of greenway, just under 50 acres of open space including pocket parks [ph], the largest of which is just over one acre in size. Centex is also planning to build a $4 million recreation amenity, centrally located and accessible by the internal pedestrian system. We are excited to be in this area, and more importantly looking forward to being part of a great community and working with the City of Raleigh as we build and eventually complete Highland Creek. When we first heard about the Horseshoe Farm Park, we were very excited to see such a large park near our new community. Centex is very aware of the needs for both passive and active recreation as part of a well-planned neighborhood. All of our market research shows that our home buying customers desire recreational amenities and facilities, not only within our neighborhoods, but
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also in close proximity to them. Access to parks with active and passive recreation facilities, schools and transportation networks are all important components to the development of a desirable community. Therefore, we believe that having components like Horseshoe Farm Park will be a great asset to our development and to all the residents in this part of the city. We would therefore like to express our support for a plan that has both active and passive recreational facilities. To build on the amenities that we have proposed in our property, we believe that a balanced plan that gives everyone an opportunity enjoy nature and participate in recreational activities of their choice is the appropriate direction for Horseshoe Farm Park. Thank you for your time and opportunity to speak on this matter. Kirschbaum: Nick Koopman, John Veluski and Robert Leonard. Hailperim: I’m Trisha Hailperim. I live at 1301 Cool Spring Road. I’m a dog lover, I’m a member of Wake Audubon. I support the park be in as natural a state as possible. I think public comment has been clear about that. I think there has been a democratic process. I’m for passive use only, basically. As a dog lover, some of the points that were made were well-taken. I agree that we need more dog parks. I just don’t think that Horseshoe Park is the appropriate venue for that. I’d like to reiterate that I think we’ve got a good plan. Let’s go with it and move on. Kirschbaum: Thank you. Nick Koopman?

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Koopman:

I’m Nick Koopman from Lowry Drive in Raleigh. I think Rodney forgot to ask those that were for the dog park to stand up and say that they are here. We don’t have to repeat what was said, but we support it 100%

Kirschbaum: Thank you. John Veluski? Veluski: Good evening, I’m John Veluski of Battery Crest Lane in Wake Forest. I was not planning on speaking tonight, so I have a bunch of disjointed, uncoordinated, rambling notes and I ask you to bear with me. First of all, I’d like to say that I am very much in favor of preserving nature. I’ve been a member of the Sierra Club for a number of years. I take my dog hiking through Falls Lake every time I get a chance. I love it. That is my church, my temple—it is where I worship. I’ve been to a number of the committee meetings and they were very acrimonious, contentious and had a lot of turmoil. The reasons are varied, and I’m not going to try to dig into that except to say that I think there was one group of parties that had a vested interest in keeping it exactly the way it is, which is nice, but that is all it is. In terms of nature areas around here we have Shank Forest, we have Falls Lake, we have Durant Nature Park, some place called Sydnor White which I never heard of until 10 minute ago. There was a very large, recent land grant with the stipulation that it be kept solely as a nature preserve. There is not a shortage of nature. We could always use more nature, of course, but it is not like we’re dying of thirst for nature here. There are a huge number of new homes going into that immediate area.
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The question that comes up is where are people going to go? As Rodney said, they’re going to go to the Horseshoe Park and they’re going to take their dogs there. It is a question of do you want to have a controlled outlet or do you want to have a random, whatever happens type of thing. I think a nature preserve would be better served by having it be isolated and controlled. If we can afford eight acres for a butterfly farm, we can certainly afford a couple of acres for a dog park. But I think one of the drawbacks to the plan the way it is, is that it has been pretty much presented as an either/or. It is either all natural, all nature, all passive and no interaction type things other than to sit and watch, or it goes the other way with basketball, tennis, etc. I think there is room for a compromise, and the compromise being one half being more activity-oriented and the other half—the lower half probably, being more nature oriented. I’ve got 40 seconds left and nothing left to say. Thank you for your time. Kirschbaum: Richard Paschal, Greg Ramschell, Marsha Presnell-Jennette are next. Leonard: My name is Robert Leonard, I live at 1023 Trollingwood Lane in Raleigh. I am a mortgage loan processor for the state employee and local government at federal credit unions, and I am a representative of the Raleigh Area Disc League. I want to paint a picture for y’all. If you go to a softball tournament, people bring drinks, families bring newspapers and people smoke. After the tournament is over, you leave and you see nothing but litter. Imagine every time someone littered during the tournament their team was assessed and out? Don’t you think litter would go down?

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In disc golf, that is exactly what we do. The very first rule in the Professional Disc Golf Association Handbook states, rule 801.01, “Littering is a courtesy violation,” and it also later states that courtesy violations are a one throw penalty to that player. It also says that players are to extinguish their cigarettes buts and carry their buts to a trashcan. Disposing the cigarette but on the ground is considered a courtesy violation. That is one of the many examples of our how our sport polices itself in concern to the environment. And also, under the rules, players are not allowed to alter living things. To quote rule 803.05, a player may not move, alter, bend, break or hold back any part of any obstacle while on the course. Disc golfers want the course beautiful for disc golfers and for others. Building a course may sound like a nightmare, but as disc golfers we beg to differ. Most things traditional in parks such as softball fields, tennis courts, soccer fields and basketball courts require destruction of the park to build those areas. In disc golf we say to leave those things. We want those trees. That creates more of a challenge, and more of a challenge for us means more fun. Also, many courses have been known to add pine straw and needles to the course, not only to add to the beauty, but to add to the challenge. Imagine trying to land a Frisbee from 350 away on hay. It is not very easy. The only fear I hear from most people about installing a disc golf course is actually the metal baskets that are required to be put on the course. But according to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, they actually allow all our targets and tee areas, not only in dammed areas, but in flood planes.
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My final point is quite simple: beautiful terrain, rolling hills, winding paths through thick forest, lakes—they are things we see at Horseshoe Farms. Disc golf does not want to destroy these. We simply want to play around them. That is more of a challenge. That is what we love about our sport. Pretty much everything I’ve heard tonight has been simple. Whatever the group that has presented, they have had one common theme. Whatever it is, they just want the environment to be safe and the park not to be altered. If you’re looking for something to do that, that’s disc golf. Thank you. Paschal: Hi, I’m Richard Paschal, I’m at 2905 Haven Road in Raleigh. I’m an electrical contractor. I’m also a bird watcher and a dog owner. But one of my main concerns here is for the health and fitness of most of the people in the area. First of all, I want to praise the vision of many parks department for installing fitness courses in many of our parks. Those provide a real defined structure that lets people get the exercise that they need. Most Americans need more exercise, but unfortunately they don’t want exercise if it is seen as a chore. What we need is a way to draw people into participating in more outdoor activities. If we want to have a real positive effect on the life of the average citizen, we’ll lure them in to getting some exercise. One of the ways to draw people in is with a game of skill. Consider the State Fare, everybody wants to throw the darts at the balloons or throw the ball through the hoop or do the ring toss—everybody wants to try the ring toss. Imagine if you are standing on a tee of a disc golf course. You’ve got a target down there at the bottom of the fairway and if you’ve got a disc or a Frisbee in
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your hand, you just can’t resist throwing it. It makes you want to play. You should see a first timer playing. He does his body language—he is leaning, “Come on! Come on! Get in there.” You know when you see somebody leaning like that they are having fun. They just can’t wait to go and get their disc and pick it up and throw it again. And once they get it in the basket, they can’t wait to go get it and go to the next tee because they want to try the next one. In this way, it lures the people in to completing the whole course. They go all the way around the whole course before they even know it, and they’re having so much fun they don’t even realize that they’ve burned a 100 calories. Disc golf is a way to encourage people to get out and to do something active. Anyone can play—young and old alike. I think people have played in wheelchairs and crutches. We’ve even had blind players. We put a noise maker on the basket and had people throw it in that. We even had one blind guy who made a hole in one. You know that made his day. Anyway, fitness trails, they provide a framework for a structured workout that disc golf does in a similar way. It provides the structure that the people need to make a regular habit out of physical activity. A lot more people will use the disc golf course and it is a lot more fun. Thank you. Ramschell: My name is Craig Ramschell. I live at 712 Coventry Court here in Raleigh. I’m a watchmaker and men’s jeweler. Let me tell you a little bit about our group, the Raleigh Area Disc League. The Raleigh Area Disc League has volunteered thousands of hours to the Raleigh area parks system since 1984 doing

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maintenance, environmental work, making aesthetic improvements at Kentwood and Cedar Hills Park. For our hard work, our leader’s founder, on behalf of the club, has received the Fred Fletcher Volunteer Award. The club has supported the United Way and the Food Bank of Eastern North Carolina for over 20 years. We have also promoted disc golf as a healthy sport to elementary phys ed classes for several years. The Raleigh Area Disc League has worked unseen in our community for the community and to promote all disc sports, but mostly the sport we love, disc golf. To sum up what we’ve mentioned here this evening, the Raleigh Parks System will benefit from disc golf at Horseshoe Farm and Park. Disc golf has very low upfront costs and almost no maintenance costs. The frequent use of both Kentwood and Cedar Hills demonstrates the high value per user for such an inexpensive park feature. Even with moderate use, a disc golf course costs less than 7 cents per round over the life of the targets. There is no other sports facility that has such a low cost per user. Ultimately we don’t need park money. We can use the old targets from Cedar Hills. All we need is use of the land. Disc golf at Horseshoe Farm Park would benefit the public as well. More and more people every year are discovering disc golf at our two existing courses. Visit either course on any weekend or weekday night, especially in the warmer months and you’ll find kids and older folks like me and families. You should see the families—they are great. They are

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absolutely wonderful. They are all there at a Raleigh park for low-cost healthy fun that is disc golf. Lastly, Horseshoe Farm Park will benefit from disc golf. Disc golf will have a minimal affect on a nature park. We don’t bulldoze fairways, there is no mass concrete like a tennis court, no lights like a baseball field—only the forest and the targets. After 22 years of patiently working for a new course in the Raleigh Parks System, Horseshoe Farm Park is the right place at the right time. Thank you. Kirschbaum: Thank you. After Marsha will be Linda Bickel, Jeff Smith and Christopher Allen. Presnell-Jennette: Hello, I’m Marsha Presnell-Jennette. I live at 618 Stacy Street. I want to

talk for just a minute about the Neuse River Corridor Master Plan. In 1995, that Master Planning Committee had 21 members, at least nine were current members of the Parks, Recreation, and Greenway Advisory Board or past members. Other members of that committee had backgrounds that included environmentalists and Parks and Recreation experts. It was a group of citizens that appreciated the value of parks to our community. I would like to encourage you to look at the Horseshoe Farm Park plan in light of the Neuse River Corridor Plan. If you will take some time to familiarize yourself with the Neuse River Corridor Master Plan document, you will note that there are nine recommendations on page four of that document for developing the Neuse River Corridor as a regional park. Item five recommends identifying and protecting the parcels of land that are wetlands or rare habitats for flora and fauna.
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Items two and three of that list include recommendations for establishing a steering committee to develop concepts for the Neuse River Corridor and establishing a committee of citizens to revise and review recommendations of the steering community. Clearly the NRC Committee saw the importance of continued public input as the area grows increasingly suburban. Now, I have never heard of these. I was a member of this board for six years—the Parks Board, and I never heard of those committees. I would like to encourage that the Parks, Recreation, and Greenway Advisory Board evaluate the validity of forming the committee and the citizen’s advisory committee as recommended in the NRC plan. As you look at these situations with Horseshoe Farms, you are grappling and struggling with the same issues that the Master Plan Committee looked at. The Neuse River Corridor Plan was enthusiastically endorsed by the Parks Department, by the Parks, Rec and Greenway Advisory Board, by City Council. It is a well thought out plan and reflects the committee’s desire, to quote out of that document, “Strike a balance between active and passive uses, conservation and development.” That plan also says, quoting again, “This Master Plan, including all its components emphasizes the relationship between resource conservation and recreation value.” So as you look at the issues of Horseshoe Farm Park, again consider the relationship. Consider the earlier document, and also look at the parcels of land that the City already owns for future parks in the Northeast section. Consider how accessible the future parks are to existing neighborhoods as well as future
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developments. There are other tract lands already purchased, waiting to be funded, and those Sydnor White, Watkins Road and Alvis Farm, and maybe others, I don’t know. I applaud the Horseshoe Farm Master Planning Committee’s suggestion that the City Council fund the development of those parks. I hope the Parks Board will endorse those recommendations. I have more comments than I’m giving. I’ll respect your request that I stop and hand my sheet to someone on your staff. Thank you. Bickel: Hello. My name is Linda Bickel, 2908 Neuse Rock Trail in Wake Forest. I urge you to adopt the current plan without changes. First, it strikes a balance between recreation and respect for the unique qualities of this site with its encircling rivers, significant natural heritage areas, diverse plants and wildlife—almost 200 species—and cultural history stretching back thousands of years. Second, the plan is aligned with what people say they want. From the 2002 parks survey to the ongoing consistent public input in the planning process. And we’ve included what those with relevant expertise recommend. Third, it is in line with the earlier Neuse River Master plan, which envisions a string of parks along the Neuse River Corridor with facilities and activities that match each site, finally a plan—a culmination of over a year of education, discussion and debate which was unanimously approved. The scope and pace of development on 401 and the nearby area has dramatically increased. There has been pressure to use Horseshoe Farms to serve this development with more developments.

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But in response, we need places like Horseshoe Farm even more. There are more suitable locations, Sydnor White for example, to provide high intensity recreation with better access and without Horseshoe Farm’s unique features. Some argue, “Why can’t we put everything on this site?” I walk there almost daily and have seen the powerful effect that this timeless place has on visitors of all ages. We intuitively know, and studies show that nature renews our bodies, minds and spirits and it is a great site to teach how vital it is to protect our environment. From the Native American saying, “We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children.” Here are just a few of the words people have used to describe Horseshoe Farm, “Refuge to appreciate nature’s quite beauty.” “Rare treasure that must be preserved for future generations.” “Unique, unlike any other location in our State.” “Sanctuary to many animals.” “Oasis away from concrete and asphalt.” “Ecological, historical and geographic wonder.” “One of the few pristine places left in our area.” “Calm, peaceful setting where my spirit feels restored.” “Always thrilled by the quiet and beauty that is so close to the business of Raleigh.” “Unparalleled among Raleigh parks.” “Superb and irreplaceable natural setting.” How many parks evoke these kinds of deeply felt responses? Please approve the current plan and ensure that this will continue to be a park in which we celebrate the river, our nature, our history and our spirit. Thanks to all those who have and will put their time and energy into defining the future of Horseshoe Farm .
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[APPLAUSE] Smith: My name is Jeff Smith. I live at 5547 Hamstead Crossing, which is a townhouse complex in the northwestern part of Raleigh. I’m a member of the Sierra Club and the Nature Conservancy and I’ve given money to the Conservation Trust of North Carolina and various sides of involvement of organizations. I consider myself an environmentalist even though I don’t work for the environment. I have enjoyed nature ever since I was a kid. One thing that I will say is that we can’t have too many natural areas, what with all the development that is going on, we need as many natural areas as we can get and as many Greenway trails as we can get. I’m happy that there are a lot of proposed Greenway trails as well as trees surrounding the Neuse River in the proposed plan. With all the flooding that has been going on lately up and down the East Coast, it shows we need to protect our wetlands and that people shouldn’t develop in low-lying areas. We need to keep this as natural a place as possible. I agree with what the person that spoke right before me said—everything about this being a unique area. Finally I’ll say that we need as many natural areas and as many Greenway trails as we can get. I’ll keep giving what money I can to various environmental organizations. I’ll renew my membership to the Triangle Land Conservancy this evening. They had a gathering last night on the other side of Peace Street. Thank you for your time. Kirschbaum: Thank you. After Christopher Allen will be Joe Angelone, Erika Bishop and Jan Pender.

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Allen:

Thank you. Good evening. My name is Christopher Allen. I live at 5100 Hunter Hill Road in the northeast part of the city. I’m an attorney in private practice here in Raleigh after a number of years with the State Attorney General’s Office. I’m here to speak tonight on support of the Master Plan as is presently constituted. I feel like this board has a real opportunity to do something grand—something heroic. That is to preserve a significant natural resource area in the face of what is obviously some intense pressure to develop. Northeast Raleigh has seen a tremendous amount of pressure to develop from all corners. We’ve got housing developments going in that are R10, R15. We will literally have people living shoulder to shoulder, three levels deep, and I really and truly and honestly believe that we need open space. We don’t need structured and intense activities that was in the previous plan that we saw before us. What we have today, in this plan you see before you, is a compromise. I feel like it has got too much active recreation as it exists, but it is a compromise. There are some active elements to this plan, and careful consideration of the unique qualities and character of this significant natural resource area. I’m an avid sports fan. My children and I—whatever was in season we were playing. My oldest daughter wanted to play hockey years ago and I wouldn’t let her because the state didn’t have a good enough dental plan. I now regret that decision. But I truly am a sports fanatic. I’m a dog lover, but these are totally inappropriate activities for property of this character. This presentation was given—the Master Plan was presented at the Northeast CAC meeting last month, and at the end of that presentation by David Deans, the CAC group voted

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on a response to a resolution in support of this master plan by a vote of 21 to nothing. There were no dissenting votes or anything of the like. Now, councilperson Taliaferro made an interesting point at a meeting we had some time ago. If not active recreation here, then where? I think the city really needs to look carefully and creatively at alternative usage. You ride through Northeast Raleigh, there are decrepit strip malls, there are big boxes empty, there are vast parking lots not being used. The City of Greensboro has three soccer fields and two lighted tennis courts in a parking lot at a shopping mall. Three doctors got together and developed it and now they are leasing it to the Greensboro Soccer Club and making a fortune. I think we need to get more creative and use the development land that has already been developed rather than focusing our development interest on pristine property like we have today. One other point I would like to make with the Wilkerson property—I know my time is up, but I would say that Tom McCormick said it best. Dr. Wilkerson saved us from ourselves. I think he said far more than he intended, but I think he knew what the city would do with a property like that. I would just implore you to adopt the plan the way it is presented. Thank you. Angelone: My name is Joe Angelone. I live on Neuse Rock Trail. Based on the annexation agreement between Wake Forest and Raleigh, I will be a citizen of Raleigh—an activist citizen. We need to look to the future of Horseshoe Park. Northeast Raleigh will continue its goal to have times on R10 and R15 zoning tracts. How do we
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educate, exercise and refresh this increasingly stressful environment? First, our children, Richard Louvs’ Book, Last Child in the Woods made a powerful case for children’s need for unstructured play in natural, pastoral environments. Dr. Robert Moore [ph], the president of landscape architecture at State is internationally known and respected for his design for children’s spaces. The author of five books and numerous articles, he has been honored here, in Sweden, in Japan and Argentina. He has designed and consulted on parks in six countries. Dr. Moore would have been here today, but he is out of town. Read his email carefully, give full weight to his credentials when you read it. He espouses a walk-in park at Horseshoe Farm Park, no development except a parking area close to the existing road. These experts tell us that our children need undeveloped natural areas to learn, grow and become effective citizens. Let’s take a look at a trendsetting California situation for insight here. I know some media producers in Hollywood and in the Universal system. They lead high pressure/deadline driven lives in a creative, highly competitive world, and they find true salvation for recreation. One is Runyon Canyon Park in the Hollywood Hills. This park is barren, wild and undeveloped, but this is their retreat on weekends. It is not the manicured, soccer, tennis, equestrian lane of other parks. No, they recharge themselves in an area with no fences and no building. Another release for them is watching a Discovery HD Network Program called Sunrise

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Earth. They sit at home and watch the natural area sunrise on expensive home theater systems—nothing but the sounds and visuals of the sun rising. The producers are a clear indication of our future productive workforce’s needs. To keep us from burnout, to recharge us, we need a natural retreat area close to our homes. The Independent, in their Best of Triangle Edition this month, sited early morning at Horseshoe Farm as the best place to let the world come to you. Producers in Hollywood watch it on TV and we have it for real. Let’s keep it real. [INDISCERNIBLE] highly stressed in the future. We need open, undeveloped areas close at hand for unstructured play and rejuvenation. On a different note, please each of you experience Horseshoe Farm Park before you make any decision to change the Master Plan. The plan is a well ___ compromise and deserves your endorsement. And one last point, take a peek at the slide and sound presentation at horseshoefarms.org. Get a view there of the undesirable alternatives we face if we make changes to this elegant master plan. Thank you very much for your plan. Bishop: Thank you to the committee for hearing us tonight. My name is Erika Bishop, I live at 4812 Tolley Court. I live one to two miles away from the park. I would like to be represented in this master plan. I would like to see a dog park as an integral part of the extensive plans outlined earlier. It is obvious that the goal of this committee is to meet the various needs of residents of Raleigh. I have been a resident since 1990. This is an opportunity to include the large portion of homes where people and dogs live as companions. Dogs are a part of many Raleigh
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families. This will allow family members to spend quality time together in the designated area. Once again, please consider including a dog park near my home in Raleigh in the beautiful and all-encompassing setting that it is. Kirschbaum: Thank you. After Jan Pender we have Denise Thorpe, Carol Ashcraft and Walter Tote. Pender: Good evening. I’m here to represent my three and five year old who stayed here for a little while, but for your benefit, went home. I am here because I am a mother of these two children and I also have experienced working for National Geographic with teacher education. I spent several years with Bill Brogner’s [ph] teacher education program there, and I’m the director of environmental education for the State of Alabama. They do have environmental education there and I’m glad to be in a state that is more progressive in how much they offer. I want to implore upon you so many things. I’ve seen lots of different places where I’ve taken children and teachers. Horseshoe Farms is a special place. It is not just woods. It is not just pretty water. It is a special place—a natural heritage site. There is a difference between a landscaped park and a natural park. There is a difference between woods that has trees that are pretty to look and woods that have trees that support wildlife habitat. I completely sympathize with the dog park need, but I would just ask you to look at things like why Shank Forest no longer allows dog in terms of habitat, because there are reasons that that may not be the best thing for Horseshoe Farm.

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For the benefit of my children, I want to let you know that they need places where they can have unstructured nature time, where they can see intact natural beauty, not landscaped parks with great playground equipment over here and a little bit of nature over there. They need time to see and experience what God’s creation and wonder have to offer. And they need to be in a place where community, natural—and non-humans exist in a friendly and dynamic way. I was very, very hurt by one of the things said in the News & Observer by one of the committee members - when they said that environmentalists had problems or made a muck of the committee meetings. I want to tell you I went to those meetings, and on behalf of my children it was hard because I spent many hours up there that I would have liked to have been tucking my children into bed to wait for two hours to speak for two minutes at the end of the meetings when many committee members just left. I consider myself an environmentalist, but let me tell you how I define environmentalist: someone who loves clean drinking water, somebody who thinks intact natural systems are something we should preserve for future generations, someone who thinks that the economic potential of a community depends on natural systems, and somebody who loves to think that children will walk in some of the same places that I can enjoy today. But to benefit my children, please leave this park as an intact place. Thank you. Thorpe: My name is Denise Thorpe. I live at 5817 Hedgemoore Drive in North Raleigh. I would like to encourage you to adopt the Master Plan as it is, with the limited changes suggested by the Audubon Society. Although we were asked not to
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address process in our time, I feel compelled to address process for two different reasons. You are a Citizen’s Advisory Board. I want to ask you to remember your location and your call, which is to represent the citizens as you make decisions about this matter. If you’re going to represent the citizens, then you need information about citizens and about involvement in the process. That goes to the process question. The other reason I want to address process is that I’m a pastor, but I’m also trained as a lawyer. My suspicion antenna goes up whenever we say that we can’t look at process. If you take the product and don’t look at the process that got it, our whole governmental system is based on the fact that we need to question process matters. You are all leaders. You have all led different projects where people have tried to do things together. You know that the first thing that you try to do is establish your vision and gather people around that vision. If you don’t do that, you’re not going to have a good process result. You have heard a lot about division and rancor and animosity in some of the comments here, and I want you to know that that resulted because things did not start where they should, which is with a vision, which is what the Master Plan says is supposed to happen. That vision was never held up and established. Instead, there was another agenda brought by the parks staff that was the subtle push underneath the surface. The discussion of the overall vision did not come forward until there was great distress by the public. And finally, half way through the process, after the public outcry, there was a discussion about what is the

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division—what is the vision for this park? What should it be? The public was very clear that it should be a natural area. Once that was established what the focus should be, it became much clearer. When you start with a vision and you gather people around a vision, then you find consensus and you find people following that. I think what you have now is a product of that. I think that you need to be concerned that the process that is established to do these master plans wasn’t followed, and I think you need to be concerned that vision was not the first thing on the agenda, and I hope in the future you can make sure that it is. In the mean time, after a lot of people’s blood, sweat and tears, you do have a vision. It is a vision that is the voice of the people speaking and you are here to represent those people. Thank you. Tote: My name is Wally Tote. I live at 2909 Horseshoe Farm Road, my property is at the north end of the proposed park, and I look right out my front door, south through the park. I have listened to some of the words that people say about this park, and I truly do get a chance to experience the beauty and grandeur of this park every single day of my life and I thank God for that. I truly mean that. I was a skeptic going into this process. I did not believe, because of some of the things that were just intonated by the previous speaker that a plan like this could happen. This is a wonderful plan, and I think that people who are involved deserve a lot of credit and thank yous for a lot of good work they did in presenting this. This proposal has been presented to you ladies and gentlemen, unanimously—unanimously. I think it is a little disingenuous for someone to stand here tonight and try to make it sound like it was less than unanimous. If
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somebody had a vote that wasn’t unanimous, they should have had the courage of their convictions if that meant to vote no against this. But you have a unanimous proposal before you, and to me the question is clear. Are you going to go with what the people of the City of Raleigh have spent the last year of your life putting before you or are you going to do something different? To me, as a member of the general public, if you do that—any or all of you are the reason that the public at large mistrusts government function. The people have spoken here. They spent the last more than a year, saying what they want in this park. It is before you. It is very simple. It should just be adopted as is. It is a beautiful plan. I would like to mention one more thing because I live there. My good friend and neighbor, John Link, brought it up. It is the access to the park which as repeatedly not been addressed. Someone will get hurt before it is addressed. I am going to say here publicly, on the record, that somebody needs to do something about maintaining that road. The city does not; the homeowners that live there do. We have paid for the last 10 years to maintain that road—the city owns it. With the exception of one pile of Crush’n Run that I think we got last winter, that’s it. That’s a disgrace. You are operating a park out there with no parking; inadequate, unsafe access, no public facilities, and I think it is a disgrace. Kirschbaum: Did Carol Ashcraft come? Ashcraft: I’m Carol Ashcraft. I live at 4500 Aviemore Crescent in Raleigh. I belong to the Sierra Club, the Audubon Society, the Nature Conservancy and a faith-based organization concerned with climate change. That is everything. Each of us in
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this room has several things in common, including those of you on the Board. We are all here because we care about our communities, our children and our neighbors. We have accepted individual responsibility to stand up for what we think is right. We appreciate the foresight and planning of the City of Raleigh and individual citizens in making this site available as a public park, and realize that it presents a unique opportunity to make Raleigh an even better city than it already is. I would go so far as to say that I believe we also hold something else in common: organized athletics and spontaneous play in the natural world are important to the full development of our children mentally, physically, socially and spiritually. Our children need both of these kinds of activities to thrive and grow into confident, healthy people, able and willing to undertake the challenges that we adults are placing before them. If we were not in basic agreement of these conditions, then the master plan we are discussing tonight would not have been developed and approved. For that reason, let us have athletics, including team sports as well as one-on-one sports for our children who live in the northeastern part of our area. Let’s put those at the new Syndor White Park and other appropriate sites. For Horseshoe Farm Park, let’s provide them all the richness of spontaneous play in nature: running, jumping, exploring, imagining and making up games that only visits to a significant natural heritage area in this park can provide them. Just because athletics and nature play are both important does not mean that they can both be accommodated at one time and still meet the needs of the children and the adults who go there.
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The master plan that the members of the Parks Board have taken under consideration tonight recognizes that fact. We should support and approve that plan which is the result of much compromise—lots of compromise on the Park Board. I’m going to skip a couple of my comments to save time. The human being is an anomaly adaptable animal. Even the problems that we are creating for our children can be addressed by our ability to work together, to think ahead, to plan and develop innovative technology. To help create capacities in our children, we need to give them nature play. Kirschbaum: Your time is up. Ashcraft: I beg your pardon. I would like to close by saying that the City of Raleigh is developing a plan for a greener future, and I think we should show them what we can do—we should show them the way by adopting the current Master Plan. Thank you. Kirschbaum: Gesa Adriance? No? John Flynn. Flynn: I would like to waive my time. Plenty of people have already said what I was going to. Kirschbaum: Thank you. Next three: Deborah Cooper, Gary Odom and Robert Winstead. Cooper: Good evening. My name is Deborah Cooper. I live at 5504 Waterflower Court in Raleigh. It is approximately a mile and ¾ from Horseshoe Park. I have taken my dogs up there just to see it because someone said I had to go see it. And it is indeed—it is beautiful, beautiful! That is for people and for animals. And I’m just saying that out of all of this acreage I think you could possibly put away two acres for a dog park, because the dogs too are—well, they aren’t people, but they
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are my children. And at my age, I have no use for parks because they are just for little kids, running around and organized sports. At my age, I’m looking for a place to sit down, enjoy and look around, but this way I can bring my family also. Thank you. Odom: I’m Gary Odom. I was hoping that Debbie would say I was her kid. [LAUGHS] I am from 3209 Wellington Court. I have businesses in Charlotte and here in Raleigh. I employ 15 people, two of whom I met at the dog park. What I want to do is thank you for Millbrook - that is my number one thing. Millbrook is my community. I probably will not go to Horseshoe. I am here to speak to the people who live in these areas that don’t even understand what a dog park is, because it is my community. I have met people all the way from Virginia who will come down to that dog park because it is so popular. I’ve heard great things. One thing is I have heard tonight that I didn’t expect is so many different good comments about so many different issues. All I ask you to do is just think about what makes for that successful park—not a successful dog park or nature park, but what is it that 10 years from now somebody will look at and go, “That is a great park.” Winstead: My name is Bob Winstead and I live at 9409 Tweeds Mill Road. I am a member of Wake Audubon, and I just want to say that we have a unique opportunity here in Raleigh to preserve a very unique piece of property. When I moved to Raleigh in 1990 I could drive around the city and see lots of open space. Since that time I see more and more encroachment of development and less and less open space. Someone mentioned a creative idea of looking at some of these big boxes that
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have been left just floundering—development that is no longer being used. There are parking lots. Look elsewhere to find a better, suitable place for the athletic fields. Kirschbaum: Robert Harper, Adam Holtzman, Dikram Kabbendgear [ph]. Harper: I’m Robert Harper. I was the chairman of the Neuse River Master Plan Committee that has been quoted. I served on this same board for six years and was chairman for two. I’ve been involved in various regional and state efforts with parks and Greenway development. I worked with the Department of Transportation and the DMV on several issues. I would urge you to read the document that we produced in our master plan. It clearly becomes all the things that everybody spoke to tonight. There is a place for everything—nothing is left out. This place was a nature reserve. It got hijacked and I really hope that all of you realize that and read the document. Jaime Ramsey and Marsha PresnellJennette have put together a great chronology of the events. I know some of you disagree with their presentation, but their facts are impeccable and their chronology makes for easy reading. I would encourage you to do those two things. One of the things that was very interesting to me while listening to the public committee meetings was on such issues as the dog park. One person came to me one time and said that the greatest supporter of ball fields was dog owners because baseball fields were surrounded by a fence, they were nice and there was nobody there. To me, the facts are that parks and recreation is changing.

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Organized sports are not what they once were in Beaver Cleaver’s Day, and that has to be recognized as we go forward. Only 25% of households have children, 75% of households have no children, and yet we speak a lot to those activities. I think there is an insidious undercurrent moving those who are unaware away from the passive recreational opportunities and more towards active activities. We need to be aware of that. We need to be cautious of it. The people of Raleigh own this land. I don’t own this land, you don’t own this land. Jack and his people do not own this land. The people of Raleigh have been very clear in my committee on this 10 year—or over 10 years ago, and in this most recent committee. And it is the public city, so we have to listen to it. Holtzman: I’m Adam Holtzman, 2109 Yorkgate Drive, about a half a mile from Sertoma Park in Raleigh. I’ve lived in Raleigh most of 50 years. I’m not going to take three minutes. It has been a long night and most people have said what I will say. But I just hate to tell my children that yet again Raleigh has squandered yet another opportunity to save something that is very precious and unique. Thank you. Kabbendgear: I’ll save you saying my name. My name is Dikram Kabbendgear. I live at 3709 Birch Brook Court. I’ve been in Raleigh 30 years. I’m a nature lover, dog lover, grieving former dog owner. I want another dog park for my next dog, but not here. Please build it somewhere else. I like the plan that I saw with the changes from Wake Audubon. I would encourage you to use—to demonstrate very low impact construction of buildings, low water use, low energy use—consider using,
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for example, no flush toilets—not toilets, but urinals that don’t use any water. They do work and they use no water—no plumbing. Otherwise, it is a great plan. Go forward . Kirschbaum: Candice Fuller, Officer Singh and Isabella Vigilante. Fuller: Hello. My name is Candice Fuller, 5300 Castlebrook Drive in Raleigh. I’m here to speak tonight on behalf of the Northeast Citizens Advisory Council. As you are probably aware, Horseshoe Farm Park falls entirely within the boundaries of our CAC. As you are also probably aware, the role of the CAC is to share information on local issues with its citizens, determine their opinions and concerns and advocate on their behalf. To this end we have had panel presentations on the Horseshoe Farm Park Master Plan in our December and November 2005 meetings. In April, after the draft Master Plan was completed, the CAC membership present at the meeting voted unanimously to endorse the draft Master Plan that is being presented tonight. The Northeast CAC supports the plan because it will meet the needs of our local citizenry as it continues to grow. We know that our Northeast region of the city is growing by leaps and bounds. It is predicted by the city’s own planning department to be one of the highest areas of growth and population density by 2030. Our population growth is not coming from single family homes on spacious lots. It is coming from townhouses, condominiums, apartments and single family homes on 1/6th acre lots. Looking ahead at planning department projections we can see that our citizens and especially our children will need open spaces to recreate in.
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Locations for organized activities such as soccer fields, baseball fields and gymnasiums of course are desirable too. However, there are alternate and more suitable locations for these activities within our area. Simply being outdoors and enjoying the restorative powers of a natural environment with friends and family will be equally needed by our residents in 2030, young, middle aged and old. Horseshoe Farm Park is unique in our area and offers a unique opportunity to anticipate our local needs and plan to meet them. We urge you to support the draft master plan and provide the citizens of the Northeast with a family-oriented outdoor recreation venue. Kirschbaum: Thank you. Officer Singh? Singh: I’m Officer Singh of the Raleigh Police Department in District 22. I’ve been an officer for seven and a half years. In the last four years I’ve worked as a school resource officer with our youth. The biggest thing that we see is a need for positive outlets for our youth. We just have to be considerate of that in the final development of this plan. Vigilante: My name is Isabella Vigilante. According to some of you I should probably be in front of MTV right now or on the computer, but I’m not. I’m here. I’ve been making speeches like this at meetings like this for about a year now, but I guess I can’t bore you because this is pretty much a new crowd of people. Let me get to the point. Please don’t rob this place of its natural beauty. You are people and you know how hectic life is. Don’t you wish you had a place to go and just exist—to escape the hustle and bustle of everyday life and read a book or take a walk or go
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with your children and teach them about nature and life? This is a place where quiet is undisturbed. It has never been adulterated by progress. God has given us this place and it is there as I speak. It stands as a silent reminder of days gone by. It is in danger of becoming a giant jungle gym. If we build common tennis courts and camp grounds in this unique place, we will have failed it completely. Horseshoe Farm Park is begging to be utilized for its intended purpose, which I believe is to appreciate the splendor of the earth on which we were put in order to preserve and treasure. Please do it justice. Thank you so much. Kirschbaum: Luci Plack, Susan Bowers, Susan Ivy. Plack: Good evening. My name is Luci Plack. I live at 3424 Suncrest Village Lane in Raleigh. I live off 401 across the highway from Horseshoe Farm Park in one of the brand new subdivisions that is coming and in need of a park. I’m very happy to say that I have learned that we’ll be having Greenways directly at the back of our subdivision. I thank you very much for that. Horseshoe Farm is a unique place. It is unique in the county as well as in the City of Raleigh. It is deserving of a reclassification as a destination nature reserve rather than a community park. I believe that the current, constant push for high activity recreational facilities may be slightly overstated. I am in education and I see no children who are lacking a place to play soccer or basketball. They never tell me that. But when I take them on fieldtrips, I see many children every school year discovering nature for the very first time. They need more places in my end of

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Raleigh Parks and Recreation Department Horseshoe Public Meeting 06-29-2006 Page 65

the city that their parents and grandparents can take them to learn about and experience nature and renew their spirits all together. Another note: a majority of our nation’s population, including me, is nearing retirement. We are retiring at the rate of 10,000 people a day. Walking is a sport that our population can safely engage in as we age and succumb to the various ailments associated with aging. We can do this at a leisurely pace, environmentally friendly to wildlife and nature. There are various large properties currently owned by the City of Raleigh near Horseshoe Park. We’ve mentioned Sydnor White. One of the closest and largest to my area and to the new Centex development will be is—the Raleigh Landfill, which is going to be developed. I beg you to keep the Master Plan as is with modifications recommended by the Audubon Society. Place your more active facilities on another piece of property without the important historical and natural values of Horseshoe Farm. Scott Weidensaul in his book Return to Wild America considers conservation’s success stories and blunders and destructive nature of human influence along side the rise in the modern environmental movement. He expresses a vision of what the future holds: The key is hope, because hope, when paired with the ferocious love Americans feel for their land, becomes action. Please take the environmentally conscious action. Preserve the history of the area and the wildlife and recommend the plan as drafted. Do not allow Horseshoe Park to become a conservation blunder. Thank you.

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Bowers:

My name is Susan Bowers and I grew up in Raleigh. I returned after being away for 26 years and I’m just astonished by the development in the region. This morning on the news I saw that 22,000 people a year are moving into Wake County—22,000 a year! And all of those 22,000 people are going to have a lot of needs, as do our current residents. We’re going to need dog parks, we’re going to need disc golf, we’re going to need tennis courts and gymnasiums. But what makes Horseshoe Farm so amazing is what is not there. Even now, driving just 20 minutes from downtown is astonishing that this pristine piece of nature is there. I mean, your heart just lifts as you walk out onto the land. I think unfortunately our land is coming under greater and greater development pressure, and that undeveloped land is increasingly the preserve of the wealthy. But right now, every citizen in Wake County has a place in the country in Horseshoe Farm Park. I would encourage you to pass the plan as it is or with the changes that the Audubon Society recommended. Please keep the astonishing variety and quality of life that the Triangle offers by keeping this little piece of nature as it is. Citizens today, tomorrow and for generations to come will thank you.

Kirschbaum: Thank you. After Susan Ivy we have Benson Kirkman, Sharon Hazouri and Sue Adley-Warrick. Ivy: I’m Susan Ivy. I live at 4909 Wallingford. I am a member of the Durham Kennel Club and also Friends of Horseshoe Farm. I don’t know if we’ve had everyone from that group stand up or not? Kirschbaum: We have not.
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Ivy:

I think there are quite a few people here from that group. I’d like to start with a quote that is a favorite of mine. “If the sight of blue skies fills you with joy, if a blade of grass springing up in the fields has the power to move you, if the simple things of nature have a message that you understand, rejoice, for your soul is alive.” Horseshoe Farm Park helps keep my soul alive. I spend all day in a noise office in front of a computer, and my two Welsh Corgis spend all day waiting patiently for me to come home. They are usually full of energy, and we all are in need of exercise that our tiny yard cannot accommodate. I participate in a number of organized dog activities, including competition/agility. My ideal would be to have an entire offleash complex of several acres dedicated to dog activities, but certainly not at Horseshoe Farm. I don’t agree with the one or two acres that are typically used as dog parks where people just sort of stand around and their dogs really don’t get a whole lot of exercise other than running around a little bit. And people certainly don’t get any exercise. I much prefer hiking with my dogs and spending time in nature. I’m always exploring our local parks in search of space, quiet and peaceful places to walk that are preferably near water. Some places like Durant Nature Park seem sorely neglected and almost have a melancholy air, while others like Shelly Lake are usually a frenzy of activity and are so crowded with people they are difficult to enjoy. Still others like Buffaloe Road Athletic Park are targeted towards organized sports for kids, not Corgis.

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The day I discovered Horseshoe Farm I was driving home from a disappointing trip to Buffaloe Road Park which was inexplicably closed. As I drove past what remains of Britt Farm where I used to ride horses, I found myself wishing I could find a similar place where I could walk with my dogs in the woods and pasture. Not two minutes later I happened to look at the map and noticed Horseshoe Farm Park for the first time. I went straight there and found exactly what I had been wishing for: a tranquil, historic place with great, expansive meadows, quiet meadows, quiet woodlands, wildlife and access to the river. I could tell right away it was a very special place. That was over a year ago and my dogs and I have been there almost every day since. When I drive down that narrow road towards Horseshoe Farm, I actually feel my shoulders relax and the stress of the day start to melt away. In addition to experiencing the beautiful landscape, charming homestead site and some truly glorious sunsets, my dogs and I have seen an incredible array of wildlife there—a large herd of deer, a family of red foxes, beavers, rabbits, hawks… Kirschbaum: Your time is up. Benson Kirman? He left? F: Hazouri: He’s in a meeting upstairs. Members of the Board, good evening. My name is Sharon Hazouri. I reside at 2802 Mayview Road in Raleigh. I’m here tonight as vice chair of the Capital Group Sierra Club representing approximately 3,500 members. Recently I was asked to join a weekend soccer team, and I’m thinking about it. As a Raleigh native I grew up in our parks watching my brother play tball, baseball and soccer. I love sports. Capital Group Sierra Club supports
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active recreation. Many of our city parks offer facilities compatible with these activities. Horseshoe Farm Park’s unique characteristics make it incompatible with these activities. We ask you to accept the draft Master Plan as approved by the Horseshoe Farm Park committee and present it without changes to the City Council. If this property is every developed, our city will lose a unique natural park. Thank you for your consideration. Kirschbaum: Thank you. After Sue, then Lyle Adley-Warwick, Leslie Titchner and Rachel Wooten. Adley-Warwick: Good evening, I’m Sue Adley-Warwick. I live at 2510 Clark Avenue in

Raleigh. I’m not a member of any environmental or recreation group, just as a member of the public I had visited Horseshoe Farm Park and it is very beautiful and unique. I came here apprehensive tonight because I had heard a little bit about the controversy in the process of developing the plan for the park, so I wasn’t sure what I was going to hear in the presentation, but I’m quite impressed by the presentation. If it is a compromise, I think it is a responsible and creative compromise, and I urge you to support the Master Plan. Titchner: My name is Leslie Tichner and I live at 3101 Douglass Street in Raleigh. I have a single comment left after everybody else’s. I think that we are all aware that we create the landscapes in which we live in response to the values we hold both individually and as a society. As a landscape architecture student, I have observed that the landscapes that surround us, both those we have created and those we have inherited in turn
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inform us individually about the culture to which we belong. Let me restate that: our surroundings, what we appreciate on a daily, weekly and monthly basis nonverbally inform us about who we are and the geographic groups to which we belong. This Master Plan is not perfect. It may require minute tweaking or even major revisions in the future, but the values exemplified by what it preserves and includes and the process involving public input through which it was evolved say a lot about our group, our society and I agree to approve it. Thank you. Kirschbaum: Thank you. Wooten: I’m Rachel Wooten. I am a psychotherapist and psychologist. I’m a former Outward Bound instructor. If I was going to say ever connection I have to an environmental organization, we would be here all night. First of all, I want to thank all of you for the ways that you have paid attention. I haven’t seen any eye rolls, I haven’t seen you all talking to each other, and I think it has been one of the unhappy parts of this whole thing—the process. And so tonight has seemed like a very good process, and I just want to start out by saying that I really appreciate the attentiveness that each of you has shown to everyone who has stood up here. I didn’t come here with any planned comments. I just made some notes. I want to say what I have observed. First of all, I know some of the people who have attended a lot of those meetings. They do have children and they are also self-employed. These are some of the people who went to all of these meetings and they actually gave up money and time to be at those meetings. To say that
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this large group of people who kept showing up to confirm this as a nature preserve are some kind of unrepresented group is like saying all those millions of people who opposed the war in Iraq were a focus group. So the people who came out were the people who wanted to speak publicly. And if there were throngs of people who wanted active recreation, they didn’t show it at these meetings. And so the comment that somebody made that said that if you don’t accept this plan there is going to be a huge mistrust of the public process, I am afraid is true. I think the public process has been really good. The public has shown up and said what they want. I think somebody else said something about relevant experts. I think what really is missing here is I personally wouldn’t know whether a dog park is a good idea or a bad idea. I would not know that, but I listened to the people who really want that badly sitting there going, “Could we have a dog park?” But what doesn’t happen in these meetings is that the dog park people talk to you and the experts talk to you, but there is no chance for the dog park people and the expert people—as just one example—to talk to each other. People who desperately want a dog park, if they actually heard several experts say that this is probably not a good idea might actually go, “Well, I think you’ve got a point there.” And so the idea of actually having conversations where people can come to the table—because the process, I think, is whether you’re going to get buy-in to what you come up with. If you have a bad process people are going to feel cheated and they’re going to feel betrayed and they are not necessarily going to go

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along with the outcome. I think that process really is important and I think conversations are very important. Kirschbaum: Are there any late arrivals who did not sign up to speak who wish to speak? We have two. The person in front first. Little: Thank you very much, I admire your endurance. [LAUGHS] My name is John Little. I’m a retired history professor, and I’m environmentalist historian. I am also a member of Wake Audubon. I have a lifelong love of sports that began when I started reading the daily accounts of the Detroit Tigers games in the sports page in my hometown newspaper, the Saginaw News in Michigan when I was eight years old in 1948. In fact, I think I can name all but one of the starting defensive players for the Tigers from that year. I even played competitive sports in high school, football, basketball and track. And my son was a college and semi-professional soccer player. My wife and I attended more than 200 of his game throughout his athletic life and we missed those after he quit playing several years later. Sports and athletics have always been important to me, and they hold a very important and obvious place in our national culture and in Raleigh. But some things are more important than athletics and organized sports. Nature is certainly one of those. Horseshoe Park offers a rare, if not unique opportunity to provide a wonderful, natural setting that is in tact for future generations. I recognize that it could also be developed into quality athletic facilities—dog parks and such.

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But Yosemite Valley no doubt would make a beautiful golf course, and Yellowstone would make a wonderful theme park placed in the hands of those who are good at those things. Fortunately for us, even those of us in North Carolina, neither of those things happened. Instead, Yosemite and Yellowstone became world class nature parks because of far-sighted people. I’m not suggesting that the Horseshoe is the same spectacle that Yosemite and Yellowstone are, but it is among the most scenic places in Wake County. The wild life including wild turkey and deer are superb, and they are losing habitat in Wake County everyday. As somebody mentioned, 22,000 people a year are coming into the county. Well, think about what that does for habitats for wildlife. There is sufficient ground on the Horseshoe to provide a viable home for such species if we have the vision to preserve it. Put athletic facilities there and you can kiss the turkeys and the deer goodbye. There is ample space there to establish habitats for other vulnerable species as well. Without dismissing the importance of athletic facilities I would submit they can be built on nearly any piece of ground and some of those have been suggested already. The Horseshoe is irreplaceable in that regard. Once gone, it can never be recovered. I would like to close by quoting a woman who many regard as the Godmother of the Environmental Movement. Her name was Margaret Murray. She lived 100 years—almost 101. She died about a year and a half ago. She is better known as Marty Murray. Mrs. Murray once said, this is kind of a blunt quote, but here it is: “Conservationists are a pain in the ass, but they make great
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Raleigh Parks and Recreation Department Horseshoe Public Meeting 06-29-2006 Page 74

ancestors.” I urge you, ladies and gentlemen to take Marty Murray’s opinion to heart and allow all of us to become great ancestors to our future generations by leaving to them this unique, exquisite and irreplaceable slice of nature in Wake County. Thank you. Kirschbaum: And the last, but not least. Geiger: Last but not least, that is a good place to be, right? Are you all still awake? Yes. My name is Travis Geiger. I live at 2937 Horseshoe Farm Road. I’ve lived there, it will be three years this fall. I own a tree service and a paving company. Everyday I help to deforest Raleigh. [LAUGHS] We can lay about 1,400 square yards of asphalt a day. I went to NC State, the land of brick. It has a brickyard, brick buildings, blah, blah, blah and etc., etc. My point is that you’ve heard all this stuff tonight and it probably sounds like blah, blah, blah to you by now. It does to me, and I’ve been sitting back there. I was trying to think, “What could be said that would stick with you guys when you go in to make your decision in the next few days or weeks?” I’ve got two kids. One is five and one is eight. They both play soccer— they are active and all that stuff. But the words, I guess, that come to mind was think to the future. Thirty years from now when they are not playing soccer anymore is there going to be a place that they can still cherish. We go down in the evenings and we have this beautiful time. I think the Master Plan is a good compromise and balance of keeping it natural and making it accessible to the public.

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But as you go in to make your decision, 20 or 30 years from now, are there going to be places like Horseshoe Farm Park with its beauty, nature and what it has? If it changes that will be something that is lost forever. If it preserved, that will be something we’ll be able to hand to our grandchildren and enjoy together. Think to the future. Kirschbaum: Thank you. [APPLAUSE] Kirschbaum: The Board will break for 10 minutes. I’d like to remind the audience that there are two more weeks of written comments. What will happen next is you will receive the two more weeks of written comment and then on the third Thursday in July, the group will have its next meeting where these issues will be discussed. At this point we are closed for this time. Bostic: There are a couple that didn’t finish their comments—I think Carol and some others? Can they hand them in? Kirschbaum: Submit it in writing in the usual form. M: [APPLAUSE] [GROUP BREAKS/RESUMES] Kirschbaum: We’ll just review for a minute what the next steps are. Like with Forest Ridge, we are advisory to council, so at our next meeting we’ll be talking about what advice we want to give the Council. We can with the Master Plan, opt to just send it on to council, we can opt to send it out for comment or we can opt if we are not sure of something, keep it in committee or in the Board.
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Thank you all.

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What we did here tonight is raise any questions within our minds and have a brief discussion of those questions and then if those consultants will write those up just as they did for the Forest Ridge Master Plan. To get started, did any questions come up? Any comments? Knight: I’ve just got a few simple things…? We’re not going to answer these tonight right? Kirschbaum: Right, we’ll just put them forth. Knight: Okay. On the disc golf, look at the normal amount of holes that you would have with disc golf. Is it 18 or is it 36? What is the average length of a hole? How many acres does a normal 18 hole golf course take. And to the dog issue—can dogs go anywhere in parks as long as they are on a leash? And another question for the Greenway. Was there a reason for them picking to come across the edge of the field instead of maybe along the tree line, along the hedge row there, or why is it not linking to some of these other paths that are already there in the wetlands area of this instead of creating new ones? Duncan: Let me make sure I understand where you are looking at that map. Are you looking at the southern end? Knight: Duncan: Knight: Correct. The question is what is the rational for the routing of the greenway in that area? Yes. And the last one is will there be a change in the topography of the open fields? Smith The only question I have, and it probably has been answered some place, but I would like a full explanation or definition of a community park and what the
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Raleigh Parks and Recreation Department Horseshoe Public Meeting 06-29-2006 Page 77

elements are so that I can be real clear as we are discussing this. I read it at some point, but I just want to be real clear what the elements of a community park are. And my final question is, parks and recreation facilities in the general area of Horseshoe Park—I heard Sydnor White I’ve heard the Wilkerson property. I want to know the proximity of either one of those to Horseshoe Farm. I want to see what park properties in the general area of Horseshoe Farm. Beggs: I’d like to hear from an expert how dog parks affect—if there is any data on dog parks and their effect on wildlife. Beyond what I think, what everybody else thinks—I’ve got a lot of opinions but you shouldn’t necessarily listen to me. So is there any information out there on that? Certo: I think I have a subset to that, because in the discussion and listening to the arguments for or against the dog park, the question is had it ever been talked about to not allow dogs on the paths or of that nature. I’m sorry Jan, but if there is a detrimental effect for dogs to be in the area and impact the wildlife there, then is there a possibility of restricting dogs on those trails? I’m not against dogs, but I’m just saying. If these are the real concerns that people have for not having a dog park or for not having dogs? That may be a further argument for having a dog park in a restricted area rather than allowing dogs on the trails. Duncan: So the question is - was the issue of restricting dogs from the park in public areas discussed?. Certo: Right. Or from restraining them in these specific areas in the park. If there is a true impact of a scent, then I would like to know about that.

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Duncan:

The second part of the question is if that were to be allowed, does it have a detrimental effect?

Certo:

And are we going to have a whole bunch of people objecting to that also? I know I can’t answer that, but we’ve got the side of people who are concerned about dogs in the park and a dog park, but we are not addressing the fact that people who hike are going to take dogs with them, so it is going to impact the wildlife. But people take dogs over to Falls Lake, to Durant, to other places that are escaping me at the moment.

Williams:

That was my question too. The second question was - had there been studies about the growth possibilities in the area to subject communities being developed that will impact the use of it?

Duncan:

So the question is was there a projection of future growth and population in the service area?

Williams:

Yes.

Kirschbaum: Doris? Burke: Taliaferro: I would like to know if the dog park was discussed at the Northeast CAC meeting. I don’t know if this is an appropriate time for me to say this or not, but I do want to clarify a few things that were discussed in the public comments tonight. First I want to say that as you all are aware, a community park designation for this park was designated when this land was purchased, which was 10 or 12 years ago. This was purchased from the Hedrick family who was interested in selling their farm for development. So part of the park and the houses that are now there, communes to this park, and the city stepped in and purchased the rest of the
Transcript prepared by Rogers Word Service 919-834-0000 1-800-582-8749 www.rogersword.com

Raleigh Parks and Recreation Department Horseshoe Public Meeting 06-29-2006 Page 79

property so that it would not become a subdivision. I do want to remind people that it was also that when we purchase a park we must stipulate what we think the future of that land will be. We can’t just buy land and designate it as a community park. It was designated that way in the Comprehensive Plan that was adopted in 2003. And finally, just a reminder, that the City Council asked the Master Planning Committee to design it as a community park. So that was not something that came out of thin air. It is not something that came from the Staff. The Staff works for the Council and the Council asked for that designation. Please remember those things as you deliberate. Smith Madam Chair I have another question, I had it written down but forgot to mention it. I would like to know, if I could… I heard a lot of comments earlier about this previous committee that studied the use of this corridor and a master plan for the Neuse River corridor – a master plan for the Neuse River Corridor. I would like to know if a previous master plan already existed, why would City Council appoint a new Master Plan Committee for the park? Kirschbaum Is it okay if I clarify that? It was straight from…What it was referring to is the Neuse River Master Plan for the corridor. It did not include this park, and this actual spot hadn’t been purchased. Duncan: We did own it.

Kirschbaum: But it wasn’t plan. Duncan: This is where we need to take…

Transcript prepared by Rogers Word Service 919-834-0000 1-800-582-8749 www.rogersword.com

Raleigh Parks and Recreation Department Horseshoe Public Meeting 06-29-2006 Page 80

Barley:

May I request something? I would like to have this clarified in discussion in the board meeting, please. I think we need to have our facts before us so that we can debate it in our board meeting factually.

Taliaferro:

Madam chair, one other comment. I also just want to remind the Board that the charge here is for planning Horseshoe Farm Park, and it is not for planning Sydnor White. That has not been publicly advertised. That planning process has not begun, nor has any direction been given to the Parks Board to purchase or develop new sites. This is about this particular property. Thank you.

Kirschbaum: Actually, I realize that Staff has addressed in the past, the need— planning needs for programs, field space and I can’t really remember if the Board actually got the materials, but some of the speakers tonight claim that there is no more need for any kind of play fields or athletic activities in that region of the city. It might be helpful to review the information on whether or not there are needs. The idea that these other spaces would be appropriate for all these types activities, it might just be helpful to have brief descriptions of what those properties are like and the expectation for them. Duncan: Let me address the first one you shared—the need for active uses. What I think I’m hearing you say is you want to share the information with the Board that was presented to the committee. Kirschbaum: Yes. Duncan: And the second portion is really a brief description of nearby property and by nearby you mean…?

Transcript prepared by Rogers Word Service 919-834-0000 1-800-582-8749 www.rogersword.com

Raleigh Parks and Recreation Department Horseshoe Public Meeting 06-29-2006 Page 81

Kirschbaum: Sydnor White, the other small extension, Watkins Road, Alvis Farm and it might be worth mentioning the Millburne Dam Park which has been master planned. Kirschbaum: Oh, and the landfill. Barley: Smith: Beggs: And what the plans are that are proposed at this current time. Move we can adjourn. I have one more question. Maybe it was discussed, but another of folks talked about these close votes. Is that in our stuff? Kirschbaum: You’d have to read the minutes, right? Beggs: Duncan: I mean, is it in the appendices? I don’t remember… It’s in the appendices.

Barley:It could be. It could be in there. You should have that. If not, I think it is on the website. Kirschbaum: Do I hear a second on this motion? Barley: Yes.

Kirschbaum: All in favor? Group: Aye.

[END OF MEETING]

Transcript prepared by Rogers Word Service 919-834-0000 1-800-582-8749 www.rogersword.com

From: To:

Cadra4@aol.com ParkPlan; jkirschbaum@nc.rr.com; gtill@nc.rr.com; richardb@ncleg.net; rwilliams179@aol.com; pbenda@us. ibm.com; gbbarley@msn.com; patrick_beggs@ncsu. edu; tina_certo@earthlink.net; tfcov@bellsouth.net; MOMFARRELL@aol.com; dwknight@mindspring.com; csmith5@nc.rr.com; gerald.wright@duke.edu; Meeker, Charles; West, James P.; tfcraven@nc.rr.com; Kekas, Joyce; rstephenson@bellsouth.net; Crowder, Thomas; pisley@boyceisley.com; Taliaferro, Jessie; brian.stevenson@eds.com; daviddeans@collegeparkrv. com; djfuller@med.unc.edu; jphillips@stewart-eng.com; amy@asawyerartworks.com; kathycrowley1@yahoo. com; ptmaync@nc.rr.com; sluginbuhl@yahoo.com; elleman@eos.ncsu.edu; aso-lds@att.net; wmarshall5@nc.rr.com; Trail4bike@aol.com; marshapj@earthlink.net; Jeanamyers@earthlink.net; robin_moore@ncsu.edu; b.ross.design@mindspring. com; Horseshoe Farm/Park Planning Comments Monday, June 12, 2006 5:57:23 PM

CC:

Subject: Date: Attachments:

Dear Parks, Recreation and Greenway Advisory Board Member: I am writing to you as a former six year member of your board, who served as vice chair of the board for two of those years. For more information about my background and activities related to parks, please see below. * Like you, I care deeply about our City parks and have spent many volunteer hours to help the park system. I know some of you are relatively new to the Board and are just getting

your bearings. Due to the high turnover rate of PRGAB and City Council members, there is unfortunately a short institutional memory for the history of park planning in Raleigh. I am writing to provide you with some background information that will help you in your consideration of the park master plans for Forest Ridge and Horseshoe Farm that you will review and discuss soon. When these new park planning experiences are viewed in the context of this history, you will likely see striking similarities. The Impetus for Resolution 2003-735 First, it is critical that you understand the history of the development of the new park master planning policy. Horseshoe Farm Park and Forest Ridge Park are the first parks to be planned under this Policy, which was adopted by City Council in January, 2004. The intent of this policy, crafted through a collaborative effort by the City’s Parks, Recreation and Greenway Advisory Board (PRGAB), City Parks staff, citizens, and City Council, was to develop a consistent set of procedures for park planning efforts and to optimize public participation. Why was a new policy written? A series of park planning incidents in the late 1990's led to a recognition that the City’s previous park planning policy was inadequate to ensure meaningful public involvement in the park planning process. There was a hope and expectation on the part of the Parks Board and City Council at the time that if the policy was revised to clarify procedures and create a mechanism for a good faith public involvement process, future park planning efforts would be more successful and less problematic. Background: City policies are enacted by our elected officials (City Council) and City Administrative Staff are expected to follow these policies unless they receive City Council approval to do otherwise. In the case of park planning, City Parks Staff are expected to follow the Council-adopted

Park Master Planning Policy, Resolution 2003-735. Here are some examples of recent park planning problems that took place before the new policy was adopted. All were in clear violation of the City's park master planning policy in effect at the time. All took place at considerable expense to the taxpayer. All were considered by the Parks Board at the time to be egregious examples of circumventing real public input and Parks Board involvement. Buffaloe Road Park: Parks and Recreation Department Staff set up a master planning committee without ever involving or informing the PRGAB as required by City policy. The PRGAB found out about it, reported it to City Council, and received permission to start the process over with their involvement. Honeycutt Road Community Park: Parks Department Staff designed the park without a master planning process or committee or any public input, against City policy. The PRGAB found out about it, stopped it,and with the blessing of City Council, acted as the master planning committee. Moore Square: Parks Staff hired a consultant to design major park changes to this much loved downtown historic square without open public input or a master planning committee of any kind, against City policy. Public outcry resulted. Pullen Park: Staff hired a consultant to design major changes to this popular historic park without any public input. Citizens found out about it and were outraged about the changes planned, leading to the Parks Board designing an award-winning public process that was intended to serve as a model of open public participation for future park master plans and the future park master planning policy.

The current Horseshoe Farm Park master planning process has been a new example of problematic park planning behaviors. To those of us who have witnessed these meetings, this difficult park planning experience has been due to the City Park and Rec Department’s approach to public involvement, NOT the new park planning policy. The problems have included:
q

disregarding City policy; not allowing the Committee to vote on issues of concern;
q

disrespecting, dismissing, and even attacking the public and public opinion when it does not agree with their agenda for the park;
q

manipulating the process and information given to the Committee to create a preconceived outcome not wanted by the public at large;
q

bullying and marginalizing master planning committee members and the public; and
q

not allowing Committee meeting minutes to accurately represent public opinion. Perhaps some version of this was true of Forest Ridge as well; I am not familiar with this process. I did attend every meeting of the Horseshoe Farm Master Planning Committee and can tell you that this process has created even greater loss of public faith in the Parks Department. If the new Park Master Planning Policy had been followed the way it was intended to be followed, the planning process would have been much more efficient and the Master Planning Committee would not have had the difficulty it had. The public's perception of our Parks Department would be

much more positive as well. According to the chair of the Master Planning Committee, the primary problem was allowing members of the public to speak too much (up to two minutes at the end of each 2+ hour committee meeting). I understand that limiting the public's access to the Parks Board has recently happened as well. Evidently a Friend of Horseshoe Farm requested a few minutes on your agenda this spring to briefly address the Board, but his request was refused by the Board's chair. Information and Education By now you have received a number of staff briefings on Horseshoe Farm. There are two issues about these briefings that are of concern to me and others who have extensive Parks Board experience: 1) It is highly unusual for the Parks Board to get extensive and detailed briefings about a park undergoing master planning like those you have received. Usually, after a draft master plan is approved by the citizen master planning committee appointed by Council to do this work, the Parks Board receives a presentation of the Draft Master Plan. The Board generally has a high level of respect for the significant amount of time and effort invested by the Master Planning Committee. The Board hears public comment and generally sends the master plan on to Council with their blessing, occassionally with minor recommendations regarding the plan. For example, in the case of the Pullen Park Master Plan, the Board recommended Council's adoption of the Draft Plan, with a suggestion of changing a program element item from Priority 2 to Priority 1. In the case of the briefings you have been given on Horseshoe Farm, it appears that the Staff is unhappy with the outcome of this master plan and

has been running a concurrent mini-master planning process with you in hopes that you will overturn the decision of the real Master Planning Committee. Jan Kirschbaum and Wayne Marshall have both been actively campaigning against the Draft Master Plan, sabotaging the work of the Committee. This only serves to confirm in the public's mind the perception that the real master planning process was a sham, and that the considerable work of this Master Planning Committee is not respected by the City and the Parks Board. 2) A second concern is that you have probably not been given FULL information, just as the Master Planning Committee was not initially given critical information until it was brought to light by others. They were given only the information that supported Staff's agenda of high intensity, high impact active recreation. When other, more objective and pertinent information was brought up, including the City's own plans, planning data, and other information, it was summarily dismissed or discredited. The Neuse River Regional Park Master Plan is an example. This popular, visionary and well regarded plan was glossed over by the Staff, even though the plan and the process that developed it made specific mention of Horseshoe Farm Park. Other Recent Examples The City’s new Park Master Planning Policy is the one thing that citizens have been able to count on to promote accountability and ensure a fair shake at having a real voice in the process of planning their parks. And now it looks like an effort is underway to dismantle and disregard that policy, before it has been followed in good faith even once. The Leesville Road Park Master Plan The latest development of the City Parks Department circumventing the Parks Board and requesting City Council approval of a shortened planning

process for Leesville Road Park is disturbing. The Parks Board, as the City Council's citizen advisory body on park policy and planning, should have been given the opportunity to weigh in on this decision and make a recommendation, but you were not. This is eerily similar to the experiences mentioned above. Pullen Park and Chavis Park Design Development Plans The recent plans for Pullen and Chavis Parks are another example: while City staff have been holding “public” meetings for the citizens to review proposals and provide input for major changes to these precious and historic parks, not a single press release was sent out notifying the public of these meetings. No wonder so few people attended! While requests were made long ago to have presentations of these plans made at the CAC closest to Pullen Park, to my knowledge these requests have not yet been met. Horseshoe Public Comment Period Not Advertised It is now the day the public comment period on the Horseshoe Farm Draft Master Plan begins. According to the City's website, no press releases have been issued by the City to inform the public of this review and comment opportunity. The City's Horseshoe Farm webpage does not even let the public know of the opportunity to provide written or oral comment on the Draft Plan. I am providing you with this information to give you some context in which to judge what you see in the coming weeks. My hope is that the Board will realize the gravity of what has been and is going on and act justly and appropriately to ensure that the public trust is restored. Thank you very much for your consideration of these comments.

Respectfully yours, Jamie M. Ramsey 2702 Van Dyke Avenue Raleigh tel 821-9059
* At the beginning of my Parks Board tenure, I founded a County-wide parks support nonprofit organization, People for Parks, to increase citizen support for all parks in Wake County. I have written many grants for improvement of the City Parks system, have raised money on behalf of our parks, helped create a Community Tool Trailer that can be used free of charge for citizen volunteer park stewardship and enhancement projects, have organized multiple volunteer park stewardship and improvement projects, have organized popular workshops and public informational meetings on our parks such as "Have a Voice in Park Planning" and "Greenways for Wildlife," and have advocated for more than 10 years for more funding and attention to our City Parks system, in areas such as park maintenance, park bond funding, the facility fee program, dog parks, and natural resource conservation. My professional background is in City and Regional Planning, working for many years at both State and local levels of government, and while on the Parks Board I tried to educate myself as much as possible about our parks system. I was actively involved in the development of the Raleigh Parks Plan and Resolution 2003-735, the City's Park Master Planning Policy, the 2000 and 2003 Park and Greenway Bonds, and many other projects while on the Parks Board.

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Mary Rose Raufer ParkPlan; Public comment on Horseshoe Farm Tuesday, June 13, 2006 9:19:29 AM

Please adopt the master plan recommendations for Horseshoe Farm Park so that Raleigh residents will have a unique natural setting, low intensity recreational area. We can put tennis courts and baseball fields in OTHER, more appropriate places. Thank you. Mary Rose and Bill Raufer

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Becky Browning ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Tuesday, June 13, 2006 9:27:49 AM

To whom it may concern; I am writing about the plans to develop Horseshoe Farm. I strongly encourage the board to keep Horseshoe Farm in the natural state it was proposed and planned to be. Occurring in a bend of the Neuse River, the farm is a unique environment and it will be a great natural resource for the public when it opens. For example, the turkeys. As an ornithologist, I cannot stress how lucky we Wake County residents are to have this population of turkeys so close to the city. And these are birds who have been here since the time of the Native Americans! What a wonderful educational tool this will be. Let the soccer fields be built somewhere else in the city. Horseshoe Farm is no place for them. The city is expanding so fast, we need to keep areas natural for our children. Thank you, Rebecca Browning 3229 Ward Road Raleigh NC 27604

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

jdmaher@bellsouth.net ParkPlan; Horseshoe Park proposal Tuesday, June 13, 2006 9:39:45 AM

I am writing to ask you to support the Draft Master Plan for Horseshoe Park developed by the Master Planning Committee. The Horseshoe Park land is unique in the City of Raleigh and its use should reflect its unique character. Uses such as gyms, lighted tennis courts, and dog parks can be placed on any sort of property. (A gym could even go in an empty warehouse or "big box" structure, for example.) A bend in the river - Raleigh's river - should be dedicated to allowing the public to appreciate this natural resource, the effect on the land, and the plants and animals it shelters. Thank you, Jennifer Maher 609 Transylvania Dr. Raleigh, NC 27609

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Candy Fuller ParkPlan; Support for Horseshoe Park plan Tuesday, June 13, 2006 11:22:23 AM

Dear Parks Board and Raleigh City Council, This email is to register my strongest possible support for the current master plan for the Horseshoe Farm park. As a citizen of the Northeast, and therefore one of the residents most likely to be concerned and effected by the plan, I am totally in support of the utilization of Horseshoe Farm park as a nature-oriented park without high intensity, organized “active” recreation. (Parenthetically, I have to say that I find the Park’s Board terminology misleading, as hiking and biking are to me “active” recreation.) The Northeast is growing by leaps and bounds, and is predicted by the City’s own planning department to be one of the highest areas of population growth and density by 2030. Our population growth is not coming from single family homes on spacious lots, but from townhouses, condominiums, apartments and single family homes on tiny lots. Our citizens, and especially our children, will need open spaces to recreate in. Organized recreation such as soccer and baseball fields and gymnasiums are of course desirable too, but there are many alternate locations for these activities. Simply being outdoors and enjoying the restorative powers of a natural environment will be equally needed by our residents in 2030 – both young and old. Horseshoe Farms is unique in our area and offers a unique opportunity to look ahead to our local needs and plan accordingly to meet them. I urge you to adopt the current master plan for Horseshoe Farm. It was arrived at through a long and arduous process which

should not be undercut at this point. Many people in the local community who have followed this process have the definite perception that the Parks Board has their own agenda for this park and that they are seeking to undercut the desires of the local populace. Please show us that this is not so, and that we can trust our City Council and Parks Board to respond to its citizens and give us the park we want and will need in the years to come. Candice C. Fuller 5300 Castlebrook Dr. Raleigh, N.C. 27604

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Keith, Willard R - Raleigh, NC ParkPlan; Re: Horseshoe farm park Tuesday, June 13, 2006 3:09:49 PM

Please keep the park as planned in the draft master plan. My family lives in the area and want a place to enjoy the river, nature and trails without dog parks, basketball courts or tennis courts. Thanks, Will Keith 919-501-9851

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Pamela Matthews ParkPlan; Horseshoe Park !! Tuesday, June 13, 2006 4:40:08 PM

It is imperative to keep Horseshoe Park as natural as politics will allow!!! There is no need for anything other than a natural setting. Anyone who visits Horseshoe can observe nature in all its wonderment. There are enough other parks and some in planning without disturbing this peaceful quiet setting. There is no other park like Horseshoe in the area....please do not destroy this. It is election time....the people will NOT forget those who voted to rape this park!!! Pamela Maxey 3900 Lauriston Road Raleigh, NC 27616
__________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Parkersharron@aol.com ParkPlan; Horseshoe Park Tuesday, June 13, 2006 7:47:47 PM

My husband and I want to express our strong support for the Horseshoe Park Plan as it is currently presented; we want it to be a place where the natural beauty of the river and the wildlife are preserved, without the noise and lights of ballfields, gyms, dogparks, etc. Sharron and Ken Parker

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

John Link ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Tuesday, June 13, 2006 9:20:23 PM

Dear Ladies and Gentlemen: We have been residents of Horseshoe Farm peninsula for over ten years and have grown to love the beauty of the land and the wildlife. When we first moved to our home, we had two albino deer that roamed the area and our backyard. They disappeared after a year or two; however, there are lots of deer, turkeys, birds, groundhogs, raccoons, and foxes, in addition to plantlife to appreciate. We attended most of the planning meetings and saw the hard work that was done by the committee. They came up with a well thought-out compromise and solution to protect, respect, and share this beautiful piece of land with the public. Please accept the Master Plan for Horseshoe as it has been submitted to the Parks and the City Council. Many people have realized that this is a very unique place and should stay that way for other generations to appreciate. Sincerely, John and Judy Link

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Elsieeads@aol.com ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Wednesday, June 14, 2006 8:44:27 AM

Please follow the Master Plan in deciding the use of this property and avoid high intensity recreational activities. Thanks, Elsie Eads

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Jean McCamy ParkPlan; Horseshoe Park Wednesday, June 14, 2006 10:44:31 AM

I would like to commend you for listening to the people and drafting the new plan for Horseshoe Bend that will preserve it for the future. It is a treasure for Wake County and, while there is a need for active recreational sites, this is not the place for them. Thank you for your continued thoughtful planning. Jean McCamy

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Bill Kistner ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Wednesday, June 14, 2006 10:52:00 AM

After months and months of careful consideration of the unique characteristics of this property, the Master Planning Committee has put together a pretty reasonable compromise. Please accept their plan as written and do not, at the last minute, try to add large buildings and designated ball fields or dog runs. They have all been considered and would be welcomed in another park in another part of the city. They have no place in this park. The city needs as many of these largely undisturbed areas as possible as once they have been built up, they will be gone forever, and forever is a real long time. Please thank the Committee for their hard work and accept their plan without modification. Thank you.

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Elsieeads@aol.com ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Wednesday, June 14, 2006 2:24:57 PM

In my previous e-mail I failed to give you my home address, so the message may have lacked credibility. I hope the Parks Committee will approve the Master Plan for Horseshoe Farm, making it primarily a nature preserve and not including high intensity recreational facilities. Thanks, Elsie Eads 1210 Canterbury Road Raleigh, NC 27608 787-5883

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

smoore2063@nc.rr.com ParkPlan; horseshoe park Wednesday, June 14, 2006 4:19:45 PM

I like the revised plan but I still would like the tennis courts put back on the plan. Sonia Moore

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Laurie Cone ParkPlan; Master Plan for Horseshoe Farm Wednesday, June 14, 2006 4:38:37 PM

Hello, I'm writing to ask you to please include the environmental stewardship, sustainability, wildlife habitat zones advisory team, and natural resource management plan comments from the Master Planning Committee as an official part of the Master Plan. Please leave plans for development of recreation facilities for less precious sites in our area. Thank you for your work, Laurie Cone 2824 Bedford Ave

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Leah27603@aol.com ParkPlan; HORSESHOE FARM Thursday, June 15, 2006 7:56:03 PM

WHAT A LOVELY SPOT OF NATURE AND OPEN SPACE!!! IS ALL OF WAKE COUNTY SUPPOSED TO BE COVERED WITH BLACKTOP AND SHOPPING MALLS??? PLEASE PLEASE SAVE THIS PLACE FOR OURSELVES AND ALL GENERATIONS. THANKS FOR CONSIDERATION OF UNPLANNED SPACE AND ALLOWING YOUR CITIZENS TO ENJOY WHAT WAS HERE BEFORE US. JUDI MATHIS, 304 GROVEMONT ROAD, RALEIGH, NC 27603

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Barharvey@aol.com ParkPlan; Draft Master Plan for Horseshoe Farm Park Thursday, June 15, 2006 11:01:22 PM

To: Members of the Parks, Recreation and Greenway Advisory Board I support nature-based recreation in Raleigh. I support the compromise plan of the Master Planning Committee. I do not wish to see lots of high intensity active recreation put back into the Plan. Yours truly, Barbara Harvey Caledonia St. Raleigh, 27609

From: To:

Marsha Presnell-Jennette ParkPlan; jkirschbaum@nc.rr.com; gtill@nc.rr.com; richardb@ncleg.net; rwilliams179@aol.com; pbenda@us.ibm. com; tfcov@bellsouth.net; dwknight@mindspring.com; Chris Smith; gerald.wright@duke.edu; Greg Barley; patrickbeggs@gmail.com; Tina Certo; Mary Farrell; Meeker, Charles; West, James P.; tfcraven@nc.rr.com; Kekas, Joyce; rstephenson@bellsouth.net; Crowder, Thomas; pisley@boyceisley.com; Taliaferro, Jessie; brian. stephenson@eds.com; daviddeans@collegeparkrv.com; debbie keelean-fuller; james phillips; amy@asawyerartworks.com; kathleen crowley; paul may; sarah luginbuhl; thomas elleman; aso-lds@att.net; wmarshall5@nc.rr.com; trail4bike@aol.com; jeanamyers@earthlink.net; robin_moore@ncsu.edu; b.ross. design@mindspring.com; Cadra4@aol.com; Horseshoe Farm/Park Plan Comments Friday, June 16, 2006 8:51:12 AM

CC:

Subject: Date: Attachments:

Dear Parks & Recreation & Greenway Advisory Board Members, Please help insure the preciousness of Horseshoe Farm Park will be protected. Recreational opportunities should be available to all citizens in our region and along the Neuse River Corridor. The Neuse River Corridor master plan, considered visionary when it was approved by City Council, specifically addressed this concept. The NRC plan clearly indicates that Horseshoe Farm should be preserved as a nature park. Horseshoe Farm is regionally significant from an environmental standpoint. In fact, it is the most significant natural area in the entire park system. This particular park should offer educational and recreational opportunities that are in keeping with maintaining the highest standards of environmental stewardship. I hope the Board will review the environmental stewardship comments and recommendations provided in the Plan's cover letter and ask Council to approve them along with the Plan.

On another note, I would like to express some thoughts to you as a former member of the PRGAB. I recently received a copy of Jamie Ramsey's email to you and I share the concerns expressed in her letter. The points Jamie makes are accurate. Serving on the Parks Board through all of those incidents, and now seeing how the planning of Horseshoe Farm has played out, reveals a pattern that I can only hope the current Board can help correct. There is a considerable learning curve in beginning to serve on any board or commission. I certainly learned a lot about Raleigh's Parks and Recreation Department as well as issues related to parks in cities around the country. Some of what I learned and observed about Raleigh Parks continues to puzzle me. Some of you may share the concerns I am addressing in this letter. Relationship with Citizens I have been puzzled by the treatment citizens receive who speak forthrightly about their concerns regarding our parks. Many qualified and knowledgeable citizens have been marginalized, criticized and discredited if they communicate an opinion different from the Parks Department. This has happened at the table of Parks Board meetings and at master planning committee meetings. I have observed citizens who are and are not members of the PRGAB subjected to the same lack of respect when they address the PRGAB, and more recently, the Horseshoe Farm Park master planning committee. During the Horseshoe master planning process I have witnessed citizens who have spoken about the importance of maintaining the ecological integrity of the park marginalized and their remarks trivialized. There were committee members who were outwardly hostile to the public. Some of the ways this was displayed was by packing up and leaving the table during the time alloted for citizens to address the committee and by speaking among themselves when citizens were addressing the committee. On occasion the chair of the committee even dismissed the committee before public comment was taken. Even a citizen's neighborhood was used to discredit their comments. If a citizen lived in a neighborhood close to Horseshoe Farm they were dismissed as NIMBY's. While citizens that lived in other neighborhoods were dismissed because they were not residents who lived close to the park. Citizens who have shown up at meetings, spoken at the public hearing or written comments have been disregarded as not being the "real" public! That there are citizens who continue to speak honestly and directly about their

interests, concerns or ideas on behalf of our parks reflects how valued parks are in this city. Board and commission members are not arms of department administrative staff. Boards and commissions are appointed by City Council to provide a different voice to Council, making board members more like an arm of City Council. Some Parks Board members may claim to know how the entire City Council will vote on an issue, and therefore the Board needs to "present something to them that they will approve." This is not how democracy is supposed to work. City Council will respectfully consider recommendations from PRGAB before reaching their own decisions. Master Planning Experience My interest in park master planning is firmly rooted in my experience as vice chair of the Pullen Park master planning committee. City Council requested the PRGAB study concerns raised by citizens who were upset about changes planned for Pullen Park without citizen notification or involvement. Ultimately the PRGAB felt that a formal master planning process was needed. Robin Moore served as chair of the committee, I was vice chair. We both felt the historical significance of Pullen Park and the controversy surrounding the "secret plan" for Pullen Park required complete transparency in the master planning process. With Robin's experience and expertise from years of consulting with cities planning parks across the country we felt we could help set a new standard for how a park master planning committee could operate in our city. We were also determined to help build the public's trust following the public outcry over the drastic changes that the Parks Department had planned for the north side of Pullen Park. At the conclusion of the master plan process for Pullen Park, the City of Raleigh received an award for the plan and planning process from the Raleigh Citizen Advisory Council. It was clear that citizens appreciated the opportunities for meaningful input in the process. During that time many PRGAB members felt a new park planning policy would help build public trust. We sought a win-win planning policy in order to strengthen confidence and communication between citizens and the P&R Department.

Some of the steps used in the Pullen Park process were incorporated into the new park master planning policy. Horseshoe Farm Park is the first park to be planned using the new policy. However, in planning this park, the policy was not followed as written. I am disappointed that the great care and collaboration that went into creating the new master planning policy has not been given a fair trial to determine its strengths and weaknesses. Should staff determine when and how to follow Council approved policies? This pattern of disregard for following a well defined park planning policy creates a climate of confusion in committee leadership which ripples throughout the committee. Public trust is established when a clearly described planning policy is followed consistently and the committee members and the public understand the steps to be followed. Our city will be better served when this principle is reliably practiced. Neuse River Corridor Plan The Neuse River Corridor master plan was enthusiastically supported by Parks Director Jack Duncan when I attended my first PRGAB outing in the fall of 1995 at Anderson Point Park. At that time Mr. Duncan explained there would be parks along the Neuse River connected by a greenway. This connectivity would allow for long bicycle rides and would someday allow for citizens from both Wake Forest and Raleigh to access parks in both towns. A variety of parks along the Neuse would provide diverse recreational opportunities including nature parks and river access for paddlers. I am puzzled that the Horseshoe Farm master planning committee was not fully informed of the Neuse River Corridor master plan and the decisions this process reached about HSF. Committee members were provided selected pages from the NRC master plan document. Explanation of the significance of the Horseshoe as a nature park for passive recreation was not given to committee members. HSF committee members did not become aware until the public review of the draft master plan meeting in November. The new Horseshoe Farm Park master plan is consistent with the NRC master plan. By supporting a park plan for HSF that clearly designates the park to be a nature park you are respecting City Council's approval of the NRC master plan, the prior work of the Neuse River Corridor master planning committee and moving a visionary plan forward. Closure The plan under consideration is the product of significant compromise. I attended

a good number of the committee meetings and commend the master planning committee members for their commitment to producing a plan that addressed what Parks staff wanted and what citizens wanted. As for my personal opinions about the park plan as presented, I would like to see the open vistas of the park remain undisturbed by buildings and parking lots. The parking area, as currently proposed, is impacting the park too much. I would like to see parking placed toward the entrance to the park, with parking areas buffered by wildflower meadows. This would set the tone of the theme of the park from the moment of arrival. The environmental education and arts center should also be situated close to the entrance in order to maintain the experience of open space as one walks toward the Neuse River. I would like to see the play ground area provide opportunities for children to interact with nature. While slides and swing sets are considered standard for park playgrounds, I would like to see this playground designed to engage a child's senses as well as their physical capacity. The theme of the play area should reflect the character of Horseshoe Farm and support the environmental education theme of the park. Traffic concerns for access into and from the park have not been addressed fully. The questions posed by committee members and the public to Parks staff about traffic have been dismissed. The close proximity of Horseshoe Farm Road and Highway 401 presents significant challenges for ingress and egress to the park. I encourage you to support Horseshoe Farm Park being a premier nature park, providing the opportunities for recreating in nature that will provide solace and engagement with nature. Sincerely, Marsha Presnell-Jennette 618 Stacy Street Raleigh, NC 27608
I served as a member of PRGAB member from 1995-2001. During that time I served as vice chair of the board, vice chair of the Pullen Park master planning committee and served on each of the Board committees at some point during my tenure. From the mid 1970's to the mid '80's I was employed as a city gardener and activities leader for the senior citizens program for Raleigh Parks and Recreation Department. Those years educated me to the importance of staff and employee relationships. I learned first hand how much Raleigh citizens love our parks.

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

susan howes ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Monday, June 19, 2006 11:16:55 AM

Dear Committee Members, This is my first writing regarding the Horseshoe Park and I am a very strong advocate of the final Master Plan derived by the Friends of Horseshoe Farm. Please accept the Master Plan as is because of the following reasons. Raleigh needs a true nature and wildlife park for children and adults to appreciate and enjoy. Too much of our natural resources have been made into concrete, buildings and noise- producing sports courts. Our wildlife have been run out of Raleigh by economic growth. What a haven we can have if we keep a wildflower garden to feed butterflies, birds and bees. The river itself is so peaceful where we can go to renew our spirits. Please keep dogs and sports activities out of an area where wild turkeys and deer roam. Your grandchildren and mine will be eternally grateful for your decision today to stick with this carefully and thoughtfully Master Plan for the Horseshoe Farm Park. Thank you, Susan Howes 919-619-2773

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Sonia Ensenat ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park plan Tuesday, June 20, 2006 11:17:49 AM

I'm writing to support the draft master plan for Horseshoe Farm. I'm very encouraged that the plan preserves the rural aspect of the place and does not allow high-intensity use. I live ~10 min. away from the park. My husband and I have been there a couple of times and love the place and would love to keep it as rural as possible. We think there are sufficient sports courts at other nearby parks that we frequent: several baseball fields at Buffaloe Park and basketball courts at Durant Trails park. The canoe/kayak launch is a great idea - we will certainly use it ! Thanks, Sonia Ensenat 3916 Lauriston Rd. Raleigh

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Trent/Elizabeth Zirkle ParkPlan; Horseshoe park Friday, June 23, 2006 10:30:35 AM

Please approve the plan as shown today in the N&O. It is much better as a nature park than another sports park. The huge soccer park on Perry Creek adds enough traffic to the area already. We need to preserve places like this before it is too late for our county. Thanks, Elizabeth Zirkle

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

karen bashkirew ParkPlan; comment Friday, June 23, 2006 8:16:20 PM

I urge the Parks Board to adopt the current Draft Plan without changes. Horseshoe Farm is a rare treasure of natural beauty in a world increasingly paved over with concrete and asphalt. Our children and our grandchildren will thank you for preserving this peaceful refuge. Respectfully, Karen Bashkirew

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:
Dear Sirs,

Linda Brown ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm preservation Sunday, June 25, 2006 9:06:59 AM

Horseshoe Farm has been a delightful respite in a world where we are continually over-scheduled, over-worked and increasingly stressed. The thought of losing such a peaceful, natural and rest-filled respite saddens me. I am a teacher and understand the need for sports facilities, but to alter this rare gem of virgin land is a huge mistake. It’s so important for our children to come to this park and learn to appreciate its natural beauty and wildlife. It affords them a chance to slow down and take a break from their ever-increasingly busy lives. Quite simply, Horseshoe Farm is a rare opportunity for all of us to relax and discover the beautiful gifts of nature. Please preserve Horseshoe Farm. Undeveloped land like this is disappearing at such an alarming rate. We are so fortunate to have an opportunity to preserve it. Thank you, Linda Brown

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Paul Brant ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Master Plan Sunday, June 25, 2006 2:37:26 PM

The Master Plan, as it is currently documented, appears to reflect the desires and interests of those who live in or near, and will be the primary users of the park property. I support the current Master Plan and will be extremely unhappy if the interests of others, including those in public service, take precedence over the NE residents who have been patiently waiting for the City of Raleigh to develop this site. This is a good beginning but we need additional parks, recreational facilities and community centers in the NE. Let's not take next 10 years to meet the current needs of this rapidly growing area. Paul Brant 4919 Shallowbrook Trail Raleigh, NC 27616 paulbrant@mindspring.com

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Kari Wouk ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Plans Sunday, June 25, 2006 3:09:17 PM

Please keep Horseshoe Farm Park natural and free of high-intensity sporting activities. There are many people in the area that would prefer a nature park to a sports park, as there are so few currently in existance. Thank you, Kari Wouk 2312 Basil Dr Raleigh, NC 27612 __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Margaret McEwen ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farms Park Sunday, June 25, 2006 3:18:28 PM

I am in favor of keeping Horseshoe Farms a natural area. We have many ballfields and gyms, and few green spaces. Raleigh is becoming increasingly urban. We need to preserve this open space where people can enjoy and experience nature. Margaret McEwen 2446 Medway Dr Raleigh, NC 27608

Talk is cheap. Use Yahoo! Messenger to make PC-to-Phone calls. Great rates starting at 1¢/min.

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Joe Turner ParkPlan; Horseshoe park - dog area Monday, June 26, 2006 11:26:07 AM

As a dog owner who uses Millbrook quite often, I'd like to see a dog area added to Horseshoe park. Raleigh now has two nice (and free to public) dog parks, but there is nowhere for waterdogs to swim. If it would be possible to make a dogpark with a swimming area for dogs at Horseshoe I think it would be very popular with breeds that enjoy the water. Joe Turner 4400 Wingate Dr Raleigh, NC 27609

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Kat Pfister ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Monday, June 26, 2006 7:54:08 PM

As I am unable to attend Thursday's meeting, I wish to make my opinion known. If the future-planned neighborhoods in that area are going to want recreational activity parks (as stated in the News & Observer), then they need to plan for those and make them a part of the development before building is started. Horseshoe Farm Park is too valuable as a nature park to the alreadyestablished neighborhoods surrounding it! Kathryn Pfister 6004 Bur Trail Remington Park Raleigh, NC 27616

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Dave Close ParkPlan; Horseshoe Park Final Draft Plan Monday, June 26, 2006 8:56:42 PM

Dear Sir or Madam: Our family of 5 support the proposed HorseshoeFarm nature-based park. We look forward to spending quality time there. Sincerely, Dave Close Donna Carver Evan Close Will Close Crandall Close

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Randy Senzig ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Monday, June 26, 2006 9:54:27 PM

Dear Sir, my name is Randy Senzig and I am a science teacher in a Wake County High School. I graduated from Garner High School. My wife's and my families have been part of this county for a long time. I wanted to share with you one important point that I learned back in 1986 when I was teaching in Broward County, Fla. In Broward County in 1970 the citizens voted yes on a bond issue to purchase land to be used later for parks. They used all the money to buy all the environmentally sensitive lands that they could. Those leaders and citizens had the foresight to see that their county was growing so fast that there would be a time when there would be no land to buy for parks when greater numbers of people would want to use them. They bought all the land that they could and then over the next 15 years developed the parks one by one. When I was there interested in learning about the local environment Broward County had a series of nature parks and other parks in place. It was a good thing because the parks were the only natural areas left after the developers moved through the area and built on everything else. The point of this story is that we are growing at the same rate as Broward County and it is possible that our county could be built out as our county doubles in size by 2025.I want my children and grandchildren to at least have a remnant left of what is wild, beautiful and natural. Make and keep Horseshoe Park a natural area for future generations. Then, let us figure out how to purchase as much natural area as possible for later development. Sincerely, Randy Senzig

From: To: CC:

Bob Mulder ParkPlan; pisley@boyceisley.com; West, James P.; Taliaferro, Jessie; tcrowder@ArchitekturPA.com; tfcraven@nc.rr.com; Kekas, Joyce; charlesmeeker@parkerpoe.com; rstephenson@bellsouth.net; Meeker, Charles; Horseshoe Farm Park Monday, June 26, 2006 10:25:58 PM

Subject: Date: Attachments:

I support the Horseshoe Farm Draft Master Plan as presented by the Horseshoe Farm Park Master Plan Committee. Horseshoe Farm is unique piece of land where low intensity uses are appropriate as recommended in The Neuse River Corridor Master Plan. The Horseshoe Farms site is a once in a lifetime opportunity. When planning any park in the City of Raleigh it is important to look at all undeveloped sites in the surrounding area to determine what uses are most appropriate for any given site. No site should be planned in a vacuum. There is a sufficient supply of yet undeveloped sites where high intensity uses are more appropriate and will do less damage to the environment then if placed at Horseshoe Farms Park. Bob Mulder Raleigh, NC 876-2828

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Joseph Huberman ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Master Plan Monday, June 26, 2006 10:27:36 PM

I have been involved in park planning in Raleigh for many years, and was on the Raleigh Parks Board from 1994-96. During that time I served on the Neuse River Corridor Master Plan Committee. I have followed the development of the Horseshoe Farm Master Plan and attended some of the meetings. I think the final plan that you have before you is an excellent compromise. 1) It respects the special natural environment that exists nowhere else in Raleigh. 2) It allows for other activities so families can come to the park to play in the field, picnic, use the arts center and be exposed the special features of the river ecosystem. 3) It provides an excellent educational component in a setting that is free from incompatible activities. While on the Neuse River Master Plan Committee we focused on the big picture. "How could the various sites along the river work together to produce a recreational educational and environmental asset for Raleigh that was greater than the sum of the individual pieces." The way we decided after much deliberation and touring the river, was to develop each site to specialize on its best and most unique features. In this way intense development could occur in the areas with little natural endowment, and the unique natural areas could showcase their environmental assets. Most people like both active sports and the peace and quiet of the natural environment, but they don't want them at the same time or in the same place. It is important to segregate the activities sot they are each in the setting best suited to them. By developing Horseshoe Farm as a natural area without active sports, and putting the active sports in another better suited location the river corridor will be

able to share more of its special features with the citizens of Raleigh. Sincerely, Joseph Huberman Joseph Huberman 904 Dorothea Drive, Raleigh, NC 27603 (919)828-6068 www.Huberman.org

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Marlyn Miller ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Monday, June 26, 2006 10:49:52 PM

Do not be so seduced by sports that you cannot appreciate the different kind of park that is so uniquely Horseshoe Farm Park. If you give in to the shortsightedness of constituents who can only think about relieving heavilyscheduled ball parks, we lose a dimension of life--the natural one. You were elected to make decisions for the good of all, for the future as well as the present. You need to protect the innocence of this park for tomorrow's sunrise over the treetops.

Marlyn Miller marlynmiller@earthlink.net Why Wait? Move to EarthLink.

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

RobertKNesbitt@aol.com ParkPlan; Comment--Horseshoe Farm Park Monday, June 26, 2006 11:36:47 PM

June 26, 2006 Ladies and Gentlemen, I write in response to the draft master plan submitted to the Parks, Recreation and Greenway Advisory Board regarding the development of Horseshoe Farm Park. In light of such heavy public input, I offer my deepest complements to the Master Plan Committee for their diligence in striking such an appropriate compromise. I wholeheartedly support the draft master plan and encourage both the Board and City Council to adopt it without further revision. I received my bachelor’s degree in Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management from North Carolina State University and am currently a graduate student in the same department. I am no activist—only a city resident who happens to have academic experience in park planning and management. I hope that my thoughts will convince the Board that the Master Plan Committee did a spectacular job of suiting a park to the surrounding landscape. I am familiar with the Horseshoe Farm site and have read previous draft master plans that fell far short of Horseshoe Farm’s potential. It is a fundamental planning principle that some sites are suited for athletic facilities and active recreation. Others are more passive. Some sites are ideal for urban recreation and others for naturebased recreation—but they should never be all four at once. The natural beauty of the Horseshoe Farm site is the perfect setting for passive, nature-based recreation. The park, as envisioned through the draft master plan, will draw residents city-wide and has the potential to be a model “eco-park” for this end of the state. The task of the Master Plan Committee cannot be to satisfy each interest, but rather

to develop a plan best suitable to the proposed site. Although taking into consideration needs and wants of both city officials and the public is part of the process, there is no requirement to satisfy everyone. Athletic facilities are valuable, and the public deserves to have quality athletic programming. However, athletic facilities can be planned and built on almost any tract of public land. I venture that this city will not see a site with more natural beauty and potential than Horseshoe Farm in the future. I ask both the Advisory Board and City Council to take advantage of what you have, and use Horseshoe as the park it was meant to be. Thank you for the opportunity to comment, and again, I urge you to adopt the current draft master plan without revision. Sincerely,

Robert K. Nesbitt 4223-1 Avent Ferry Rd. Raleigh, NC 27606

From: To:

Linda Pearsall gtill@nc.rr.com; patrick_beggs@ncsu.edu; tina_certo@earthlink.net; tfcov@bellsouth.net; jkirschbaum@nc.rr.com; richardb@ncleg.net; rwilliams179@aol.com; pbenda@us.ibm.com; gerald. wright@duke.edu; csmith5@nc.rr.com; dwknight@mindspring.com; MOMFARRELL@aol.com; gbbarley@msn.com; ParkPlan; Meeker, Charles; West, James P.; tfcraven@nc.rr.com; Kekas, Joyce; rstephenson@bellsouth.net; Crowder, Thomas; pisley@boyceisley.com; Taliaferro, Jessie; Ecological Significance of Horseshoe Farm Park Tuesday, June 27, 2006 9:25:03 AM linda.pearsall.vcf

CC:

Subject: Date: Attachments:

Dear Raleigh Parks, Recreation and Greenway Advisory Board Members: I am writing to you today as the Director of the North Carolina Natural Heritage Program of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources. The North Carolina Natural Heritage Program is the state agency charged with identifying the most significant natural features of our state. Once identified, we work with landowners and government agencies to protect these areas from development and to build support for their conservation. In 1993, NC Natural Heritage Program documented the natural areas of Wake County as part of a multi-county report on natural areas of the Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine Region. Nineteen Wake County natural areas were identified, including Horseshoe Farm, Hemlock Bluff and Lake Johnson. A more complete inventory of Wake County natural areas published in 2003 documented 44 significant natural areas, including, again, these city-owned lands. As you meet this week to consider the proposed master plan for Horseshoe Farm, please be aware of the ecological significance of the natural features of Horseshoe Farm. Horseshoe Farm contains a high quality

example of the Piedmont/Mountain Levee Forest natural community, as well as one of the best Floodplain Pool wetland complexes in the Piedmont. The natural river levee at Horseshoe Farm Park is unusual in its height and in the quality of the mature bottomland forest it supports (it may be the tallest forest remaining in the county); the wildlife habitat this mature forest provides is increasingly rare in Wake County as it is throughout North Carolina. It is unfortunate that quality riparian forest habitat continues to be lost; however, that on-going loss significantly increases the importance of conserving the forest at Horseshoe Farm Park. Given the ecological significance of the forest, the levy and the wildlife habitat at Horseshoe Farm, we ask that you approve those features of the proposed master plan which will have minimal impacts. If you have questions or need additional information, please contact me at 715-4195 or at linda.pearsall@ncmail.net. Thank you for your efforts to promote and protect Raleigh parks and greenways. Linda Pearsall

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

RonaldLohr@aol.com ParkPlan; HORSESHOE FARM IS PERFECT AS A NATURAL OASIS Tuesday, June 27, 2006 10:10:52 AM

As you are besieged by comments, I simply would ask that you keep Horseshoe Farm as close to its natural state as possible. Urbanized "improvements" would not provide the calming sanctuary that our growing population needs. Thank you for your efforts. Ron Lohr

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Bill Troop ParkPlan; horseshoe park Tuesday, June 27, 2006 11:10:42 AM

I am a resident of Raleigh. I have a dog and use the Millbrook Park a lot. It gets quite crowded there on weekends. I would like the Horseshoe Park plan to include a off leash dog park. thank you, Bill Troop IBM Engineering & Technology Services RTP, NC 27709 e-mail: troop@us.ibm.com phone: 919-254-2695 (t/l 444)

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Sarah Cox ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Dog Park Wednesday, June 28, 2006 11:54:18 AM

To Whomever it May Concern, I will be unable to attend the meeting on Thursday, June 28, but as a dog owner I would like my voice heard about the Horseshoe Farm Dog Park. I regularly attend Millbrook Dog Park and have for several years. I love the Park and have been incredibly impressed with the upkeep of the park and the friendliness that I have felt among fellow dog lovers. The Park is not only a place to exercise my dog safely, it is a place to meet people and be social outside in a very casual setting. In the last while, the Park has become very crowded and even with the opening of the new park downtown, crowding is a real problem. It has gotten to the point that an experienced Dog Parker doesn't go to the park if the weather is too nice for fear of being confronted with herds of dogs. The more dogs that are at the park, the harder it is to control them and that causes very real problems. If a new park were to be opened in Horseshoe Farm, it would very positively impact not only Millbrook Dog Park but the whole community. Horseshoe Farm is an ideal location for a new park and would only benefit the area. Please pass the plan to build a new dog park, it will be greatly appreciated! Thank you for your time. Sincerely, Sarah J. Cox __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Daniel Rouse ParkPlan; Horse shoe farm park Wednesday, June 28, 2006 3:49:43 PM

I will be unable to attend this evenings meeting concerning Horse Shoe Farm Park but I want to show my support for the plan that you have recently adopted and ask you not to reconsider changing the plan as it stands now. I am a fifty year old hiker that loves the solitude of the park as it is now and my husband and I have walked there ever since Dr. Hedrick sold the property to the city. We have been walking there long before all the excitement of what to do with the land and we have fallen in love with it. The hawks that fly over our heads, the turkey who strut to get away from us when they see us, the deer that are really not too afraid of us are all the reasons why you want to leave this place as natural as possible. There are other places where you can put a gym and more pavement but there are not many areas where children and their families can come and just enjoy nature. We felt that the last adopted plan was a little more built up then we wanted, but we felt it was a great compromise to have walking trails in the woods and a few parking spots so others can share the park. Please let the plan stand as is. Thanks for listening. Bobbie Rouse

Daniel Rouse therousehouse@earthlink.net Why Wait? Move to EarthLink.

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

johnwpelosi ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Thursday, June 29, 2006 11:28:10 AM

To the Raleigh Parks Board and City Council: Please consider implementing the draft master plan for the Horseshoe Farm Park as it is written. I have followed the development of the plan and know about the controversy over various elements of the plan. I have heard the arguments put forth by different advocates for different elements. The planning process correctly resulted in excluding elements (basketball courts, dog parks, tennis courts) that would have destroyed the integrity of the park as a nature park. Much testimony was presented to document this, given by experts from NC State, the Audubon Society, the Sierra Club and other knowledgeable individuals and organizations. Still some believe the excluded elements should be put back in. It is difficult for me to understand why they still believe this in the face of all the evidence showing that these elements will destroy the natural environment of the park with all its very special features, especially since it is clear that there are other nonsensitive locations where these elements may be located. This week’s news describes how the coastal areas of our State are undergoing environmental endangerment because of the practices of certain developers. As more and more natural areas are destroyed by all the development going on in Raleigh and Wake County we must save as many natural areas for our citizens as we are able. The Horseshoe Park draft master plan saves such an area. I hope the parks board and the city council chooses to leave the draft master plan as it is and to vote to develop the park accordingly. Sincerely yours, John Pelosi, Vice President B. W. Wells Association 1255 S. Main St. Wake Forest 556-3409

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Adams, George M ParkPlan; New City Park-Horseshoe Thursday, June 29, 2006 3:43:50 PM

I am a resident of the Riverside Community. Please reconsider allowing a dog park at this park. Currently, the closest dog park to our community is Millbrook Exchange. I believe the demand/use of the dog park will grow with the planned communities along 401. If there are concerns around wildlife, the use of the dog park could be limited to the daylight hours (do not install lights in the dog park section). George Adams, Ph.D. G Senior Laboratory Coach MMD-Wilson Quality Laboratory office 252-246-6047 Fax 252-246-6359

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From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Luci Plack ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Meeting tonight Thursday, June 29, 2006 4:00:43 PM horseshoe farm city council.wps

Sent: Thursday, June 29, 2006 3:55 PM Subject: Horseshoe Farm Park Meeting tonight

Please see attachment in regard to tonight's meeting. Thank you.

Good evening Mayor Meeker, City council members and neighbors, Luci Plack , 3424 Suncrest Village Lane Raleigh, I live off 401 across the highway from Horseshoe Farm Park. I would like to speak on two issues. I came to the Master Planning Committee meetings with a concern for a new park in my area. I became very disheartened as I observed Park employees and their rudeness to Raleigh they got up, walked around and whispered to each other while citizens ( whose interests they stated they had at heart) spoke near the end of the meetings. I also observed Park employees eye-rolling snickering and acting very unprofessional as citizens spoke. I was also disturbed with the evasive answers and tactics in regard to ownership of land in the area when I spoke with a Park employee at a meeting. As I did more research, I learned that it seemed possible that the committee was not getting all the facts about the park and the area. I feel that the concept of a Master Planning committee is an excellent one, if its members are fully informed and thereby can make correct decisions and choices. The planning of Horseshoe Farm would not have taken so long if the committee been given all the tools it needed at the beginning. The City of Raleigh Parks should continue and expand this concept of Citizen-based master planning committees, making certain that the citizens receive all information for the task at hand. Secondly, and most important, are my concerns for the Park at Horseshoe Farm. This is a unique place, unique in the county as well as the City of Raleigh. I believe the current, constant push for high-acivtity recreational facilities maybe slightly overstated. I am in education and I see children every year on field trips discovering nature for the first time. Children need a places in the city their parents and grandparents can to take them to experience Nature and renew the spirit. The majority of our population is aging and nearing retirement. We are retiring at the rate of 10,000 a day. Walking is a sport that our population can be safely engaged as we age and succumb to the various ailments associated with aging. There are large properties currently owned by the city of Raleigh near the Horseshoe Park. One of the closest and largest is the landfill. I beg you keep the Master Plan as is and place more active facilities on another piece of property without this important historical and natural value of Horseshoe Farm.

Scott Weidensaul in his book Return to Wild America “considers conservation success stories and blunders and the destructive nature of human influence along side the rise in the modern environmental movement” and expresses a vision of what the future holds: “The key is hope, because hope, when paired with the ferocious love Americans feel for their land becomes action”. Please take the action required, do not allow Horseshoe Farm Park become a conservation blunder. Thank you

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Amanda Turner ParkPlan; Horseshoe Thursday, June 29, 2006 4:56:04 PM

I know there is a meeting this evening that my husband and I are unable to attend due to work, but we would still like to voice our opinion. We would like to have a dog park located at Horseshoe Park. We were just there the other day and I know you have some Master plans in place, but we would enjoy it if a dog park were there. Milbrook dog park is where we normally go, but it is quite crowded sometimes and it would be great to have another option. It's a great location. Let us know if there is anything else we can do to help with the process of getting a dog park located at Horseshoe Park. Brent and Amanda Turner 875-8260

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From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Lynn Harvey ParkPlan;

Thursday, June 29, 2006 5:39:42 PM

The farmland should stay natural at Horseshoe Bend. ---------------------------------------------------------------Lynn Harvey Marketing Assistant Tel: 919-772-0115 x133 Fax: 919-772-8259 ATI Industrial Automation 1031 Goodworth Dr. Apex, NC USA 27539-3869

Email: katherine.johnson@ati-ia.com Engineered Products for Robotic Productivity ----------------------------------------------------------------

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Brenda ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Thursday, June 29, 2006 6:02:24 PM

Hello - thought I would voice my opinion about development on Horseshoe Farm Park. Please keep this a more natural area, accentuating what it already is. Maybe add trails, ground lights, scattered shelters, but keep the plantings that are attracting wildlife, and keep out overdevelopment. Tennis courts and dog parks can be built anywhere; especially where wildlife has not become established. Thank you for listening, and let's please keep Raleigh beautiful. I've been in many of our states, and our area stands out as quite a prize. It's because we have elected in the past to keep substantial natural areas. Over-developing would cause our city to lose value, and begin to resemble other towns that have not watched their growth. Brenda Warlick 5009 Yadkin Drive Beautiful Raleigh

From: To: CC:

Stewart Rapp ParkPlan; Crowder, Thomas; Meeker, Charles; Stephenson, Russ; pisley@boyceisley.com; Taliaferro, Jessie; Kekas, Joyce; West, James P.; tfcraven@nc.rr.com; Horseshoe Farm Park Thursday, June 29, 2006 6:31:40 PM

Subject: Date: Attachments:

Please keep Horseshoe Farm Park in it's more natural state. Do NOT choose to disturb the natural beauty and wildlife settings with tennis courts and a dog park. I am an avid tennis player and use many Raleigh public tennis courts however this property has special value and should have minimum development. The public has been very clear about this but the City Parks leader, Wayne Marshall continues to defy the public he represents. Heed the publics requests and develop the park as the committees majority and community have directed. Per many news reports about this controversy and this latest WRAL report, "The master plan voted on and now moving forward keeps Horseshoe Farm Park more of a natural place with trails and camping." RIGHT! Finally, I advocate the Park Advisory Board and Raleigh City Council do NOT confuse the land GIFT bestowed on us by Dr. Annie Louise Wilkerson as a reason to defy the publics understanding and vote to keep Horseshoe Park Farm a more natural and serene getaway. Thank You, Stewart Rapp & Family 201 Sampson St. Raleigh, NC 27609 Phone: 919-571-9657 srapp@nc.rr.com

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:
Keep it natural.

Karlhedrickjr@aol.com ParkPlan; HORSESHOE FARMS Thursday, June 29, 2006 7:48:08 PM

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Catherine Scott ParkPlan;

Thursday, June 29, 2006 7:48:39 PM

Keep it like it is!!!

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Ludwick ParkPlan; horseshoe farm Thursday, June 29, 2006 8:37:54 PM

I would like top see the farm remain natural with a greenway. It would be nice to have a small playground area too. My 10 year old son would like to restore the farm and have a campground for kids to experience the farm life. Marie Ludwick Jacob Ludwick

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Janie Wilson ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Thursday, June 29, 2006 9:26:27 PM

As someone who is constantly dismayed at the loss of our green space, please keep Horseshoe Park natural and free of tennis courts, dogs, lights and other ammenities which could be provided in more urban settings. This is a rare opportunity. Size the moment and keep the space natural. Janie Wilson

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Susan Wyatt ParkPlan; I am a proponent of a nature-based park at Horseshoe Park Thursday, June 29, 2006 9:53:24 PM

I am sorry that I was not able to attend the public hearing tonight regarding Horseshoe Farm.. However, I hope you will also consider written public comments. I am a strong supporter of the Audubon position to keep Horseshoe Farm as a nature -based park.

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From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

NCSU Wolf ParkPlan; Horse Shoe Park Thursday, June 29, 2006 10:59:36 PM

Leave it ALONE... Leave it natural. Find a site that needs rebuilding or renovating and put the tennis courts, etc. there. No need to continue this urban sprawl instituted by the relocated yankees.

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

jdem@juno.com ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Friday, June 30, 2006 2:14:35 AM

It is a very sorry state of affairs when absolutely every open piiece of land is seen as something that has to be developed. You have a beautiful parcel with this farm and once it is developed, it is gone FOREVER. Please keep it as natural as possible and preserve some space for present and future generations.

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Lavine, Dorothea ParkPlan; Preserve the park as is....... Friday, June 30, 2006 8:26:42 AM

Everything is so commercial..leave some of the beauty…………………………...

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Will Rowland ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Friday, June 30, 2006 9:14:25 AM

Dear Park Advisory Board, I would like to see Horseshoe Farm Park kept as old farmland, open grass fields, and trees. Having a serene public place like this as a quiet retreat is more valuable than building ball fields and a community center. Please consider other locations for these items. Horeshoe Farm park can preserve habitat for wildlife as well as a bit of history for young and old along the quiet trails. Thank you. Will Rowland Fuquay-Varina, NC Past President of Wake Audubon

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

mollyh@mindspring.com ParkPlan; Dog Park at Horseshoe Farm Park Friday, June 30, 2006 9:39:30 AM

Good morning, I was upset today to have heard that a Dog Park may not still be in the plans for the Horseshoe Farm Park master plan. Please reconsider and know that Dog Parks have become an essential asset to communities which afford dog owners and their dogs a great means to socialize and become more responsible animal loving citizens. If not Horseshoe Farm Park then please keep other areas in mind for additional Dog Parks!!! Thank you, Molly H. Boothe Raleigh Resident - 27612

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Sue Ivy ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Master Plan comments Friday, June 30, 2006 11:42:10 AM

Eleonor Duse wrote: “If the sight of the blue skies fills you with joy, if a blade of grass springing up in the fields has power to move you, if the simple things of nature have a message that you understand, rejoice, for your soul is alive.” Horseshoe Farm Park helps keep my soul alive. I spend all day in a noisy office in front of a computer and my two Welsh Corgis spend all day waiting patiently for me to come home. They’re usually full of energy and we’re all in need of a lot more exercise than our tiny yard can accommodate. I helped clear the land for the Millbrook Exchange Dog Park and I was excited by its opening. Unfortunately, neither my dogs, nor I care for the crowded, raucous, noisy free-for-all it’s evolved into. It’s simply too small for the number of dogs that use it. Several dogs have been injured there by other dogs, including mine, and often, while owners stand around socializing, dogs are left unsupervised. I train and compete with my dogs in the sport of dog agility and participate in other dog-related activities but one of my favorite pastimes is hiking with my dogs and spending time in nature. To that end, I am always exploring local parks in search of safe, quiet, peaceful places to walk--preferably near water. Some, like Durant Nature Park, seem sorely neglected with an almost melancholy air, while others, like Shelley Lake, are usually a frenzy of activity and are so crowded with people that they’re difficult to enjoy. Still others, like Buffalo Road Athletic Park, are targeted toward organized sports--for kids--NOT Corgis.

The day I discovered Horseshoe Farm Park, I was driving home from a disappointing trip to Buffalo Road Park, which was inexplicably closed. As I drove past what remains of Britt Farm--where I used to ride horses--I found myself wishing I could find a similar place where I could walk with my dogs in the woods and pastures. Not two minutes later, I happened to look at the map and noticed Horseshoe Farm Park for the first time. I went straight there and found exactly what I’d been wishing for! A tranquil, pastoral place with great expansive meadows, quiet woodlands, wildlife, AND access to the river. There was also a wonderful positive energy there that I haven’t felt in any other park in Raleigh. I could tell right away it was a very special place. That was over a year ago and my dogs and I have been there almost every day since. When I drive down the narrow lane toward Horseshoe Farm, I can actually feel my shoulders relax and the stress of the day start to melt away. In addition to experiencing the beautiful landscape, charming homestead site and some truly glorious sunsets, I’ve seen an incredible array of wildlife there--A large herd of deer, a family of red foxes, beaver, hedgehogs, rabbits, hawks, heron, geese, raccoon, turtles, bats and a myriad of birds. My sincerest hope is that the Master Plan, crafted by the committee AND the community will mean minimal impact to this little piece of paradise and it’s population and that my dogs and I can continue to enjoy both for many years to come. I urge you to adopt this plan as is. While I do firmly believe that Raleigh needs many more dog parks—I DO NOT believe that Horseshoe Farm Park is an appropriate place for one. In fact, rather than a tiny one or two acre “poop patch” like the Millbrook Exchange Dog Park, I would love to see an entire, multi-

acre, fenced park facility, dedicated to dogs, with swimming and hiking areas and space for all types of dog sports and training including Agility, Obedience, Rally, Earthdog, Lure Coursing, Breed showing and Tracking. WWW.AKC.ORG has information on all of these events and is just one of several different sponsoring organizations. There is a huge population of dog owners who participate in organized events both locally and nationally and a severe shortage of facilities to accommodate them. In addition to providing greater recreational opportunities for Raleigh residents and their dogs, there are also significant revenue opportunities to be realized through fees for use of the facilities by groups and clubs.

Thank you for your time and consideration. Susan J Ivy

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Keith Nickerson ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Friday, June 30, 2006 12:51:13 PM

My two cents; Keep this land in its natural state. We already have too little natural land and too much blacktop, concrete, and buildings. __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:
June 29, 2006

Vicki Weis ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Friday, June 30, 2006 2:20:36 PM

To: Members of the Parks, Recreation and Greenway Advisory Board

At the May 25th, 2005 meeting of the Horseshoe Farm Master Planning Committee, Jan Kirschbaum, your Chairman, address the committee and told us we had to consider all forms of recreation for the park, active as well as passive. So for six months, from the public meeting on March 30th, 2005 to the public meeting on Nov. 16th, 2005, the Committee listened politely while the consultants led the discussions and Park staff present statistics on registrations for Parks Dept. programs over the last four years, demographics on populations projections for the NE district, etc., etc., obviously lobbying for revenue producing, programmable "active recreation" in the Horseshoe Farm Park. At the August 17th, 2005 meeting, various program directors of the City Park staff stood up and told the committee what kind of facilities they would like to see in the Park for their divisions. However, the committee heard an entirely different vision for the Horseshoe Farm Park from members of the public, starting with the first public comment meeting on March 30th, 2005. Although the Master Plan Committee was never given the opportunity to discuss the results of this meeting, HagarSmith did provide us with an 8 page list of all the comments received, which were overwhelmingly in favor of keeping the park as natural as possible to preserve its existing special character. (see "Public Input-1.pdf") This trend continued through all 19 of our committee meetings. Every committee meeting was open to the public and all members of the public were welcome to speak before the end of each meeting. On occasion, we did have members of various athletic groups address the Committee, such as the representative from Pop Warner Football at the May 25th, 2005 meeting, but these individuals did not come to speak at more than one meeting, did not give us any reasons why the Horseshoe Farm Park was specifically the best place for their activity or even indicate if they had ever been to the Horseshoe. Most of the public

comments at the end of each meeting pointed out the special nature of the Horseshoe Farm and were consistently in favor of keeping the Horseshoe Farm Park a nature park focused on river oriented recreation and environmental education. This vision for the Horseshoe Farm Park is also supported by the 2002 survey of Raleigh residents in Tables 1 and 13 in Appendix C of the "Raleigh Parks ... Comprehensive Plan" prepared by Dr. Gene Brothers. Under "Activity Interest, Participation and Latent Demand" in Table 1, the top 7 items," Viewing Wildlife, Arts & crafts classes, Picnicking with family, Walking in natural areas, Art Shows, and Canoeing" are all accommodated in this Final Draft Master Plan for the Horseshoe Farm Park. (Tables attached.) This Draft Master Plan also conforms to the City Council approved Neuse River Corridor Regional Master Plan which I believe designated the Horseshoe Farm as a nature preserve. The Master Plan Committee members were in substantial agreement on several program elements for the Horseshoe Farm Park all the way through the Master Planning process. This was evident in the priority voting on June 29th, 2005 when River Oriented Recreation, Environmental Education, Picnicking, Informal Playing Fields, Arts and Crafts and Outdoor Amphitheater were the five highest priority elements. Almost all of the program elements, both high and low, that the committee was allowed to vote on were included in the first draft of the Master Plan which was presented to the public for comment at the November 16th, 2005 public meeting. During the 30 day public comment period in November, 2005 and at the public meeting, the overwhelming majority of comments received requested that the Master Plan Committee remove the last three of the lowest priority elements that were still included in the Draft Master Plan, the Dog Park, the Indoor Active Recreation Center and the Tennis Courts. At the next meeting on December 7th, 2005, the Master Plan Committee responded to the input received from the public and voted 8 to 5 to remove these elements. In the end, the Master Plan Committee listened to the public, not the Parks Department, so this Final Draft Master Plan successfully fulfills the stated goal of the new Master Planning Policy to give the public more input into the development of their parks. I feel that this Final Draft Master Plan for Horseshoe Farm Park truly reflects the wishes of the public for the quiet, nature based park that they want for themselves, their children and future generations. I hope you will endorse it wholeheartedly. Thank you.

Vicki Weis Horseshoe Farm Park Master Plan Committee Member 2901 Horseshoe Farm Road Wake Forest, NC 27609

Attachments: Here are two tables from the “Raleigh Parks Plan Parks , Recreation and Greenways Element of the Comprehensive Plan” Comprehensive Plan” Prepared for: City of Raleigh Parks and Recreation Department Prepared By: Dr. Gene Brothers Adopted May 4, 2004 Table 1 from Appendix C – “Facility Needs Analysis Supporting Data” (Table 1 ranks activities by latent demand. Table 13, below, ranks activity by interest) Table 1. Activity Interest, Participation and Latent Demand for Raleigh residents during 2002 Activity % Interest% (extreme-v/high)* 58.9% 38.1% 51.7% 73.0% 54.8% 40.2% 43.2% 55.4% 33.8% 53.3% 29.7% 31.7% 29.6% 41.7% 56.1% 25.9% 32.6% Participation 12 months** 22.5% 3.8% 17.7% 39.1% 22.2% 8.3% 12.5% 25.4% 4.3% 25.3% 2.1% 6.5% 4.4% 17.1% 31.6% 2.8% 10.0% Latent Demand* 36.3% 34.3% 34.1% 33.8% 32.6% 31.9% 30.7% 30.0% 29.5% 28.0% 27.6% 25.2% 25.2% 24.6% 24.6% 23.1% 22.6%

Viewing wildlife Arts/craft classes Picnicking with family Walking in natural area Arts show/festival Canoeing/Rowing Picnicking with groups Outdoor Performance Fitness-related Classes Using fitness trail Sprayground/water park Using Pedal boats Nature Study Indoor Performance Eating Lunch Sailing Playing Tennis

Visiting greenways Kite Flying Photography Fishing Jogging Bicycling Playing volleyball Reading Outdoors Walking Pets Looking at gardens Playing Softball Watching sports Playing Frisbee Playing Golf Mountain biking Playing Baseball Fitness/team swimming Playing Soccer Playing Football Roller/inline Skating Summer Camp Walking along trail Playing Horseshoes Playing basketball Playing Disc golf Bird Watching Playing Shuffleboard Skateboarding Trackout camp Playing at playground

47.6% 27.8% 34.9% 30.2% 40.5% 41.9% 23.2% 37.5% 42.3% 45.8% 22.0% 37.3% 24.6% 22.9% 26.4% 16.2% 21.4% 22.0% 16.7% 22.3% 14.9% 74.5% 15.3% 23.5% 13.8% 23.2% 7.9% 7.4% 6.4% 35.5%

25.3% 5.5% 12.9% 8.9% 20.9% 23.4% 4.7% 20.4% 25.9% 30.1% 6.7% 22.1% 9.6% 8.4% 12.1% 2.3% 7.6% 9.0% 3.8% 9.9% 2.5% 62.3% 3.1% 11.5% 3.9% 15.6% 0.5% 1.2% 0.6% 31.3%

22.4% 22.3% 22.0% 21.3% 19.6% 18.5% 18.5% 17.1% 16.4% 15.7% 15.3% 15.2% 15.0% 14.5% 14.3% 13.9% 13.8% 13.0% 12.9% 12.4% 12.3% 12.2% 12.2% 12.1% 9.9% 7.6% 7.4% 6.2% 5.7% 4.2%

Table 13 – Appendix B – “Public Participation Preference Survey Recreation Participation Preference Survey Supporting Data” Table 13: Activity Interest and Participation Activity % Interested (extreme-v/high) Walking along trail 77.5% Walking in natural area 74.2% Viewing wildlife 58.7%

% participation 12 months 64.6% 40.2% 23.7%

Eating Lunch Arts show/festival Using fitness trail Outdoor Performance Picnicking with family Visiting greenways Walking Pets Looking at gardens Bicycling Picnicking with groups Jogging Canoeing/Rowing Arts/craft classes Reading Outdoors Playing at playground Indoor Performance Photography Fitness-related Classes Watching sports Playing Tennis Using Pedal boats Sprayground/water park Fishing Nature Study Sailing Mountain biking Kite Flying Playing basketball Playing Golf Roller/inline Skating Playing Frisbee Playing Soccer Playing volleyball Playing Softball Bird Watching Fitness/team swimming Playing Football Summer Camp Playing Baseball Playing Disc golf Playing Horseshoes Playing Shuffleboard

54.3% 50.4% 49.9% 49.5% 49.3% 43.4% 41.7% 39.3% 39.0% 38.5% 38.4% 36.3% 34.0% 33.8% 32.5% 31.4% 29.7% 29.7% 29.4% 26.9% 26.9% 26.9% 26.3% 24.6% 22.8% 22.5% 22.5% 20.5% 19.9% 19.3% 19.1% 18.4% 18.4% 18.1% 17.1% 17.1% 12.7% 12.1% 12.4% 10.9% 10.0% 5.0%

32.4% 22.1% 27.8% 26.9% 18.0% 26.3% 27.2% 31.5% 21.9% 12.5% 22.4% 9.5% 3.9% 22.2% 29.0% 17.9% 13.7% 4.2% 23.1% 11.0% 7.1% 2.3% 9.0% 4.7% 3.2% 12.5% 5.1% 11.7% 9.0% 9.8% 10.1% 8.6% 4.7% 7.1% 15.6% 6.5% 4.1% 2.4% 2.3% 4.8% 3.2% 0.6%

Trackout camp Skateboarding

4.9% 4.1%

0.6% 1.1%

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:
Dear Committee:

Nadeen Sakowski ParkPlan; Horseshoe Park Friday, June 30, 2006 3:00:05 PM HorseShoe Comments.doc

I would like to thank you for spending so much time listening to all of our comments last night. I spoke last night but I am sending along my comments because I know I am not the best speaker and I want to be sure my points come across louder then my voice. Best Regards, Nadeen Sakowski

Horseshoe Farms Park is indeed a unique area located in the midst of a burgeoning population. Its natural division between the upper and lower areas affords an opportunity for compromise that other parks don’t present. However the plan before us does not represent a compromise and instead blatantly ignores the fact that there are a large number of houses in the area that are underserved in terms of recreation. If you look at the developments about to be constructed you will find even more houses are about to be built in its radius. We were supposed to build a park that served the growing needs of the city and I fear we failed. We have several nature parks in the area and another in the works. That doesn’t diminish Horseshoe Park or make it less special but it does remind us that there are other interests that have to be met as well, and the increasing demand there is not being answered. Some of the elements removed from the park could well have been left and coexisted leaving the character of the park with its woods and wetlands intact. The dog park, for instance, is one element whose removal makes little sense. The stated concern is that turkeys and deer will be disturbed. With a dog park at the entrance, the majority of dog owners will come to the dog park and leave and rarely walk the rest of the grounds with their dogs. Without a dog park the dog owners will still come but they will venture through every inch of the grounds. The fact that the dogs will be leashed will mean nothing to the animals that smell and hear them. A dog park costs little to build and maintain. More importantly the dog park represents much more to a lot of people then a place for dogs to play. People come to the dog park not just to socialize their dogs and give them the off leash exercise they so desperately need but they also come because we are a community. Millbrook and Oakwood are outstanding successes but two dog parks in a city our size is hardly adequate. Horseshoe can eliminate some of the over crowding experienced at Millbrook and extend the experience to the people in its radius.

If you want to see success, look at Millbrook: It is the first place many new Raleigh residents find, a place where young and old interact without barriers. The grieving dog owner comes to bemoan the loss of a family member, the sick come for moral support, the lonely come for companionship and the new dog owners come to introduce their new friends. Not long after it opened the News and Observer noted that if you want to find out what is happening in Raleigh, go to the dog park. It is truly a place where friendships and bonds are formed by both people and their dogs. We have a saying on our Millbrook t-shirts that it is a place where dogs bring their people to play and it’s true. But there are too many people and too many dogs and we are missing too many opportunities to have similar success stories.

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

John Little ParkPlan;

Sunday, July 02, 2006 10:05:52 PM Presentation to Parks,Recreation, and Greenway Advisory Board, 29 June 06.doc

Park Planning Staff: Please find attached my remarks made at the meeting on 29 June. Thank you. John J. Little 4201 Windsor Pl. Raleigh, NC 27609

I have a life long love of sports that began when I read the daily accounts of the Detroit Tigers’ games on the sports page of the Saginaw (Michigan) News when I was eight years old in 1948. I later played competitive sports in high school—football, basketball, and track—and my son was a college and semiprofessional soccer player. My wife and I attended more than 200 of his games throughout his athletic life. Sports and athletics have always been important to me, and they obviously hold a very important place in our national culture and in Raleigh.

But some things are more important than athletics and organized sports. Nature is certainly one of them. Horseshoe Park offers a rare—if not unique—opportunity to provide a wonderful natural setting intact for future generations. I recognize that it could also be developed into quality athletic facilities, dog parks, and such. But Yosemite Valley, no doubt, would make a beautiful golf course, and Yellowstone would make a wonderful theme park if placed in the hands of those who are good at such things. Fortunately for us—even those of us in North Carolina—neither of those things happened. Instead, both Yosemite and Yellowstone became world class nature parks because of far sighted people. I am not suggesting that Horseshoe is the scenic spectacle that Yosemite and Yellowstone are, but it is among the most scenic places in Wake County. Its wildlife, including wild turkey and deer, are superb, and they are losing habitat in Wake County every day. There is sufficient ground on the horseshoe to provide a viable home for such species if we have the vision to preserve it. Put athletic facilities there, however, and you can kiss the turkeys and deer goodbye. There is ample space there to establish habitats for other vulnerable species as well. Without dismissing the importance of athletic facilities, I would submit they can be built on nearly any piece of ground. The Horseshoe is irreplaceable in that regard. Once gone, it can never be recovered.

I would like to close by quoting a woman who many regard as the “godmother of the environmental movement.” Her name was Margaret Murie, better known as Mardy Murie. Mrs. Murie once said that “conservationists are a pain in the ass, but they make great ancestors.” I urge you Ladies and Gentlemen, to take Mardy Murie’s expression to heart and allow all of us to become great ancestors to our future generations by leaving to them this unique, exquisite, and irreplaceable slice of nature in Wake County. Thank you.

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

John Link ParkPlan; Horse Shoe Farm Park Monday, July 03, 2006 6:54:27 PM

i understand the difficulty of trying to address all the need and conflicting directions. A suggestion -USE THE 30+ AC OWNED BY CITY OF RALEIGH ACROSS 401 FROM HORSE SHOE FARM PARK FOR A DOG PARK AND DISK-GOLF COURSE..... KEEPING HORSE SHOE FARM PARK AS RECOMMENDED. Regards, John Link

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Monika Coleman ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Tuesday, July 04, 2006 10:24:11 PM

This is a great opportunity for Raleigh to preserve this unique piece of land as a natureoriented park. Adding ball fields and athletic facilities would not fit into this kind of park. I am sure there are other areas for this.

Monika Coleman 7720 Prospector Place Raleigh, NC 27615

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Jennifer Peterson ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Wednesday, July 05, 2006 2:12:26 PM

It was just brought to my attention that there was going to be a new dog park in this area however, it might not happen. I just wanted to send this email to voice my concern......I just moved from the Brier Creek area to Northeast corner where this park would be located. We used to go over to Millbrook and it's so crowded many times we just leave. I would love to see this park created so that I can enjoy time with my dog again....I thank you for this opportunity and hope this park is created!! : )

Jennifer Peterson
Staff Accountant
etrials Worldwide, Inc 4000 Aerial Center Parkway Morrisville, NC 27560 Phone: 919-653-3645 Fax: 919-653-3621

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Keri King ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Wednesday, July 05, 2006 3:13:01 PM

I recently heard about the possibility of a new off leash dog park. I'm writing to offer my support for the idea. I live in North Raleigh and used to take my dog to the Millbrook Exchange park but have stopped due to overcrowding. The Millbrook Exchange park is a GREAT facility and a nice size but it has gotten so popular and at times...especially the weekend...it seems there's not enough space for all the four legged kiddos to play without disagreements starting. Another dog park would be a welcome site. It would offer another option if Millbrook is full. Thanks for the possibility...paws crossed! Keri

,-._,-. \/)"(\/ (_o_)

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Tavious Williams ParkPlan; My Horse Shoe Part Thoughts Wednesday, July 05, 2006 4:20:58 PM

I'm a 23 year old male who is in the process of buying a first home in the Wake Crossroads area. And I think that Horse Shoe Farm Park should be developed using a half and half approach. I like to play tennis but find it hard to find a decent public place to play in the area. So I think that tennis/volley ball courts and other athletic type facilities should be incorporated within the park. But also I feel nature is important so that too should be considered. This park will be of use to the citizens of Raleigh for many years to come and I think that it should be built to it's fullest potential. There has got to be a nice mix of both. As long as there are tennis courts though, I will be happy. Thanks, Tavious Williams Concerned Wake County resident 14 years #919-790-0408

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James Hartigan ParkPlan; Horseshoe Wednesday, July 05, 2006 9:52:02 PM

Please reconsider making Horseshoe Park into a dog park. Many of the dog parks in Raleigh are so successful and with good reason. I think Horseshoe Park would make a fabulous choice for a dog park. There are many dogs in my neighborhood and it's would be conveniently located for many people (and doggies) to enjoy. Thank you for your cooperation, James Hartigan

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RGWolk@aol.com ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Plan - Public Comment Thursday, July 06, 2006 10:26:41 AM

At the meeting of the Advisory Board on 29 June 2006, the members of the audience were encouraged to offer "creative suggestions" for the Horseshoe Farm Park Draft Master Plan. One of the suggestions presented to the board was, in my opinion, especially creative but may have been missed by some members of the Board because it was presented briefly and succinctly and rather late in the evening. It deserves repetition. The recommendation was to consider seriously installing in any necessary buildings such facilities as "waterless" toilets that operate while saving considerable quantities of water. Furthermore, I would recommend that park facilities make use of any and all feasible alternative forms of energy to provide power and reduce the demand for fossil fuels resulting in augmenting the pollution load of our region. Doing so would provide the citizens of Raleigh, both adults and children, a superb demonstration of such facilities and serve not only as an example of what can be done but also as a personal, and therefore memorable, educational experience. I urge you to incorporate such ideas into your recommendation for Horseshoe Farm Park to the City Council. Robert G. Wolk 6001 Clare Court Raleigh, North Carolina 27609 rgwolk@aol.com

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Blueskypds@aol.com ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Thursday, July 06, 2006 11:56:51 AM

Keep the park natural. This type of environment cannot be replaced once destroyed.

Joe Azzara Raleigh, NC

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Farmerbrown2jr@aol.com ParkPlan; horseshoe farm Thursday, July 06, 2006 4:25:31 PM

I urge the park planners to keep Horseshoe Farm as natural as possible. It is quite a unique place. To convert it to a park with buildings, lights, playing fields, etc would truly be a shame. Let's keep it a nature park. Sincerely, John Brown

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Sharon Serre ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Monday, July 10, 2006 3:15:30 PM

I would like to express my support for not adding active recreation to the Horseshoe Farm Park. My house is being built in the Neuse Crossing community, and this natural park was one of the things that drew me to this area. I look forward to taking my children to this unique spot so they can see nature that's not in a zoo. The simple dirt road to the park makes it special and sets it apart from the pavement of most of North Raleigh. The history of the mills in the area should continue to be recognized with simple brochures and maps. This city has a lot of great parks and recreation activities, including the soccer complex and Fox Road Park close by. It would be best to add more space to these already developed parks than ruin the beauty of Horseshoe Farm Park. Thank you, Sharon Serre

From: To: CC:

Rachael Wooten ParkPlan; Kekas, Joyce; Tommy Craven; Philip Isley; West, James P.; Crowder, Thomas; Stephenson, Russ; Taliaferro, Jessie; Meeker, Charles; Re: Horseshoe Farm/Park Plan Comments Monday, July 10, 2006 10:32:23 PM

Subject: Date: Attachments:

Dear Parks Board, I am writing to support the acceptance of the Master Plan that was presented to you on June 29th. I want to add my observations from that meeting: An overwhelming majority of those present asked that you accept this plan. Those people included: Parents who asked you to preserve this park as a place where their children can have unstructured play in nature. The appointed representative of the CAC which includes the entire area in which the park exists, telling us their vote was 21 -0 in favor of the plan. Many experts from varying fields, from naturalists to child development folks, to parks planners and so on. Members of the Neuse River Corridor master planning committee. Several organizations including the Sierra Club and the Audubon Society. NOTABLY ABSENT: Not a single parent asking for active recreation was present. Not even one. (nor were any present at the last large public meeting.) If there are such parents who want this for their children, they have not availed themselves of any public process in which they could publicly voice their opinions, including their own CAC. The only person who advocated for a mixture of active and passive recreation was a representative of the development company, Sun Trust. Disturbing moments:

Wayne Marshall commenting on a "pressure group that attended so many of the planning meetings," saying those people must be retired or childless. Otherwise he couldn't imagine how they had that much time to spend on this issue. Mr. Marshall succeeded in dismissing a huge level of public participation and personal choices made to take responsibility for their community on the part of many individuals. Many of them not only have children, but actually gave up income to be present at some of those meetings. He simultaneously succeeded in insulting people who are retired and people who don't have children. One person made a sarcastic comment about dog parks. I thought this was unnecessary, especially since so many people obviously love these parks. I don't believe HSF is the place for such a park, but I do believe we should share our opinions respectfully, and not put down others' preferences. Clearly there is a need for other dog parks, and other disc golf courses. If more discussion is needed about these two issues, I would suggest that you be more creative about a process that allows people to be heard, and to talk with each other at the table. We don't need another process where people come and 'talk at' the Parks Board. We need to ask city management to facilitate a meeting with all relevant players, especially those with strong wishes, and most especially with the relevant experts, in order to have an outcome that people can accept, even if it isn't their first preference. People not only need to be heard, they need to hear the reasoning behind the decisions. There is a big discrepancy about information about alternative sites in the area for active recreation. I have heard widely differing opinions about the possible development of the landfill, which the county owns, and Sydnor White, just two examples. I am not satisfied with the answers I'm getting, especially since competent individuals with access to good information are telling me diametrically opposite things. Again, a process is needed where all the relevant players are at the table. That would include representatives from the city and the county, as well as citizens and outside consultants, so that the objective facts can be known by everyone involved. I will close by reiterating what someone said at the June 29th meeting. Public opinion, which has been solicited and given in great

quantities, clearly supports accepting the Master Plan presented to you last month. If you choose not to accept the Master Plan, and do not advocate for the city council to accept it, a massive amount of mistrust in the whole process of public input and participation will be created. Not to mention the potential loss of HSF as one of few significant Natural Heritage Areas, not just in the city, but in the state. You have been entrusted with a huge responsibility to the public, which has appealed to you in good faith and worked in good faith. Your responsibility extends to the land as well, which needs an advocate for it's preservation, along with all the precious beings, human and otherwise, who need such a place to live and thrive.....for generations to come. Most sincerely, Rachael Wooten

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Lancaster, Justin ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Tuesday, July 11, 2006 4:09:05 PM

I hope you consider a disc golf course on this park. I’ve been playing for about a year now and must say that it’s a great sport for all ages Justin Lancaster MIS Specialist

4011 WestChase Bvld. Raleigh, NC 27607 (919) 833-7152 (919) 833 1828 (Fax)

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Manisha Desai ParkPlan; Need for tennis courts Tuesday, July 11, 2006 9:54:39 PM

Hello, Raleigh is on the rise in terms of growth for the projected future mentioned in many magazines and it is the 'young' population that is coming. To elevate Raleigh even further we need to keep tennis as an intergral part of this community. Tennis is just not a 2 or 4 person sport but a family sport for many of us. Also, outdoor activities are a must here because we can use the courts for 10 out of 12 months here because of the great weather. The more we can get are children out here the better the lifestyle for the future. Thanks for considering a tennis park. Manisha Desai

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From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

JBailey128@aol.com ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Wednesday, July 12, 2006 6:39:14 AM

I recommend that Horseshoe Farm Park be a nature park. To destroy this natural beauty with playing fields, lights, and building would be a shame. The uniqueness of this property cannot be replaced or found elsewhere. Our natural areas are rapidly disappearing in this county. Let's preserve this one. Thanks, J. R. Bailey

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Alice Loyd ParkPlan; Follow Horseshoe Farm Master Plan Wednesday, July 12, 2006 7:06:39 AM

Dear Parks Board, Please follow the compromise Master Plan for Horseshoe Farm. I attended the hearing June 29 in City Council chambers and heard the appeals to the Park Board from dog park and disc golf advocates, and while the activities they support are wholesome, they can be conducted on less pristine land. This precious acreage can't be reconstructed elsewhere; it should be preserved in its entirety. The Master Plan preserves the quality of Horseshoe Farm in order for people to enjoy it now and in the future. Please practice good environmental stewardship for our community by adopting the Master Plan. Sincerely, Alice Loyd 3415 Noel Ct Raleigh, NC 27607

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Janis Ramquist ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Wednesday, July 12, 2006 7:10:24 AM

Horseshoe Farm is a unique environmental area, leave it for enjoyment as. Not everything needs to be changed. Activities such as disc golf, a dog park, and high intensity active recreation will have a negative impact on the character and environmental quality of this park. These facilities should be placed in locations that have no environmenta significance, in more accessible locations closer to neighborhoods and schools. Thank you, Jan Ramquist 2208 Oxford Hill Rd Raleigh, NC 27608 919-831-9316

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surffisher@mindspring.com surffisher@mindspring.com; ParkPlan; RE: Horseshoe Farm Park Draft Master Plan Wednesday, July 12, 2006 7:40:03 AM

I attended the June 29 public hearing and wanted to add that I am an owner of two dogs who loves to let them play and socialize with other dogs off-leash. Additionally, I have played disc golf since I was in college, some 18 years ago or so. I support the overall objectives of providing more opportunities for off-leash dog recreation and disc golf facilities in Raleigh. However, I DO NOT support the inclusion of facilities for either activity at Horseshoe Farm Park. Its just the wrong place for such activities and facilities. Please do the right thing and support the Master Plan as is. Thank you for your consideration.
_______________________ Victor D'Amato 308 Glascock Street Raleigh, NC 27604 (919) 834-7899 surffisher@mindspring.com _______________________

-----Original Message----From: surffisher@mindspring.com [mailto:surffisher@mindspring.com] Sent: Wednesday, June 14, 2006 3:40 PM To: parkplan@ci.raleigh.nc.us Subject: Horseshoe Farm Park Draft Master Plan Importance: High Dear PRGAB: I have reviewed the proposed master plan for Horseshoe Farm Park and would like to express my support. The proposed focus of the park as reflected in the Park Vision Statement is appropriate and I commend the Master Planning Committee for considering the overwhelming public input

in support of passive recreation, protection of wildlife and environmentallyfocused and sensitive development. I would prefer a Plan reflecting less intense development (particularly adjacent to the wetland areas), but appreciate the balance that the Master Planning Committee tried to strike. I urge you to support this Master Plan and recommend approval by the City Council. Thank you for your consideration.
_______________________ Victor D'Amato 308 Glascock Street Raleigh, NC 27604 (919) 834-7899 surffisher@mindspring.com _______________________

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Gina ParkPlan; Draft Master Plan, Horseshoe Farm Park Wednesday, July 12, 2006 7:54:25 AM

To Whom It May Concern ~ Horseshoe Farm Park is a most precious commodity with its natural beauty and habitat. I have enjoyed taking my children out there even now to enjoy the natural surroundings as well as viewing what wildlife is present on any given day. In attending some of the Master Plan drafting meetings as well as being out to Horseshoe Farm itself, I agree with the benefits in keeping the park as close to its natural state as possible. High intensity sports activities, a dog park, etc would too much disturb the natural balance with the wildlife and the flow of preserving the habitat. Those types of activities are better suited for a park that does not have the unique characteristics that Horseshoe Farm does. High intensity sports (to include even disc golf), bright lights, heavy traffic, dogs, etc would upset the delicate natural balance. Even without those things, there are plenty of opportunities to enjoy the park and its unique qualities to include classes available at the arts center, camping, fishing, canoeing, walking, biking, a playground, etc. A way for people to get out and enjoy nature as well as learn about it. I think the current Draft Master Plan is an adequate compromise from where things started as well as meeting the desires of those wishing to keep in lines with a natural preserve area. Please consider adopting and implementing the Draft Master Plan in its current state. With much appreciation ~ Sincerely ~ Regina Reeder Monetflwrs@yahoo.com 2408 Scouting Trail, Raleigh, NC 27615

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

leaderstrategies@mindspring.com ParkPlan; re: Horseshoe Park Wednesday, July 12, 2006 7:57:05 AM

Please support the Master Plan for and help protect one of the City's most environmentally significant and valuable parks. Susan Hagberg leaderstrategies@mindspring.com

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karen bethune ParkPlan; support of Master Plan for Horseshoe Farm Wednesday, July 12, 2006 8:15:15 AM

I am writing as a resident of the city of Raleigh to support the Master Plan for Horseshoe Farm Park. I am also a dog owner but feel a dog park would be innappropriate for this environmentally sensitive site. There are better places for such things as dog parks and high intensity athletic fields than Horseshoe Farm. Please preserve the unique character of this site by approving this plan. Thank you,Karen Bethune

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Cheryl Gourley ParkPlan; Master Plan for Horseshoe Park Wednesday, July 12, 2006 8:38:02 AM

Please adopt the proposed master plan for Horseshoe Park. As concerned citizens, we have worked hard to get this plan where it's at. No disc park or dog park is needed at this site. There are plenty of less significant areas than Horseshoe for that! As an elementary science teacher in Wake County I know the importance of maintaining the quality of this historic oxbow park. Thank you in advance for listening to our concerns and making the correct choice for this site. Cheryl Gourley

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Betsy Kane ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm park plan comments Wednesday, July 12, 2006 8:50:54 AM

Dear Parks Board members, I wish to include my comments on the plans for Horseshoe Farm Park. A dog park is inconsistent with a nature park with conservation and wildlife watching goals. Dogs are seen as predators by wild birds and animals. Wildlife cannot distinguish between dogs on leashes or roaming free -- they just smell or see or hear the dog as a predator. So dogs (even on leashes) will cause wildlife to leave the area, permanently in many cases if the presence of dogs is frequent. Also, we know that leash-only rules are not well followed, and many dog owners will unfortunately let their dogs off-leash once away from entrance areas. This has happened at Schenck Forest and at the Museum Art Park. No degree of enforcement of rules was sufficient to keep dogs on-leash at Schenck, and it had to be closed to dogs altogether due to constant violations by irresponsible pet owners. A frisbee or disc golf course is also inconsistent with a nature park with conservation and wildlife watching goals. Disc golf is a great pastime and lots of fun, but if you have ever seen a course, the sites get trampled thoroughly. The repeated crashing through vegetation is incompatible with other goals at the park. People love being outside -- and people love dog parks, and people also love disc golf. Absolutely, more disc golf courses and dog parks are needed -- in areas that are not of special environmental concern. Yes to more dog parks! Yes to more disc golf courses! But leave them out of Horseshoe Farm!! Betsy Kane Raleigh

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Maryellen Switzer ParkPlan; Please support the master plan for Horseshoe Farm Park Wednesday, July 12, 2006 8:53:30 AM

Please support the master plan for Horseshoe Farm Park. This plan is a reasonable compromise between simple preservation and high intensity use. Please keep this environmentally significant park in as pristine a state as possible. -Maryellen Switzer 6003 Bissette Road Wendell NC 27591 (919)217-9095

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Colleen Sharpe ParkPlan; jkirschbaum@nc.rr.com; Taliaferro, Jessie; daviddeans@collegeparkrv.com; Horsehoe Farm Master Plan Wednesday, July 12, 2006 9:13:01 AM

We'd like to formally state our support for the Horeshoe Farm Draft Master Plan. Although we do not live in the City Limits of Raleigh, we are both employees of the City of Raleigh and we live 5 minutes away from the property. The Horseshoe Farm property is a rare piece of land within our jurisdiction and should be treated with respect and care. We have had the opportunity to enjoy the park many times over the past few years and would prefer it to stay just the way it is, but we know that is not going to happen. If the property must be developed in some capacity, we believe the Draft Master Plan should be approved and the park developed accordingly. Considerable time and effort was spent on the plan by many people. Citizen input was received and compromises were made. We'd like the Parks Board and the City Council to approve the Draft Plan as is and send a message that participation on boards and committees is time well spent and that the process put in place works. As the owners of two dogs, we understand and appreciate the need for dog parks, but we do not support one at Horseshoe Farms. We believe there are better locations for dog parks and other active recreational uses such as Frisbee golf and would support them in other locations. Horseshoe Farms is a special piece of property and should be preserved and protected. We believe the Draft Master Plan is a reasonable compromise of uses and that it should be approved as proposed. Sincerely, Colleen and Thomas Sharpe

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Holly Keaton ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Draft Master Plan Wednesday, July 12, 2006 9:13:21 AM

Members of the Parks Board, One of the things my family and I value most about Raleigh is the responsible and intelligent way that the City manages our green space. I hope that you’ll continue this tradition by supporting the Master Plan to develop Horseshoe Farm as a nature park. I know that some members of our community have spoken out in support of providing a disc golf course in the woods and a dog park in the open area. In my opinion this would just be disastrous! Disc golf and dog parks are good ideas and I think that we should make them available in our community, but there are much better locations for activities like these. Horseshoe Farm is one of the City’s most environmentally significant natural areas and active, high impact activities like disc golf and concentrated dog play will undoubtedly damage the environmental quality of the park as well as its general character. These kinds of activities are more appropriate for more accessible, less environmentally unique areas. The Master Plan provides for all kinds of activities that are appropriate for the particular qualities of Horseshoe Farm. Please keep Horseshoe Farm a park for enjoying the river, plants and wildlife and for low environmental impact activities such as environmental education, arts education, and informal play. Thank you! Holly Keaton
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

Holly Keaton Professional Services Manager
Emergency Technologies, Inc. (ETI) 7200 Stonehenge Dr. Suite 308 Raleigh, NC 27613-1620 Phone: Fax: E-Mail: Website:

(919) 676-6200 Ext. 229 (919) 870-7447 hkeaton@EmergencyTechnologies.com www.EmergencyTechnologies.com

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From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Josh Redlus ParkPlan; Protect Horseshoe Farm with the Master Plan!! Wednesday, July 12, 2006 9:18:52 AM

Horseshoe Farm is one of the City's most environmentally significant and valuable parks, and should be treated with respect and care. The Master Plan is a reasonable compromise and should be supported and adopted! The Master Plan provides for many kinds of recreational activities that are appropriate for the particular qualities of this park site. Activities such as disc golf, a dog park, and high intensity active recreation will have a negative impact on the character and environmental quality of this park. These facilities should be placed in locations that have no significance, in more accessible locations closer to neighborhoods and schools. Please ask the Parks Board and Council to approve the recommendations regarding environmental stewardship in the Master Planning Committee's transmittal letter to Council. Thank you, Josh Redlus Resident Raleigh, NC

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Mary Walek ParkPlan; Horsehoe Park Wednesday, July 12, 2006 9:40:19 AM

I am writing to request that Board adopt the Horseshoe Farm Master Plan. I live within 3 miles of the park and as I drive to and from Raleigh I see much cutting of forests, paving over of farmland for shopping centers, increased run-off into area streams and occasional flooding. Development is co-opting nature right and left. Nature has few spokes-people whereas developers seem to get whatever they want. We need to cherish the gifts that we have - for our own mental health as well as for future generations. The Horseshoe site is a rare gem. The last time I visited there, a few steps from the parking area I rescued a salamander that had been left high and dry after a rain. I have lived in Raleigh over 30 years and that was the first time I had seen a salamander in nature in this part of the state! THAT is the promise of Horseshoe. Once it has a dog park, a disc course or whatever, it can't be undone. Like the Dix property downtown, Horseshoe should be preserved for what it is, not how it can be exploited. PLEASE save Horseshoe. Try the Master Plan for awhile - if for some reason (and I can't imagine what) it doesn't work out, changes can happen later. But once the wildlife has fled, once noisy crowds and organized sports teams move in, it will never be the same with no going back. We need retreats not just ball fields. Please save Horseshoe! Mary Walek

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Kari Wouk ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Wednesday, July 12, 2006 9:55:56 AM

Dear Parks Board and Council, Horseshoe Farm is one of the City's most environmentally significant and valuable parks, and should be treated with respect and care. Many people prefer to go to a park for the value nature in a pristine condition. This is so lacking in our area and is rarely represented in the park system. The Master Plan is a reasonable compromise and should be supported and adopted. The Master Plan provides for many kinds of recreational activities that are appropriate for the particular qualities of this park site. Activities such as disc golf, a dog park, and high-intensity active recreation will have a negative impact on the character and environmental quality of this park. These facilities should be placed in locations that have no environmental or nature significance and in more accessible locations closer to neighborhoods and schools. Please approve the recommendations regarding environmental stewardship in the Master Planning Committee's transmittal letter to the Council. Thank you for your time, Kari Wouk 2312 Basil Dr Raleigh, NC 27612

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Keith, Willard R - Raleigh, NC ParkPlan; comment on horseshoe farm park Wednesday, July 12, 2006 11:00:25 AM

Please – no dog park and no disc golf, keep it natural! Thanks, Will Keith

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Kathleen Broniak ParkPlan; Please approve the recommendations of the Draft Master Plan for Horseshoe Farm Park Wednesday, July 12, 2006 11:01:16 AM

To the Parks Board and Council: Please approve the recommendations regarding environmental stewardship in the Master Planning Committee's Draft Master Plan for Horseshoe Farm Park. I support this plan for the following reasons: • Horseshoe Farm is one of the City's most environmentally significant and valuable parks, and should be treated with respect and care. • The Master Plan is a reasonable compromise. • The Master Plan provides for recreational activities that are appropriate for the particular qualities of this park site. • Activities such as disc golf, a dog park, and high intensity active recreation would have a negative impact on the character and environmental quality of this park and would be better located closer to neighborhoods and schools.

Thank you. Kathleen Broniak

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

gadriance ParkPlan; Hooseshoe Farm Wednesday, July 12, 2006 11:53:47 AM

What a great opportunity to create a nature park! Please do not spoil this opportunity! Disc golf and Dog parks are great, but there are more appropriate locations for such activities! Horseshoe Farm should be an environmental park for viewing wildlife, river recreation, environmental and arts education and open areas for informal recreation and play. Please do not change the Master Plan, it would be a shame! Gesa

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Bob Peckham ParkPlan; Please follow Horseshoe Farm Draft Master Plan Wednesday, July 12, 2006 11:57:38 AM

As Horseshoe Farm is such a unique environmental area, it needs to be preserved. Much thought and effort has gone into the draft master plan. Please do not change it to allow activities which would harm the natural environment there. There shouldn't be a dog park, disc golf or any team sports. There are other places for those that don't have this unique environmental setting. Thank you. Bob & Sandy Peckham 7600 Copper Creek Ct. Wake Forest, NC 27587

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Tom Hawkins ParkPlan; Adopt Master Plan for Horseshoe Park Wednesday, July 12, 2006 11:59:35 AM

I encourage you to adopt the master plan for Horseshoe Park, to keep the area environmentally pristine, and to locate high intensity recreational activities in other less sensitive public areas. Thank you,

Tom Hawkins

Broker, CRS, GRI, ABR RE/MAX Capital Realty 1520 Glenwood Ave Raleigh, Nc 27608 Direct: 919-306-1022 Toll: 800-828-8108 Web: www.tomhawkins.net Email: tomhawkins@remax.net

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Karen Rindge ParkPlan; Please preserve Horseshoe Farm Park Wednesday, July 12, 2006 12:05:02 PM

Dear Park Planning Board, Horseshoe Farm is a unique natural place in Wake County, and it ought to be protected in its present form. Wake County is growing rapidly, and Raleigh is the fastest growing city on the East Coast. This means that the wonderful treasures found in our few remaining natural areas can easily be lost to development. The citizens appointed you to make the wise decisions to preserve a few special aress locally for all of us to enjoy. My family and friends have been there and really loved it. No other place offers the same ecological diversity in the county, making it a wonderful opportunity to educate citizens, especially children, about the natural world. While we need sports and recreation areas, those can be built in places that are not in the old, natural state that is Horseshoe Farm. The Master Plan offers a reasonable compromise on this matter. I urge you to approve the recommendations re: environmental stewardship in the Master Planning letter sent to the city council. Thank you. Karen Rindge 3303 Clark Ave. Raleigh NC 27607 krindge@earthlink.net

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

nancy gill ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Wednesday, July 12, 2006 12:05:12 PM

I have been a resident of Raleigh for almost 22 years and would like to voice support for the draft Master Plan for this park. I appreciate the provision for many recreational activites but would not like to see a dog park or disc golf facitilites in this pristine location. Thank you, Nancy Gill 3969 Haithcock Rd. Raleigh, NC 27604 __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:
Dear Sir/Madam:

Patricia Amend ParkPlan; park plan for horseshoe park Wednesday, July 12, 2006 12:18:13 PM

Please develop Horseshoe park as a nature park without all the lights from tennis or basketball courts. We need to preserve what little nature our hectic lives really need. It is so important to the environment and welfare of our minds. Thanks so much, Patricia Amend

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Patricia Amend ParkPlan; Master Plan Horshoe Park. Wednesday, July 12, 2006 12:22:26 PM

Re: Master Plan at Horseshoe Park. In addition to my previous e-mail I would like to share the following as well:

Horseshoe Farm should be an environmentally responsible venue for viewing wildlife, river recreation, environmental education and arts education, and unstructured, informal play.
Thank you for your consideration for something that is so very important. Sincerely, Patricia Amend

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

StrictlyBiz1920@aol.com ParkPlan; Support of Community Center at Horseshoe Farms Wednesday, July 12, 2006 12:51:37 PM

Dear Sir or Madam: My name is Maryam Lynch and I am a resident in the Berkshire Downs West Community located just off Perry Creek Road and NE Raleigh. This email is to request that you seriously consider the needs of our families, children and residents by putting a Community Center at the above referenced location. As this area of Raleigh gets more developed, there are less areas for our children to have a safe place to play outdoors, not to mention someplace nearby to participate in various recreation classes like other communities have in their immediate vicinity. The closest thing to us that I'm aware of is Green Road which is 4-5 miles away that you must have your own transportation to get to. Horseshoe Farms will be the ONLY facility of it's kind in the NE Raleigh section where there are hundreds of families around the Ligon Mill/Mitchell Mill intersections can access easily. Again, I ask that you take a closer look at the needs of our community and vote in favor of developing the Horseshoe Farms area into a Park and Community Center for the families of NE Raleigh. If you have any questions or would like to speak to me directly, I can be reached at 919.873.9525. Thank you for your time and immediate attention. Best Regards,

Maryam J
Maryam J. Lynch Treasurer and Rocky Court Block Captain Berkshire Downs West Block Association (BDWBA) "People may not remember exactly what you said or did ~~BUT~~ they will always remember how you made them feel"

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

shalom45@bellsouth.net ParkPlan; Community Center at Horseshoe Farm Wednesday, July 12, 2006 1:02:09 PM

Dear Sir or Madam: My name is Patricia Jones and I am a resident in the Berkshire Downs West Community located just off Perry Creek Road and NE Raleigh. This email is to request that you seriously consider the needs of our families, children and residents by putting a Community Center at the above referenced location. As this area of Raleigh gets more developed, there are less areas for our children to have a safe place to play outdoors, not to mention someplace nearby to participate in various recreation classes like other communities have in their immediate vicinity. The closest thing to us that I'm aware of is Green Road which is 4-5 miles away that you must have your own transportation to get to. Horseshoe Farms will be the ONLY facility of it's kind in the NE Raleigh section where there are hundreds of families around the Ligon Mill/Mitchell Mill intersections can access easily. Again, I ask that you take a closer look at the needs of our community and vote in favor of developing the Horseshoe Farms area into a Park and Community Center for the families of NE Raleigh. If you have any questions or would like to speak to me directly, I can be reached at 919-878-4317. Thank you for your time and immediate attention. Best Regards, Patricia Jones Secretary, BDWBA Berkshire Downs West

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Dean Naujoks ParkPlan; Mayor Charles Meeker; Thomas Crowder; russ@russforraleigh.com; Kekas, Joyce; Horseshoe Farm Comments Wednesday, July 12, 2006 1:04:02 PM

To whom it may concern, I am writing on behalf of the Neuse River Foundation. My name is Dean Naujoks, I am the upper Neuse Riverkeeper. I represent 2800 members who have designated me as a spokes person/advocate for the Neuse River. I serve on Raleigh’s Storm Water Management Advisory Commission and many other boards and committees. I attended many of the early meetings for Horseshoe Farm and attended the first public hearing. I am dismayed that the Parks and Recreation Staff have attempted to hijack the public process and consistently ignore how the public would like to see this wonderful natural area— Horseshoe Farm—developed. It is inconceivable to me that this type of staff intervention to thwart the public process would ever happen on the Stormwater Management Advisory Commission. The Raleigh Stormwater staff I work with are true professionals. With the exception of public support to see a Frisbee golf course at Horseshoe Farm, the public hearing I attended was unanimously in favor of keeping Horseshoe Farm in more of a natural state with a focus on river access, river recreation, wildlife viewing, environmental education and arts education, and unstructured, informal play. To my knowledge, there has been no interest to develop a large recreation area, lit tennis courts etc… The meetings and public hearings I attended, no one spoke out in favor of a confined dog park. I primarily attended these meetings early on, hoping there would be an emphasis on the Neuse River with public access to the river (since it is surrounded on three sides by the Neuse River) and that the park was designed in such a way that it would not negatively impact the river. People overwhelmingly embraced these concepts time and time again. I was satisfied the process was moving in the appropriate direction that reflected the views of the community. However, since that time I have witnessed the public process that is required in the Parks Master Plan consistently undermined. Raleigh Parks and Recreation Staff should be ashamed of themselves for aggressively pushing for active recreation (when it was not

requested) as should the Parks Board if they knowingly ignore the public interest. Our tax dollars paid for this park, the public has a right to say how it should be developed. I am asking Parks Board and the Raleigh City Council to approve the recommendations regarding environmental stewardship in the Master Planning Committee's transmittal letter to Council and support the public position that Horseshoe Farm is a unique natural area that should be maintained in more of a natural state with an emphasis on the Neuse River— which provides hundreds of thousands of people with drinking water every day. Future Generations will thank you. Dean Naujoks Upper Neuse Riverkeeper Neuse River Foundation 112 South Blount Street Raleigh, NC 27601 919-856-1180 919-839-0767 dean.nrf@att.net

www.neuseriver.org
Working to protect Falls Lake and the Neuse River Waterkeeper Alliance Member

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

trosenberg@mindspring.com ParkPlan; PLEASE SUPPORT THE HORSESHOE FARM MASTER PLAN Wednesday, July 12, 2006 1:06:26 PM

The Master Plan is a reasonable compromise for the parties involved. This natural area in the heart of Raleigh should be preserved as a haven for Raleigh dwellers who seek sanctuary form the urban qualities of our growing community. This is a readily accessible location, and allows many the opportunity for diversity in their environment, a paradox in many American cities. Please protect this wonderful asset for Raleigh now and for the future so that we may live, work and play in greater harmony with nature. Reserve the more active and intense activities of disc golf, the dog park and high impact recreational activities for other areas, but preserve this piece of history and nature! Please, and thank you, Theresa Joan Rosenberg Architect & Attorney 2742 Rue Sans Famille Raleigh, NC 27607-3051 Telephone 919.781.5741

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

brandonbecker@mindspring.com ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Master Plan Wednesday, July 12, 2006 1:34:15 PM

Horseshoe Farm is one the most environmentally significant and valuable parks in the area, and should be treated carefully and responsibly. The Master Plan shows a reasonable compromise. It provides for many kinds of recreational activities that are appropriate for the particular sensitive qualities of this park site. Activities such as disc golfing, a dog park (although I love dogs), and high intensity active recreation will have a negative impact on the character and environmental quality of this park. These facilities should be placed in other locations with less significance, in more accessible locations closer to neighborhoods and schools. I support the recommendations regarding environmental stewardship in the Master Planning Committee's transmittal letter to Council. Thank you, Brandon Becker 125 Riding Ridge Rd. Fuquay-Varina, NC 27526

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

hadriance ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm. Wednesday, July 12, 2006 2:20:31 PM

Open Space! Open Space! Open Space! The further we go in time the less we have. When open space is gone, it is gone. Forever. Have you seen the population projection for this part of NC? It is frightening. So the worsening problem is, too many people. Horseshoe Farm is an open space gem that is becoming for valuable every day. And remember, they are not making any more land than we have now. I implore you to keep that land as it is now.

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

DMTWT@aol.com ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Wednesday, July 12, 2006 2:55:44 PM

To Whom it may concern, I live right next to the park and can't tell you how much I enjoy seeing the wild life run around and play out here. I get to see more of them because of people coming out here with their dogs and chasing them closer to my home. I think the master plan is great just the way it is. I wish the park could stay the way it is right now but the next best thing, I guess, is the way the master plan is now. Anything else would just ruin a beautiful piece of land. I am a soccer mom with children involved in sports so I know the importance of high end parks. My husband is also involved in the building business so I'm not opposed to development either. I just know if we don't preserve the natural areas that we still have, our future generations will never know what "wild" life is. Truly Mrs. Doris M. Tote 2909 Horseshoe Farm Rd. Wake Forest, NC

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Vicki Stocksdale ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm park Wednesday, July 12, 2006 4:36:34 PM

Horseshoe Farm is one of the city's most environmentally significant and valuable parks, and should be treated with respect & care. It should be an venue for viewing wildlife, river recreation, environmental education and arts education, and unstructured, informal play. Disc golfers & dog parks would be inappropriate at this location, as well as high intensity active recreation. These facilities should be placed in locations that have no significance, in more accessible locations closer to neighborhoods & schools. Let's leave a splendid legacy for our children...once destroyed, nature's beauty cannot be repurchased at any price!! The Master Plan is a reasonable compromise and should be supported and adopted. --

From: To:

Merrie Hedrick sford@newsobserver.com; ParkPlan; hedrickmt@hotmail. com; ridesallieride@gmail.com; jonathanhedrick85@gmail. com; The Horseshoe Farm Wednesday, July 12, 2006 4:55:37 PM

CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Thank you for this chance to let my voice be heard. Please keep the Horseshoe Farm in as pristine condition as is possible. My heart is deeply invested in this very special place. I love it as if it were family. If I can help in any way to preserve it I stand ready to assist. It is an unmatched place of nature and in the near future it will be a rare open space in Wake County. I was married at The Horseshoe and my four children grew up there. It was a wonderful childhood and life for them and for me and my husband. I want other families to have the oppurtunity to love this beautuful place in the same way. That is the main reason my Husband Dr. William W. Hedrick sold it to the City of Raleigh rather than developing it. I have a granddaughter who I want to visit and grow up knowing the Horseshoe. I cannot tell you of all the thousands of children that visited the Horseshoe when we live there. Fall and Spring for many many years preschool children and elementary students visited our farm with their classmates. I wish you could see their faces as I remember them. This needs to continue. The list of memories I have will always be in my minds eye. This I will always cherish. Thank you for this chance again to speak. Respectfully yours, Merrrie Hedrick - I would be happy to speak with anyone interested in what I have to say. , Merrie Hedrick ( former Wake County Commissioner) - 1978 Old Crawford Road - Wake Forest, NC 27587 - telephone (919) 562-2491I looked forward to hearing from you about this matter. Thank you for your help.

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Cathy Brittingham ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Wednesday, July 12, 2006 4:58:22 PM

Dear Raleigh Parks, Recreation and Greenway Advisory Board: I strongly support the Draft Master Plan for Horseshoe Farm Park dated 4/5/06 as approved by the Horseshoe Farm Park Master Plan Committee. I do not support changes to this Draft Master Plan. I especially do not support any changes to this Draft Master Plan that will add high intensity active recreation, such as disc golf and a dog park, to this Significant Natural Heritage Area. Thank you for supporting this Draft Master Plan. Sincerely, Cathy Brittingham 1242 Beringer Forest Court Wake Forest, NC 27587

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

jlinkboyd@aol.com ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Wednesday, July 12, 2006 5:05:10 PM

Raleigh Parks Board, As a child, I was fortunate to have parents who would spend many afternoons picnicking and strolling around Umstead Park. An earlier generation of government officials had the wisdom to preserve a large portion of land that we all enjoy amongst the hustle and bustle of North Raleigh. I encourage you to preserve a beautiful section of Wake County, Horseshoe Farms, for those who appreciate natural space. The onset of 540 has brought dramatic growth to Northeast Raleigh. Vast tracks of land are being developed to meet the demands of a rapidly growing community. This is a unique opportunity to preserve an Umstead-East for future generations to appreciate and cherish. Mark Boyd 3417 Savan Ct Raleigh, NC 27613

Check out AOL.com today. Breaking news, video search, pictures, email and IM. All on demand. Always Free.

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:
Good afternoon,

Joan Stutts ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Wednesday, July 12, 2006 5:35:07 PM

I am a home owner living very close to Horse Shoe Farm and I feel very strongly about keeping this farm environmentally in tact. Here are a few points I would like to make:

q

Horseshoe Farm is one of the City's most environmentally significant and valuable parks, and should be treated with respect and care.

• The Master Plan is a reasonable compromise and should be supported and adopted. • The Master Plan provides for many kinds of recreational activities that are appropriate for the particular qualities of this park site. • Activities such as disc golf, a dog park, and high intensity active recreation will have a negative impact on the character and environmental quality of this park. These facilities should be placed in locations that have no significance, in more accessible locations closer to neighborhoods and schools.

I am requesting the Parks Board and Council to approve the recommendations regarding environmental stewardship in the Master Planning Committee's transmittal letter to Council. Thank you for your time!

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Carolyn Stidham ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Wednesday, July 12, 2006 6:16:29 PM

This beautiful piece of land is appropriate for a NATURE PARK and that alone. How sad it would be to add any other activities or distractions! Thanks for your thoughtful consideration, Dr. and Mrs Stidham

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

soclwkr@aol.com ParkPlan; Horseshoe Park Wednesday, July 12, 2006 6:23:54 PM

I recently moved to the area and have visited Horseshoe Park with my daughter who was visiting from Asheville. It was early afternoon and before we even reached the main gate there was a family of deer alongside the road. It was extremely peaceful there as we walked around and I cannot imagine ANY organized sports taking place there. I'm sure that if there is a need for organized sports, that there has to be somewhere else where there is ample space for that type of activity. Additionaly, I live within walking distance (and I'm sure within noise distance) of the park. As it is, Ligon Mill can be extremely congested at times and the addition of organized sports will not only add to the traffic and noise pollution, but destroy the natural serenity of such an unspoiled and historical section of the city. Check out AOL.com today. Breaking news, video search, pictures, email and IM. All on demand. Always Free.

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

thailperin@bellsouth.net ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Wednesday, July 12, 2006 8:01:12 PM

To whom it may concern: I want to take this last opportunity to advocate for Horseshoe Farm Park. I attended the June 29th meeting at which the majority of people supported passive use and leaving the park in a natural state, although there was support from people who want a dog park and disc golf. I stated that I'm a dog lover and have two dogs but I don't think this particular park is the appropriate venue for a dog park. I attended the public hearings for the dog park at Millbrook Exchange Park and wholeheartedly supported a dog park there. I've been there since and as the lady said at the meeting, it is overcrowded. However, the landfill off Durant Road is slated to be turned into a park and I would strongly support a dog park there and it's one idea that has been proposed for the future park. The main reason I don't support one at Horseshoe is because I think it's best suited for quiet, passive communing with nature. A dog park would mean two-legged counterparts would also flock to the park and it would be noisy and rambunctious. Also, this area is relatively isolated - dog parks and athletics are better suited in areas with a higher population density. Someone pointed out that people will bring their dogs anyway, and he's right. I would be ok with being able to bring dogs on leash to hike, but not a dog park. I don't know if bringing dogs on leash to hike and having sites for bags for proper waste disposal has even been considered but maybe that would be a good compromise. As for the disc golf, I'm not in favor of that. We already have volleyball and I think that's enough of a compromise. Again, I think it just makes sense to have athletics in parks closer to schools and population dense neighborhoods. Basically I'm in favor of approving the plan we've got with the possible exception of some discussion about the idea I mentioned of limited dog use. Thank you for your time and consideration. Trisha Hailperin

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:
Dear Parks Board,

Cdisc@aol.com ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Wednesday, July 12, 2006 9:32:43 PM

This is to urge you to consider adding disc golf to Horseshoe farm park. As was mentioned at the June 29 meeting, disc golf is expanding in Raleigh. The sport will have minimal impact on the fauna and flora of the park, and a disc golf course will have more use and probably cost less than the two sand volleyball courts that are on the plan. The best area in the park for the course is the northeast corner. That area seems to have no facilities, no cultural or archaeological sites and no ecologically unique traits. That corner does however have the quantity of land and diversity of topography that would be ideal for a disc golf course. Thank you for your consideration, Craig Ramsdell 712 Coventry Ct. Raleigh, N. C. 27609

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Barharvey@aol.com ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Wednesday, July 12, 2006 10:29:20 PM

Ladies and Gentlemen, PLEASE....Approve the recommendations regarding environmental stewardship in the Master Planning Committee's transmittal letter to Council. Disc golf and dog parks are great, but there are better locations for each. Horseshoe Farm should be an environmentally responsible venue for viewing wildlife, river recreation, environmental education and arts education, and unstructured, informal play. High intensity active recreation will have a negative impact on the character and environmental quality of this park. These facilities should be placed in locations that have no significance, in more accessible locations closer to neighborhoods and schools. Thank you for your consideration, Barbara Harvey 5817 Caledonia St. Raleigh, NC 27609

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Linda Bickel ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Wednesday, July 12, 2006 11:58:21 PM

Please adopt the current Draft Master Plan as is. It achieves a balance between recreation and respect for the unique qualities of this site (with its encircling river, Significant Natural Heritage Area, nearly 200 species of plants and animals, and cultural history stretching back thousands of years). The plan is also aligned with what people say they want - from the 2002 Parks survey to the on-going, consistent public input during this planning process- and with what those with relevant expertise recommend. It reflects the earlier Neuse River Master Plan which envisioned a string of parks along the Neuse River Corridor, with facilities and activities that match each site. And, finally, the plan; culmination of over a year of education, discussion, and compromise; was unanimously approved. Thoreau wrote, "The question is not what you look at, but what you see." Many have seen Horseshoe Farm's rare and irreplaceable intrinsic value and believe that it can provide not only a wide range of lower impact recreation, but also vital environmental education, and needed nourishment for body, mind and spirit – for all ages. But that can't happen if overdevelopment and incompatible uses damage or even destroy what people are drawn there to experience- the natural beauty, character, and varied habitats of this site.

Less distinctive locations with better access can be used to provide for disc golf, dog parks, and high intensity sports. Some of these facilities are already on Master Plans (e.g. disc golf at Marsh Creek and Forest Ridge and dog parks at Buffaloe Athletic Park and the North Wake Landfill). Others could be placed at more suitable undeveloped parcels ( e.g. on 401 or at Sydnor White). Along with the overwhelming public voice for what is desired at Horseshoe Farm, the land itself and the river stand as eloquent, powerful testimony for what this park can be- now and far into the future. Thank you for your commitment and concern for the people and parks of Raleigh! Sincerely, Linda Bickel Wake Forest
"There is a way that nature speaks, that land speaks. Most of the time we are simply not patient enough, quiet enough, to pay attention to the story." (Linda Hogan)

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Cdobbinral@aol.com ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Thursday, July 13, 2006 12:25:29 AM

Hello Parks Board, I believe the Master Plan should be supported and adopted. I have visited Horseshoe Farm many times and find it beautiful as it is, but the Master Plan is an acceptable compromise with the recreational activities it provides. I own and love my two dogs and still think this area would have more value without a dog park. This type of land is too rare not to go by the recommendations regarding environmental stewardship. Thank you, Charles Dobbin Raleigh resident

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Jeanette Stanley ParkPlan; Horeshoe Park Thursday, July 13, 2006 9:09:30 AM Jeanette.Stanley.vcf

I approve the Draft Master Plan I believe that organized sports, a dog park, and disc golf activities would be better placed at other locations. I was a soccer Mom for 13 years, have a dog, and my sons now enjoy disc golf. I support all of these public recreation activities, however, I recognize that preservation of Horseshoe Farm would be a special gift to future generations.

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

bif bream ParkPlan; HFP Thursday, July 13, 2006 10:00:27 AM

To whom it concerns, I am all for making the Horseshoe site a park, but not a sanitized, over illuminated playground for the convenience of the new locals in the massive new developments. I believe a wilderness park would be far better for the city in the long run, as this site has historical significance and unique natural beauty that should be preserved. We should be allowed refuge from the audible hum and visible glow of Raleigh's progress and development. It is not wise to allow ourselves to become numb to the beauty and potential of an empty space. Voicing my opinions is fairly rare, at least publicly, for I fear they have little or no impact on the direction of events. In this case, I hope someone listens. Sincerely, Bif Bream

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

beth6744@bellsouth.net ParkPlan;

Thursday, July 13, 2006 10:57:14 AM

Notes on why Horseshoe Farm should remain a natural habitat for people to enjoy.............. My husband and I love to walk around the perimeter of the meadow early on Sunday mornings and delight in the peace and solitude we experience.Sometimes we stand quietly and watch as deer graze in the meadow......sometimes we count wildflowers while we walk and often we've seen foxes and many species of birds.There are few places like this wonderful piece of nature and we would truly hate to see it become "just another Raleigh park site". Beth and Juan Jimenez Wake Forest,NC

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

dalesuiter@nc.rr.com ParkPlan; Horseshoe Park Comments Thursday, July 13, 2006 12:33:35 PM

Dear Raleigh Parks, Recreation and Greenway Advisory Board Members: I am a wildlife biologist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, but I these comments represent my personal thoughts and should not be considered official comments from my agency. I would like to take this opportunity to encourage you to consider the ecological significance of the natural areas of Horseshoe Farm when making decisions about how this property will be used in the future. Biologists with the North Carolina Natural Heritage Program have identified two natural communities, the Piedmont Levee Forest and the Floodplain Pool wetland complex, as some of the best remaining examples of these communities in the Piedmont. These significant natural communities and all of Horseshoe Farm provide important nesting and foraging habitat for a variety of birds, mammals and other wildlife species. The assemblage of plants that occur there play an important role in creating these natural communities and supporting the wildlife that occurs in them. Horseshoe Farm provides an important buffer for the Neuse River and serves as a corridor for terrestrial species to move up and down the river. It would be a terrible and selfish mistake to convert these areas to unnatural, human and dog centered recreation such as a dog park, disk golf or athletic fields. A large concentration of dogs creates sounds and smells that are disturbing to wildlife. Further, a dog park would also attract many pet owners that would hike outside of the dog park with their pets. Time and time again, I have seen pet owners let their dogs off of their leashes when they think no one is looking and I see those dogs chase, disturb and sometimes kill birds, small mammals and other forms of wildlife. It is a natural instinct for dogs to chase other animals and pet owners are rarely able to control their pets and

prevent that from happening if the pets are not on a leash. Further, leash laws are hard to enforce because of the nature of where people let their dogs run free. The Research Triangle area has developed rapidly over the past 20 years and we are quickly destroying our forests and natural areas. The reduction in populations of many plant and animal species that were once abundant in central North Carolina is well documented. We have only been given one opportunity to ensure that these special areas like the communities at Horseshoe Farm are protected to support wildlife species and for future generations to study and enjoy. Please be accountable to our environment and our grandchildren and protect Horseshoe Farm Park with minimal human and pet centered development. Raleigh has plenty of other areas where dog parks and human based recreation can be located that are not adjacent to significant natural areas. Please contact me if you have any questions regarding my comments about Horseshoe Farm Park. I would be glad to discuss my concerns with you in more detail. Dale Suiter 2508 Fields of Broadlands Drive Raleigh, NC 27604 919-810-6339 dalesuiter@nc.rr.com

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Cindy Freeman ParkPlan; Support of Community Center at Horseshoe Farms Thursday, July 13, 2006 12:42:10 PM

To Whom it may Concern:

My name is Cindy Freeman and I am a resident in the Berkshire Downs West Community located between Capital Blvd and 401 in NE Raleigh. I am sending this email in STRONG support of a community center at Horseshoe Farms, and to ask that you seriously consider the needs of this rapidly growing area. This area is steadily growing, but there are no safe areas for our children. The center at Green Road is about 4 miles away, so transportation is an issue. Our children deserve a safe place to participate in recreational activities/classes just as other neighborhoods have. We currently have a small playground recently completed last April; that has only one swing set; not nearly enough for the number of children in our community. Horseshoe Farms will be the only facility of its kind in the NE area that will benefit hundreds of families including the Ligon Mills area. Please consider the needs of the families in this area and vote in favor of developing Horseshoe Farms into a park and community center in the NE Raleigh area. Please feel free to contact me at 919/954-4861, vis this email address, or 395-0305 cell. Thank you for your time and consideration. Sincerely,

Cindy K Freeman Community Chairperson Berkshire Downs West Block Association

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From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Tracy Morris ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Thursday, July 13, 2006 1:38:24 PM

To Whom It May Concern I am writing to say that dog parks are nice and practical in some areas, but not at Horseshoe Farms. I love my dogs - but they are loud and disruptive in natural areas. Please don't consider putting a dog park at Horseshoe Farms - as it is, it is such a valuable asset to Raleigh. Thanks for your time! Tracy Morris Environmental Specialist NCDENR -Tracy C. Morris Project Manager NC Ecosystem Enhancement Program 919-715-1658 www.nceep.net

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Mdeans@aol.com ParkPlan; Shouse, David; jkirschbaum@nc.rr.com; Taliaferro, Jessie; Duncan, Jack; Horseshoe Farm should be a nature park Thursday, July 13, 2006 2:58:00 PM

Dear Raleigh Parks, Recreation and Greenway Advisory Board Members: I have attended most of the Horseshoe Farm Master Planning Committee meetings, the last two public hearings, several NECAC meetings where the park at Horseshoe Farm was discussed and a couple of PRGAB meetings where issues about park planning or Horseshoe Farm were on the agenda. It is indisputable that the public overwhelmingly wants the park at Horseshoe Farm to be a nature park. The HSF Master Planning Committee recognized this and unanimously voted for a master plan that reflects that strong sentiment. Many others who are more educated, more detailed, and more persuasive than I could ever be have written to you and spoken to you at meetings about making Horseshoe Farm into a wonderful nature park. I just want to give you my nontechnical overview of what a great opportunity you have to create a first rate park that emphasizes the Neuse River, protects and preserves the natural resources on the property and gives the public what it is begging you to do. I have been to Horseshoe Farm many times in the last year. I hope that anyone who is charged with making major decisions about this park will take the time to go to Horseshoe Farm, preferably with their families, and walk the property - the cane break, the fields, the forests, the wetland and the river banks and the river. There is much more to see and feel when you are there, and if you go, you'll know it, too. Horseshoe Farm is so much more than available acreage for sports fields. Then, consider what the public at large has said: Horseshoe Farm is not just another 146 acres; it is different and special. It should be preserved so

we can all enjoy it, now and in the future, for the unique and beautiful place it is. Other city-owned park land is nearby and is not yet developed. You should consider the existing Master Plans for Buffalo Road Athletic Park, Marsh Creek Park, Forest Ridge, and the Wake County Landfill site to see what is already planned to meet the active recreation needs of the residents in NE Raleigh. You should also consider park land the city owns but has yet to be developed - especially Sydnor White, which is very close to Horseshoe Farm, is less environmentally sensitive and diverse, is close to neighborhoods and has excellent road access. The city owns a plot of land on US 401, directly across the river from Horseshoe Farm. These properties, along with new land donated by developers, should be where the pavement, the traffic, the lighting and the crowds should be, not on Horseshoe Farm. If you still wonder what the public wants in future parkland besides sports fields, take a look at the city's own survey where they asked people what they wanted in parks that was not already provided. The top 7 things are nature oriented, not scheduled high intensity activities. People now and in the future want to walk on trails, picnic in the woods, enjoy open fields, observe birds and other wildlife and enjoy the peace and quiet in a natural setting. At the June 29, 2006, public hearing members of local disc golf clubs and dog park groups spoke out about their interest in having these activities at Horseshoe Farm. These groups are looking for more disc golf course and more dog parks anywhere they could possibly get them because there are not enough in Raleigh. But no one made the argument that these things need to be in this particular park - they'll happily take them at any park. Their needs could be fully satisfied if new facilities were made available to them at other locations concurrently with developing Horseshoe Farm as a nature park. It just does not make sense to put a dog park - and its concentration of dogs - in a nature park. Likewise, the disc golf players need trees and other obstacles for the best course and all the wooded area at Horseshoe Farm is designated Significant Natural Resource Area. Again, this is not a compatible activity for Horseshoe Farm.

Lastly, I don't think you can ignore the work of a prior Master Planning Committee that intended for Horseshoe Farm to be a nature park. The chair of this committee has spoken publicly many times about this - that the committee clearly intended Horseshoe Farm to be a Nature Reserve. Thank you, Marcia Deans 878-8141

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Jan Pender ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Thursday, July 13, 2006 3:00:13 PM

Dear Parks, Recreation, and Greenways Advisory Board, I am writing to urge you to adopt the master committee’s plan for Horseshoe Farm Park. Horseshoe Farm is the City’s most significant environmental site. This plan will preserve Horseshoe Farm as the significant natural heritage site it is designated and fulfill the City’s moral and ethical responsibility to wisely steward the City’s natural resources. The plan upholds, rather than undermines, the state’s effort to preserve natural heritage sites across North Carolina. The master planning committee’s plan, if followed, will provide citizens of Raleigh with a remnant of their natural heritage, a much needed place to learn about the region’s natural and cultural heritage, an exceptional site to enjoy and experience the natural world, and a place where people young and old can exercise their bodies in healthy and restorative ways. The preservation of Horseshoe Farm is an opportunity for the City of Raleigh to provide a gift to the people of Raleigh. Raleigh’s population is booming, driven in large part by the influx of people attracted to the area’s natural areas and high quality of life. The Triangle’s high quality of life is sustained by the region’s remaining natural areas that provide attractive places for families to live, clean drinking water and air, wildlife habitat, and passive recreational opportunities. Many people are moving to the Triangle to escape the dense urbanization and environmental degradation of other areas in the country. The preservation of Horseshoe Farm is an investment in Raleigh’s economy and environmental health. The Parks Board is being presented with a well developed plan for Horseshoe Farm despite the committee’s chair numerous attempts to inappropriately develop the park in a way that matched his background as a builder and developer. Fortunately, the committee listened to the expertise

of numerous professionals who testified on the Park’s behalf, offering the committee the quality and level of professional advice a City would normally pay thousands of dollars for in outside consulting fees. The credentials of those testifying was impeccable and the Parks Board should consider itself lucky to have a public not only interested in developing high quality parks, but willing to offer expertise and services to the Parks Department free of charge to get it done. The committee chair made comments several times, both to the committee and to the public at large, that nobody will use a park like Horseshoe Farm if the land is preserved for “only birds and butterflies.” This comment shows not only a bias unfortunate in someone put in the role as a facilitator, but also shows great ignorance about parks and the state of the environment in North Carolina. Nature parks are consistently one of the most highly demanded resources by communities across the country. North Carolina’s Mecklenburg County has far more nature parks (12 nature reserve parks that encompass more than 5,500 acres) than Raleigh. In fact, Mecklenburg County recommends new funding for additional nature areas, expansion of existing nature preserves and increased engagement with the public to educate them about biodiversity. (See Mecklenburg County’s 2006 State of the Environment report for more information about these recommendations.) The City of Raleigh is also in need of more nature based parks. The Charlotte region is no different in its demand for nature than Raleigh. More than 98,000 people visit the City of Cary’s Hemlock Bluffs nature preserve each year. Blue Jay Point receives many more visitors. Nature parks like Horseshoe Farm are not in danger of being underused. To the contrary, parks like Horseshoe Farm face the same threat as our national park system in that they are too often “loved to death.” Parks are not just for young people looking for team sports, but for all people looking for a place where they can hear the plaintive notes of a bluebird, sneak a glimpse of a deer browsing in the fields, and see tracks of a red fox near its den. I worked as an environmental educator for the National Geographic Society and the State of Alabama, focusing my attention on teacher workshops to infuse the public with a greater understanding of the importance of natural systems to our planet’s survival and the human-environment relationship. Horseshoe Farm is a place where individuals, families, organized groups,

and teachers and students can learn about their world through a wildlife gardens, picnic areas, hiking trails, interpretative walks, a visitor’s center, and teacher resource center. Horseshoe Farm showcases the importance of the Neuse River to the region’s development and economy. It offers a rare glimpse of an intact river system in the process of forming an oxbow lake, a rare phenomenon to encounter in this day when most streams have been human altered through channelization. Horseshoe Farm is a rare outdoor learning laboratory for citizens and visitors to learn how to preserve clean drinking water, clean air, healthy ecosystems, and sustainable communities for future generations. As a mother of two children, I visit many of Raleigh’s city parks. In each park, my children are far more interested in the park’s natural features than human made structures. They would rather watch natural creatures in their habitat than people playing sports, play in a creek rather than on a playground structure, and look for rocks, onion grass, and other natural features than participate in a structured and adult supervised activity. The City parks staff may not realize this phenomenon because they don’t count the number of children feeding ducks, picking up pinecones, and running through their park’s open fields. Numerous studies show that children have a born affinity for the natural world and, without its continual access, suffer emotionally, mentally, and physically. Children today are far more prone to obesity, learning disabilities, and isolation than decades ago when ball fields, gymnasiums, and organized activities were not part of a child’s park experience. Raleigh has an opportunity at Horseshoe Farm to demonstrate the City of Raleigh is interested in building a strong, sustainable, and creative community by respecting the public process which is overwhelmingly in favor of keeping Horseshoe Farm a nature preserve. The Parks Board can show that it is interested in the recreational needs of ALL people by placing activities on the sites best suited for them, not “stuffing” a natural heritage site with those activities that require a less sensitive environment. By adopting the master planning committee’s plan, the Raleigh Parks Board can also demonstrate that it will not participate in abuse and neglect of people and the non-human inhabitants of our community. Please adopt this plan and recommend its approval to the City Council. The people of Raleigh for generations to come will applaud you.

Sincerely, Jan Pender 509 Emerson Drive Raleigh, NC 27609

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Carol Linelle Ashcraft ParkPlan; responding to request of PRGAB member at 6/29 public hearing Thursday, July 13, 2006 3:10:13 PM

Good afternoon: At the Horseshoe Farm Park Master Plan public hearing June 29 in City Council Chambers, a Parks, Recreation and Greenway Advisory Board Member, Richard Bostic, requested me--as well as others who cut off their spoken comments to meet the three-minute limit, to submit copies of their complete remarks. I have provided below a copy of my remarks in response to this request: STATEMENT FOR THE PARKS, RECREATION AND GREENWAY ADVISORY BOARD PUBLIC HEARING ON THE HORSESHOE FARM PARK MASTER PLAN June 29, 2006 Each of us in this room has several things in common. We are all here because we care about our community, our children and our neighbors. We have accepted individual responsibility to stand up for what we think is right. We appreciate the foresight and planning of the City of Raleigh and individual citizens in making Horseshoe Farm available as a public park, and realize that it presents a unique opportunity to make Raleigh an even better city than it already is. I also believe that we each know that organized athletics and spontaneous play in the natural world are important to the development of our children, mentally, physically, socially and spiritually. Our children need both of these kinds of activities to thrive and grow into confident, healthy people able and willing to undertake the challenges that we adults are placing before them. If we were not in basic agreement on these points, then the master plan we are discussing tonight would not have been developed and approved.

However, just because nature play and athletics are both important does not mean that they can be accommodated at one site and still meet the needs of the families who go there. The master plan that the members of the Parks Board are taking under consideration tonight recognizes that fact. We should support and approve that plan, which is the result of much compromise and hard work. Let us have athletics, including team sports, in rapidly growing areas of the city surrounding Horseshoe Farm Park. Let's put those facilities at the new Sydnor White Park and other appropriate sites. Let's also provide rich opportunities for spontaneous play in the outdoors, such as running, jumping, exploring, and spontaneous games, that only a Significant Natural Heritage area like Horseshoe Farm Park can provide. Being in and exploring nature have been shown to improve children's concentration and creativity, cooperation with others, and even school performance. Only Horseshoe Farm Park offers a truly superb combination of features that will fulfill our children's needs for free time outdoors, and offer them all the benefits it can provide. The City of Charlotte, backed largely by banking interests who understand the importance of green space and environmental foresight in attracting economic development, is pursuing a greener future for its citizens and obtaining favorable national media coverage in the process. We're in a city that is not yet completely paved over. Let's show other N.C. municipalities that we can use our resources just as wisely, if not better, than Charlotte can. Adopting the current master plan for Horseshoe Farm Park is one way our Parks Board can help demonstrate our own commitment to the future and further advance Raleigh's reputation as a desirable place to live and work. Carol Ashcraft 4500 Aviemore Crescent Raleigh, NC 27604

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jtaylor@alfredwilliams.com ParkPlan; marshapj@earthlink.net; Draft Master Plan Comments from Mr. Edward Curtis Thursday, July 13, 2006 3:32:32 PM

To the park board: I feel that the park should stay as is to serve all the people, without a dog park. Sincerely Ed Curtis

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Joe Angel ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park... let the public prevail Thursday, July 13, 2006 3:36:33 PM

The most recent and most objective study of Raleigh citizens' park desires was the Public Participation Preference Study included in the Raleigh Parks Plan adopted on 4 May 2004. This statistically valid study was a true sample of the city's demographic. Full details are available on the city website. The public clearly stated their preferences: Activity Walking along trail Walking in natural area Viewing wildlife Eating Lunch Arts show/festival Using fitness trail Outdoor Performance Picnicking with family Visiting greenways Interest 77% 74% 58% 54% 50% 49% 49% 49% 43%

The public has spoken loudly and often on their desires for Horseshoe Farm Park. Here is a table of the top desires submitted to the Parks Department in the 185 written comments to the Horseshoe Farm Master Plan during the November 2005 Public Input period: Environmental Concerns No Rec Center No Tennis Want Nature Reserve No Dog Park Focus on Nature/River Listen to Public 143 112 97 89 86 61 53

Focus on Wildlife No/Minimum Lighting Keep Env. Ed. Center Minimal Development

52 44 33 31

The consistency between what the public wants in Raleigh and what they want in Horseshoe Farm Park is obvious. Horseshoe Farm Park's unique site along the Neuse and its Significant Natural Heritage Area makes the case for a nature park even stronger.

The Draft Master Plan was unanimously approved by the Master Planning committee after 17 months of hard work and difficult compromises – including no Dog Park and no Disc Golf.

Dr. Wooten, a noted psychologist, spoke at the June 29 th PRGAB Public Input meeting. Her key message: Our Governmental Representatives – on the PRGAB and on the City Council – need to reaffirm our belief that they truly represent the public. That they are truly hearing their constituents - by approving the Draft Horseshoe Farm Master Plan. The Plan is a compromise – that should not be compromised.

-Joe Angelone 2908 Neuse Rock Trl Wake Forest, NC 27587 (within Raleigh ETJ)

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Paul May ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Thursday, July 13, 2006 3:48:37 PM

PRGA Board Members, I joined the Horseshoe Farm Master Planning Committee hoping to plan this park to be used by all citizens in this fast-growing part of the city. I felt a Community Center (with gym), picnic shelters, ballfields and tennis courts, plus the natural amenities of a Greenway trail and canoe/kayak access would be a great asset in NE Raleigh. The nearest Community parks with any of these items are Millbrook Exhange and Green Road, several miles away. The nearest Neighborhood park (Spring Forest) is closer, but still more than 2 miles away from this area. Several new subdivisions have already been added south of Mitchel Mill Road and Forestville Roads, plus Brighton and Braefield north of Mitchell Mill. The population growth in this area will be magnified as the Centex development off Hwy 401 grows to it's 1200 home limit. A full-service Community Park is desperately needed in this area. After hearing several convincing points, I decided any organized and properly maintained ballfields should not sit on this property. The runoff from those fields would have very little filtering or obstruction before flowing into the Neuse River. Even though the Neuse does not provided any drinking water for Raleigh (or its customers), it does provide drinking water for towns downstream, and we have to protect that resource. We also heard many compelling talks on the wildlife that has been seen in the Horseshoe, birds, deer and wild turkeys. I certainly hope this wildlife still come around the Horseshoe after the installation of a paved Greenway trail, 2 bridges over the Neuse and an Environmental / Arts Center building. I feel that most of the wildlife will be scared off by this minimal "friendly" development, and not return. Since we have heard how rare the wild turkeys are to the Horseshoe, I have spotted wild turkeys off Camp Kanata Road and Forestville Road, just south of Rogers Road. I wonder if these are truely rare, and whether they actually inhabit the Horseshoe.

We heard numerous times about how some kids have never had a chance to get out in the woods to experience wildlife. That we need to isolate this patch of land, with no "active" recreation for these needs. This lack of wildlife "experience" seems to be more a product of the parents not introducing it to their kids, then there not being enough open, wildlife areas to explore. This is one reason why I felt a Comm Center with gym would be a good fit in the open pasture, at the top of the hill. That facility could house Summer and Track-out Camps that could include nature programming right on the site, plus as kids or parents came for active recreation, they discover the park and might come back for outdoor discovery. I'm sure the Env/Arts Center will host some of these programs, but the size and duration of these visits would be limited by the size of that facility. Ultimately, I based my Elements votes primarily on the Neuse River Regional Park Plan. This seems to be an outstanding, detailed document that was completed after much more exhaustive research and work then we completed on our Plan. The identification of Horseshoe Farm as a Nature Preserve was the prevailing motivation when I voted to eliminate the Comm Center, Tennis Courts and Dog Park. This piece of property fits more into this description than the other, adjacent "horseshoe" that is bisected by 6-lane Highway 401. I have biked on the sewer line right-of-ways along parts of the Neuse, it gives you a distant, serene feeling. If this document can be followed, we could preserve that feel for many years to come. I also felt that if we didn't follow the direction of this City Council Approved document, why should anyone follow the Master Plan that we created? Finally, this area of Raleigh really needs another Community Park soon. Whether the Sydnor White or Watkins Road properties get developed or another property is acquired, the growing population in this part of the city should not have to drive to Millbrook Road, Green Road or beyond for indoor recreation. There has been discussion that the Northeast Park District already has more that its share of Community Park land to serve its needs until 2025, but if you look at that district, it stretches from Atlantic Ave on the East, to Crabtree Creek (inside the Beltline) and New Bern Ave. on the south, to the ETJ boundary on the west, to Hwy 401 and the Neuse River on the North. The vast majority of the parkland is in the southern half of this district, where the population is probably not growing, but decreasing. The population is moving north, that is where we need to develop Community Parks. I enjoyed working on this Committee and appreciate the opportunity (from the

Parks Dept Staff). I learned a lot about the Parks System and the Planning Process, I hope the Raleigh Parks System can continue to grow wisely as one of the largest and best in the country.

Paul D. May Horseshoe Farm Park MP Committee (919) 453-0682 ptmaync@nc.rr.com

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John Connors ParkPlan; john.connors; Horseshoe Farm Park Thursday, July 13, 2006 3:51:43 PM Effect Dogs on Wildlife- CO.pdf

July 13, 2006 Raleigh Parks, Recreation & Greenway Advisory Board Dear Board Members: Please find below additional information from Wake Audubon in response to issues that arose at the public hearing for Horseshoe Farm Park on June 29. I have also attached a copy of a 2006 study looking at the impact of dogs on wildlife communities. It is long and technical, but the abstract, introduction and previous literature on dog ecology sections provide good scientific information to begin a discussion on this issue. Issue 1: Disc Golf CourseWake Audubon does not believe the Horseshoe Farm Park to be an appropriate site for Disk Golf. There are five primary reasons for this. 1. Protect Wildlife Habitat: The wooded sections of the Horseshoe Farm Park have been recognized as significant Natural Heritage lands by the NC Natural Heritage program. These wooded areas are subject to flooding (almost all of the floodplain was underwater during the Tropical Storm Alberto), and the site provides important wildlife habitat where animals can find escape cover and shelter. 2. Concern About Ticks: There are thick (herbaceous) stands of sedges, river oats and switchcane across much of the forested floodplain. These grasses are often 2-4 feet tall. This provides the primary day cover for deer at this park. Lone Star Tick and chigger populations are abundant in these sections of the park. Lone Star Ticks are vectors of many serious tick-borne diseases. Extensive clearing and mowing would have to be undertaken to render this section safe for Disc Golf. This is a very different situation from more urban park settings where deer are not in

residence and ticks are not a problem. 3. Avoid Recreational Conflict: Disc Golf has nothing to do with Environmental, River, Archeological or Arts Education. Establishing a disc golf course at Horseshoe Farm Park would introduce a recreational conflict at this park. 4. Environmental Concerns: Disc Golf is not environmentally benign. There are substantial impacts to trees from being repeatedly hit by discs, and there is inevitable compaction of the soil and erosion within the course. This may be unintentional, but it is significant and inappropriate for a floodplain forest listed as a Natural Heritage site in an Environmental Education-oriented park. 5. Alternative Sites: Disc Golf courses have already been approved in the master plans for Marsh Creek Park and Forest Ridge Park. Those should be built before additional courses are considered in northeast Raleigh. Issue 2: Fenced Dog ParkWake Audubon does not believe that Horseshoe Farm Park is an appropriate site for a fenced Dog Park, and that guidance from natural resource professionals should be sought in developing plans for locating trails, resource stewardship and the visitor experience. Only recently have studies been undertaken to analyze the impact of dogs on wildlife, and on natural resource-based recreation (see attached report). Much more research needs to be done. No study that I know of specifically looks at the impact of a fenced dog park on the surrounding wildlife community, or on the recreational experience of visitors related to wildlife viewing. It is becoming clear, however, that wildlife species are impacted by the presence of dogs in park settings. Benjamin Lenth, Mark Brennan and Richard Knight have recently published a study entitled, “The Effect of Dogs on Wildlife Communities”, which was submitted to the Boulder County Open Space and Mountain Parks Committee in February 2006 (see attached report). Their study compared recreational trails that prohibited dogs with those that allowed dogs off-leash, under sight and voice control. Their findings determined that “the presence of dogs along recreational trails correlated with altered patterns of habitat utilization by several wildlife species.” This included Mule Deer, as well as small mammals including: squirrels, rabbits, chipmunks and mice. All exhibited “reduced levels of activity in proximity to trails in areas with dogs, and this effect extended at least 50 meters off trail.” For deer, activity was decreased within 50

meters for trails used by recreationists alone, but increased to 100 meters on trails where dogs were allowed. The researchers conclude that “trails in areas that allow dogs have a wider area of influence on mule deer and small mammals…this area of influence surrounding trails is potentially unsuitable habitat for these species. In these areas, visitors are less likely to view these wildlife species.” This research would suggest that to provide the highest quality wildlife viewing experience for visitors at an Environmental Education Center, dogs should be prohibited. Yates Mill Pond Historic Park and Schenck Memorial Forest have adopted that rule….Yates to protect nesting waterfowl; at Schenck, NCSU staff tired of low compliance with the rules on keeping dogs on a leash. Hemlock Bluffs Nature Preserve in Cary does allow dogs on a 10-foot leash. They report high compliance due, in part, to frequent staff surveillance. Their park staff have had training provided by the Cary Police Department in dealing with off-leash offenders. Staff can take names, issue warnings and ban use for repeat offenders. State Park Rangers at Umstead SP have the authority to issue citations, and frequently do, for off leash offences. Raleigh does not have a park where dogs are prohibited, and no one has suggested that Horseshoe Farm Park adopt that policy. The fenced dog park proposal would be in addition to dogs allowed on leash along trails. Compliance with leash laws in Raleigh parks appears to be fairly low and this is a concern. During 88 morning visits to Durant Nature Park from 2000-2006, I recorded 208 people walking dogs with 43% of those people having allowed their dogs to run off leash (unpublished). My Museum colleague, Jesse Perry, reports a similar problem at Lake Johnson. It is our hope that Raleigh would improve its record of enforcement of its leash law at an Environmental Education Center located at Horseshoe Farm Park. It is our fear that it won’t, and the wildlife viewing opportunities at the Horseshoe will be diminished despite attempts to develop habitat enhancements. Clearly there is interest among some park users for off-leash settings, but it is not clear that a fenced dog park is the preference for most dog owners. I personally would not bring my dog to a fenced park setting with dozens of other dogs. Nevertheless, two fenced dog parks are already planned for northeast Raleigh …4 acres at the Durant Road landfill, and another at the Buffalo Road Athletic Park. Wake Audubon supports those plans and installation of those facilities.

The addition of a fenced dog area in a park emphasizing Environmental Education, however, creates a blatant recreational conflict. We do not know the exact impact on wildlife that a fenced dog park will have. Evidence would suggest that it would affect wildlife. There can be no doubt, however, that it will affect the recreational experience of visitors seeking the inspiration of a quiet natural setting, and challenge Interpreters at the site when offering environmental education programs. In 30 years working as an Interpretive Naturalist visiting Nature Centers across the country, I have never seen an Environmental Educator Center juxtaposed with a fenced dog park. Indeed it may be time that this community explores creative options for accommodating trails, in addition to fenced areas, where people with dogs can legally allow them to be off-leash, while subsequently closing important natural resource parks to dogs altogether. But that is a topic for another day. Wake Audubon remains convinced that a fenced dog park would diminish the qualities of the Horseshoe. We also feel it would be helpful for Raleigh Parks to invite professional natural resource managers to assist with trail planning, natural resource stewardship, and enhancing the recreational visitor’s experience at the Horseshoe Farm Park as this site plan proceeds. John I. Connors, Boardmember Wake Audubon Society PO Box 12452 Raleigh, NC 27605

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amy@asawyerartworks.com ParkPlan; Shouse, David; Horseshoe Farm Park Draft Plan Comments Thursday, July 13, 2006 3:51:49 PM

As a Horseshoe Farm Park Master Planning Committee member I would like to offer the following comments in support of the Horseshoe Farm Park Draft Master Plan: This park plan - though not perfect - allows for a unique blend of nature, history, art and culture, as well as opportunities to exercise and play - paddle, walk, jog, bike, have a picnic, to be silly and run around like a maniac in an open field just like the deer do - which is an increasingly rare opportunity for kids (and adults) in Raleigh. There are hundreds of activities which are possible at this park if designed according to the concepts outlined in the draft master plan - flexibility is the key - this plan is well suited for a broad array of park programs. The committee discussed, compromised and negotiated ad nauseam to create a draft park plan which respects the environmental and cultural value of this property - while serving the recreational needs of this growing community. I ask the Parks Board and City Council to consider the time and hard work that went into this plan - please respect the decisions made by volunteer community citizens who spent well over a year and many, many hours listening to park staff, community experts, and public input to arrive at this draft plan. Demographics presented to the master planning committee made it quite clear that this is a very diverse community - well educated, nicely employed and steadily aging - but the most striking feature is cultural diversity. My interpretation of this data is that the park programming must be as broad, unique and diverse as this community. It should serve many ages and common interests because the park cannot be all things to all people. Horseshoe Farm is a community park with a rich community history and environmental significance - with infinite potential to be a unique learning and

recreational experience for new and old residents of the surrounding community. By learning about the history and value of the community in which you live, you become more connected to your community, which leads to a sense of place - a sense of belonging. You also become part of the community which reaches beyond the arbitrary planning limits. Community history lives amongst us - the ancestors of the early Horseshoe Farm residents are here with us - I have met several through this planning process and they have stories to share with their new neighbors. Our community has the living resources to build an oral history project about Horseshoe Farm...how many city parks have such a thing? How many parks have the potential for archaeological field schools? A sense of ownership, pride and stewardship grow from this kind of connection with place. A community becomes safer and more secure this way as well and it becomes more unified. If we allow for community involvement and stewardship within this park, the park will be safer, cleaner, and better cared for than one with special interest or politically motivated facilities which much of the community neither requested nor supports. Neglect, misuse and vandalism arise from lack of community ownership of public property - that does not have to be the case with Horseshoe Farm which has hundreds of supporters, fans, and happy regular users already. One disturbing analogy used throughout the process by the master planning committee chairman was that Horseshoe Farm is a big toy box - and we need to put all the toys we can in it. Beyond being disrespectful of the value of the property and the intelligence of the committee, this is a short sighted view of Horseshoe Farm. Many people in my community see it as a jewelry box - a complete, interconnected package - the jewelry being a river, wetlands and natural levees, giant heritage trees, thousands of wild animals, insects, birds, reptiles and amphibians - with hidden jewels –artifacts - from people who lived there hundreds and thousands of years ago...all lined on the inside with beautiful green pastures. When I think of a toy box I think of a place to hide away toys and games many of which wear out, break, and are thrown away before we ever grow up. Do we put tennis shoes and baseball gloves in the jewelry box? Most people say no - most people I know are dumbfounded by that idea. Most people who come to Horseshoe Farm and spend any time exploring it are taken by the sheer beauty of the place and cannot fathom putting chain link, acres of pavement and bright lights in a place like the ‘Shoe. Since this is public property we do need to compromise - we do need to allow people to come enjoy the beauty of the park - the jewelry must be shared...but

it also should be protected and treated with respect. I think that can be accomplished - but it needs to be done carefully and slowly - with the community’s help. This plan starts the path towards smart development of this resource - and at the same time has made it glaringly clear that we need more parks in less sensitive locations - we need creative reuse of already neglected and defaced property - and kids need easy access to parks. We should be talking about incentives for developers to allow space for neighborhood parks, playgrounds and facilities in the neighborhoods or close to the neighborhoods...and allow sensitive property like Horseshoe Farm be focused on our dwindling natural and cultural resources. Horseshoe Farm has regional environmental significance - a point which should not be taken lightly. As people have said repeatedly - you can put basketball courts, dog parks, disc golf, or tennis courts just about anywhere... but you cannot find another place like Horseshoe Farm just anywhere. Please respect this committee’s deliberations and unanimous vote for the concepts outlined in this plan. Please use valuable man hours and tax dollars putting the parks closer to the neighborhoods, on accessible property more suited for sports facilities, and protect our valuable natural resources for the future generations to explore and enjoy by developing them in a sustainable way - suitable to their unique qualities and environmental and cultural value to the community. Thank you Amy Sawyer 2929 Horse Shoe Farm Road Wake Forest, NC

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Angela Giordano ParkPlan; Horeshoe Farm Thursday, July 13, 2006 4:00:57 PM

Horseshoe Farm should be an environmentally responsible venue for viewing wildlife, river recreation, environmental education and arts education, and unstructured, informal play. • Horseshoe Farm is one of the City's most environmentally significant and valuable parks, and should be treated with respect and care. • The Master Plan is a reasonable compromise and should be supported and adopted. • The Master Plan provides for many kinds of recreational activities that are appropriate for the particular qualities of this park site. • Activities such as disc golf, a dog park, and high intensity active recreation will have a negative impact on the character and environmental quality of this park. These facilities should be placed in locations that have no significance, in more accessible locations closer to neighborhoods and schools. • Please to approve the recommendations regarding environmental stewardship in the Master Planning Committee's transmittal letter to Council. Regards,

Angela Giordano
Momentum Printing Sales Representative 919-465-0700 - phone 919-465-2423 - fax 919-607-6454 - cell

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Elizabeth Scherrer ParkPlan; no new dog park at Horseshoe Bend Thursday, July 13, 2006 4:42:31 PM

An ecologically significant site like Horseshoe Bend is no place for a dog park!! OR for Frisbee golf or high activity sports. This valuable site is only appropriate for lowimpact uses. While ecological quality will not enhance the experience of sports or dog-walking, these activities WILL degrade the ecology of the Horseshoe Bend area. The park will become useless for the designated use of wildlife viewing. This is a poor use of our resources. The ecological significance of the site will be ruined by trampling, trash, clearing for parking and amenities, vandalism, introduction of weeds, rats, and other pests, and users bending the rules to use areas they are not supposed to. Once high-intensity uses have impacted the habitat and diversity of plant and animal species, they do not recover. Let us leave a treasure for our descendants instead of another overused, trampled urban park. A less ecologically significant site would be far more appropriate for a dog or sports park. The City must have many properties that have already been degraded. Several of these parcels should be available for high-impact uses. Elizabeth Elizabeth Scherrer EcoScience Corporation 1101 Haynes Street, Suite 101 Raleigh, NC 27604 Phone 919-828-3433 Fax 919-828-3518 http://www.ecosciencenc.com

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Carol Linelle Ashcraft ParkPlan; public comment: Horseshoe Farm Park Master Plan Thursday, July 13, 2006 5:00:18 PM

At the public hearing June 29 on the Horseshoe Farm Park Master Plan, supporters of disc golf and dog parks spoke with feeling about their needs for more facilities. I listened to them and considered whether their requests might be reasonable and how they would, in reality, affect the environmental treasures at Horseshoe Farm Park. Now that I have looked into the effects of both of these features on parks where they exist, I must oppose both of them as highly detrimental to Horseshoe Farm Park. Either one of them would ruin the use of the park for the purposes for which it is intended. I live very near Marsh Creek Park, where I understand a complete disc golf course is planned. I am sympathetic to the disc golf players themselves, and would be happy for them to have their new course there. I could even bicycle over there and enjoy watching them play, as I have never even heard of disc golf before now. I am also a dog-lover myself, and have enjoyed taking my dog off leash on the Neuse River Greenway. I live alone and my dog is very important to me. Now that I have learned about the effects of dogs on greenways, trails and the wildlife habitat surrounding them, I am reluctantly going to decrease the number of times I take my dog there, and keep her on a leash virtually all the time when I do go with her. That's how strongly I feel about the importance of preserving our remaining wildlife habitat for others to enjoy. It is even more important at Horseshoe Farm Park. Please accept the Horseshoe Farm Park Master Plan as it is, including approval of the cover letter's statement on environmental stewardship. Thank you for the opportunity to comment. Sincerely, Carol Ashcraft 4500 Aviemore Crescent, Raleigh, NC 27604

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Baird, David ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Plan Thursday, July 13, 2006 5:36:08 PM

To Whom It May Concern: I am the President of the Raleigh Tennis Association. We, as an organization, would like for the board to strongly consider (5) tennis courts being added to HSF Park Plan. For the past (4) years, the RTA has applied for and been given the USTA Community Development Grant. This grant is based on league participation and local USTA memberships. Each year, our awarded amount has grown 3-5%. With that money, we have started or enhanced a number of city programs many of which are free or subsidized for needy applicants. Raleigh has been one of the fastest growing tennis cities within NC and right now ranks #3 based on the league memberships and participation. Due to previous park planning, many of our sites are not usable for league matches that require a minimum of (5) courts (both junior and adult leagues) and are thus, not fully utilized. With the growth in the part of the county where HSF will be, we see this as a great opportunity to set the new standard for mid-size public tennis facilities and ask that a minimum of (5) courts be considered. If we are able to successfully grow the game through projects like this, we will continue to receive the needed financial support from the USTA and as a result, Raleigh tennis will grow and prosper. Thanks for your time! David Baird

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Marsha Presnell-Jennette ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park comments Thursday, July 13, 2006 5:48:51 PM

Dear PRGAB Members and Department Staff: My comments from the Parks Board's public meeting will be on the record. Once again, I urge adherence to the Neuse River Corridor master plan recommendations. To do otherwise is to disregard a master plan that was approved by the PRGAB, Staff and City Council. The park plan as presented offers a rich experience for park visitors while preserving the unique features of this special park. Had the master planning committee had the freedom to seriously explore master planning the park specifically as a nature park, I think we would be seeing a very different park plan. The plan before you represents many, many compromises. IF the park had been planned from the beginning as a nature park many things would be different. For example, imagine the parking being kept at the entrance of the park, eliminating bringing paving and cars deeper into the park. Screening the parking areas with low berms and wildflower plantings would help diminish the impact of the cars in the park's vistas. Please make sure the environmental stewardship recommendations from the master planning committee are integrated into the approved park master plan. Including disc golf in this particular park would damage the ecological integrity of the significant natural heritage areas. Since another nearby park has a disc golf course already called for in a park's master plan having one at HSF park does not spread that activity out to other areas in the City. Please go ahead and install the disc golf course in the Marsh Creek Park as the master plan for that park indicates!

As a dog lover and a supporter of dog parks I appreciate the change of attitude in Raleigh Parks now offering dog parks. I look forward to more dog parks spread throughout the city so that dog owners will not have to drive their dogs so far for play dates. Since there is a dog park in the plan at the landfill park as well as one at Buffaloe Road Park, let's hurry and get them built! And add more parks for people and dogs in other sections of the city as well. It is not appropriate to have a dog park at HSF park if the purpose of the park is to be a nature park with environmental education. Why not look for a place to have a much larger facility allocated for dogs? I look forward to a dog park large enough to have a pond for dogs to swim in and different areas fenced for different sizes of dogs. Imagine an area with a covered pavilion for obedience classes! How about including an agility training area which could also serve as a rehab area for pets? Such a diverse facility would be very popular with people who enjoy recreating with their dogs. But, keep a dog park out of HSF park! Dogs should also be kept on leash in the park. Provide parks that are more appealing to people with dogs than a nature preserve/environmental education park. I have been concerned that the HSF park master planning committee was never allowed to fully explore the issues related to traffic into and from the park. There are safety issues that have not been addressed in a public forum related to increased traffic at Horseshoe Farm Road and Ligon Mill Rd. as well as at 401. The public deserves to know what the Parks Department plan is related to managing traffic flow at those intersections. Marsha Presnell-Jennette 618 Stacy Street Raleigh, NC 27607

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John Gerwin ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Thursday, July 13, 2006 5:55:22 PM

TO: Raleigh Parks, Recreation & Greenway Advisory Board Dear Board Members, I believe that Horseshoe Farm should be an environmentally responsible venue for viewing wildlife, river recreation, environmental education and arts education, and unstructured, informal play. I would say that this property is one of the City's most environmentally significant parks, and should be maintained strictly as such. Naturally, there are a variety of interests in the use of this park, and the Master Plan addresses a number of these by allowing for a variety of appropriately passive recreational activities for a Park of this type. But, I do not believe that dog parks nor disc golf are appropriate activities at this site. It's impossible to satisfy everyone at any one site, unless you have a site the size of Wake County.......you don't! It's most important to match the site characteristics to the activities, and Horseshoe Farm is clearly an *environmental* and *cultural* site. It is of course important to address citizen concerns, but dog parks and disc golf are activities that should be sited elsewhere. The disc golf activities are NOT benign, as to environmental damage, contra the well-scripted speeches made at the recent public hearing. One has only to view Kent Park, or watch the activity (I used to play some). I urge you to seek other sites for a disc golf array. As for dog parks, I believe two are already in the City's plans in NE Raleigh. Thus, the Horseshoe Farm site is inappropriate on proximity/density alone. But, a dog park would also distract from the experience that this locality can offer. Soon every neighborhood will be demanding cat parks.......It's true, I am primarily interested in passive, enviro-type activities, and I would love to have a nice environmental park over on this side of town, but we really don't. We have Pullen: tennis and basketball courts; Lake Raleigh/Johnson: full of people who don't keep their dogs on a leash. I won't take myself or my dog there. My dog is very strong and gets cranky when

other dogs nip or bark at him, and to avoid an incident, I stay away. I'm tired of loose dogs that I don't know running up to us. So, I will drive to the east side to experience Horseshoe Farm (Umstead is a bit noisy with the airport nearby), and I expect others to compromise and drive to the dog park or disc golf course that suits them best. I urge the Parks Board and Council to approve the recommendations regarding environmental stewardship in the Master Planning Committee's transmittal letter to Council. Sincerely,

John Gerwin
John Gerwin 1008 Ravenwood Dr. Raleigh, NC 27606

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Karen Rindge ParkPlan; WakeUP Wake County letter re: Horseshoe Farm Park Thursday, July 13, 2006 7:11:03 PM

WakeUP Wake County
Taxpayers for Good Growth Now

July 13, 2006 Dear Raleigh Parks Board: I am writing today regarding Horseshoe Farm Park on behalf of WakeUP Wake County, a volunteer citizens’ organization supporting good growth and growth planning in Wake County. WakeUP Wake County recognizes that because our community is growing so rapidly, with 27 acres of land being developed daily, we must pay careful attention to how this growth will impact our quality of life for decades to come. Among issues that are affected by rapid growth, such as schools, transportation and housing, WakeUP understands that protecting open space and preserving environmental quality are fundamental to a healthy quality of life for all of us. Because Wake County is building about 1,000 residential homes a month, we of course need places for outdoor recreation, and the Master Plan calls for providing different types of outdoor recreation spaces. Horseshoe Farm Park is one of Raleigh’s most environmentally significant parks and it needs to be treated with special care because it is surrounded by the Neuse River. There is simply no other place like it in the city, and it is an important recreation place as it is. As the county develops, we must ensure that some natural places, like Horseshoe Farm Park, are protected for generations to come. While dog parks and ball fields are needed too, those can be built in areas that are not so environmentally fragile. We

risk damaging a pristine, unique natural place and negatively affecting the water quality of the Neuse River. WakeUp Wake County represents taxpayers who believe we should be using our tax dollars to ensure a good quality of life for us all. Damage to the Neuse River, which surrounds Horseshoe Farm, will only cost the taxpayers more in the future. Keeping Horseshoe Farm in its natural state will cost much less than converting it into other recreation facilities. During the decision-making process around this park, the public has spoken consistently and in significant numbers in support of simply keeping the park in its natural state. As a public- appointed committee, we hope that you will honor what the public has asked for in this process. We ask that you approve the recommendations regarding environmental stewardship in the Master Planning letter to the city council. Thank you for you consideration. Sincerely, Karen Rindge Chair, WakeUP Wake County Contact: 919-828-3833; krindge@earthlink.net

Karen Rindge krindge@earthlink.net

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

harrywilson ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Draft Master Plan Thursday, July 13, 2006 7:43:48 PM

Let me begin by admitting that I am not a Raleigh resident, but I have lived in Wake County for 25 years. I work in Raleigh (staff attorney for the State Board of Education) and I shop and eat many meals in Raleigh. I am also a member of Wake Audubon. I gain much pleasure from watching, feeding, and photographing birds, but I also enjoy a variety of wildlife. Surely you have received many messages from Wake Audubon members and from Friends of Horeshoe Farm. Although I share the message that they present, I shall not repeat it. Instead, I want to urge your support for a nature park with a different argument. Recently Fox News carried a story at http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,202166,00.html entitled "Bird Extinctions More Rapid Than Thought." The story quotes Stuart Pimm of Duke University, who estimates that humans are causing the extinction of one bird species per year, on average. In the absence of human impact, researchers estimate that the rate would be more like one species becoming extinct every 100 years. Shortly before the news leaked that several people had actually seen the supposedly extinct Ivory-billed Woodpecker, I read Phillip Hoose's excellent book, "The Race to Save the Lord God Bird." The book describes the battle between greed and resource exploitation on the one hand and the desire to preserve and protect on the other. Unfortunately, the first side seems to prevail much more frequently than does the latter. My point is this -- some speakers at the recent public hearing indicated that we already have enough land devoted to nature parks, but who are we to say how much is enough? We seem to be able to learn only after it is too late, after we have failed to maintain sufficient habitat for a species to survive. Once we destroy the habitat, learn what we have done, and decide to

restore the habitat, we discover just how difficult, expensive, and time-consuming that process is. I urge you to maintain the existing habitat of Horseshoe Farm as it is and to look elsewhere for property that is more conducive to being used for disc golf, for dog parks, or for active recreation. Harry Wilson Zebulon, North Carolina harrywilson@earthlink.net http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~harry/

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

ecomas ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Thursday, July 13, 2006 8:52:07 PM

Dear Council Members: When I elect my representatives in government, I expect them to be visionaries not only of the immediate future, but of several years to come. This is to express my concerns regarding Horseshoe Farm, or any other piece of public domain. We need to be serious about leaving a habitable planet for our children and grandchildren so they will be thankful instead of regretful about our actions. If we are going to destroy or even change a pristine piece of land that already has beauty and natural resources, how are we going to justify that to our future generations. While I fully support athletic fields in our community, this is not the right location for those. Organized sport activity will bring litter, noise and pollution, all detrimental to this delicate environment. I urge you, to please, keep this property as a resource for education, natural family enjoyment and wildlife habitat. I recomment the current Draft Master Plan. Thank you. Sinceraly, Maria M. Comas 4104 Breadfruit Ct. Raleigh, NC 27616

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Christopher Allen ParkPlan; Horseshoe Farm Park Comments Friday, July 14, 2006 12:05:54 AM

Dear Raleigh Parks, Recreation, and Greenway Advisory Committee: As a Raleigh-born native and life-long resident, I am writing to voice my support for the Horseshoe Farm Park Master Plan as it is presently constituted, with the exception that I implore you include the amendments advocated by the Audubon Society. I voiced my opinion at the public meeting, but sadly I could not fully express my deep devotion to this issue in the three (3) minutes as allotted. As a life-long sports enthusiast with two children who were/are student-athletes (now almost grown), I appreciate the need for sites that have, as their primary focus, recreational opportunities such as tennis with lighted courts, gymnasiums, dog parks, ball fields, disk golf courses, and the like. There are too few of these areas to meet the needs of our active population. However, Horseshoe Farm Park, with its natural pristine setting and sensitive environmental areas, is simply not the location for such intensive active recreational activities. I will leave it up to the credentialed and learned professionals to explain in detail why this is so, unless it is so patently obvious. One may ask “if we do not locate active recreation at Horseshoe, then where?” I sincerely believe that the City Administration, especially the Parks and Recreation Department, has not fully explored locating active recreation amongst the oceans of empty asphalt parking lots and vacant “boxes” formerly housing retail establishments in the Northeast sector of our city. These defunct strip malls and big boxes are a result of Big Real Estate ventures known as REITs, and remain a blight upon our cityscape. These eyesores are a product of the Big Real Estate Developers’ “slash and burn, cut and run” mentality; a mentality that sadly appears to permeate our Parks and Recreation Department. We can rehabilitate these already developed areas into tennis courts, soccer fields, dog parks, gymnasiums, and other recreation sites without having to needlessly destroy the “raw land” (a developer’s term). There are countless acres of already desecrated land that could more than adequately fulfill this need.

One final point, the plan as presented is already a compromise, hammered out after eighteen month’s-worth of meetings. However, the committee only began serious and open-minded discussions only after the November, 2005 public hearing where the overwhelming sentiment of those present favoring a NATURE PARK were allowed to express their opinions. The reason that the committee spun their collective wheels for nearly a year is obvious; they were attempting to pound a square peg into a round hole. The chair of the committee gave the orders to the consultants; “let’s take all of the toys out of the toy box, and see how many we can fit into the space” and then the “planning” began. The process was flawed from the outset, and was righted only in the face of overwhelming public sentiment. You have a unique, if not historic, opportunity to choose to stand in the face of the City’s apparently egocentric and self-absorbed leadership who have from the outset attempted to orchestrate the planning process of this park and thwart the Public Will. At the press conference announcing Dr. Annie Wilkerson’s gift to the city, City Attorney Tom McCormick obviously spoke unintended volumes when he said, “Dr. Wilkerson saved us from ourselves.” She felt the need to bind her gift as we say “eight ways from Sunday.” It is clear that Dr. Wilkerson had no confidence in the City Administration’s apparent ability to do the right thing; a fact that we, the public have learned too well. Please prove us wrong!

Very truly yours, Christopher E. Allen

Christopher E. Allen, P.A. Attorney at Law 5540 Centerview Drive, Suite 200 Raleigh, NC 27606 919.424.6350 (Office) 919.414.3310 (Cell) 919.872.6685 (Home)

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Susan Bowers ParkPlan; Please keep Horseshoe Farm Park as a nature park Friday, July 14, 2006 12:08:44 AM

I grew up in Raleigh and in the public school system we read a short story about a family visiting a park. The parents and two kids enjoyed a picnic lunch, exulted in laying in the soft green grass and looking at the cloudsmoving by, laughed in excitement and marveled at the wildlife they spotted (look a groundhog! a beaver!), ran through a meadow with butterflies--nothing unusual, just a lovely idyllic day in the country. The kicker was that at the end of this 'normal day in the country,' much to the the reader's surprise, the family got on a moving walkway, donned their personal pollution control devices, and returned to the gray, polluted, overdevelopped world in which they lived. What seemed like a normal day was a day for which they had saved for years. Taking an evening stroll to Cameron Village with my nieces, a year or two ago, when they were about 7 and 9, I pointed to the woods near the YMCA, and told them to remember them, that this little piece of nature would soon be gone. I knew nothing about the development plans for the area. And much sooner than I expected, those woods were in fact gone. This week on Oberlin Road, both an oppossum and a racoon lay dead in the road, killed by traffic, having too little sheltering nature. Bit by bit, so gradually it is almost goes unnoticed, the natural world is being edged out. Development, is, of course a necessary part of having a healthy, vibrant, growing economy. But unless we make concerted efforts to preserve nature as it is, much sooner than we think, there will be none left. We will have developped all the land. I can not think of another piece of land in Wake County like Horseshoe Farm Park. What makes it unique is that it really feels like stepping out of the city and into a rural environment--into the countryside. What makes a trip to the country so refreshing and exhilerating is the total absence of development. The quiet and still. The sound of the wind in the trees. The way a bird's call lingers in the air. The play of the sun on the vast meadows and grasses. The view of nature as far as the eye can see. The wildlife. The rich smells of grasses ripening in the

sun that only broad open fields produce. It is astonishing that such a rural experience is still available just off of Capital Blvd, and so accessible to Wake county residents. Development, high intensity recreation, disc golf, a dog park, densely scheduled activities that require a constant stream of cars would all shatter the character of the park which is truly unique. While the story at the beginning of this note seems futuristic, and certainly was at the time it was written in the 60s or 70s, already it captures a growing truth about Wake County. Experiences we took for granted growing up in Wake County are less and less accessible for our children and will be even rarer for their children. Horseshoe Farm park, an exquisite jewel in the bend of the Neuse River, should be kept a nature park as laid out in the overview Park plan drafted some years ago. My computer is not letting me access the newest Master Plan from your website, and I sat too far back in the last meeting to see all the details, but I would prefer HFP to be kept natural, with the exception, perhaps of making the river accessible with a put in and take out for quiet nonmotorized boats, and perhaps a River history and interpretive center tucked into the trees and one of the existing farm buildings converted to a river cafe; a few paths, minimal development in a way that leaves the rolling hills and open vistas and rural character unchanged. What will be miraculous and marvelous to our children and generations to come, is not the ability we would show in developing this small corner of nature, but our ability and wisdom in not developing it. The 843 acre Central Park in NYC, was, as you probably know, created a mere 150 years ago as an act of great vision in a still developping city. Like Raleigh, there was still undeveloped land 'farther out,' and even in the mile around the southern base of the park, but what park planners Frederick Law Olmstead and Calvert Vaux and other city leaders understood was that the city would fill in around the park, and that as the city developped, open space would become more and more important as an immediate nearby haven from the frenetic sounds and rhythms of modern life. Law and Vaux "also trusted in the power of nature to lift man's spirit." (Central Park Conservancy) With it's vast size, and NYC's population of 8 million people (the same as the entire population of NC), there are a few activities available in Central Park, but it is predominantly devoted to green space and individual use.. Car traffic is limited and totally

prohibited in most areas on the weekend. When I lived in NYC for 16 years, I felt such daily profound gratitude to these city leaders who lived 150 years before me, for having the wisdom, vision and foresight to designate these 843 acres for Central Park. What a difference this oasis of green space makes to life in the city today. I was even more grateful knowing the park was created amidst and despite severe political pressures of the time. In Raleigh we are not in danger yet of losing our suburbs, but we are in immediate danger of losing our rural character. A character that sets Raleigh apart and adds to the quality of life in the Triangle. There will come a time when, as for the family in the short story, a simple 'day in the country' is not readily available outside a few precious places. And generations of the future will think of you and thank you for preserving for them such a gift. And bless you for accomplishing a feat so much more difficult than developing a typical suburban park; preserving a nature park. Than you for your kind consideration, Sincerely,

S Bowers

From: To: CC: Subject: Date: Attachments:

Tom & Nanette Lehr ParkPlan; Horseshoe Park Input Friday, July 14, 2006 7:23:46 AM

The Horseshoe Farm Master Plan Committee made their recommendations, but a significant event happened when Annie Louise Wilkerson M.D. donated Nature Preserve Park to the city of Raleigh. Since this land must be used as a Nature Park, the city of Raleigh should rethink how they use the Horseshoe Farm land. The horseshoe land park should include more activities such as: a gymnasium, tennis courts, and a ropes course. Opponents of a gym say that it would affect the deer. But if the noise is inside the gym, why would that affect the deer? Also, tennis courts are not noisy and wouldn't affect wildlife negatively. I've seen deer in our neighborhood, so they do adapt to seeing people and even houses. A gym, tennis courts or a ropes course wouldn't negatively affect the wildlife. Given that there will already be a mandatory Nature Preserve in the North/Northeast Raleigh area, Horseshoe Park should have more activities like these and they won't negatively affect wildlife. I hope this input can still be accepted. Let me know if it cannot. Respectfully submitted, Tom Lehr 9408 Buggy Run Circle Wake Forest, NC 27587 919.345.4097 http://www.wral.com/goodnews/7330690/detail.html

Their recommendations include: 1. Limiting conflicting uses.. . "the Reganal Park blends all types of recreational activities from bird watching to baseball withouf conflict, and celebrates the river and the unique pleasures it provides." (Exec. Summ. pg iv) 2. Identify unique natural resource features... "Regional natural area inventories completed by the NC Natural Heritage Program and TriangIe Land Conservancy.. .include. . .the Horseshoe Farm property north oi the US401Neuse River crossing.. .A natural area at fiorseshoe Farm contains a mature, essentially undisturbed bottomland and hardwood forest. A well-developed natural levee and a few flood plain pools are present. Three natural community types are represented at this site: Piedmont-Mountain Levee Forest, Piedmont-Mountain Bottomland Forest and Flood Plain Pool." (pg 35) 3. Designation of three general categories o f recreational facilities and park land: Active, Passive and Nature Reserve. "Nature Reserves are prirnaril y selected because they contain unique environmental chamcteristics such as rare plant communities or prime habitat for wildlife which provides secluded educational and interpretive opportunities retated to the ecology of the area.. .They are essential far preservation of some wildlife species currently existing in the Comdor. To be successful, these sites need to be in a quiet secluded area away from highways and major development. Access to these sites should be limited to protect the value of wildlife habitat. Several unique sites are identified on the Inventory and Analysis drawing. These include.. .Hor.wshoe Bend Park.'"pp 66-67) 4. Description of Horseshoe Bend Park "Horseshoe Bend Park as shown on this plan c e ~ t e r around and expands ow Horseshoe s Farm, a site already owned by the City of Ralei gh. A pedestrian bridge to the Capital Area Soccer League Property and Perry Creek Greenway to the west immediately expands recreational opportunity for users at both sites. A historic farm site which adjoins both sidcs of US 401 would be a valuable addition to this park." (pg 88)
Betrayal: Horseshoe Farm Park listed as 'Community Park' When the: IZorseshoe Farm Master PIanning Committee was convened in 2005, they were given the task of planning the Horseshoe as a ' T o m u n i t y Park". This is not the same as a "Nature Reserve", and the stage was set for deep divisions among the Master Planning committee members, and the community as a whole. Wake Audubon members have a leng-time interest in thc Horseshoe. In Wake Audubon's publication, A Rir-dwaicher 's Guide ro the Triungle published in 2000, we describe the Horseshoe as a site "Lxawn for its Wild Turkqjpoplilution and abundaplr songbirds." We have experienced the changed designation as a bctrayal of our expectations, and of all the hard work we invested into the original Neuse Rjver Corridor plan. How could it be othenvise? Wake Audubon supported the plan developed for BuffaIo Road Athletic Park, also along the Neuse. We provided the City with an Inventory of Natural Resources we found on that site (see Appendix 1, excerpts of report), found it to have a rich natural history, and yet supported the loss of those resources as the site was developed for active recreation. We did that with the knowledge that compromises must be made and the Horseshoe, a few miles upstream, was slated to be a nature reserve.

How did the designation of HSF change from a nature reserve to a Community Park? There is no clear answer. Apparently, when changes to the Park Comprehensive Plan were reviewed and adopted in 2004 the Horseshoe was listed (in that document's Appendix) as a community park. The change was never discussed. Wake Audubon reviewed the Comprehensive Plan and made many suggestions, but we did not notice this change. We want to know who proposed this change? Why was it not discussed? Who is responsible for fomenting the deep divisions within the HSF Master PIanning Committee, and in the Parks and Recreation community as a whole? No one seems willing to take responsibility for this. T would be nice to have a little honesty here! t

Definition: Conflicting useA continual challenge among Master Plan committee members has to been understand the concept of recreational conflict. The refrain from Active Recreation advocates has been: Horseshoe Farm Park is 146 acres, sure1y we can fit all sorts of recreational experiences on that site. This requires a 2-part answer: 1. Although thc Horseshoe is 146 acres, over 60% of that total is Namral Heritage bottomland forest and all have agrccd developmen2 there should be limited. The area that could be developed is actually 50 acres of open meadow, and to limit roadways and protect vistas across the meadow, the general consensus was to keep the development on the north side of that meadow. These constraints define n much smaller development footprint than 146 acres. 2. The textbook definition for recreational conflict is: "interference with a isit it or ' s recreational goals that he or she attributes to another person 's behavior. ...conflict is a special type of dissatisfaction rhat occurs when one person cannor achieve tire recreational experience they desire bscat~se the infe$erenw o others. " An of f Introduction to Outdoor Recreation. 2005, Moore, Roger L. and B. L. Driver, Venture Publishing It is often the character of these conflicts that they are assymetrical; that is, "when one grmp dislikes contact with another but the reverse i no( true." s Many people simply don't realize they have impacted the recreational experience of another. Examples of this are endless, so it is best to minimize these conflicts in the planning stage of a park.

Definition: Natural Resource-based RecreationSome have sought to divide this community by the type of recreational pursuits we choose, as if it were one or the other. Advocates qfAetive Recreation versus Advocates for Passive Recreation. Indeed, sometimes it feels like the park planning process for the Horseshoe is being treated as if it were a great athletic competition. It is not! This attempt to divide us is truly unfortunate and could have long-term consequences. Many of us have chosen to advocate for natural resomce-based recreation for the Horseshoe, but we aren't against active recreation. We advocate for both.. .only not in places where they will impose serious conflicts among users. We have supported Buffal Road Athletic Park, the proposed active recreation elements at the proposed landfill par , and will support active recreation when it is proposed at Sydnos White Park.

h fact, the environmental community has a long history of strong support for parks and recwation initiatives. We ask that you not take our support for granted. This is about Parks and Recreation, and how we can accommodate all those different recreational pursuits we want to enjoy as a community without stepping on each other's toes. Some people have suggested that the Horseshoe will sit idle in the absence of active recreation.. .that passive recreation wiIl not generate interest in the community. This false assumption is created by use af the term '"passive recreation". A preferred term is '9VaturaI Resource-hased Recreation": defined as "recreation experiences ~ h aresuii f fram recreaiion acfivifies thsf occur in and depend on the natural environment...natrwal and cul~ural/Jristoric resources that make otrtdoor recreation possible, and the other outdoor elements useful for recmtional purposes. These include file natural resources of land, water, vegetation,wildlgenair and minerals as well ns the fnciliries and other developmenfs used l'n outdoor recreation engagements. " An Introduction to Outdoor Recreation. 2005. Moore, Roger L, and B. L. Driver, Venture Publishing One way to think about this is imagine those natural history experiences you coufdn't find in your own back yard.. .you would have to go to a richer resource site to find them. It is significant that most of Raleigh's parks provide abundant athletic opportunities but limited natural resource-based experiences. So consider, for example, where in the Raleigh parks system would you take a visitor who wanted to see a Deer? How about a Groundhog? A Box Turtle? A Gray Tree Frog? Now by tougher ones. Where would you find a rich chorus of frogs singing after a summer thunderstorm? Where would you take them to search for a Black Rat Snake, or to find Spotted Salamander eggs in a vernal pool, or to listen for a chon~s Eastern Spadefoot Toads after a heavy rain? Where of might you see a Wild Turkey tom strutting in front of a group of hens? (see Appendix 2). Where in Raleigh" world could you find all of the above. ..onIy at the Horseshoe!

Recommendations Regarding the Proposed Master Plan
Key Constrain tsl Responsihili ties: 1. Protect VernaI Pond: The vernal pool on the west side of the park is one of the most important natural attributes of the Horseshoe Farm P a ~ kThis spring we have . documented its importance as an amphibian breeding site (see Appendix 2) including: Matbled and Spotted Salamander, and Eastern Spadefoot Toad. This site is particularly vulnerable to contamination from storm water pollution because it collects rainwater, but there is generally no outlet. There is concern that storm water run-off from the Environmental Education Center complex, parking lots, the pfaygound, and other "acilities will pollute this important resource. Every effofl must be made to prevent this I-am occurring. 2. Maintain Wild Turkey and Provide Viewing Opportunities: Wild Turkey found at H m e Shoe Farm are descended from the original North Carolina Wild Turkey stock and ha .e been present along this section of the Ncuse for as long as anyone can remember, Th s is an incredibly interesting species with intrinsic interpretive value. Wild Turkey are r at. ;le only to North America and were domesticated by Native Americans in the s u m western US. Turkeys the world over are descended from those transported by SJ~ar explorers who had contact with these Native Americans. Bcnjamin Franklin ;sh no-ni :ated the species to become our national emblem. They have unique courtshp

activities that are an exciting viewing spectacle. NC Wildlife Resources Commission Wild Turkey Biologist Mike Seamster visited the Horseshoe on February 15,2006 and provided suggestions for maintaining turkey at the Horseshoe, which I summarized and sent to the committee. (see Appendix: 3. Feb. 28) He suggested a 6 acre-food plot area to support the turkey, and that it might be possible to lure the turkey for scheduled viewings with a 'timed'feeder, although he was cautious about this latter strategy. 3. Enhance Wildlife Viewing: The floodplain fringe (bottomland) habitat appears to have the expected component of wildlife species. (see Appendix 2 ) However, the 46-acre meadow provides fair foraging habitat, but little cover?for most wildlife species. We found no birds using the area for breeding, and little cover available for rodents, rabbits or other prey species. Clearly the current mowing regime limits use of the meadow by wildlife. We recommend developing a meadow management plan which provides a mix of succession stages within the meadow, in addition to that part which is consistently mowed for informal play. 4. Minimize Conflicts: This site is unique and deserves focus, Raleigh does not now have a staffed Environmental Education Center in its system, and one planned here would complement a planned center in southeast Raleigh along Walnut Creek. The Neuse River corridor currently provides Raleigh with its water supply, while Walnut Creek is the historical source, Comparisons of watershed protections and resulting water quality impacts have great potential as a storyline connecting these Interpretive facilities. Trails, camping, and other recreation facilities throughout the park should be located to minimize disturbance, while maximizing viewing opporhmities of wildlife for park visitors. It i s recommended that a team of experts be assembled to help with plans for locating these facilities.
OpportunitiesPotentiaIs: 1. River Education & Recreation: While we struggle with drought and floods and all eycs are focused on the Neuse and its water.. .isnY it time we dedicate a park to this river? That is how the Neuse River Regional Park Master Plan Committee envisioned it. .. "the Regional Park.. .celebrates the river and the unique p/easures ir provides." (Exec. Summ. pg iv) It may not flow through downtown, but the Neuse is the lifeblood of our community. We drink it, we bathe in it, we excrete into it, and we recreate on it. We should celebrate this connection by introducing our citizens to its waters and teaching them to be good stewards. Imagine a park, with its river launch, its environmental center, its picnic shelter and even its playground focused on our relationship to the river. Why shouId we muddy the message with conflicting recreational pursuits that have nothing to do with the Neuse and can be provided elsewhere? 2, Innovative Playground: The playground should be unique and provide an introduction to the Neuse River. For example: "there could be climbing and crawling scwlptures qf Neuse River creatures...from Water Dogs to River Offers, and of Native American ctdfure.. .perhaps design a replica of an Occaneechi lodge as part o the pla-v equipment. There could be a f water element which simulates the flowing Neuse. Designed as a raised sluice-wav with waferj70wing~from Falls Lake (Pool) to the Horseshoe Bend and back Along its tlre course f h ~are~ r riffre arms with rocks, logs, river animals, mussel beds. Lwamps,heaver

dams, a river camp u Tuscaroruns..all rniniaturjz~d reflecting things one n ight f . but f encownter while paddling the Neuse. Since the sluiceway i 3 fee( high,children am ahlc s tof i a t smaV boats and other objects in the water and follow the progress along the Neuse. "(See Appendix: 4, Letter to h4P Comm, 6-27-05) 3. Environmental Education Building: It is important that as plans are drawn for the Environmental Education Center that funds and space for exhibits, a working laboratory for use by students, a classroom, and a small introduction theater be included, with all focused on the Neuse River and water quality issues. Funding for exhibits and educational opportunities focused on regional water quality should 'be readily available. 4. Viewing Nature, Observation Tower & Walkway: The lobby of the EE Center should have a large picture window, oriented toward the southwest, where the Butterfly Meadow has been installed. The window should have special glass which discourages birdhindow strikes. Feeding Stations, wildlife food pIantings, nest boxes, and other wildlife kttractshand art should beckon visitors to enjoy the view from the lobby window, and also entice them to walk in the Butterfly Meadow and beyond. It would be advantageous to include a raised Observation Tower walkway (similar to that found at Lake Crabtree Park), perhaps arising from the EE Center and providing an aerial view southeastward, across the meadow complex, and also westward into the tree line toward the Vernal Pond and Neuse River. A 4 x 4 x 16 foot cinder block chimney swift tower could be added toward the meadow side o f the EE Center, but in full view, looking down, from the walkway.. .offering spectacular seasonal viewings of this migratory bird coming to roost. Trails, camping, and other recreation facilities throughout the park should be located to minimize disturbance, while maximizing wildlife viewing opportunities, for visitors to the park. It is recommended that a team of experts be assembled to help with plans for locating these facilities. 5. Wildlife Meadows: The open meadow at Horseshoe Farm Park is approximately 46 acres in size. At present the Parks Department mows the entire meadow a few times during the summer. Visits to the meadow during the spring and early summer of 2006 produced no species of breeding birds nesting in the meadow, and few favoring early succession habitat were found at WSF Park. The current plan suggests a Butterfly Meadow 4.5-5 acres), a Birding Trail (no specific acreage) and a transitional wildlife habitat edge (minimum 50 feet in width). We would recommend that 40-50% of the existing meadow (western half of the site) be planned as a wildlife viewing meadow, with the rest (eastern half) offered for informal play. Nature trails would weave through a mix of meadow prescriptions and mowing patterns, wildlife plantings, and wildlife viewing areas terminating near the wildlife food plots (southwest corner of meadow). Establishing a 20-acre complex of wildlife meadow, shrub thicket and food plots would insure high diversity of wildlife species, including Indigo Bunting, Blue Grosbeak, Common Yellowthroat, and White-eyed Vireo, among others- species which are noticeable now by their absence. We wouId expect excellent viewing opportunities as these and other species take up residence. A committee of witdIife experts should be assembled to help with the planning of this wildlire meadow complex. 6. Wild Turkey Viewing: In the summer of 2006 the NC Birding Trail committee will be@naccepting nominations for parks to be included in the Piedmont section of the NC Birding Trail, The Bird Trail site designation will include references for Tocat restaurants,

accommodations and other retail business that pertain to the out of town birder coming to visit the area far unique bird watching opportunities. Inclusion of 5-6 acre food plots (southwest corner of meadow), a feeder and a viewing blind for Wild Turkey at this park site would be unique in the state and enhance the City's nomination request for the Horse Shoe Farm Park to be included in the Piedmont section of the NC Birding Trail registry. The NC Wildlife Resources Commission and the NC Wild Turkey Federation can be expected to help with this project.

Conclusion: Wake Audubon encourages the Parks, Recreation and Greenway Advisory Board to respect the efforts of the Horseshoe Farm Master Planning Committee, and the work of the original Neuse River Regional Park pf an, and approve the essence of this plan, while allowing for teams of experts to develop plans for managing wildlife viewing opportunities, and send the plan on to the Raleigh City Council for approval as soon as possible.

Respectfully submitted,

John 1, Connors, Boardm Wake Audubon Society

Appendix 1

Final Report to Raleigh Parks & Recreation Department Buffaloe Road Park Habitat Inventory January- July 2000 Conducted by John Comors and Patrick McMillan for the Wake Audubon Society
Background: In late 1999 the Wake Audubon Society Board of Directors became aware that a large tract of parkland had heen acquired by the City of W e i g h along the Neuse River called B&loe Road Park, and that it was proposed to develop the site as active recreational h d (athletic fields). Our concern was to make sure that natural resource . values were taken into account during the planning and development process for this, and all future park sites in Raleigh's system To that end the Board authorized the contracting of Patrick McMillq a well-known plmt c o m m ecologist, to assist with performing a quick inventory of habits on the proposed park site. The Park was wisited during 5 occasions from January through July, 2000 and information was recorded on general habitat characterisitics across the park with particular reference to fragile habitats, vertebrate species with their locations, some invertebrate and plant populations with emphasis on sites with significant diversity, local interest or vulnerability, and general overall impressions of the site. No attempt was made to try to inventory all species present. At the request of the Raleigh Parks and Recreation Department a preliminary report was drafted on March 7,2000 and debvered to the Raleigh Parks office.
Site Designation: In the initial stages of h/iaster Planning for the site the Raleigh Parks Department provided for analyses to be performed on the sites drainage, slopes, soils and forest trees. Our report will refer to the Park Division's map produced by the City's Urban Forester designating wooded tracts across the site (Area 1 t h Area 9). In addition we have identified the four open fields as Areas 10, 11, 12 and 13.. .starting with the fieEd adjacent to the fhmhouse along Buffaloe Road (Area 10), with each sequentially numbered through the open field, Area 13, which overlooks the Neuse River.

Inventory Dates: Audubon volunteer John Connors d o r contractor Patrick McMilan visited the site on January 17, February 18, April 9, June 6 and July 15,2000. During each 3-4 hour visit data was collected across the entirety of the site with emphasis shifted to those sites deemed unusual or vulnerable during ow initial visits. In addition, although the bottomland ad-jacentto Beaverdam Creek was visited each session, detailed inventory was not performed because of the dficulty i sampling the site particularly with the n project's time constraints, along with the recognition that this part of the site was likely to remain free from development due to its extensive wetlands.

remnant populations of endemic granitic outcrop plants, but none were found, The atea has long been used for gazing. Opuntia cactus groupings appear to be the I s at vestige of the localized rock outcrop plant community. S i w c a n t birds in this area include: Common Yellowthroat and Blue Grosbeak. Area 11- This large agricultural field, adjacent to the developing neighborhood, has recently been cultivated in soybeans. There were no s i w c a n t findings here.
Area 12- This agricultural field has also recently been cultivated in soybeans. The fieId is surrounded on 3 sides 4 woodlands, and wildlife used this field extensively. Whitetailed Deer were observed i the field, and Red-tailed Hawk, Blue Grosbeak and n Indigo Buntings appeared to be nesting in or around this field. Area 13- This agricultural field has aIso recently hosted soybeans. It is more secluded from the other fields, and overlooks the Neuse River and Beaverdam Creeks. Deer sign was abundant here, and bird activity was s i m c a n t . Species using this field include: Blue Grosbe& Indigo Bunting, and Eastern Kingbird. Soils in this field area quite sandy, and vegetation along the field edge included species of forbes. eg Opuntia cactus, with an a h d y to rapid drainage.

Implications: Bufiloe Road Park has been earmarked as a park for active recreation with extensive athletic fields and facilities. Although there are extensive agricultural fields already available on site for positioning fields, it is assumed addizional clearing of forested land wilt be required to accormnodate the range of fields desired. The Inventory performed was not extensive enough to fully describe how the alterations will effect the plant and animal communities currently on site; however, it is possible to predict with some certainty impacts of park development on some species. It is also possible to plan protection for the vuhmabEe sites, particularly I" order streams and wetlands, in arder that storm nm-off fiom ballfieIds, roadways and parking lots does not diminish their vitality. Birds and Mammals- Deer will likely continue to occupy the site. using retreats dong Beaverdam Creek for refuge, and the Neuse River greenway as a travel corridor. Groundhogs may persist, but their den sites are vulnerable to destruction fiom construction, dogs off leash, and people. A n m k r of bird species can be expected to be displaced by developing the site as an Athletic Park. Species that will be lost include: Ovenbird, Hooded Warbler, and Louisiana Waterthrush. These are ground nesting species and will not persist with the influx of people. Species that will Iikely be displaced include: Prothonotary Warbler, and Yellow-throated Vireo. Species that may be displaced include: Parula Warbler, Yellow-breasted Chat and Yellow-billed Cuckoo. These species may need more intact woodland habitat than will be left at the site, and may be adversely d e c t e d by the large numbers of people and evening activity. Species that use the bottomland forests, and successional habitat along the greenway including: Red-shouldered Hawk Acadian Flycatcher, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Red-eyed Vireo, Blue Grosbeak, Indigo Bunting and Common Yellowthroat may persist following park development. Plants- The most si&cant assemblages of plants were found i Areas 2 , 3 , 4 and 9. n Many of these assemblages are vulnerable unless steps ate taken to direct visitors to protect them, by using trails and signage, or to keep visitors from them. This is particularly true with plants growing atop large boulders, or in wetland seeps or bottomlands.

Appendix 2

Species Inventory1 John Connors
Site: Horseshoe Farm Park, Raleigh, Wake Co., North Carolina Dates: 5/22/05 3126f06 Time: 11-2 prn 8-11 am

6,3106 8-10 am

Species List:

Mammals Virginia Opossum
Carolma Short-tailed Shrew Eastern Mole G a Squirrel ry Groundhog
Beaver

evidence Yes evidence

evidence

Yes

Yes

yes

yes

Red Fox Raccoon River O t r te Whi te-tailed Deer

Yes evidence evidenceevidence evidence evidenceevidence evidence Yes evidenceevidenceevidenceevidence evidence Yes Yes Yes

Rirds Cneat Blue Heron Canada Goose Wood Duck Turkey Vulture Red-shouldered Hawk Red-tailed Hawk Mourning Dove Yellow-billed Cuckoo Barred Owl Chlmney Swift Ruby-thr.Hummingbird Belted Kingfisher Red-bellied Woodpecker Down!, Wdpk Hairy Wdpk Northern Flicker Pileated Woodpecker Eastern Wood Pewee Acadian Flycatcher Eastern Phoebe Great-crested Flycatcher No. Rouzh-winged Swallow Cliff Swallow Barn Swallow Blue Jay American Crow . Flsh Crow Carolina Cluckadee Tufted Timouse White-breasted Nuthatch Carolina Wren Winter Wren Golden-cmnned Kinglet Ruby-crowned Kinglet Blue-pay Gna~catcl~er Eastern Bluebird

Hermit Thrush
Wood Thrush American Robin Moclungbird Brown Thrasher Cedar Waxwing White-eyed Vireo Yellow-throated Vireo Red-eyed Vireo Yellow-~lmpedWarbler Yellow-throated Warbler Pine Warbler Prothonotary Warbler Yellow-breasted Chat Summer Tanager N. Cardinal Blue Grosbeak lndigo Bunting Chipping Sparrow F~eld Sparrow Song Sparrow White-throated Sparrow Dark-eyed Junco Red-winged Blackbird Common Grackle Brown-headed Cowbird House Finch A. Goldfinch *Evidence : Wild Turkey
Reptiles: Worm Snake Eastern Garter Snake

Black Rat Snake Eastern Fence Lizard Ground Skink Eastern Box Turtle River Coater
Amphihians:
Arncrican Toad

Fowler's Toad Eastern Spadefoot Toad (recorded calling 6-14-06)- 1' record in no. Wake C o since 1985 No. Cricket Frog Spring Peepw Upland Chorus Frog Green Frog Southern Leolpard Frog Marbled Salamander (larvae in vernal pool) Spomd Salamander (eggs in vernal pool) Red-spotted Newt (larvae in vernal pool)

Appendix 3

To:Horseshoe Fann M s e Planning Committee atr
From: John I. Gonnors, Wake Audubon Boardmember Re: Site visit from N W C Wild Turkey Biologist
February 28,2006

On February 15, Mike Seamster, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commjssion's
Wild Turkey Biologist, met wjth David Schaus and myself at Horseshoe F m Park. We hiked a good bit of the park over 2 hours time. His genesal irr~pressions listed below: are

a

The Wild Turkey found along this section of the Neuse Fliver are, indeed, original native North Carolina stock. Wild Turkey have never been released in .this area. We found 2 areas where Wild Turkey had recently been foraging for acorns at the Horseshoe. Wild Turkey oRen ranse over large tracts of land and man agers oRen consider 2000 acres to he a normal home m g e for turkey. Biologists have witnessed surprising behavioral changes in the last 20 years, and have found turkey to be far more adaptable,particularly as it relates to living in proximity tok people, than was previously thought, Wild Turkey apparently become acclimated to living in suburban communities in the absence of hunting pressure, and they seem to do this fairly quickly once hunting ceases. The amount of range needed to support a population of turkey also seems to be decreasing, particularly in areas of' abundant food. Seamster considered the acreage at the Horseshoe and adjoining lands to be on the low end of range needs for a stable population of Wild Turkey, but was hopeful that the protected Neuse corridor, along with habitat management strategies, could help support a resident flock.He mentioned that there are 2 flocks of Wild Turkey, 40 and 50 birds strong, that have taken up residence on an PLsheville golf course, and hardly move as golfers play t h u & them. Wild Turkey have few natural enemies once they reach adulthood. They roost in trees at night. They are most vulnerable when nesting, or as young flightless poults. Turkey nest on the ground, typically in heavily vegc tated areas within the woods. The upper levee areas of the Horseshoe provide exce1ler.t nesting cover. Semster was most concerned about the potential for dogs offlea!;h when the turkey were nesting or raising flightless young. He had less concern about greenway walkers OT cyclists on those trails. Jdeal habitat consists of forests with large oak and other mast producing trees, fairly oFen understory with abundant herbaceous cover, :md adjacent open fields, Seamster described the habitat at the Horseshoe and along thle Neuse River corridor as ideal Wild Turkey habitat. Food mops can be planted which will improve forr-lge for Wild Turkey. Seamster suggested a mix of chufa, Iadino clover and winte~. wheat. He suggested plantings of 2
acres each for these crops to support 10 -15 turke:g.The food plots should be planted along the lower edge of the large meadow, not tot) far from the edge of the woods. Seamster did not recommend using a feeder, but d i d say he felt using one would attract turkey, and if used with a timer, it could br:: used to attract turkey and deer to the feeding station at a particular time of day. Thls would make observation of the
~

rn

animals easier. His primary concern was to keep visitors far away from the feeding station since turkey are Iarge, and may become fairly tame. Semster thought the idea of a viewing station could be quite suecesshl, though he did not h o w of another site that has one. He described the variety of calls that hunters use to lure hrkey. ..it is quite an art fom.
a

Searnster was certain that the Iocal chapter of the Wild Turkey Federation, along with the NC Wildlife Resources Commission, wouId be willing partners if Wild Turkey were featured at Horsesho Farm Park.

In summary, we found evidence that WiId Turkey were currently using the park, that the park has ideal habitat for Wild Turkey, and that there is potential for enhancing habitat to help maintain this population and to provide viewing opportunities for the visiting public. If the committee chooses to include Wild Turkey management in its recommendations, then some provision for food plots, observation areas, and carefuI siting of facilities, particularly the camping are: :ind picnic shelters, so as to complement the viewing potential and not interfere wi i17 it, should be included in the plan.
Let me know if you have any questions. JC

Appendix 4

To:Horseshoe Farm Master Plan Committee
From: John Connors, Wake Audubon Beardmember Re: Imagine the Horseshoe

Final Comments: Please find below a vision.. .a program day for Horseshoe Farm Park on June 27,201 0. It's raw, just a sketch. It assumes the site has been developed on the Theme of an Environmental Adventure River Park; one which emphasizes the historic and current relationships among people, wildlife and the Neuse River environment. My hope is that this 'vision7 will provide a stimulus for imagining what could be, with a passive recreation focus. O f course, I make a few assumptions here: 1. That the Hadrick homestead has been reconfigured to accommodate student interns. There is no h o r n structural impediment to this.. .with some relatively minor modifications, the house would be suitable for them, Front line staff fee1 good about this; the Administration is reluctant. But housing Interns is not new-many P & R Departments across the country do this. It's an inexpensive way to get and train staff, and expands program opportunities; it helps the P & It profession; provides a great service for the students; and it will put Raleigh P & R in the ncws. 2 , Active RecreatjonlCommunity Centet is directed elsewhere- to Buffaloe Road, to North Wake Landfill, to Marsh Creek. Once again, as stated at the Committee's last meeting.. .I know of no Environmental Education Cmtms across the country (and I have been to dozens) that have a Community CenterJGymasium in association with an Environmental Education Center. 1 have heard some comment about how this park will become crowded with walkin visitors, like Shelley Lake, as neighborhoods devel~p u n d it. The geographical m setting of this park, % surrounded by the Xeuse, reduces the casual waIk-in traffic of neighbors- so it is not like Buffaloe Road, or Millbrook, or even Shelley Lake, or any of the other community parks. That is precisely what sets this site apart- limited access- and why it should be developed differently. The Vision: June 27,2030
6:OO am- Intern Arise. Interns housed in the Hedzick house awaken and get ready for the days programming. There are 4 students, undergraduates in PRT curricula from across the US. These upper

classmen are supervised by an NCSU graduate student living on site. Most PRT programs require theis students to fulfill an Internship before graduation. Interns assist regular PT and FT staff with programming in nature, art, and adventure; based at the Horseshoe and other City Rec areas.

are able to float small boats and other objects i the water and follow the progress along n the Neuse. Attendance: 50 pre-school ers *Classes for Visiting CarnperslSchools- There are 2 (fee-based) scheduled programs for visiting camps/schools. One emphasizes the wetlands and includes a visit to the wetland boardwalk culminating with a session using dip nets. The other is an Insects of the Meadow class. The Summer (Naturaljst) Intern provides these classes. Attendance: 60 studentslcampers.
4 pm. River Campout- Scouts arrive by canoe at river camp. Staff checks them in.

A tendance: 15 . 1
450-6:00 pm Camps end; pick-up of campers takes place.

5-7 prn - Twilight River Paddle- Intern checks in enrollees of this after work paddling session. Attendance tends to be higher than in morning; reservations are recommended

for the watercraft. Attendance: 25. 7:30-8:30 pm.- Owl Prowl at the Horseshoe. Scout campers have already signed up, E 5 others, mostly families, asrive for the public Owl Prowl. Attendance: 30.
9 pm. Park Closes,

Let me know if I can help in any way.

John Connors

DATE: TO: FROM: SUBJECT:

July 14, 2006 Parks, Recreation and Greenway Advisory Board Park Planners Shanna Davis and David Shouse Horseshoe Farm Master Plan - Responses to Questions from the Board

Note: Active links are found throughout this document to provide you with further information on sources or to add clarity. Most are links to documents on the same disc on which this document was transmitted to you; a couple are links to information on the web and will require internet access to be viewable. BACKGROUND 1. How many holes are needed for a disc golf course? What’s the average length of a hole? How many acres is a normal disc golf course? According to the Professional Disc Golf Association (PDGA), a disc golf course generally has 9 or 18 holes but can be any number as long as it is divisible by three. “A full length championship course can require more than one acre per hole depending on foliage density. However, a small recreational course can sometimes fit 2-3 holes per acre depending on terrain.” (Retrieved on 7/3/06 from http://www.pdga.com/makecrse.php ) There are two courses in the Raleigh Park system, one at Cedar Hills and one at Kentwood. Both are 18 holes with additional putting baskets and average 5 to 6 acres. The average fairway width for these two facilities is 60ft and length varies from 120 to 200 ft. Cedar Hills is described by local disc league websites as being a championship course while Kentwood is described as good for beginners. o Due to the sensitivity of the floodplain area at Horseshoe Farm, staff does not recommend a disc golf course in this area. Staff experience and a recent study by North Carolina State professor Yu-Fai Leung has shown that disc golf does present a degree of environmental impact on the resource, particularly soils and vegetation that extends beyond course construction. 2. Can dogs go anywhere in our parks as long as they are on a leash? Yes (For further information on this issue see the response under question 7)

Page 1 of 8

3. Is there a reason why the greenway is routed across the edge of the field? Why is it not linking into the other paths that are already there along the wetland area? At the August 17th meeting of the Master Plan Committee, there was a general consensus that the greenway should generally follow the river to maximize views. This was confirmed at the September 12th meeting. At the September 21st and January 25th meetings, concerns were raised by the public including representatives of Friends of Horseshoe Farm Park about the greenway following the river and recommendations were made regarding trails in sensitive areas. A lot of discussion ensued at the January 25th and February 8th meetings regarding the use of porous trail surfacing. In general there arose concerns about putting the greenway, which is typically paved, in the forested flood plain. The biggest concern was probably for the mature hardwoods in the area which attribute to the Natural Heritage Area designation. There was also concern for the integrity of sensitive areas such as wetlands and levees. Staff shares this concern but felt with proper alignment in the levee areas and use of boardwalks in wetlands, impact on these features could be limited. It is a maintenance concern to have significant amount of non-paved trails in the floodplain as asphalt holds up better in flood events whereas other surface types easily wash away. (See Minutes from February 8th Committee Meeting for notes on the full discussion and motion.) o Staff recommends the Greenway and Interpretive Trails text (p. 17, 18 in the Plan) are good descriptions to guide trail development. The graphic Plan adequately portrays the CONCEPTUAL location desired by the Master Plan committee. Ultimately the design locations of Greenway and Interpretive Trails will take into consideration the impact of bridge construction, location of sensitive areas (wetlands, specific vegetation, topography and archeology), permitting and current best practices of trail design. 4. Will there be a change in topography of the open fields? Excerpt from page 22 of the Draft Master Plan: The designated informal open field play areas will offer the opportunity to engage in recreational activities. Reserved use is anticipated to ensure that there is time allocated for recreational activities (i.e. pickup football, ultimate Frisbee, kite flying, and picnicking). With the exception of a backstop, these areas will include little to no amenities typically associated with formal play fields (i.e. fences, markers, permanent goals, lights, etc.). These areas will be graded as needed for drainage and safety and all grading activity should be in keeping with the existing terrain. Turf grass will be planted so that multiple, year round activities can be supported. These areas should have no lighting and should be very flexible in their use. This statement applies to both areas shown on the Draft Master Plan with the title Open Field.

Page 2 of 8

5. Explain a community park and its elements Excerpt from page 37 of the Parks Plan:
Community Parks typically range in size from 30 to 75 acres and serve residents within a two-mile radius. Base facilities within Community Parks typically include: o Community Center or Neighborhood Center o Picnic shelter and picnic area o Performance area o Baseball, Softball and/or Multi-Purpose fields o Tennis, Basketball and/or Multi-Purpose courts o Walking trail o Playground o Unprogrammed recreational open space o Parking Additional Facilities within Community Parks are intended to vary from adjacent facilities. During the Master Planning process, choices can be made from the following list that includes, but is not limited to: o Community Center with gymnasium or other specific focus (e.g. fitness or center; arts center) o Additional Restroom building o Pet exercise area o Skate courts o Horseshoe pits o Swimming pool o Substantial athletic fields with spectator facilities for organized sports ranging from baseball and football to volleyball.

6. What are the parks and recreation facilities in the general area of Horseshoe Farm? (Click here for a map showing all the park property listed below, their spacial relationships and service areas) Developed city parks in the general area of Horseshoe Farm are: o Durant Nature Park Metro Park 241 acres Distance from Horseshoe Farm: 2.5 miles as the crow flies (acf) or 5 miles driving
Existing • Open Play Area • Outdoor Basketball Court • Picnic Shelters • Playground • 2 Lodges • 2 lakes, associated streams • Trails

o Buffaloe Road Park Metro Park 167 acres Distance from Horseshoe Farm: 3.3 miles acf or 6.5 miles driving
Existing • 1 Adult Baseball Field • 4 Youth Baseball Fields • 1 Football Field • Track • Playground • Wetland boardwalk & Unpaved Trail Future Phase • Off-leash Dog Area • 3 Adult Softball Field • 2 Youth Baseball Field • Open Play Area • Picnic areas • Substantial additional trails

Page 3 of 8

o Millbrook-Exchange Park Community Park 69 acres Distance from Horseshoe Farm: 4.3 miles acf or 6.7 miles driving
Existing • Community Ctr w/Gym (2 courts) • Off-leash dog area • 2 Playgrounds • Swimming Pool & Sprayground • 23 Tennis Courts & Tennis Center • 1 Adult Softball Field • 2 Youth Baseball Fields • 2 Outdoor Basketball Courts • 3 Picnic Shelters • Paved & Unpaved Trails Future Phase • Nature Center • Lake

o Green Road Park Community Park 27 acres Distance from Horseshoe Farm: 4.5 miles acf or 6.2 miles driving
Existing • Community Ctr w/Gym (2 Courts) • 2 Outdoor basketball courts • 4 Lighted Tennis Courts • Playground • 6 Outdoor Volleyball Courts • Adult Baseball Field • Youth Baseball Field • Picnic Shelter Future Phase • Gym addition

o Spring Forest Neighborhood Park 22 acres Distance from Horseshoe Farm: 2.7 miles acf or 4.2 miles driving
Existing • 1 Youth Baseball Fields • Open Play Area • Picnic Shelter • Playground • 4 Lighted Tennis Courts • Paved walking trail Future Phase • Pool

Community Park 111 acres o Marsh Creek Distance from Horseshoe Farm: 4.4 miles acf or 6.2 miles driving
Existing • 1 Adult Softball Field • 1 Youth Baseball Field • Picnic Shelter • Open Play Area • In-line Skate Court Future Phase • Aquatics Facility • Community Ctr • Picnic Shelters • Disc Golf • Tennis Courts • Trails

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Undeveloped parkland in the general area of Horseshoe Farm are: (see question 12 for further details about these properties) City-owned o Sydnor White Community Park 64 acres o Watkins Road Community Park 38 acres o NPS -16 Neighborhood Park 26 acres o Alvis Farm Community Park 82 acres o Annie Louise Wilkerson, MD NP Special Park 158 acres Other: o North Wake Landfill 7. How do dog parks affect wildlife? Is there any information out there? Has the issue of allowing dogs on trails been discussed? Should dogs be restricted from trails? Is it less impact to restrict dogs to a dog park? There is little research on the environmental impacts dogs on the environment and even less on the impact of dog parks on the environment. However, there have been some studies on the impact of dogs on wildlife. To summarize, dogs act as an extension of human influence in natural habitats. This extension is most dramatic when dogs are off-leash. For instance, deer and some birds have been shown to flush quicker when dogs accompanied hikers, particularly when off trail. 1 When comparing deer activity near trails where dogs are permitted as well as hikers, equestrian and mountain bikers, it has been shown that deer reduce their activity at double the distance from the trail when dogs are allowed on the trail versus when they are prohibited. Small mammals are also impacted but resume their activities in closer proximity to the trail than do deer. 2 While dogs do increase the impact to wildlife even leashed and kept to a trail, this is much better than having them off-leash as they can unpredictably wander off-trail which elicits flushing responses even when they do not give chase. Studies have shown that wildlife sensitive to recreational disturbances are the most sensitive to unpredictable patterns 3 but can adapt to more predictable spatial activities such as those restricted to trails. 4 Perhaps this could also be said of any activity that is confined to a defined space. Dogs affect on native canines is dependent on the species as some will be drawn to the scent markings along the trail to monitor their territory. As far as disease spread by dogs, domestic dogs offer the most risk to native canines but can also introduce disease and parasites to small mammals. 5 Dogs can also transfer the seeds of exotic species into natural areas but this is less of a concern with dogs than it is with bikes. o From a management perspective, it will be difficult and impractical to restrict dogs to a portion of a park property (such as limiting their presence to only an off-leash area). Early phases of development at Horseshoe Farm are anticipated to be an un-staffed facility; enforcement of any restrictions will require a change in City ordinance and support of enforcement personnel. In addition, as a destination park (or part of an ‘arrival park’ to the Neuse River) visitors arriving by car or greenway may be reluctant to either leave their dog in the car or turn away if they are unaware of a restriction until they arrive. Prohibiting all dogs at a “nature preserve” like the Annie Louise Wilkerson MD Nature Preserve might be possible with extensive publicity and education. It should be
Miller, S.G., R.L. Knight and C.K. Miller. 2001. Wildlife response to pedestrians and dogs. Wildlife Society Bulletin 29:124-132. 2 Lenth, B., M. Brennan, and R.L. Knight. 2006. The Effects of Dogs on Wildlife Communities. Final research report submitted to: Boulder County Open Space and Mountain Parks. 3 Knight, R.L. and D. Cole. 1995. Wildlife responses to recreationists. Pages 51-69 in R.L. Knight and D. Cole ed. Wildlife and recreationists: coexistence through management and research. Island Press, Washington D.C. 4 Whittaker, D. and R.L. Knight. 1999. Understanding wildlife responses to humans. Wildlife Society Bulletin 26:312-317. 5 Sime, C.A. 1999. Domestic dogs in wildlife habitats. Pages 8.1-8.17 in G. Joslin, and H. Youmans, coordinators. Effects of recreation on Rocky Mountain wildlife: A review for Montana. Committee on effects of recreation on wildlife, Montana chapter of the Wildlife Society. Page 5 of 8
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noted that 150 acre Hemlock Bluffs Nature Preserve in Cary does not prohibit dogs on a leash, and reports good compliance on weekdays; more intervention by on-site management is required on weekends. 8. What is the projection for future growth and population in the service area? The Park Plan describes a Community Park as serving residents within a two mile radius. o The number of households is expected to increase by 70% between 2000 and 2009 o Estimated Two Mile Radius Population: • 2004 = 11,158 • 2009 = 14,010 • 53% change between 2000-2009 Horseshoe Farm is located in the Northeast Raleigh Planning Jurisdiction o It is the largest planning district o Estimated population as of January 1st, 2006 was 64,687 o Between the year 2000 and 2025 the estimated population increase is 146% o By 2025 the Northeast Raleigh planning district will be the largest employment center with 51,282 or 18% of the employment in Raleigh 9. Was the dog park discussed at the NECAC meeting? At a NE CAC meeting in fall 2005 the group Friends of Horseshoe Farm presented information on the yet-to-be-adopted preliminary draft of the Master Plan. After the adoption of the Preliminary Draft Plan staff presented the Plan to the NE CAC. Mention of the off-leash dog park occurred at both these meetings, although staff was not present at the earlier meeting. On April 13, 2006 Committee member David Deans gave a presentation of the Draft Plan to the NE CAC. He states that he told the CAC that the gym, the dog park and the tennis courts were removed from the initial draft plan in response to public input that Horseshoe Farm should be a nature park and these three elements were not compatible with a nature park. 10. Was Horseshoe Farm Park included in any previous plans- the Neuse River Master Plan? The primary reference to Horseshoe Farm Park in the Neuse River Regional Park Master Plan occurs on page 88 and states: Horseshoe Bend Park as shown on this site plan centers around and expands on Horseshoe Farm, a site already owned by the City of Raleigh. Page 88 goes on to describe the larger arrival park termed the Horseshoe Bend Park in greater detail of which the then owned Horseshoe Farm property is only a part. The historic farm mentioned on this page is actually referring to a site identified by historic properties as the O’Hara Stell property located across the river from the horseshoe farm property. Additional references specific to the Horseshoe Farm property are found on pages 7, 31 & 38. References to the larger arrival park inconsistently referred to in the plan as Horseshoe Bend, Horseshoe Bend Farm, and Horseshoe Bend Park can also be found on pages 67, 89 & 93. Park site-specific Master Plans in the Neuse River plan included only Anderson Point and Millburnie Parks. 11. What information is available regarding the need for playfields and athletics in this region of the city? Several pieces of information related to program program participation and facility use were brought forward to the Horseshoe Farm Master Plan Committee during their deliberations. − At their meeting on April 27, 2005, Randy Ray, the Recreation Superintendent presented a memo describing facility capacity issues in direct response to questions asked during a previous committee meeting. (Click here to view this document)
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− Around that same meeting, further information was presented on CLASS participants living within two miles of Horseshoe Farm. This included a map and tables showing how many registered for specific programs. This CLASS data represented class registrants from 2001 to 2005 excluding athletics. (CLASS is the Dept. registration software; Click here to view) − At a later meeting, David Shouse presented another memo, dated June 7, 2005, listing camp programs and their capacities per the request of a committee member. (Click here to view) − Further information on field space can be found here. 12. Give brief descriptions of these other park lands and what plans are proposed: Undeveloped park sites in the general area of Horseshoe Farm are: City-Owned: These sites do not have master plans, and therefore, specifics about what the future holds for these sites cannot be assumed. However, they have been classified by park type which does give some guidance. Additionally, there are always constraints associated with the specific site related to deed restrictions and easements, topography and other environmental characteristics. System Integration Plans (SIP) are in process for some of these to more fully identify those constraints, however, some are more obvious and can be discerned by applying basic principals that would apply to any park property. As you click on each park property below, you will see a map depicting the amount and location of the most developable places on each site. The map shows a 50 ft perimeter buffer which is a departmental policy used as a guideline to buffer the park from surrounding development. Additionally, any riparian buffers are shown as well as the presence of floodplain or floodway. A graphic analysis of topography also shows where the flattest areas are located. They are represented by the white and yellow colors. There are development restrictions associated with utility easements and they are shown on the map as well. Horseshoe Park is listed as first as a comparison. o Horseshoe Farm Community Park 147 acres Known constraints: riparian buffers, floodway, Natural Heritage Area, Developable acreage: Approx. 67 acres o Sydnor White Community Park 64 acres Distance from Horseshoe Farm: 1 mile acf or 4.5 miles driving Known constraints: sewer easement, riparian buffers Developable acreage: Approx 45 acres o Watkins Road Community Park 38 acres Distance from Horseshoe Farm: 2.6 miles acf or 3 miles driving Known constraints: Riparian buffers Developable acreage: Approx. 23 acres Neighborhood Park 26 acres o NPS -16 Distance from Horseshoe Farm: 3 miles acf or 4 miles driving Known constraints: Riparian Buffers Developable acreage: Approx. 13 acres o Alvis Farm Community Park 82 acres Distance from Horseshoe Farm: 4.3 miles acf or 6.7 miles driving Known constraints: Riparian Buffers Developable acreage: Approx. 50 acres o Annie Louise Wilkerson, MD NP Special Park 158 acres Distance from Horseshoe Farm: 4.4 miles acf or 7 miles driving Known constraints: Deed Restrictions – Nature Preserve Developable acreage: NA due to deed restrictions Other o North Wake Landfill Owned and planned by Wake County Distance from Horseshoe Farm: 2.5 miles acf or 5 miles driving
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Known constraints: Has 3 landfill areas one of which is under Subtitle D Municipal Landfill regulations. Proposed Development includes: school, dog park, skate park, environmental education center with a focus on recycling, amphitheatre, playgrounds, baseball fields, multipurpose fields, basketball courts, picnic shelters, paved trails, hiking trails, off-road bike trails, wetland, greenway connections (click the North Wake Landfill link above to see the adopted plan)

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MOTIONS AND AMENDMENTS TO THE HORSESHOE FARM DRAFT MASTER PLAN
By the Parks, Recreation and Greenway Advisory Board July 20, 2006 Pete Benda made a motion for the Parks Board to accept the Horseshoe Farm Master Plan as documented and presented and to forward to City Council for consideration. He added the parenthetical point that he feels the single enclosed structure that is defined as the Arts/Environmental Educational Center can also (at the discretion of the architects and the department) be granted sufficient space for meeting rooms and community functions that might be needed to serve that part of the City (i.e. senior clubs, boy scout groups, glee clubs, etc.). His motion was seconded by Greg Barley. The board discussed the Master Plan in detail and added the following amendments to the original motion: Patrick Beggs’ motion – in reference to building placement, to encourage innovative design we charge the design team to the following guidelines: a. to preserve view sheds and scenic vistas; and b. to use current natural landscapes to hide, camouflage buildings, parking and roads. His motion was seconded by Richard Bostic. 1. Richard Bostic made a perfecting amendment that Patrick Beggs’ verbiage be a part of the park’s vision statement, paragraph 2, page 4 (accepted by Beggs) ACTION –The motion passed unanimously. Greg Barley’s motion – to consider an addition to the park, a recreation center with indoor active recreation on the current location described as “playground” and that the “playground” be located just above the parking lot. His motion was seconded by Chris Smith. 1. Patrick Beggs made a motion to amend Greg Barley’s motion – to remove where the center will be located (accepted by Barley). 2. Richard Bostic proposed a substitute motion to strike the Environmental/Art Center and replace it with a recreational center. His motion was seconded by Patrick Beggs. ACTION – The board voted on the substitute motion. The motion failed (2 ayes – Bostic, Smith; 11 nays). 3. After more discussion Richard Bostic added a perfecting amendment to the original motion that the facility be built similar to the Laurel Hills Community Center (accepted by Barley). The Board voted on the amended original motion ACTION – The motion passed (12 ayes; 1 nay – Knight). Chris Smith’s motion – to site the recreation center as indicated on the “Preliminary Master Plan” proposal. His motion was seconded by Greg Barley. 1. Chris Smith made a modification to his motion that the picnic tables be situated as they are in the “Preliminary Master Plan”. 2. After further discussion Chris Smith withdrew the modification to his original motion. 3. Patrick Beggs moved to table the location discussion. ACTION – The motion died due to lack of a second. 4. The Board voted on the original motion. ACTION – The motion passed (12 ayes; 1 nay – Knight). Chris Smith’s motion – to add a dog park. His motion was seconded by Tina Gordon. ACTION – The motion failed (1 aye – Smith; 12 nays).

Till’s motion - that the picnic area be moved and the major road be extended for accessibility as far down as it is on the “Preliminary Master Plan”. Her motion was seconded by Greg Barley. 1. Richard Bostic moved that they temporarily displace the motion until they discuss other elements because it’s a part of the talk about location of facilities. His motion was seconded by David Knight. ACTION – The motion passed unanimously. Patrick Beggs’ motion – to include an upstream pedestrian, non-vehicular river access (with exclusion of staff for maintenance needs). His motion was seconded by Gail Till. 1. After discussion, Patrick Beggs withdrew his motion. Knight’s motion – to accept plan as brought forth by the committee with the amendments approved by the board. (He called the original question to the motion). His motion was seconded by Pete Benda. voting on David’s motion the board agreed to discuss the displaced motion which is that the picnic area be moved and the major road be extended for accessibility as far down as it is on the “Preliminary Master Plan”. Gail Till changed her motion to extend the road only and not to include the picnic area. 1. After a lengthy discussion, Greg Barley called question on the motion. ACTION – The motion passed unanimously. 2. The board voted on the road extension. ACTION – The motion failed (13 nays). Richard Bostic’s motion – to delete the word “passive” on page 4, paragraph 3, line 5 of the park’s vision statement. His motion was seconded by Greg Barley. 1. Because there is going to be more than one area of where text will have to be changed, Richard Bostic withdrew his motion. After a brief break the board reconvened and Chair Kirschbaum handed her gavel to Vice Chair Till so that she could make a motion. Jan Kirschbaum’s motion – to include outdoor basketball courts back in the plan. Her motion was seconded by Chris Smith. 1. Richard Bostic amended the motion to specify that two (2) outdoor courts be included in the plan (accepted by Kirschbaum). 2. Jan Kirschbaum modified the motion further – to include two (2) outdoor basketball courts, unlit, in a location with the keeping with the board’s design directions. 3. The board voted on the amended motion. ACTION – The motion passed (11 ayes; 2 nays – Knight, Benda). Jan Kirschbaum’s motion – to re-add tennis courts in the plan. The number of courts is based on the need at the time of building (between 2-5). Her motion was seconded by Chris Smith. ACTION – The motion failed (2 ayes – Kirschbaum, Till; 11 nays).
3 Before 2 David

1 Gail

Motion to move picnic area moved and road extension was displaced; will appear again during HSF discussion 2 David Knight’s motion temporarily on hold to discuss displaced motion; will appear again during HSF discussion 3 Continuation of discussion of the displaced motion to move picnic area and extend road (footnote 1)

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David Knight displaced his motion to call the original question to come immediately after text change discussion.
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Jan Kirschbaum’s motion – to give staff the latitude, to make the appropriate text changes that will keep the plan consistent. Her motion was seconded by Chris Smith. 1. After discussion, Tina Gordon made a substitute motion to consider the six changes in the text that Jan Kirschbaum has identified in the plan (accepted by Jan). 2. Jan moved the following: a. Page 2, paragraph 1 - needs text to support that there were multiple other public venues for active recreation. b. change the word “adopted” to “suggested” c. add a sentence at the end of paragraph 5 to say the Parks, Recreation and Greenway Advisory Board accepts the concept of a community park which also serves to protect the woods along the river edge as a nature preserve that allows for both active and passive recreation. 3. Richard Bostic suggested the changes be voted on individually and not as one continuous motion. ACTION – The motion to change the word “adopted” to “suggested” failed due to lack of a second. 4. The motion to add a sentence at the end of paragraph 5 was seconded by Richard Bostic. 5. Tina Certo made a substitute motion for the Board to devise a cover letter to City Council that specifies where the Board has modified the master plan as presented to them, by itemizing the areas that they made modifications, by showing a plan overlay, and by pointing out to Council where language in the plan will need to be modified if Council accepts the Board’s recommendations. This will enable Council to have both recommendations before them. Her substitute motion was seconded by Greg Barley. 6. Chris Smith called question of the motion. ACTION – The motion passed unanimously. 7. The board voted on the substitute motion. ACTION – The motion passed (12 ayes; 1 nay – Knight) David Knight again called the original question of the motion. Greg Barley asked that the motion be clarified. The motion is for the Parks Board to approve the Horseshoe Farm Master Plan as presented with approved amendments to the original motion and to forward these recommendations to City Council for consideration. The board voted on the motion ACTION – The motion passed (aye 12; nay – Knight).
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David Knight displaced his motion to discuss text changes; will appear again during HSF discussion (footnote 2) 5 Continuation of discussion of the displaced motion to call the original question to motion (footnote 2 and 4)

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