JSO_AR_2008 (5) by chrstphr

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									From the Sheriff

The year 2006 proved to be one of great momentum for the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office. In this annual report I want to review some of the accomplishments – those that you may know about, and some which happened “behind the scenes.” They all contribute to our overall success, and kept us on track to meet our annual obligations and our strategic plan and mission. The issue of murder continued to be a focus for our agency and the city in 2006. Reducing Murder: A Community Response was produced by the Jacksonville Community Council, Inc., after a lengthy study of the issue by concerned stakeholders. I commissioned this study, and paid for it through drug forfeiture money, so the entire community would have an opportunity to better understand the scope of the issue and how many systems in our society have failed when a police officer is summoned to the site of a murder investigation. Five recommendations for law enforcement were suggested, and by the end of the year we had addressed four of them. We also began planning for our violent offender re-entry program for implementation in 2007, the fifth recommendation. This involved extensive study of research and looking at other programs around the country, and improving upon what we learned to maximize the success of our program.

Sheriff

John H. Rutherford

Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office
Core Values

We launched Operation Safe Streets in April, in conjunction with many criminal justice and law enforcement partners. With a strategic focus on the illegal guns, the criminals who use them, and the geographic areas affected by this violence, we implemented literally dozens of covert and overt tactical operations which all met, and continue to meet, our program goals. Our International Affairs Unit addressed the importance of helping foreign nationals deal with language challenges and cultural barriers, while working to help them avoid becoming crime victims or engaging in criminal behavior. Interacting with the law abiding public citizens asking for their help, partnering with the faith based community and Mayor’s Office to walk the neighborhoods, and promoting the importance of sharing crime information became the central message our agency worked to promote. It paid off. By the end of 2006, anonymous tips to First Coast Crime Stoppers, as part of our Gun Bounty program, had increase an average of 272%. The quality of the information we receive continues to be solid, and more investigations, arrests and convictions are occurring in historical numbers. The last half of the year saw a decline in murder of 38% city wide, because of all our efforts in patrol and investigations. We must also improve from within, to improve results. Continuous Improvement is not a sign on the wall in this agency, it is a way of doing business. Doing more with less, setting goals and measuring results, and continuously raising the bar is how we go from good to great. That is why I began the year by creating the Continuous Improvement Division – bringing together four important units to work seamlessly. ISM, our technology arm, has to deliver to the men and women on the street the latest information and access to the many systems and databases they need to perform at optimum levels. It’s based on real time crime analysis, data collection and analysis and planning. Now all those specialists work under one strategic division, and or organization works to be as LEAN as we possibly can. The year 2006 did not end well, with an increase in murders to 110 from 91 in 2005. I am often asked what that number would have been had we not put so much effort into addressing this issue. I can’t answer that. But we are seeing negative indicators, in that most mid and large cities nationwide are not only experiencing dramatic increases in murders, but also gun violence overall, by criminals. As we grow as a city we must work to ensure that sustainable growth for law enforcement also occurs. I am grateful to the City Council and Mayor for heeding my requests that we fill all sworn vacancies in the 06-07 fiscal year. The deficits in manpower that result in delayed responses, especially as we work to answer a record number of calls for service, were addressed in this year. That is a victory, along with the increased awareness by citizens that it is an increasingly dangerous world out there, and every one of us plays a critical role in working with police to address these challenges.

REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY 2008
RIDING FOR THE BRAND

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Mission Statement
The mission of the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office is to protect the lives and property of the citizens of this community, to preserve the peace, and to prevent crime and disorder while constantly guarding personal liberties as prescribed by law.

TO ACHIEVE OUR MISSION WE MUST DEVELOP AND PROVIDE:
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a well-trained and disciplined patrol force capable of assessing and responding to the changing needs of the community it serves, to include delivering swift emergency response when required a proactive traffic enforcement program designed to regulate traffic movement and assure safe and expedient travel on city streets a skilled and experienced investigative team for bringing criminal offenders to swift and impartial justice a community relations effort charged with educating the public about law enforcement issues, with emphasis on the community’s role and responsibilities with respect to the prevention of crime an unrelenting quest to eliminate organized crimes and vice violations, with special emphasis on those associated with the distribution and sale of illegal drugs facilities for secure, humane, corrective and productive detention of those awaiting trial as well as those already sentenced

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TABLE OF CONTENTS: Mission Statement Message from Sheriff John H. Rutherford Appointed Staff YEAR IN REVIEW January February March April May June July August September October November December 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 2 3 4

The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office recognizes that we cannot fulfill our mission without community support. It is imperative that a dialogue characterized by mutual trust and open and honest communication be maintained between this agency and our community. It must include a willingness to continually examine and modify policies and procedures to assure that our mission is accomplished in a manner compatible with the best interests of the community.
Photo left: On May 7, 2008 the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office hosted its annual Police Memorial Day observance, playing tribute to the 59 officers who paid the ultimate sacrifice in service to this community.

Memorial:
Police Officer Christopher Kane
We lost a dedicated public servant on September 4, 2008, in a tragic on-duty automobile crash. Police Officer Christopher Kane selflessly served the citizens of Jacksonville for 11 years and was a man to be admired and respected. Officer Chris Kane dedicated his life to serving his country, community, and above all his family. He was a military veteran, member of the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office, family man and beloved Pop Warner football coach. It is with a heavy heart that we bid farewell to our fallen comrade and hero.

Special Awards, Presentations & Recognition 17 Crime Statistics & Budget 18, 19

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Letter From Sheriff
What It Takes To Be “THE” Premier Law Enforcement Agency in America
By Sheriff John Rutherford – Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office

I welcome the scrutiny and review of our agency by objective, qualified, fact-finding experts and standards-based organizations that qualify their opinions and render facts. This helps us continuously improve our performance and delivery of services to the citizens of Jacksonville. Why? Because we aspire to be THE premier law enforcement agency in the United States of America. How will we get there? Some argue we already are there – based on the opinions of outside experts that have visited and reviewed the JSO in recent years.* But organizational management experts will tell you that in goal setting you have to be “aspirational” – that means, YES, you can achieve the goal in a measurable way, but the moment you rest on your laurels, you are losing ground and therefore no longer “the best.” I agree. So, when our senior team sat down to talk about our objectives for the 08-09 fiscal year, we decided to set the stage by revising our Vision/Goal statement and creating one unifying Goal for our entire organization: “The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office aspires to be THE premier law enforcement agency in the United States.” There is the possibility that we might never reach that goal, but by creating tangible, measurable objectives that support this, in every department, division, section and unit, we can assure the community that we’ll never stop trying. The principles that all our objectives are based upon are: To be responsive to the community; to be restorative in character; and to be responsible to our commitments, which include: •	 •	 •	 •	 •	 •	 Be	proactive	in	protecting	the	citizens, Preserve	the	peace, Fight	crime, Prevent	crime	and	disorder, Constantly	guard	personal	liberty	as	prescribed	by	law	and Maintain	the	highest	level	of	honesty	–	integrity	–	fairness	–	trustworthiness	in	all	our	relationships		 at all times, both as individuals and as an organization.

Sheriff

John H. Rutherford

Core Values
COMMUNITY FOCUSED The community is our customer. As such, it is the community who must define quality service. We will form partnerships with our citizens and listen to them. We will stay close. We will remember that every contact between a member of the community and any part of the Sheriff’s Office is where community opinion is formed. ALWAYS IMPROVING Our business is service. The only way we can improve our business is to improve our service. We are constantly in a learning mode. We are willing to examine what we do and make changes to improve. WORTHY OF TRUST The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office has achieved its reputation as a premier law enforcement agency because it has earned the trust of the community. We will safeguard that trust. We will keep our promises. Whether on or off duty, we will behave according to the highest set of ethical standards. We will protect the rights of all citizens. RESPECT FOR EACH OTHER Employees deserve a decent working environment, one in which relationships are characterized by mutual respect. We will listen actively, talk straight and act fairly. We will encourage each other and every employee to contribute and grow to his/her fullest potential. We will work together as a TEAM and appreciate the contributions of all.

These are our values: Community Focused; Respect for Each Other; Always Improving; and Worthy of Trust. As a younger man, one of the books I most enjoyed reading was the anthology of stories about the old west and the days the frontier was being settled, written by Louis L’Amour. He wrote of the men who “rode for the brand,” showing loyalty and commitment to their outfits, in the face of tremendous adversity and challenges. As long as the rancher or cattleman treated his crew with respect and fairness, their dedication and hard work was guaranteed. With this mutual respect, in a time where lawlessness and dishonor abounded, these pioneers found great reward (both tangible and intangible) in their work. And they worked with pride. Our relationships with each another here at JSO, and with the community we serve, are not very different. Our men and women are out Riding for the Brand of the citizens of Jacksonville every day. They face tremendous danger and adversity from citizens who do not like the law or resent being compelled to do the right thing and made to obey the law. They also recognize, and seize, the opportunities to build trust in the community and strengthen our partnerships with the many law abiding citizens in Jacksonville. This is why we work to make sure that in everything we do we are honoring our Mission and striving to meet our Goal.
It is then and only then, that we can call ourselves THE premier law enforcement agency in the country.
* Some of the agencies and experts citing excellent performance, management, and quality of service provided by the JSO in the past 18 months are: Edmund F. McGarrell, Ph. D. – Michigan State University Commission on Accreditation of Law Enforcement Agencies – 100% compliance w/ mandatory standards American Corrections Association Commission for Florida Law Enforcement – 100% compliance w/ mandatory standards National Commission on Correctional Healthcare- 100% compliance w/ mandatory standards The Matrix Group – operational audit Police Executive Research Forum (PERF) Jerry H. Ratcliffe, Ph. D. – Author of “Intelligence Led Policing”- Temple University

RIDING FOR THE BRAND

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Appointed Staff
Sheriff John H. Rutherford, elected by the citizens of Jacksonville in 2003 and re-elected in 2007, leads the more than 3000 Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office employees.
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EXECUTIVE STAFF

An executive staff of six appointed sworn officers and one civilian carry out the initiatives of the administration.
(l-r back row) Carol J. Hladki, Director, Police Services; Gordon A. Bass, Director, Department of Corrections. (l-r bottom row) Dwain E. Senterfitt, Director, Department of Investigations and Homeland Security; John H. Rutherford, Sheriff; Micheal P. Edwards, Director, Department of Patrol and Enforcement; Lauri-Ellen Smith, APR, Special Assistant to the Sheriff; Frederick H. Lewis, Director, Department of Personnel and Professional Standards; and Frank J. Mackesy, Undersheriff.

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CHIEFS

The five Directors of the JSO are supported by 12 Chiefs who manage a division within the JSO.
(l-r standing) David L. Stevens, Patrol East Division; Jimmy A. Holderfield, Personnel Division; Rick L. Townsend, Professional Standards Division; Mark S. Richardson, Community Affairs and Special Events Division; Wayne R. Clark, Patrol West Division; Richard M. Graham, Detective Division; Roy M. Henderson, Homeland Security and Narcotics/Vice Division; Greg C. Burton, Police Services Division.

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(l-r seated) Stephanie J. Sloan-Butler, Prisons Division; Tara H. Wildes, Jails Division; Maxine L. Person, Budget and Management Division; John P. Hartley, Continuous Improvement Division.

ASSISTANT CHIEFS
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Nineteen assistant chiefs oversee the day-to-day operations of the JSO.
(l-r back row) Maurice Holderfield, Community Transition Center; Donald W. Redmond, Jails; Mike Williams, Narcotics and Vice Section; Edward L. McDonald, Zone 3; Randolph H. Hammond, Zone 5; Vicki Diaz, Communications Section; David E. Coffman, Community Affairs; William A. Goethe, Montgomery Corrections Center; Micheal A. Rutledge, Zone 6; Adam J. Brown, Central Records; Andrea M. Smith, General & Logistics Support; Ronald L. Lendvay, Crimes Against Persons Section; and J. Carson Tranquille, Homeland Security Section. (l-r front row) Michele L. Remolde, Academy Director; Thomas R. Hackney, Zone 4; J. R. “Huck” Ross, Zone 1; Robert F. Connor, Jr., Zone 2; Bobby Deal, Special Events; and Larry L. Jones, Crimes Against Property Section. (Photograph location courtesy of Sharon Allen, owner, the Plaza Building a Historic National Landmark, 353 East Forsyth Street.)

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DIRECTOR

Carol J.Hladki 6 Dwain E. Senterfitt
CHIEF

POLICE LIEUTENANT

Gregory C. Burton Richard M. Graham John	P .	Hartley Maxine	L.	Person Mark S. Richardson
ASSISTANT CHIEF
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Daniel T. Adams Richard	P.	Buoye Tony R. Davis Stephen G. Gallaher Robert	P.	Hacksunda William M. Johnson Matthew S. Nemeth Ashish Sircar
POLICE SERGEANT

Bobby L. Deal Vickie D. Diaz Ronald L. Lendvay Andrea M. Smith Mike S. Williams

Steven J. Amos David B. Anderson, Jr Robert E. Burns Amy B. Coarsey Scott R. Delano Terrence C. James 4

Robert A. John Phyllis	M.	McNeely James			P.	Morgan Gary E. Nelson Johnny L. Oldham, Jr. Dennis	E.	Pellot Charles B. Remolde , III Steven C. Rudlaff Matthew M. Russell Jackson W. Short Lolita M. Smith James W. Walters Jocelyn A. Wells

CORRECTIONS SERGEANT

Efrem Z. Banks Maceo J. Hunt Jason A. Rogers Equilla K. Stallworth

COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICER CORPORAL

ASSISTANT MANAGEMENT IMPROVEMENT OFFICER

Sandra R. Chandler Linda	P.	Gilbertson Charles B. Reagor Catina F. Uylee

Robert A. Bias Joshua J. Marshall

COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICER LIEUTENANT

Andrew M. Belk Patrick	W.	Carlson Christopher M. Edwards Ryan L. Goethe Ryan C. Heaton Matthew L. Herrera Aaron J. Roe Robert A. Scarborough Marshall S. Strickland Michael S. Wilson

CALLED TO SERVE

January
“OPERATION DOWN UNDER”
The Robbery Unit conducted “Operation Down Under” at local Kangaroo convenience stores and Family Dollar stores. The stake-outs around the city were done in an effort to catch armed robbery suspects. An anonymous citizen tip allowed investigators to identify the suspect and his two accomplices. Members of the unit located suspects Trevina Brown, Carla Fields, (see photo # 1) and Marilyn Barnhill and on January 16, 2008 the three suspects were arrested and charged with 10 counts of armed robbery. By year’s end, the unit increased its clearance rate more than 4% over 2007.

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FUNDING FOR POLICE OVERTIME RESTORES OSS

JSO announced the return of up to 70 additional officers, working overtime, to areas called “Hot Spots” as a result of city funding. The $3 million dollars enabled Operation Safe Streets (OSS) officers to conduct outreach, known as “Knock and Talks”, with citizens. Started in 2006, OSS and its $1,000 “Gun Bounty” proved very successful in generating record numbers of citizen tips and aided in arrests for violent crimes and the removal of illegal guns from Jacksonville’s streets. Since the inception of the overtime efforts, officers reached out to more than 77,000 citizens. Photo 2: The January 31 press conference announcing
the return of OSS funding for overtime showcased guns taken off the streets as a part of OSS’s Gun Bounty program, which began in August of 2006.
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“OPERATION GOLDEN ARROW”

“Operation Golden Arrow” was a multi-agency investigation (JSO Long Term Narcotics squad, Violent Crimes Task Force, and Aggravated Battery Unit, in partnership with the Drug Enforcement Agency which began in January of 2008. It focused on several known violent drug traffickers from the Sherwood area, suspected of committing multiple aggravated batteries and assaults. Later in 2008 search warrants were executed and more than twenty-five people throughout Florida were arrested for trafficking in cocaine in Duval County. Seizures	included	currency,	vehicles,	weapons	(see	Photo	#	3),	land	and	homes.

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COUNTERFEIT CHECK CASHING RING BUSTED

JSO Economic Crimes detectives, working with the U.S. Secret Service’s high tech task force and the U.S. Attorney’s Office, helped bring an elaborate check cashing scheme to a halt in January. Using stolen information about bank accounts or businesses, the suspects would print and cash fake payroll checks at area retailers. Four arrests were made.

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FIRST SIX AFRICAN AMERICAN POLICE OFFICERS HONORED

The Durkeeville Historical Society and the Northwest Jacksonville Community Development Corporation (NJCDC) honored six individuals during a historical marker dedication ceremony held on Jan. 16. The marker honors the six African American men (Henry Harley; Edward Hickson, Sr.; Alvin James; Beamon W. Kendall; Marion Massey; and Charlie Sea) who were hired in 1950 and are credited with breaking down racial barriers	at	the	former	Jacksonville	Police	Department	(JPD).	Photo 4: (l-r) Mrs. Alma Harley, widow of Henry Harley;
Paul Tutwiler, Northwest Jacksonville CDC; former Sheriff Nat Glover; and Sheriff John H. Rutherford participated in the Jan. 16 dedication ceremony.

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$100,000 GRANT FROM BANK OF AMERICA BENEFITS PAL

The	funds	were	used	to	renovate	the	PAL	Eastside	Community	Center	at	Flossie	Brunson	Park.	The	facility’s	 size was almost doubled, when formerly uncovered walkways and rooms were incorporated into the building’s footprint. Photo 5: Bank of America (BOA) representative Martha Barrett (left) presented a check for $100,000
to Lt. Bobby Deal (second from left), Executive Director of PAL Councilman Dr. Johnny Gaffney (second from right), and PAL President Richard Cohee (right) during the “Take Pride in the Eastside” grand opening and check presentation ceremony on January 12.

CALLED TO SERVE: January Employees of the Month

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Photo 6: (l-r standing) Reserve Officer of the Month Frederick J. Joseph II; Corrections Officer of the Month Ofc. Mark A. Gross, Pre-Trial Detention Facility (PTDF); Police Supervisor of the Month Police Sgt. Raymond W. Beltz, Zone 3. (l-r seated) Civilian Employee of the Month Police Emergency Communications Ofc., Janet G. Brown, Communications; Police Officer of the Month Detective Carla D. Roberts-Jones, Burglary Unit. Not pictured: Corrections Supervisor of the Month Corrections Sgt. Scott Umstead, PTDF.

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February
“OPERATION CROWS NEST”
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“Operation Crow’s Nest”, a drug investigation by the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) and JSO, resulted in the arrest of two suspects, Jacob Jones and Albert Gray. Jones was convicted of drug trafficking and money	laundering	and	was	sentenced	to	twenty	years	in	State	Prison	and	Grey	received	18	years	in	prison	for	 trafficking in cocaine. Cash and bank accounts totaling $58,347.24 were seized along with a BMW 740i and 2005 Chevrolet C4500 truck. The total seizure was $156,347.24.
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JSO PARTICIPATES IN WOODLAND ACRES CLEAN-UP

Approximately 67 tons of mixed litter and debris were collected, along with 4.6 tons of yard waste, 312 tires,10 household appliances and one stolen car. The event was organized by Lt. Michael Beckmann, Zone 2. He was awarded	the	2008	Award	of	Excellence	by	JaxPride	for	the	clean	up	project.	Photo 1: (l-r) Zone 2 Police Officers
James Watford, Dan Will, Kevin Zehler, Sgt. Danny Williams, Ms. Linda Farris, Volunteer, and Ofc. Brian Myers were among the 10 officers and 100 volunteers who participated in the Woodland Acres Cleanup on February 2.

“OPERATION SUGAR CANE”
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On Wednesday February 6 a federal grand jury in Jacksonville indicted the man also known as “Black Shack” or “Sugar Shack,” along with five others, on multiple drug charges, including conspiracy to distribute crack cocaine. Daryl Shack was reported to have “terrorized” people in the Biltmore neighborhood of Jacksonville for years. Through a plea arrangement he was sentenced to 20 years in prison later in 2008, when he admitted to a list of charges that took a clerk 20 minutes to read aloud in court, according to the Florida Times Union. Detectives from JSO’s Zone 5 Task Force led the investigation.

COMMUNITY TRANSITION CENTER HELPS INMATES

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Throughout 2008 the Community Transitions Center (CTC) maintained a partnership with the YouthBuild program, resulting in participating inmates learning carpentry skills while helping to complete 36 new homes. Additionally, six participants were hired for carpentry jobs after incarceration as a direct result of the skills they learned while in the program. Photo 2: On February 1 inmates from the Community Transitions Center (CTC) helped
YouthBuild frame a home for Habijax for Humanity of Jacksonville, Inc. on Reynolds Lane.

JSO’S CRIME ANALYSIS UNIT RECOGNIZED

The	Office	of	Community	Oriented	Policing	Services	(COPS)	of	the	U.S.	Department	of	Justice	published	Enhancing the Problem-Solving Capacity of Crime Analysis Units, written by crime analysis unit manager Matt White. The guide	was	incorporated	into	the	COPS	Problem	Solving	Tools	Series,	which	features	a	variety	of	policing	topics	 written by many renowned authors and law enforcement experts. Photo 3: Matt White, Manager of the Crime Analysis
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Unit, uses advance technology in the fight against crime in Jacksonville.

POLICE EXECUTIVE RESEARCH FORUM STUDIES OSS

The	organization	recognized	as	the	premier	“think	tank”	for	police	operations,	PERF	(see	image	#	4),	was	invited	 by JSO to study Operations Safe Streets. Through a Department of Justice grant, the study will look at the use of	Crime	Analysis,	also	called	“Intelligence	Led	Policing,”	and	the	effects	of	community	problem	solving	tactics	 used by Sheriff’s officers during the initiative.
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PERSCRIPTION DRUG SCAM DISMANTLED

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Members of a specialized prescription drug squad conducted an undercover investigation, which resulted in the arrest of 70 year old Dr. Benjamin Malalang, when investigators confirmed that he was writing prescriptions for Oxycontin (see photo # 5) to women in exchange for sex. The operation was started based on a tip from a confidential informant. It was believed that over a period of several months women were offered prescriptions in exchange for sex, after seeking help for medical problems at his pain management clinic.

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CALLED TO SERVE: February Employees of the Month
Photo 6: (l-r) Corrections Supervisor of the Month Corrections Sgt. Mike Jowers, Montegomery Correctional Cetner; Reserve Officer of the Month Gary Carlson; Police Officer of the Month Jimmy W. Britt, Zone 6; Corrections Officer of the Month Michael S. Henry, Pre-Trial Detention Facility; Police Supervisor of the Month Police Sgt. Lonnie J. Mills, Property and Evidence Unit; Civilian Employee of the Month Police Emergency Communications Officer III Joe E. Fooshee II.

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CALLED TO SERVE

March
JACKSONVILLE JOURNEY COMMITTEE APPROVES ADDITIONAL OFFICERS
In December of 2007 Sheriff John Rutherford presented city officials with a long range staffing plan that included an additional 225 sworn officers. In March of 2008, a recommendation to approve the hiring of 101 additional officers was endorsed by city officials. In 2007, JSO developed and implemented a state of the art recruitment 1 portal called JOINJSO.COM, to advance and streamline the recruitment process.

FIRST CRIME FREE COMMUNITIES CERTIFIED

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Developing a partnership with renters, CFC officers work with management to ensure that criminal activity on the property is prevented, apartments and grounds are made safe, and tenants know the consequences of allowing criminal activity in their apartments or on the property. By the end of 2008, reported incidents in certified communities such as Eureka Gardens, The Plantation, and Paradise Island were down 29%. Photo 1: Pam Floyd, manager of Eureka Gardens in Zone 4, is presented with a sign designating the community as “Certified” in the Crime Free Communities (CFC) program. On March 12 three communities in Jacksonville were featured as the first in Jacksonville to meet all the requirements of the anti-crime program.

“OPERATION TO CATCH A CONTRACTOR”

Working	with	the	state’s	Department	of	Business	and	Professional	Regulation,	more	than	30	individuals	were	 2 cited for soliciting work requiring licensure by the state. This included arrests of those who did not qualify for absentee booking, as well as “cease and desist” orders. Home repairs done through unlicensed individuals can result in personal or financial harm, and creates unfair competition for licensed professionals. Photo 2: During a
March 14 news conference, Sheriff Rutherford explains the charges facing the suspects arrested during a “sting” of unlicensed contractors called “Operation To Catch a Contractor.”

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The squad investigated the complaints and charged Willie Solomon with dealing drugs from the house. On March 10 investigators raided the home, arresting Solomon and several others. The investigators seized three assault rifles (along with other weapons); a case of ammunition; $90,000 in cash; and multiple vehicles. Following his conviction,	Solomon	received	120	months	in	Federal	Prison.	During 2008, the Mid-Level squad seized 4.7 kilograms of cocaine, fifty-seven firearms, 1090 lbs of marijuana, 7546 MDMA pills and over $478,000 in cash. Photo 3: Bales of Marijuana seized during the raid on a Westside home on March 10.The investigation was prompted
by complaints from neighbors.

DRUG RING ON JACKSONVILLE’S WESTSIDE BUSTED BY JSO’S “MID-LEVEL” NARCOTICS SQUAD

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JACKSONVILLE SHERIFF’S OFFICE IN THE COMMUNITY

The JSO Community Affairs and Special Events division, with funding from the Jacksonville Automobile Dealers Association, introduced a program for teens. In partnership with the Florida Sheriff’s Association, the two-day driver’s education course “Teen Driver Challenge” was created to show teenagers how to drive “smart and safe.” Throughout the year the Teen Driver Challenge was offered three additional times to 48 young drivers. Photo 4:
Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office Office instructor Billy Perry (right) works with teen drivers Greg Mattson (left) and Clayton Smith during the first Teen Driver Challenge, held at the police academy March 7 & 8.
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COMMUNITY AFFAIRS/SPECIAL EVENTS “NOTEWORTHIES”

More than 750 Duval County high school students from 28 schools participated in the third annual “Stop Teen Underage Drinking” rally on March 20, at the Morocco Shrine Auditorium. Also the “Sheriff’s Star Students” mentoring	program	offered	by	the	Police	Athletic	League	(PAL)	wrapped	up	in	March.	More	than	30	volunteers,	 including	certified	teachers	and	JSO	personnel,	tutored	more	than	100	PAL	youth	and	students	from	the	community. Who were preparing for the FCAT.

JSO PARTICIPATION IN WALKS, RIDES, RUNS, AND FIGHTS ... AIDS MANY GOOD CAUSES CALLED TO SERVE: March Employees of the Month

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In March, employees raised $1,262 for the Walk to D’Feet ALS (Lou Gherig’s Disease) and Guns n’ Hoses (see photo	#	5)	raised	$200,000	for	the	Fraternal	Order	of	Police	Foundation	Charities.	

Photo 6: (l-r) Police Officer of the Month John T. Whitcomb, Zone 4; Volunteer of the Month Teresa A. Gilleo; Civilian Employee of the Month David W. Albert; Human Resources; Corrections Supervisor of the Month Sergeant Gabriel J. Bourgon,PTDF. Not pictured: Corrections Officer of the Month Brian A. Neilson, PTDF and Police Supervisor of the Month Police Sgt. Claude E. Ayoub, Community Affairs. RIDING FOR THE BRAND 7
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April
PROJECT SAFE STUDENTS IN SCHOOLS ANNOUNCED
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Following	in-depth	discussions	with	the	Duval	County	School	Board,	the	NAACP,	and	other	interested	parties,	the	 Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office received support for the program in a vote by the DCSB.
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PSSS	is	designed	to	intervene	in	the	lives	of	young	students	who	are	making	bad	decisions	that	affect	their	 success in school and in the community. The goal of the program is to foster better understanding between law enforcement officers, students, parents, and administrators through prompt, intensive and effective intervention strategies. Implementation of the program was approved for the 08-09 school year in all middle and senior high schools.

SEXUAL ASSAULT AWARENESS DAY

In 2008 the Family Violence/Child Abuse Unit of JSO conducted more than 450 child abuse or elder abuse related investigations. Photo 1: Sheriff John H. Rutherford spoke at the April 3 Sexual Assault Awareness Day press
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conference, held on the front steps of the Police Memorial Building. The annual event, produced by the Women’s Center of Jacksonville, marks April as Sexual Assault Awareness Month.

OPERATION “HALF PINT”

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A female suspected of robbing drug stores in Mandarin and the Southside was located as a result of JSO Evidence	Technicians,	Robbery	Unit	detectives,	and	vigilant	patrol	officers.	On	April	20	“Half	Pint”	robbed	a	Hess	 Station on Atlantic Blvd. Officers spotted the suspect’s vehicle at another store, and Tamisha Charmaine James was arrested. JSO cleared five robbery cases. Later in 2008 James plead guilty to armed robbery and was sentenced to 15 years in a Florida state prison. Photo 2: The vehicle Tamisha C. James used while robbing drug stores in
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March and April of 2008.

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Several members of the agency were recognized during Victim’s Rights Events: •	 Det.	Robin	Waters	(see	photo	#	3),	Special	Assault	Division/State	Attorney’s	Office,	received	the	Law	Enforce-	 ment Victim Advocate Award. •	 Det.	Jared	Reston,	Career	Criminal	Unit	and	Ofc.	Nicholas	Rodgers,	Zone	1,	received	special	recognition	as		 courageous law enforcement officers. •	 JSO’s	Victim/Witness	Counselor	Coordinator	Kathy	Pannell	was	awarded	the	2008	Judicial	Victim	Advocate		 award for her work with the “Missing Link.” This program assists victims of domestic violence in filing petitions for divorce. In 2008, JSO police officers distributed more than 116, 617 Victim/Witness Guides to help victims in their recovery. Photo 4: Ann Dugger, Executive Director, The Justice Coalition, hosts the National Crime Victims’ Rights
Week kickoff held at Hemming Plaza on April 14.

VICTIM SERVICES WEEK

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“OPERATON D-DAY”
In April 2008, the JSO Mid-Level Narcotics squad participated in a one-day cultivation crackdown in North Florida and the panhandle code-named “Operation D-Day.” Duval County seized 633 marijuana plants ( see photo # 5). The Squad targets mid-level dealers or organizations. The investigations generally are short and the members work in tandem with the Violent Crimes Task Force and the Aggravated Battery Unit to arrest violent drug dealers that are not a part of more intricate drug operations.

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“I TOOK THE PLEDGE” SAFETY PROGRAM

The students at John Love Elementary School (see photo # 6) pledged to Sheriff Rutherford not to use a gun to	solve	their	problems	during	the	“I	Took	the	Pledge”	safety	program	on	April	17.	JSO	partnered	with	the	Boys	 and Girls Club of Northeast Florida to present the gun safety and conflict resolution program to children in local elementary schools. Events such as this are coordinated by the Community Affairs Division (CAD) of the JSO. The mission of the CAD is to promote community involvement by establishing crime prevention programs and partnerships with citizens.

25TH ANNUAL LAW ENFORCEMENT TORCH RUN FOR SPECIAL OLYMPICS
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Photo 7: (l-r) Lt. John Lamb, Community Affairs, leads Chief David Stevens, Patrol East; Retired Det. Gregory Strickland; Asst. Chief John Hartley, Narcotics/ Vice and HIDTA; Lt. Elizabeth Kenny, Zone 1; and Police Cpt. Mark Bowen, Patrol East during the 25th Annual Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics on April 16. JSO participants raised more than $8,000.

CALLED TO SERVE: April Employees of the Month

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Photo 8: (l-r) Corrections Supervisor of the Month Sgt. Adraine L. Head, PTDF; Police Supervisor of the Month Police Sgt. William T. Wilkerson, Community Affairs; Reserve Officer of the Month Morris Napier; Civilian Employee of the Month Renee D. Barnhart, Clerical Support Aide III, Community Affairs; Corrections Officer of the Month Donald D. Boston, PTDF; and Police Ofc. of the Month Kim A. Clausen, Zone 4. 8 CALLED TO SERVE

May
ANNUAL ShAdCo SAFETY FAIR
Photo 1: Representatives from the Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department, Jacksonville Transportation Authority, and the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office’s Mounted, K-9, Marine units and Bomb Squad participated in the Sheriff’s Advisory Council (ShAdCo) Annual Safety Fair on May 3 at the River City Marketplace in Zone 6. Three additional ShAdCo safety fairs were held at the following locations in 2008: Regency Square Mall, Zone 2; Avenues Mall, Zone 3, and at the WalMart on 103rd Street, Zone 4.

CSO GRADUATION

In 2008, 44 Community Service Officers (CSOs) were hired, increasing their ranks to 79. These “force multipliers” responded to 33,500 non-emergency public service calls in 2008, allowing the sworn police officers to address the more serious law enforcement needs of the community. Photo 2: Twenty-two recruits

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graduated from the Community Service Officer Training class on May 12. This was the second group of CSO’s to complete the class in 2008.

2008 CLICK IT OR TICKET CAMPAIGN COMES TO JACKSONVILLE

Memorial Day weekend is historically one of the deadliest on Florida roadways. The campaign’s results included the apprehension of more than 150 fugitives and more than 1,000 were either cited or arrested for driving with suspended licenses. Eighty two stolen vehicles were also recovered. Each of the six zones has a traffic unit that participates in special enforcement programs such as “Click it or Ticket”. These initiatives raise awareness of traffic laws and educate citizens about reducing traffic crash fatalities by promoting safer driving techniques. In 2008, there were a total of 137 traffic fatalities in Duval County. This represents a 21 percent decrease from 2007, when there were 174 traffic fatalities. Photo 3: Sheriff John Rutherford is flanked by
traffic officers at the “Click It or Ticket” safety belt enforcement campaign press conference on May 12.

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“STRANGER DANGER” VIDEO PREMIERS Production	of	the	video	was	supervised	by	the	JSO,	funded	by	the	Boys	&	Girls	Clubs	of	Northeast	Florida,	 and written/produced/directed by film students from Douglas Anderson School of the Arts. More than 100 elementary schools in Duval County received a copy of the video. In addition to assisting with the “Stranger Danger” video, members of the School Safety Education Unit presented 120 Officer Friendly and 77 Danger Stranger presentations to elementary students during the 2007-2008 school year. Photo 4: Police Ofc. Keith
Jowers, School Safety Education Unit, and McGruff the Crime Dog give a “thumbs up” for the new Stranger Danger Video at the May 15 video debut at Lola Culver Elementary School.

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LEGAL GUIDE FOR NEW ADULTS

The Legal Guide for New Adults provides important information to “rising seniors” and soon-to-be adults about their legal rights and responsibilities as an adult in Florida. The guides are produced and distributed, at	no	charge,	through	a	grant	from	the	Florida	Bar	Foundation	as	a	part	of	the	Bar’s	Justice	Teaching	Program. Photo 5: (l-r) Sheriff John Rutherford along with Attorneys A. Russell Smith, Hank Coxe, and Superintendent
Ed Pratt-Dannals spoke to juniors at Samuel A. Wolfson High School about the new Legal Guide for New Adults at the school on May 21.

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JACKSONVILLE JOURNEY UPDATE

In May the Jacksonville City Council approved implementation of the Sheriff’s long-term staffing plan, by agreeing to allow the hiring cap to be raised. They authorized the hiring and training of 40 more officers in the current fiscal year. The Sheriff’s Office realized savings in corrections, due to a lower inmate population which created savings in food, medical costs, and overtime.

CATALYTIC CONVERTER THEFT RING BUSTED

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With record high gas prices, and precious and semi-precious metals selling at an all time high, thieves focused on the catalytic converters in automobiles. JSO’s Auto Theft Unit, working with a tipster, cleared more than 30 of these cases in May.

CALLED TO SERVE: May Employees of the Month

Photo 6: (l-r) Reserve Officer of the Month William J. Hartley; Police Supervisor of the Month Police Sgt. James A. Pendley, Zone 6; Civilian Employee of the Month Rebecca R. Viets, Clerical Support Aide III, Alarms Unit; Police Officer of the Month Clayton R. Short, Zone 1; and Civilian Supervisor of the Month Sergeant Moliea J. Smith. Not pictured: Corrections Officer of the Month Jeffery D. Pekks

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RIDING FOR THE BRAND 9

June
DNA TESTING HELPS SOLVE COLD CASES
The 2005 robbery and shooting death of Rolando Julio Chang was suspended when leads ran out and there wasn’t enough information or evidence to identify a suspect. Like many Cold Cases, the JSO Homicide team reactivated the case using DNA analysis by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE). On June 6, 2008 Sheriff John H. Rutherford announced the arrest of suspect Jerry Alto Smith for the murder of Chang. FDLE was able to link Smith through the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS). Members of the unit successfully rebuilt the initial investigation after Smith was charged with Armed Robbery and Murder.
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CITIZEN TIPSTER WORKS WITH POLICE - M.D. IMPERSONATOR CAUGHT

In May Officer Ike Brown, working off-duty at an area hospital, was briefed by security guards about a possible physician impersonator. Using surveillance film, Brown confirmed that other area hospitals had also experienced thefts of laptop computers and purses. No attempt by the suspect to communicate with any patients was discovered. A citizen’s tip led Intelligence detectives to the man’s location. Edward Lavern Smith was arrested in June. Stolen purses, laptops and credit cards were recovered at his home.

LOCAL DISCO CLUB CLOSED WHEN FOUND UNSAFE

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DART is a partnership between the JSO, city Code Enforcement, Building Safety, Zoning, the Fire Marshall’s Office, and General Counsel’s Office. The partnership targets nuisance properties including businesses that are deemed unsafe or have previously been involved in criminal activity such as illegal drugs, prostitution, alcohol violations, gambling, dog fighting, and gang related activities. In June, DART joined the state division of Alcohol, Beverage and Tobacco in an enforcement action at a local nightclub. Violations included unauthorized alterations to the structure that breached a firewall and blocked an alley allowing exit in case of a fire or emergency. DART worked more than 270 cases in 2008. Photo 1: DART
signs such as this label properties as unsafe.

JOINT ROLL CALLS
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Each Quarter the Sheriff and his leadership team host joint roll calls for officers and interested civilian employees. This gathering gives men and women throughout the agency an opportunity to be addressed by the Sheriff of the issues of the day, as well as informal recognition for a job well done. Photo 2: On June 11 Sheriff
Rutherford spoke to officers at the 7 a.m. Watch Two Roll Call at the Police Memorial Building.

SUMMER SAFETY MOVES TO FOREFRONT

Each	summer	in	Zone	6,	where	Huguenot	Park	is	located,	and	in	Zone	2,	where	Kathryn	Abbey	Hanna	Park	is	 located, officers use Four-Wheel Drive Units to patrol, help ensure citizen safety, and a quick response in the event of an emergency. In addition, four JSO reserve officers volunteer their weekends, acting as force multipliers, by patrolling the two parks in trucks, all-terrain vehicles, and by jet-ski. In 2008, 85 reserve officers volunteered more than 21,200 hours of service by augmenting the JSO police presence at special events throughout the city, athletic events at neighborhood schools, and patrolling in the zones. Photo 3: JSO Reserve Officer patroling local beach.

JSO BOMB SQUAL ENHANCEMENTS FEATURED

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By year’s end, the Bomb squad had responded to 131 calls for assistance in Duval, Baker, Bradford, Clay, Nassau and St. Johns Counties. However, as the Region 3, Tier 1 team for Florida’s Regional Domestic Security Task Force, the squad is subject to calls for response from any of the additional counties including: Alachua, Flagler,	Gilchrist,	Levy,	Marion,	Putnam,	and	Union	Counties.	Homeland	security	grant	funding	was	secured	to	 purchase the additional equipment highlighted in the article, shown. Photo 4: credit: Florida Times Union, June 16,
2008, Dana Treen, Staff Writer.

CALLED TO SERVE: June Employees of the Month

Photo 5 (l-r standing): Corrections Officer of the Month Albert T. Braddy, PTDF; Police Officer of the Month Det. John J. Reynolds, Career Criminal Unit; and Police Supervisor of the Month Police Sgt. Joe M. Harbin, Zone 1.

(l-r seated) Civlian Employee of the Month Police Emergency Communications Ofc. Patrice M. Georgeo, Communications; and Corrections Supervisor of the Month Corrections Sgt. Jerry W. Kirkpatrick Not pictured-Reserve Office of the Month Reserve Sgt. Michael L. Scratch.
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10 CALLED TO SERVE

July
ZONE 3 AND BURGLARY UNIT TEAM UP TO SOLVE THEFTS
On July 29, 2008, Zone Three Officer Lauri A. Kindon contacted the Burglary Unit regarding a theft involving the loss of commercial lawn equipment. Kindon had developed a source that identified a potential suspect who was trying to sell stolen equipment. Burglary Sgt. Larry Kitchen worked with an undercover detective, who posed as a potential buyer for the stolen merchandise and contacted the suspect. During the conversation, Herman S. Davis (the suspect) agreed to a meeting. The detectives met with the suspect and negotiated a deal to buy the mower for $800.00. Davis was arrested and found to have driven a stolen vehicle with a stolen trailer license tag to the meeting with the detective. He was charged with dealing in stolen property and auto theft. Detectives recovered two diesel lawn mowers valued at $10,000, a stolen vehicle, and a stolen tag. Graph 1-Three year comparison of business and residential burglaries city-wide.
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AVIATION UNIT SUPPLIES NECESSARY SUPPORT FROM THE AIR
Continuous training is fundamental to the effectiveness of the agency’s specialized units.
Photo 2: Members of the JSO Air Units, Dive Team and Marine Unit train on the St. Johns River.

Operations of the Air Unit include surveillance, pursuits, search and rescues, drug interdiction, criminal apprehension and prisoner transport. The unit logged 2,051 helicopter flight hours and supported ground units for 6,375 dispatched and on-viewed calls for police service in 2008.

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The	“Precious	Cargo”	Summer	Car	Safety	public	awareness	initiative	was	launched	to	educate	people	 about leaving their children, pets and other valuables in hot vehicles unattended. JSO	officers	distributed	“Precious	Cargo”	reminder	decals	to	area	businesses,	for	their	front	doors	and	 windows, warning customers about the danger to people and pets left in a hot vehicle for just minutes. During the press conference, a demonstration showed that in just 11 minutes the temperature in a car had risen from 99 degrees to 120 degrees. Photo 3: (l-r) Nathan Newman, M.D., Chief Medical Officer,
Solantic; Police Officers Duane Darnell and April M. Cobb, Zone 2; and Karen Bowling, Chief Executive Officer, Solantic look on as Sheriff John H. Rutherford addresses the media at the July 15 press conference held at the Arlington Solantic medical clinic on Monument Road.

“PRECIOUS CARGO” SUMMER CAR SAFETY INITIATIVE ROLLS INTO LOCAL BUSINESS

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LOCAL AGENCIES WORK TOGETHER TO KEEP WATERWAYS SAFE
•	 •	 •	 There are 39,000 registered boats in Duval County. This does not include the thousands from other cities that travel our waterway each year. Memorial Day, Labor Day, and the 4th of July are the busiest recreational boating days in Jacksonville. In 2008, the Marine Unit conducted 7,000 boater safety inspections on the waterways and boat ramps and taught 29 boater safety courses. Photo 4: Members of the JSO Marine Unit and
the U.S. Coast Guard participated in a July 3 press conference on Boater Safety Tips hosted by Major Lee Beach, Regional Commander of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC).
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5

ZONE ONE GETS NEW STOP STATION
Photo 5: Rev. Herman Fountain of Historic Mt. Zion AME Church (back left) looks on as Sheriff Rutherford addresses shoppers at the grand opening of the Winn Dixie store at 777 Market Street. The July 9re-opening celebrated massive renovations to the store, including new space that was allocated to support a JSO Stop Station for officers. Photo courtesy of Winn Dixie.
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CALLED TO SERVE: July Employees of the Month

Photo 6: (l-r) Corrections Officer of the Month Nikki L. Logan, Montgomery Correctional Center; Reserve Officer Timothy R. Hinson; Administrative Aide Kimberly D. Keen, Human Resources; Police Supervisor of the Month Police Sgt. Angela L. Tompkins, Zone 4; and Civilian Supervisor of the Month Sgt. Sylvia L. Hutchinson, Central Records/Data Input. Not pictured: Police Officer Adam R. Boyd, Crime Free Housing Unit, Zone 3.
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RIDING FOR THE BRAND 11

August
“WORLD’S BEST” POLICE MOTORMAN
Police	Officer	David	Sciandra	(see	photo	#	1)	defeated	more	than	100	other	police	motorcyclists	to	win	a	 competition	held	at	the	Harley-Davidson	100th	Anniversary	Police	Motorcycle	Skills	Competition	in	Milwaukee,	 WI	on	August	29.	Police	Ofc.	Curt	Brown	placed	fourth	in	the	competition.	
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These competitions are an integral part of police training. JSO utilizes 17 motorcycle officers for traffic enforcement and special events. Due to being less visible on the road, and the lack of physical protection provided by a car, motorcycle police officers are more susceptible to serious injuries and death in on-duty traffic crashes.

COMMUNITIES RALLY AGAINST CRIME

The 25th Annual National Night Out (NNO) was held on Tuesday, August 5. JSO participated for the 22nd year by holding more than 100 events in various neighborhoods. Neighborhood Watch groups plan events to strengthen each neighborhood through increased crime prevention awareness, police/neighborhood relationships, and by encouraging support and participation in neighborhood watch programs and Sheriff’s Advisory Councils (ShAdCo.) Jacksonville had 820 Neighborhood Watch programs operating in Jacksonville in 2008. Photo 2: On August 5, Sheriff Rutherford spoke to a group of Arlington residents about current issues in the city. It was one of the many stops he and other members of the JSO leadership team make during National Night Out.

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JACKSONVILLE ENDURES TROPICAL STORM FAY

First	responders	must	be	prepared	for	every	event,	planned	and	unplanned.	Public	safety	during	weather	 related disasters is a top priority. In late August Tropical Storm Fay skirted Jacksonville’s coastline, knocking down trees, creating power outages and destroying property (see photo # 3). All JSO “essential personnel” are ready to activate and provide critical assistance when needed during these emergencies.
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ACCREDITATION HONORS EARNED BY JSO

In August the JSO underwent two on-site assessments for re-accreditation. One by the Commission for Florida Law Enforcement Accreditation, Inc. (CFA) and one by the Commission on Accreditation of Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA.) Assessors from CALEA recommended reaccreditation WITH DISTINCTION, indicating an evaluation of 100% compliance with all applicable mandatory standards. Additionally, the CFA concluded its assessment of JSO, also recommending recognition for 100% compliance with all its mandatory standard For many years the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office has maintained the “Triple Crown” of accreditation, being accredited by all three major criminal justice accrediting agencies: CALEA, American Correctional Association (ACA) and National Commission on Correctional Health Care (NCCHC). The Sheriff’s Office has also successfully completed State accreditation for both Law Enforcement (CFA) and Corrections (Florida Corrections Accreditation Commission), bringing the total number of accreditations held by the Sheriff’s Office to five.
Photo 4: (l-r) Police Sgt. Buster French, Academy; Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA) Assessor “Team Leader” Deputy Chief Douglas A. Middleton, Henrico County Division of Police, Richmond, VA; Sheriff John H. Rutherford; and CALEA Assessor Director Kevin T. Nuss, Oldham County Emergency Management, Lagrange, Kentucky at the CALEA exit interview held on August 21.

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DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS HOLDS SPECIAL GRADUATION FOR 11 INMATES

The	JSO	Department	of	Corrections	held	the	first	WorkNet	Training	Program	graduation	for	11	inmates	at	the	 John	E.	Goode	Pre-Trial	Detention	Facility	on	August	1.	The	WorkNet	training	program	prepares	inmates	for	a	 successful transition back into society upon release and addresses concerns inmates have about re-entry into the community. The JSO Department of Corrections provided the City of Jacksonville 240,812 hours of inmate labor, with an associated savings to taxpayers of $1.6 million in 2008. Photo 5: (l-r) Resource Specialist Alyssa Bishop
(left), Jacksonville Re-Entry Center (JREC); Manager Cathy Chadeayne (center), Jacksonville Re-Entry Center (JREC); Lenny Wright (right rear), WorkNet Facilitator; and Corrections Officer Eric Wesley (far right), Pre-Trial Detention Facility.

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Photo 6: (l-r) Reserve Officer of the Month N. Keith Tanner; Civilian Employee of the Month Recreational Leader Shelly D. Williams, Police Athletic League; Corrections Officer of the Month David L. Baker, PTDF; Corrections Supervisor of the Month Corrections Sgt. Lynette F. Clinch, PTDF; Police Supervisor of the Month Police Sgt. James A. Parker, Homicide Unit (Cold Case), and Police Office of the Month Larry R. Propper, K-9 Unit. 12 CALLED TO SERVE

CALLED TO SERVE: August Employees of the Month

September
SHERIFF ANNOUNCES PARTNERSHIP WITH ICE
JSO partnered with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in 2008 to enforce 287 (g) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). The program uses specially trained and deputized corrections personnel, who access federal databases to determine if arrestees are felony criminal illegal aliens. Photo 1: (l-r) Corrections Officer Jamal Prejean, Pre-Trial Detention Facility; Sheriff John H. Rutherford; Corrections Officer Mae West, Pre-Trial Detention Facility; and Assistant Field Office Director David Wing, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) announce the new partnership.

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CRISIS INTERVENTION AND TRAINING AIDS INMATES

In order to effectively treat and safely house mentally ill inmates at all three of its corrections facilities, the JSO now trains all corrections employees in Crisis Intervention. Additional training exists for dual certified officers, so they can process Baker Act patients/inmates. This is more efficient that removing a sworn officer from patrol to handle the processing of this special population. Photo 2: Susan Lee, Executive Director,

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Mental Health America of Northeast Florida (left); and Julio Martinez, Chair, Board of Directors (right); presented Corrections Sgt. Barbara J. Weber (middle) with the Community Leadership Award for Advancing Mental Health within the Law Enforcement Community at a reception on Sept 16. Corrections Sgt. Weber was recognized for her work in the JSO Crisis Intervention Training (CIT) program and enhanced training of CO’s.

InVest AWARDED GRANT AND GIVEN STATEWIDE RECOGNITION

The Intimate Violence Enhanced Services Team (InVest) partnership is a collaboration between the JSO, Hubbard House, and the City of Jacksonville. The Team was awarded a 2008 U.S. Department of Justice grant from the Office on Violence Against Women. During 2008, InVest associates met and reviewed a total of 7,297 domestic violence police reports. Based on the review of reports, 380 potential clients were identified as “high risk” victims during 2008. Of this number, 83 victims accepted the services of InVest and became clients.

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READING CAMPAIGN AT SCHOOLS

Sheriff Rutherford read to fourth grade students from on of his favorite books, “Ride for the Brand” a collection of stories by Red Steagall on September 5 (see photo # 3). He was at San Jose Elementary School for their Fall reading campaign “Diagnosis: Success.”

ZONE 4 STARTS NEW H.O.M.E. PROJECT

Zone 4 Sergeant Donald Smith and Officer Wayne Dees developed the Homeless Outreach through Monitoring and Enforcement (HOME) project in September. Members of the homeless population are offered the options of shelter and mental health facilities by officers. JSO also removes the makeshift “homes” and related debris from city property, using inmate labor (see photo # 4).

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SHERIFF’S NEIGHBORHOOD CRIME PREVENTION WALKS REACH CITIZENS IN ALL AREAS OF DUVAL COUNTY

On Sept. 16 Sheriff John Rutherford (photo # 5) spoke to the residents who live around Edward Waters College	in	Zone	5	about	crime	prevention.	Joining	him	on	the	walk	were	EWC	President	Claudette	H.	 Williams	Ed.D	(left);	EWC	Vice	President	of	Financial	Affairs	Jim	Washburn	(second	from	left);	and	State	 Attorney-elect Angela Corey (right). Sheriff Rutherford is routinely joined by city council members, clergy, and civic leaders to walk neighborhoods in Jacksonville. The walks allow citizens an opportunity to talk to the Sheriff and his staff and discuss crime and crime prevention in their neighborhoods.

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JSO EMPLOYEES MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THE COMMUNITY

JSO employees and their families participated in three charity events in September: •	 Rasing	$	3,314	for	the	American	Heart	Walk •	 Hosting	and	participating	in	the	10th	Annual	Sheriff’s	Cup	Charity	Golf	Classic	held	on	September		 	 23,	raising	more	than	$88,000	for	the	Police	Athletic	League	and	 •	 On	Sept.	25	“Team	JSO”	lead	the	way	in	the	10th	Annual	“Light	the	Night	Walk”	for	the	North	Florida		 Chapter of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. Employees raised more than $1,500 for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society in shirt sales. JSO’s Corrections employees have been a driving force in this event for the 10 years that it has existed (see photo # 6).

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CALLED TO SERVE: September Employees of the Month

Photo 7: (l-r standing) Corrections Supervisor of the Month Sgt. Gary L. Riggs, Montgomery Correctional Center;

Police Supervisor of the Month Sgt. Robert A. Beers, Zone 2; Civilian Employee of the Month Joseph R. Cangemi, Support Services; Reserve Officer E. Frank Grossholz. (l-r) seated: Police Officer of the Month Det. Vernon A. Richardson, Missing Persons; and Corrections Officer of the Month Vericka A. Brookins, PTDF. RIDING FOR THE BRAND 13

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October
DERELICT VEHICLE LAW
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Changes to a Florida State Statute, regarding the use of a “derelict motor vehicle certificate” for the sale or purchase of derelict cars, took effect in October. The new law forced vehicle owners, salvage vehicle dealers, and certified secondary metal recycling companies to provide proper documentation of ownership when selling or purchasing derelict vehicles. Members of the Auto Theft Unit conducted inspections and found more than four businesses that were not in compliance. Three arrests were made. The unit offered trainings to the companies to alleviate confusion about the law. Photo 1: A Red BMW was stolen and improperly sold to a salvage yard. The owner
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was in the process of restoring the vintage BMW, when a neighbor had the car removed and sold it to an unlicensed dealer, who in-turn sold it to a salvage dealer to be stripped for parts.

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JSO EMPLOYEES HONORED FOR EXCELLENCE

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Throughout the year, the following organizations recognized the excellent work of JSO employees from all areas of the agency: •	 200	Club	of	Jacksonville •	 Exchange	Club	of	Jacksonville •	 Arlington	Optimist	Club •	 Sons	of	the	American	Revolution	 •	 Southside	Businessman’s	Club	 •	 Kiwanis	Club	of	Jacksonville •	 American	Society	for	Industrial	Security	 •	 Rotary	Club	of	West	Jacksonville,	Inc.		
Photo 2: (l-r) Det. Jared T. Reston, Career Criminal Unit; CSO Carnell Brown, Zone 2; and Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Lieutenants Mark Kruger and Michael “Chip” George display their awards following the Southside Business Men’s Club Annual Police Officer and Fire Fighter of the Year awards ceremony on October 22.

JACKSONVILLE JOURNEY FUNDING INCLUDES PREVENTION AND INTERVENTION PROGRAMS

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The city’s 2008-2009 budget included the hiring of much needed police and corrections officers, plus funding for projects and programs identified by various Journey subcommittees. Returning convicted felons to the community and helping them become successful, along with other important prevention and intervention programs, are critical to stemming violent crime in the community.

VICE UNIT BREAKS UP DOG FIGHTING RING
Members of the Vice Unit arrested four people for using animals for the purpose of fighting, following a four month investigation on the Northside. More than 100 dogs were rescued. Cattle prods, syringes, canine drugs, and other dog fighting paraphernalia was recovered. The home was DARTed and several vehicles were seized.
Photo 3: Of the 116 pit bulls rescued, 102 had to be euthanized. The remaining 14 were mostly puppies, and along with several adult dogs, were deemed suitable for adoption.
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LIGHT THE CITY

JSO Motor Unit members (see photo # 4) led 750 motorcyclists and their passengers, who participated in the	annual	Light	the	City	charity	ride.	The	event	raised	more	than	$37,000	for	PAL	and	the	Concerns	of	Police	 Survivors	(COPS.)	

INVESTIGATION REVEALS UNPERMITTED STORAGE OF 60,000 TIRES

The	JSO	Interagency	Special	Investigations	Unit	and	the	Department	of	Environmental	Protection	collaborated	 to investigate the unlawful storage of 60,000 illegally dumped tires at four different sites in Jacksonville (see photo # 5). Kenneth Landers was located and arrested on charges of. In addition, the owners of the properties involved were required to lawfully dispose of the tires or reduce the numbers of tires to meet state guidelines.
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NEW FISCAL YEAR INFUSES OPERATION SAFE STREETS OVERTIME

A $4 million allocation by city officials ensured that overtime officers would return to the streets to continue their community outreach and enforcement through the end of 2008 and into 2009. From Feb-May in 2008, overtime money used for amplified police presence in the “Hot Spots” neighborhoods resulted in a 29% reduction of murder in those areas, and a 15% reduction city wide.
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CALLED TO SERVE: October Employees of the Month

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Photo 6: (l-r standing) Corrections Officer of the Month William B. Stanford, PTDF; Police Supervisor of the Month Lt. Mathew S. Nemeth, Zone 1; Civilian Employee of the Month Clerical Support Aide III, Alecia Y. Tremble, Investigations Division, Crimes Against Property and Crimes Against Persons; Police Officer of the Month Det. Jared T. Reston, Career Criminal Unit; and Volunteer Bishop Darrell L. Coats, Community Posse. Not pictured: Corrections Supervisor of the Month Corrections Sgt. Barbara J. Weber, PTDF.

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November
POLICE EXPLORER PROGRAM DEVELOPS LAW ENFORCEMENT SKILLS IN TEENS

On	November	25,	thirty-five	Police	Explorer	cadets	(see	photo	#	1)	celebrated	graduation	from	the	Police	 Explorer program. They completed 64 hours of training in various police related functions, all designed to develop	their	interest	law	enforcement	as	a	profession.	The	Explorer	Program	is	a	branch	of	the	Boy	Scouts	 that educates and involves youth in police operations. The participants also train and compete in regional and statewide Florida Sheriff’s Explorers Association competitions to test their skills.

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JSO CO-HOSTS THE NORTHEAST FLORIDA REGIONAL DOMESTIC SECRITY TASK FORCE ANNUAL MEETING

On Nov. 18 members of the Florida Coast Guard (left boat), Florida Wildlife Commission (right boat), and the JSO Marine Unit (not pictured) demonstrated tactical waterborne responses, on the St. Johns River, during the Northeast Florida Regional Domestic Security Task Force (RDSTF) Annual Meeting held at Metropolitan	Park	(see	photo	#	2).	More	than	200	members	of	the	RDSTF	from	the	12	surrounding	counties	 attended the event. Agencies brought tactical equipment and demonstrated the broad range of capabilities of first responders.

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ANNUAL ShAdCo MEETING RECONGIZES MEMBERSHIP GROWTH

During the annual ShAdCo meeting held on November 20, Sheriff Rutherford and his staff thanked the more than 500 plus ShAdCo members in attendance, for their partnership and volunteer time during the past year. The Sheriff also uses the meeting as an opportunity to share his vision for the coming year, and to inspire ShAdCo members to stay active in the fight against crime. ShAdCo is a volunteer organization of community members who meet regularly. It provides direct communication between JSO and citizens on issues of importance in the members’ neighborhoods. By year’s end there were 19 ShAdCo’s in operation with a combined membership of more than 2000 members. Photo 3: State Attorney-elect Angela Corey attended the annual ShAdCo Meeting and spoke to citizens about the need for partnerships between the police, citizens and city officials to fight crime in Jacksonville.
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33RD STREET PAL EXPANDS IN 2008

The	PAL	Board	of	Directors,	Jacksonville	PAL,	and	the	Jacksonville	Sheriff’s	Office	hosted	the	grand	opening	 of	a	new	PAL	Teen	Development	Center	located	at	the	33rd	Street	facility,	on	November	21.	The	new	center	 provides	teens	ages	15	and	up	use	of	the	center	and	the	programs	offered.	Planned	programs	and	services include: workforce development, community service projects, academic support, entrepreneurship, career development, entertainment, financial planning, educational and enrichment field trips and leadership training. The center currently serves 70 youth. Photo 4: Director of Patrol and Enforcement Micheal Edwards emceed the “Grand Opening” of the new Teen Development Center on November 21.

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MOUNTED UNIT STEPS IN

Three members of the JSO Mounted Unit patrolled neighborhoods in Arlington, following a rash of daytime residential burglaries. The unit (see photo # 5) responds, when requested, to any area of the city, providing an additional law enforcement presence. The horse’s stature affords the officers greater visibility and their presence in neighborhoods acts both as a crime deterrent and a community outreach tool. First Coast News reported that residents who live in the area came out of the houses just to say how thankful they were for the crime fighters that are hard to miss.

CALLED TO SERVE: November Employees of the Month

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Photo 6: (l-r) Reserve Officer of the Month Keith L. Seamann: Civilian Employee of the Month William F. Bass, Montgomery Correctional Center; Corrections Supervisor of the Month Corrections Sgt. Kenneth R. Westberry, II, Pre-Trial Detention Facility; Corrections Officer of the Month Mark M. Parrott, PTDF; Police Supervisor of the Month Police Sgt. Jerry C. Stang, Economic Crimes Unit; Police Officer of the Month Mark E. Gorsage (now retired), former member of the Canine Unit.
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RIDING FOR THE BRAND 15

December
1

CLAY AND DUVAL COOPERATION EXPANDS

1

The program dubbed “Cops Without Boarders” was first introduced in 2007, when the Clay County Sheriff’s Office (CCSO) partnered with JSO to track criminals who moved across jurisdictions. Utilizing the Law Enforcement Information Exchange (LInX) system, developed by Naval Criminal Investigative Service and with a memorandum of understanding between many agencies, officers can now track crime patterns and criminals that move between jurisdictions. In addition to the public campaign about “Cops Without Borders,” CCSO is adopting some of the same strategies used in JSO’s Operation Safe Streets. For the criminals, the message is “When You Cross the Line, So Will Law Enforcement.” Photo 1: (l-r) State Attorney-elect Angela Corey, Clay County Sheriff Rick Besler, Sheriff John H.
Rutherford, and officers from both agencies, at the Dec. 1 news conference announcing the new COPS WITHOUT BOARDERS billboard campaign on Blanding Boulevard.

2

I.M. Sulzbacher Holiday Party, 21 Kids of Christmas, Shop with a Cop, Special Needs Christmas Party, and the Annual Children’s Home Society Christmas Party are among the many annual events JSO employees organize and participate in to help make the holiday season special for children and their families in Jacksonville. Photo 2: New this year, Police Ofc. Michael Tomberg, Crime Free Multi-Housing Unit, Zone 2, played Santa
to the Hicks Family of the Chase Oaks Apartments on December 16.

JSO SUPPORTS THE COMMUNITY THROUGHOUT THE HOLIDAYS

3

INMATES GAIN SKILLS WHILE INCARCERATED

3

On December 8, 2008 JSO’s Community Transitions Center held graduation services for inmates who earned their General Education Development (GED) equivalency diploma or technical proficiency certificates. By years end, 73 inmates earned their GED’s as a result of the partnership between the JSO, the City of Jacksonville, and the Florida Community College Jacksonville in a program called DAWN. Photo 3: Axavien Kelly stands with his family after earning his
GED on December 8. Editor’s note- since earning his degree, Mr. Kelly has been released and is currently attending welding school.

JSO CITIZEN’S ACADEMY GROWS IN POPULARITY
Twice a year JSO holds a Citizen’s Academy to give citizens a broader understanding of how law enforcement functions in the community. In 2008 more than 30 citizens attended the 12 week class to learn about specialized units such as the Bomb Squad, Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) team, and Narcotics. They also toured the JSO correctional facilities and the firing range. Photo 4: Director of Personnel and Professional Standards
Rick Lewis (far left) and Police Officer Cindy Leavens, Citizen’s Academy Instructor (far right), were on hand to celebrate with the class of 13 Citizen’s Academy graduate in December.

4

“THE PREMIERE LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCY IN THE COUNTRY”

5

All training of Sworn and Corrections personnel is conducted at the Northeast Florida Criminal Justice Training and Education Center (“The Academy”). During 2008, the Academy offered four non-certified police officer classes, two police certified classes, two Corrections class, four cross-over classes, and two FCCJ basic law enforcement courses. In addition, 123 specialized/advanced courses, 22 police supervisor In-Service sessions, nineteen 19 Corrections In-Service sessions, and five Community Service Officer In-Service sessions were held. Photo 5: On Dec. 18 Corrections Officer Christopher Scarprinati addressed the 14 corrections recruits
during their graduation ceremony from the Basic Corrections Class, at the Academy.

REMEMBERING TED HIRES

6

The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office enjoys the support of many business and civic leaders in the community. Perhaps	none	of	them	had	as	great	an	impact	on	making	sure	the	criminal	justice	system	serves	the	victims	 of crime as Ted Hires (see photo # 6). He died suddenly in December. Ted founded The Justice Coalition, a non profit organization that is dedicated to serving crime victims and their families, as well as engaging the law abiding community to help in the fight against crime. His support and friendship to the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office will be missed and his devotion to making Jacksonville a safer city will be forever appreciated.

CALLED TO SERVE: December Employees of the Month

Photo 7: (l-r) Police Supervisor of the Month Police Sgt. Bobby Lyle, Field Training Office; Reserve Officer of the Month Michael D. Bragg; Civilian Supervisor of the Month William Winstead, Facilities Manager, Police Services; Civilian Employee of the Month Freda B. McDowell, ID/Records; Police Officer of the Month Trent M. Helms, Patrol, Zone 6. Not pictured: Corrections Officer of the Month Russell Rhoden, PTDF.
7

16 CALLED TO SERVE

Special Awards, Presentations and Recognition
SIX PILLARS of CHARACTER
Ten	JSO	employees	received	the	Six	Pillars	 of	Character	in	2008.	Each	Six	Pillars	of	 Character recipient is chosen, as deserved, for	displaying	at	least	one	of	the	Six	Pillars	of	 Character: trustworthiness, respect, responsibility, fairness, caring, and citizenship.
1

JANUARY Assistant Chief Bobby Deal Special Events

FEBRUARY Corrections Ofc. Letitia Merriweather Academy

MARCH Ret.	Police	Ofc.	 Scott McNeil

APRIL Police	Sgt. Ricky Brown Zone 4

MAY Police	Lt. John Lamb Community Affairs

JUNE Police	Ofc. David Sciandra Zone 3

JULY Police	Sgt. Steve Zona Robbery Unit

AUGUST School Resource Ofc. Richard Hendley Community Affairs

SEPTEMBER 2 Police	Ofc. Hazel Moore Zone 5

OCTOBER Police	Ofc. Mike McCall Zone 5

CERTIFICATES of COMMENDATIONS
Police	Sgt.	Lakesha	A.	Anderson,	Zone	4 Det. Donald A. Bishop, Robbery Unit Det.	Patrick	A.	Bodine,	Homicide	Unit Police	Ofc.	Beau	H.	Bottin	IV,	Zone	4 Det. Byron D. Butler, Robbery Unit Police	Sgt.	Keith	A.	Clement,	Zone	4 Det. Jamie L. Eason, Homicide Unit Det. Tanya M. Fowler, Robbery Unit Det. Tim A. Gagnon, Robbery Unit Police	Ofc.	Jody	M.	Kirkland,	Zone	5		 Det. Larry E. Kuczkowski, Robbery Unit Corrections Ofc. Nikki L. Logan, MCC Corrections Ofc. Lisa M. Love, MCC Corrections Ofc. David L. Lucas, MCC Det. Rudy A. McClain, Robbery Unit Police	Ofc.	Scott	J.	McNeil,	Zone	4 Corrections Sgt. Donna McWaters, MCC Police	Ofc.	Jason	M.	Mosley,	Zone	4 Police	Ofc.	Marc	A.	Musser,	Zone	4 Det. Clem G. Nieto, Robbery Unit

Awarded to JSO employees in recognition of service “above and beyond” the call of duty.
Corrections Sgt. Velinda R. Owens, MCC Det.	Mike	N.	Padgett,	Robbery	Unit Police	Ofc.	Michael	R.	Pickering,	Zone	4 Det. Margaret M. Rhatigan, Homicide Unit Corrections Ofc. Thomas W. Riner, MCC Det. Juan F. Roa, Robbery Unit Det. Juan L. Santiago, Robbery Unit Det. Donnie E. Slayton, Robbery Unit Police	Ofc.	Bart	R.	Smith,	Zone	4 Police	Sgt.	Barry	L.	Stevenson,	 Violent Crimes Task Force Det. Dennis M. Sullivan, Homicide Unit Corrections Ofc. James D. Taylor, MCC Det. Ernest M. Thompson, Robbery Unit Police	Ofc.	Scott	A.	Tucker,	Zone	5 Police	Ofc.	Rick	E.	Vercruysse,	Zone	4 Police	Sgt.	Arthur	A.	Webb	II,	Zone	4 Police	Ofc.	Justin	C.	Wilson,	Zone	4 Police	Ofc.	Troy	D.	Yorton,	Zone

Awarded to civilians who assist the JSO and the community.
3

CERTIFICATES of APPRECIATION
Mr. Brad Barnett Mr. Aaron Brown Mr. Mark Caliel Mr. James Carroll Mr. Jelani Crawford Mr. Daniel Devries Mr. Jerry Dorman Mr. Jeff Engelskirch Mr. Lee Griffin, III Mr. Skip Gwinn Mr. Mark Hartley Mr. William Hatchett Mr. Albert Hoehn Mr. Omar Holcomb Mr. Artemus Holly Mr. Christopher Howell Mr. Jerzy Hubert Mr. Rodney Ivey Ms. Susan Ivey

Mr. Dean Jones Mr. Jeff Kocak Mr. Fred Kowkabany Mr. Jeffrey Landers Mr. Ken Manning Mr. Bob McGarvey 4 Mr. Dennis McWhorter Ms. Kristina Meade Mr. Matt O’Keefe Mr.	Charles	Pearson Mr.	Johnny	Pride Mr. Sedrick Rivers Mr. Gary Silcox Mr. Kelly Sweat 5 Mr.		Philip	Vetter Ms. Misty Williams Ms. Maria Williams Mr. Gene Williams

Awarded to JSO employees who perform acts of courage in extremely hazardous situations. Police	Ofc.	Roy	A.	Fabila,	Zone	1 Police	Ofc.	Scott	E.	Millan,	Zone	2 Police	Ofc.	Burton	W.	Thomas,	Zone	1 Police	Ofc.	Michael	T.	Wong,	Zone	1 Police	Ofc.	M.	Robert	Winslow,	Marine	Unit	
LIFESAVING AWARD

MEDAL OF MERIT

Awarded to JSO employees whose actions directly results in the saving of another’s life.

Police	Ofc.	Ryan	T.	 Fraser,	Zone	4 	 Corrections Officer David M. Mireles, Jails Police	Ofc.	James	M.	Taylor,	Zone	1 Police	Ofc.	John	Whitcomb,	Zone	2 Police	Ofc.	G.	Perry	Yarber,	Zone	5 Det. Latosha M. Agnew, Burglary Unit Police	Ofc.	D.	Paul	Aldridge,	Marine	Unit	 Police	Ofc.	Chester	Bear,	Zone	6 Police	Ofc.	Frank	H.	Canaday,	Zone	4 Police	Ofc.	David	J.	Couch,	Zone	4

Police	Ofc.	C.	Pete	Goody,	Marine	Unit Police	Ofc.	P.	John	Hysler,	Zone	4 Police	Ofc.	Christian	L.	Kornegay,	Zone	3 6
PURPLE HEART

Awarded to a sworn or corrections officer who is seriously injured while performing his/her official duties. Det. Jared T. Reston, Career Criminal Unit Police	Officer	Nicholas	A.	Rodgers,	Zone	1		
RIDING FOR THE BRAND 17 7

Crime Statistics & Budget
Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office Grants Awarded by Year – 2008
Florida Department of Transportation- Integrated Traffic and Public Safety Analysis Project - year 3 Florida Department of Transportation - Covert DUI Vehicle Project USDOJ - JAG - Jacksonville Re-Entry Center - year 2 FDLE - JAG - Beaches Analyst - year 2 USDOJ - State Criminal Alien Assistance Program USDOJ - OJP - Bulletproof Vests Partnership 2008 TOTAL

Award Amount
$27,328 $57,678 $81,109 $51,661 $22,464 $30,188 $270,428

Required
$25,828

$25,828

OFFICE OF SHERIFF FY 2008 ANNUAL BUDGET
OTHER SERVICES & CHARGES 19% SUPPLIES & CAPITAL 2% EMPLOYEE BENEFITS 21% SALARIES 57% INSURANCE 1%

OFFICE OF SHERIFF FY 2008 ANNUAL BUDGET

APPROVED	 BUDGET BY CATEGORY % OF TOTAL

	

OFFICE OF SHERIFF FY 06-07 VS. FY 07-08 COMPARISON OF ANNUAL BUDGETS
Description Approved Budget FY 07 $176,308.584 57,440,795 7,702,795 8,936,389 184,746 201,372 32,414,172 352,020 528,109 3,313,874 3,114,300 90,000 1,314,776 420,954 4,818,250 633,535 3
$ 297,774.674
8 18 CALLED TO SERVE

SALARIES $183,045,770 EMPLOYEE	BENEFITS	 	 66,688,618	 PROFESSIONAL	SERVICES	 	 11,169,315		 OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICES 10,549,354 TRAVEL	AND	PER	DIEM	 	 220,607	 COMMUNICATIONS	&	FREIGHT	 	 204,030	 INTERNAL SERVICE ALLOCATIONS 33,682,773 UTILITY SERVICES 465,287 RENTALS AND LEASES 401,609 INSURANCE 3,438,736 REPAIR	&	MAINTENANCE	SERVICES	 3,703,661	 PRINTING	&	BINDING	 	 95,656	 OTHER CURRENT OBLIGATIONS 1,633,843 OFFICE	SUPPLIES	 	 524,456	 OPERATING	SUPPLIES	 	 5,916,289	 TRAINING,	PUBLICATIONS,	&	MEMBERSHIPS	 579,929	 MACHINARY	AND	EQUIPMENT	 	 60,003	 TOTAL $322,379,936

56.8 20.7	 3.5	 3.3 .1		 .1		 10.4 .1 .1 1.1 1.1		 0		 .5 .2	 1.8	 .2	 0	 100.0

Approved Budget FY 08 $183,045,770 66,688,618 11,169,315 10,549,354 220,607 204,030 33,682,773 465,287 401,609 3,438,736 3,703,661 95,656 1,633,843 524,456 5,916,289 579,929 60,003
$ 322,379,936

increase/ (Decrease) $6,737,186 9,247,823 3,466,520 1,612,965 35,861 2,658 1,268,601 113,267 (126,500) 124,862 589,361 5,656 319,067 103,502 1,098,039 (53,606) 60,000
$ 24,605,262

% of Increase/ (Decrease) 3.7% 13.9% 31.0% 15.3% 16.3% 1.3% 3.8% 24.3% -31.5% 3.6% 15.9% 5.9% 19.5% 19.7% 18.6% 9.2% 100.0%
8.3%

Salaries Employee Benefits Professional Services Other Contractual Services Travel and Per Diem Communicaitions and Freight Internal Service Allocations Utility Services Rentals and Leases Insurance Repair & Maintenance Services Printing and Binding Other Obligations Office Supplies Operating Supplies Training, Publications, & Memberships Machinery and Equipment

Crime Statistics
JACKSONVILLE SHERIFF’S OFFICE Jacksonville Sheriff’s UCR PART I CLEARANCES Office – 2008 UCR Part 1 Clearances
66.1 54.6 66.4 2008 Jacksonville Clearances 2007 National Average

JACKSONVILLE SHERIFF’S OFFICE Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office UCR Crimes FOR 2008 UCR CRIMESfor 2007 – – 2008
35.000 30.000

70.00

60.00

1

30,157

PERCENT CLEARED

50.00

NUMBER

40.00

39.6

48.8 46.9

25.000

20.000

30.00
23.0 21.4 10.3 MURDER RAPE ROBBERY AGG ASSAULT 9.1

15.000
12,012 4,717 AGG ASSAULT BURGLARY LARCENY

20.00

10.00

17.8

10.000
13.3 15.5

9.5

5,000
115 262 2,938

0.00

0

4,029 VEHICLE THEFT

BURGLARY

LARCENY

VEHICLE THEFT

MURDER

RAPE

ROBBERY

CRIME

CRIME

60000 50000 40000 50,238 51,072 51,250

UCR CRIMES 10 YEAR TREND
51,021 50,520 49,771 50,117 49,771 53,652 54,230

MURDERS BY MONTH – 2008
Murders by115 Murders Month – 2008
14 12 10 8 6 4

NUMBER

Number 30000 20000 10000 0 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

YEAR

2 0 Murders

Jan 11

Feb 7

Mar 7

Apr 7

May 7

Jun 11

Jul 13

Aug 5

Sep 12

Oct 14

Nov 12

Dec Total 9 115

TRAFFIC HOMICIDES BY MONTH 2007 vs. 2008
25

20

15

10

5

0 2007 Alcohol/Drug 2008 Alcohol/Drug 2007 All 2008 All

Jan 12 4 20 11

Feb 7 3 13 9

Mar 8 7 16 12

Apr 4 6 17 12

May 3 9 12 13

Jun 8 6 12 13

Jul 6 4 13 7

Aug 7 5 14 12

Sep 6 3 13 13

Oct 11 6 23 13

Nov 9 6 10 10

Dec 4 6 11 12

Total 85 65 174 137

7 RIDING THE BRAND 19

IMPORTANT NUMBERS
Emergency Non-Emergency Police Information Jail Information Administration Internal Affairs COMMUNITY AFFAIRS DIVISION Crime Prevention Special Events School Resource Officer 911 630-0500 630-7600 630-5747 630-2120 630-2187 630-2160 630-2160 630-2196 630-2160

PATROL DIVISION Zone 1 (Gateway) Zone 2 (Regency) Zone 3 (Powers Avenue) Zone 4 (Cedar Hills) Zone 5 (Superior Street) Zone 6 (Dunn Avenue) DETECTIVE DIVISION Crimes Against Property Burglary Unit Economic Crimes Interagency Investigations Auto Theft Unit/Marine Theft Crimes Against Persons Homicide Unit Cold Case Unit Fugitive Unit

630-2190 924-5361 726-5100 828-5463 573-3165 384-8028 696-4335 630-2170 630-7998 630-2175 630-2177 665-8025 630-2173 630-7991 630-2172 630-2172 630-2180

Missing Persons Unit 630-2627 Robbery Unit 630-2179 Sex Crimes/Family Violence & Child Abuse Unit 630-2168 Intimate Violence Enhanced Services Team 588-0201 Traffic Homicide Unit 630-2178 Victim Services Coordinator 630-1764 HOMELAND SECURITY DIVISION 630-0449 Career Criminal Unit 630-2324 Narcotics/Vice 630-2163 Homeland Security Unit 630-0449 DEPARTMENT OF POLICE SERVICES 630-2205 Central Records Unit 630-2209 Civil Process Unit 630-2141 Property and Evidence 588-0005 PERSONNEL & PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS 630-2134 Academy 713-4900 Recruitment www.JoinJSO.com

The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office is a triple crown accredited law enforcement agency.

501 East Bay Street • Jacksonville, FL 32202 • www.coj.net/sheriff


								
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