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Guidelines for Recruitment and Appointment of Unclassified Employees

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					Office of Human Resources, Employment Services, 122 Kerr Administration Building, (541) 737-0549

Guidelines for Recruitment and Selection of Unclassified Employees
Developed by the Office of Human Resources and The Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity

Table of Contents
Who to Contact for Assistance ................................................................................................................................................ 2 Definitions ................................................................................................................................................................................ 3 Policy on Recruitment and Appointment of Unclassified Employees ..................................................................................... 4 Roles in the Search Process ................................................................................................................................................... 5 Procedure for Recruitment and Appointment of Unclassified Employees .............................................................................. 7 Flow Chart of the Procedure for Recruitment and Appointment of Unclassified Employees (Exhibit A) ............................. 11 Procedure for Conducting an Accelerated Search (Exhibit B) .............................................................................................. 12 Procedure for Waiver of the Regular Search Process (Exhibit C) ....................................................................................... 13 Sample Advertisements (Exhibit D) ..................................................................................................................................... 14 Ads/Announcements That Meet Department of Labor Certification Guidelines (Exhibit E).................................................. 15 Sample Screening Summary (Exhibit F) ............................................................................................................................... 17 Guidelines for Conducting Reference Checks (Exhibit G) .................................................................................................... 18 Guidelines for Conducting Interviews (Exhibit H).................................................................................................................. 20 Interview Evaluation Form (Exhibit I) .................................................................................................................................... 26 Sample No Interview Letter (Exhibit J) .................................................................................................................................. 27 Sample Regret Letter to Applicants – Interviewed – Not Selected (Exhibit K) ..................................................................... 28

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Office of Human Resources, Employment Services, 122 Kerr Administration Building, (541) 737-0549

Who to Contact for Assistance
If you need assistance, email employment@oregonstate.edu. The subject of your message should be: “Need Assistance” In the body of your message include the following information:
   

The nature of your problem or issue you need assistance with Your Name Your Phone Number Your Department Name

Emails to this address typically receive a response within 3 – 4 hours. Note: You should first refer to the Campus User Guide for assistance on how to use the Online Position Description & Recruiting System. The link to the guide is: http://oregonstate.edu/admin/hr/jobs/UserGuide.doc

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Office of Human Resources, Employment Services, 122 Kerr Administration Building, (541) 737-0549

Definitions
Academic Rank
The category assigned to unclassified employees in the academic service, whether the service is teaching, research, extension, administration, or other. Academic rank is distinguished from professional faculty without rank and includes Professor, Associate Professor, Assistant Professor, Instructor, Senior Instructor, Research Associate, Faculty Research Assistant, Senior Faculty Research Assistant, and Lecturer. Refer to http://osu.orst.edu/staff/faculty/handbook.

Accelerated Search
A search lasting two weeks (14 calendar days) or less in duration; requires approval from the Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity.

Annual Tenure (Tenure-Track) Appointment
An appointment given to faculty employed at .50 FTE or more who are serving in a probationary status for indefinite tenure.

Fixed-Term Appointment
An appointment that is limited to a specified period of time (usually no more than one year or until the end of the current fiscal year) with stated beginning and ending dates.

Hiring Official
An individual who has the authority to hire employees within a department.

Indefinite Tenure
Appointment made by the President in witness of the university’s formal decision that the faculty member has demonstrated such professional competence that the university will not henceforth terminate employment except for cause, financial exigency, or program or department reductions.

Online Position Descriptions and Recruitment System
OSU system that automates the management of position descriptions and the recruitment process.

OSCAR
The Oregon State Central Administrative Resource website that provides secured access to online tasks for recruitment and hiring.

Professional Faculty
An employee working in an academic, student, or other administrative support position with professional titles, and without an assigned rank.

Underutilization
The employment of women and/or persons of color in a particular job group at a significantly lower rate than would reasonably be expected given their availability in the qualified population.

Waiver of Search
An exception to the regular recruitment and selection process, granted by the Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity.

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Office of Human Resources, Employment Services, 122 Kerr Administration Building, (541) 737-0549

Policy on Recruitment and Appointment of Unclassified Employees
Oregon State University will pursue an active recruitment and selection process to assure the availability of qualified applicants to meet its employment needs and to assure equal employment opportunity through affirmative action. Success is demonstrated by recruitment that actively includes people from historically under-represented (underutilized) groups, along with the selection and appointment of the most highly qualified candidates. Over time, fair and active recruitment and selection practices should result in OSU workforce demographics that mirror the demographics of the qualified applicant populations from which positions are filled. OSU engages in active recruitment and selection processes based on affirmative action principles in order to assure equal employment opportunities. At each step in the search and selection process, search committee members are asked to review their processes and practices to identify and eliminate unintended bias, and actively work to include applicants who historically have been excluded. The intent of this review is to ensure that no individual or group is discriminated against on the basis of a protected status, such as race, color, religion, national origin, citizenship, sex, sexual orientation, age, disability, or qualified veteran status. Hiring officials should seek advice and consultation on this policy and procedure from the Office of Human Resources. The Office of Human Resources will consult with Academic Affairs, Office of the General Counsel, and the Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity, as appropriate. Hiring officials seeking advice and approval to conduct an accelerated search or waive a search – or to obtain general guidance and strategies for equal opportunity, affirmative action, and diversity in the search – should contact the Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity.

Management/Retention of Recruitment and Selection Documents:
Documents related to the recruitment and selection process must remain confidential, and only shared with search committee members, the hiring supervisor, and the person managing the administrative functions of the process (search support person). Documents must be retained at the department level for three years after the date of appointment, and then destroyed.

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Office of Human Resources, Employment Services, 122 Kerr Administration Building, (541) 737-0549

Roles in the Search Process
Hiring Official
1. Selects search committee members with subject matter expertise or experience, diverse perspectives, integrity, independent views, good judgment, strong group skills, open-mindedness, and commitment to the university’s standard of promoting and enhancing diversity. 2. Meets with the full search committee and formally “charges” them with the responsibility to participate in the development of the position, write the position description (if applicable), and perform personal outreach to produce a diverse pool of qualified applicants. The hiring official is responsible for describing the vision, priorities, focus, and considerations to be adopted throughout the search process. 3. Reviews screening results, as needed, prior to interviews, especially if there is concern about some aspects of the screening process or lack of diversity in the finalist pool. 4. Interviews applicants at the end of the campus visit (after the search committee, department representatives, stakeholders in the position, etc.) to complete the visit, answer any questions, and describe the next steps in the search process. 5. Selects the appointee based on the available information (including application, interview results, reference checks, and the search committee’s written discussion of each applicant’s strengths and weaknesses), or makes a decision to reopen the search. 6. Negotiates a verbal offer with the proposed appointee, including terms of employment such as salary, start date, startup package (applies to some academic faculty positions), moving expenses, etc. Secures approval of offer from the Office of Human Resources prior to finalizing the offer and presents the offer to the appointee. 7. Announces the appointment, and creates a comprehensive plan to orient the new employee to the university, college, and department/unit. May assign a mentor to assist with this plan.

Search Committee Chair
1. Establishes favorable search practices that will: a. Involve the search committee members in active recruitment and personal outreach to a diverse group of potential applicants. b. Encourage search committee members to recognize and avoid unintentional bias. c. Provide each applicant with full consideration in order to maintain equal opportunity and fairness throughout the process. d. Maintain strict confidentiality throughout the search process (including names of applicants and committee discussions regarding qualifications, etc.). 2. Directs the affirmative action efforts of the search by: a. Monitoring the demographics of the pool by requesting demographic summary information from the search support person at each stage of the screening process. b. Identifying any groups screened out of the search process at a disproportionate rate, reviewing their applications, and advocating that they advance to the next step in the process, as appropriate. c. Acting affirmatively to advance women and people of color at each stage of the screening process, especially to the interview stage, unless there is no reasonable chance for their success. d. Increasing affirmative action efforts at every stage of the process when underutilization is present. These efforts include, but are not limited to: targeted recruiting; outreach; screening; and monitoring outcomes to assess and modify the current course of action, as necessary. 3. Manages timely communication with applicants, search support person, the hiring official, stakeholders, and the Office of Human Resources.
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Office of Human Resources, Employment Services, 122 Kerr Administration Building, (541) 737-0549

4. Maintains strict confidentiality throughout the search process (including names of applicants and committee discussions regarding qualifications, etc.). 5. Contact applicants interviewed, but not selected to inform them of their status.

Search Support Person
1. Manages applicant files by: a. Communicating with applicants and responding to requests for information. b. Ensuring strict confidentiality about applicants; their status in the search and their personal demographic information. 2. Compiles applicant demographic information and provides reports to the search chair at each stage of the screening process. 3. Performs other administrative support tasks that may include, but are not limited to placing approved ads and announcements, managing the status of applicants in the online system, scheduling meetings and interviews, and making travel/lodging arrangements. 4. Maintains strict confidentiality throughout the search process (including names, gender, and race of applicant pools and search committee discussions regarding applicants.

Search Committee Member
1. Makes a commitment to participate in all aspects of the search process by: Evaluating the position and assisting with the development of the position description (if applicable). Participating in active personal outreach to a diverse group of potential applicants. Recognizing and avoiding unintentional bias throughout the screening process. Increasing affirmative action efforts at every stage of the process when underutilization is present. Providing a fair and equitable assessment of each applicant’s skills, knowledge and abilities to perform the functions of the job. f. Considering whether or not each applicant has “transferable” skills; those that might be used to meet minimum qualifications, in an effort to avoid unnecessary exclusion from further consideration. g. Reconsidering applicants who have been screened out of the process, as requested by the search committee chair. h. Providing an in-depth evaluation of each finalist’s strengths and weaknesses as part of the recommendation to the hiring official. 2. Maintains strict confidentiality throughout the search process (including names, gender, and race of applicants, and committee discussions regarding applicants. a. b. c. d. e.

Use of Applicant Demographic Information
Applicant demographic information (race/ethnicity and gender is collected in an effort to build and support our affirmative action plan. In order to use this information appropriately, OSU is committed to: 1. Keeping individual applicant demographic information confidential and separate from applicant files. 2. Sharing demographic information only with the chair and members of the search committee to assess potential exclusionary effect at each stage of the screening process.

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Office of Human Resources, Employment Services, 122 Kerr Administration Building, (541) 737-0549

Procedure for Recruitment and Appointment of Unclassified Employees
This procedure is the primary method used to recruit applicants for unclassified positions. Approval to conduct an accelerated search (see Exhibit B, Procedure for Conducting an Accelerated Search), or waive a search (see Exhibit C, Procedure for Waiver of the Regular Search Process) will be granted only in exceptional cases, as these types of searches represent an exception to the regular recruitment and appointment process.

Step 1. Hiring Official Initiates the Search Process
1. Review and identify position requirements and necessary qualifications. a. Establish the position and assess the value added to the department/unit. b. Determine the required and preferred knowledge, skills, experience and abilities necessary to perform the position successfully, and how will they be measured or evaluated. c. Determine the non-traditional criteria, skills and work experience that are transferable to the position. d. Determine other attributes that would make an applicant successful in the position. e. Review the position description for completeness and clarity. If the position description is outdated or doesn’t exist, update or create it using the online position description and recruitment system. 2. Identify search committee chair, search support person, and list of search committee members: a. Five to nine committee members is an optimal number. A variety of perspectives broadens and enriches the breadth of the decision-making process. b. Strive for racial/ethnic and gender diversity. c. Involve the search committee members in each step of the process, including an in-depth review of the position requirements and qualifications and how they will be measured or evaluated as screening criteria in the search process. 3. Employees designated as Unit Contact/Managers or Human Resource Liaisons will login to the online position management and recruitment system and create a new action to begin the recruitment process.

Step 2. Recruit for the Position
1. Once a search is approved by OHR, the search committee may proceed with recruiting, using both of the following recruitment methods: a. Focused recruiting – each committee member documents his/her efforts in networking with colleagues to identify and recruit interested, qualified people (paying particular attention to attracting applicants who are women and people of color, especially when there is under-utilization). b. Broadcast recruiting – advertise in accordance with the distribution plan. Important Information for Assistant/Associate/Professor Recruitments: If teaching is a component of the duties of this position, and the hiring supervisor intends to consider Non-U.S. Citizen or Non-Resident applicants, the recruitment action must include a written advertisement intended for publication in a professional journal. (Photocopies or printouts of on-line advertisements are not acceptable). Proof of the placement of this advertisement is a requirement for the Labor Certification process for permanent residency. Contact Valerie Rosenberg, Director, International Student and Scholar Services, for assistance in this process. See Exhibit E for assistance. 2. The Unit Contact/Manager or HR Liaison monitors the race/ethnicity and gender of applicants and shares percentage distributions with the chair and members of the search committee to help them decide if they are satisfied with the diversity of the applicant pool. Demographic summary reports are accessible through the online system at any time throughout the search process.

Step 3. Screen Applicants
1. Once applicants begin to apply for a position, the search committee members and the Unit Contact Manager or HR Liaison can begin reviewing the applicant pool to determine if the recruitment resulted in a sufficient number of qualified applicants for consideration, and if the pool is sufficiently diverse. If not, the search committee should confer with the hiring official to determine next steps in extending the search process and engaging in more additional focused recruiting.

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Office of Human Resources, Employment Services, 122 Kerr Administration Building, (541) 737-0549

2. If the search committee determines that the applicant pool is acceptable, they proceed to review applicant materials, using the screening criteria to assess the strengths of each applicant (see Exhibit E, Sample Screening Summary). Search committee members are encouraged to separate applicants into categories, such as: a. Unqualified or unacceptable applicants. b. Qualified applicants. c. Highly qualified applicants. If the applicant pool is large, consider dividing the search committee into sub-groups, and give a portion of the applications to each group to evaluate. If the applicant pool is small, each committee member is encouraged to review each application. 3. After the initial review of the qualifications of each applicant and the determination by the search committee of the qualified applicant pool, the search committee chair reviews the resulting applicant pool with the search committee to ensure that women and people of color are represented in the qualified pool in the same proportion that they were in the original applicant pool. 4. The search committee selects the applicants to be considered further for an interview and professional reference checks. The search committee chair reviews this list of applicants with the search committee to ensure that women and people of color are represented in the same proportion that they were in the qualified applicant pool. After revisiting applicants that may merit additional consideration, the chair must provide job-related reasons for each applicant eliminated at this stage. OAR 580-20-005 prohibits one from simultaneously holding the status of faculty member (all unclassified positions; those with and without rank) and graduate student. Thus, students are considered to be in active student status from the time of matriculation until degree certification and, thus, are ineligible for faculty positions unless the Dean of the Graduate School has granted an exception to the OAR. Criteria by which exceptions may be considered are found at the Graduate School website, where you may also access the OAR rules. The website can be accessed at see the Graduate School’s explanation at http://oregonstate.edu/dept/grad_school/faculty/facultystudent.html). Please note that this OAR applies to each term, including summer session. Contact the Graduate School with questions about this OAR. 5. Search committee members may decide to check professional references for the top tier group of applicants (see Exhibit F, Guidelines for Conducting Reference Checks). When conducting reference checks, hiring officials are encouraged to talk with former supervisors and professional associates in order to obtain specific information about the applicant’s experience and qualifications in previous positions. Degrees, professional licenses and credentials should be checked before interviews are conducted. Use the National Clearinghouse at http://www.degreeverify.com to verify degrees.

Step 4. Pre-Interview Approval
The Unit Contact/Manager or the HR Liaison must request pre-interview approval from the Office of Human Resources. The status for each applicant must be updated in the online system before requesting permission to interview. The Office of Human Resources will send pre-interview approval by return email or contact the search chair or search committee support person for further information, if needed, prior to giving approval to proceed.

Step 5. Campus Interview and Visit
1. After receiving pre-interview approval from the Office of Human Resources, all applicants are contacted: a. Applicants to be interviewed are contacted by telephone or email to schedule the campus interview and visit. b. Applicants who were not selected for the first round of interviews but who are still under consideration should be informed of their status. 2. The campus interview and visit serves several functions: a. The search committee reviews and discusses with the applicants their experience and skills as related to the position duties and non-traditional criteria. b. Applicants learn about the position and OSU.
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Office of Human Resources, Employment Services, 122 Kerr Administration Building, (541) 737-0549

Campus and community constituents meet the applicants, interact or interview them, and provide feedback to the search committee. d. The search committee has an opportunity to promote the position and employment at OSU. 3. A campus visit may include any of the following activities in addition to an interview: a. A tour of the department, campus and community. b. An opportunity for the applicant to give a presentation, seminar, lecture, or other public demonstration of skills required for the position. c. A public forum providing an opportunity for interaction between the applicant and his/her campus constituents (often used for administrative positions). d. An opportunity for the applicant to ask questions about the department, position, employee benefits, community resources, opportunities for dual-career couples, etc. 4. Conducting interviews (see Exhibit G, Guidelines for Conducting Interviews): a. Make the applicants feel welcome and comfortable in the interview environment – the goal is for them to be comfortable so they can best represent their skills, knowledge and abilities to perform the duties of the position. b. Practice behavioral interviewing – a technique that focuses on specific job-related experiences. c. Interview questions must be related to the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to successfully carry out the duties and responsibilities of the job. Avoid asking questions that will elicit information that can later be used in a discriminatory manner when making a hiring decision.

c.

Step 6. Search Committee Evaluates Interview Process Outcomes
1. The search committee reconvenes and evaluates the results of the applicant interviews (see Exhibit H, Interview Evaluation Form). The result of this meeting should be a written discussion of each applicant deemed qualified after the interview process is complete. This document, at a minimum, should contain: a. The name of each acceptable applicant. b. The applicant’s qualifications for the position. c. The applicant’s strengths. d. The applicant’s weaknesses. e. The committee’s overall assessment of each applicant interviewed. Compare each applicant’s qualifications to the other applicants who have been interviewed. Assess each applicant’s qualifications as applicable to the position. f. Assessment of the diversity hiring criterion: If the diversity criterion is a required qualification, describe how the proposed appointee meets this requirement. If the diversity criterion is a preferred qualification, describe how this qualification was addressed in the search/selection process. If reference checks have not been completed prior tot this stage, they MUST be conducted before submitting recommendations to the hiring official.

2. The committee report is submitted to the hiring official, who makes the final hiring decision.

Step 7. Appointing an Applicant
1. After receiving the search committee’s report on the finalist interview process and reference checking, the hiring official can do one of the following: a. Rely on the search committee’s recommendation by selecting one of the finalists; b. Conduct further investigation and evaluation of an applicant’s experience and qualifications; or c. Reject the recommendations of the search committee and reopen the search. 2. When the hiring official selects an applicant for appointment, she/he may contact the applicant and make a verbal offer, being sure to make clear that the offer is contingent upon the Office of Human Resource’s written approval. Salary, start date, and other conditions of employment can be negotiated at this point if they are consistent with the information approved on the posting for the position. If the conditions of employment are not consistent with the information approved on the posting, the hiring official must contact the Office of Human Resources to discuss his/her recommended terms and conditions of employment before an offer of employment can be negotiated.
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Office of Human Resources, Employment Services, 122 Kerr Administration Building, (541) 737-0549

When a tentative agreement is reached, the Unit Contact/Manager or HR Liaison asks the Office of Human Resources to review the letter of offer. See the online system user guides for specific instructions. 3. The recommended appointee accepts the position by signing and returning a copy of the letter of offer. The new employee must also sign and return the “Fast-Track Employee I.D.” form to the department. Once the form is returned, the hiring official must fax a copy to Employee Records & Information in the Office of Human Resources at 737-0553.

Step 8. Announcing the Appointment of an Applicant
1. Before an announcement is made, the applicant should be given an opportunity to resign from her/his present position. 2. The search committee phones and/or sends regret letters to those applicants who have not yet received notification of the search outcome. 3. The hiring official announces the appointment to the department/college and university, as appropriate.

Step 9. Provide Integration and Orientation Sessions for New Employee
Hiring official creates a comprehensive integration and orientation program to introduce the new employee to the university, college, and department. Refer to Inside OSU, an orientation guide for new employees at http://oregonstate.edu/admin/hr/newempl.html, as a resource.

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Office of Human Resources, Employment Services, 122 Kerr Administration Building, (541) 737-0549

Exhibit A – Recruitment and Appointment of Unclassified Employees Process Flow Chart
Hiring official initiates the search process by forming the search committee and involving them the development of the position in and writing the position description.
↓

Hiring official completes the appropriate “fill” action in the online system submits the NAPO packet to OHR
↓

OHR reviews and approves search plan
↓

Search committee recruits for the position
↓

Search committee evaluates applications and conducts reference checks; selects applicants to interview
↓

Search committee obtains pre-interview approval from OHR
↓

Campus visits and interviews are conducted
↓

Search committee evaluates interview process outcomes and conducts additional reference checks, as appropriate
↓

An applicant is recommended for the position; the hiring official submits a draft letter of offer to OHR through the online system
↓

The appointment is approved by OHR
↓

Hiring official sends approved letter of offer to the appointee.
↓

Once the offer letter is signed, the department completes hiring paperwork to formally “hire” the new employee. Hiring packet is submitted to OHR.

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Office of Human Resources, Employment Services, 122 Kerr Administration Building, (541) 737-0549

Exhibit B – Procedure for Conducting an Accelerated Search
An accelerated search is one lasting 14 days or less. The Unit Contact/Manager must login to the Online Position Description & Recruiting system, and complete the following steps when requesting an accelerated search:     On the Comments page of the action, add a statement declaring that you are requesting permission from the Office of Affirmative Action (OAAEO) to conduct an accelerated search. After you save this action or save and submit it to the HR Liaison, make note of the action number. You will need it for the next step. Send an email to the Office of Affirmative Action & Equal Opportunity (OAAEO) requesting permission to conduct an accelerated search. Include the action number assigned to your action, so they can easily access it in the system. An associate in the OAAEO will reply to your email, approving or denying your request.

You can send your request to the OAAEO at any time in the workflow up through submission to the HR Officer. The selection process proposed must be consistent with the Policy & Procedure for Recruitment and Appointment of Unclassified Employees. A search committee of five to seven members is recommended for an accelerated search. Questions regarding these instructions may be directed to the Office of Human Resources (737-3103) or the Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity (737-0865). Email: affirmative.action@oregonstate.edu

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Office of Human Resources, Employment Services, 122 Kerr Administration Building, (541) 737-0549

Exhibit C – Procedure for Waiver of the Regular Search Process
CRITERIA
The Office of Affirmative Action & Equal Opportunity (OAAEO) may authorize a waiver of the regular search process for an unclassified position when: 1. 2. 3. 4. an emergency exists; the proposed appointee is uniquely qualified; a recent search reveals the lack of a qualified pool of applicants; or other compelling reasons exist.

Decisions to waive the regular search procedures are made on a case-by-case basis. In determining the appropriateness of a waiver, the OAAEO considers whether or not the waiver would result in a hire that supports Oregon State University’s affirmative action goals and its policy of being responsive to dual career couples. The Unit Contact/Manager begins a new “fill” action in the Online Position Descriptions and Recruitment system, and submits the action through the department workflow. After the Dean/VP approves the action and submits it to the HR Officer, the Position description will be reviewed for classifiability to make certain that the work described is unclassified work. After reviewing the PD, the HR Officer will send the submitter of the action an email stating that the action is pending – on hold until the Office of Affirmative Action & Equal Opportunity (OAAEO) approves or denies the request to waive the search. One the Unit Contact/Manager receives notification from the HR Officer that the action is pending, the Unit Contact/Manager must send an email to the Office of Affirmative Action & Equal Opportunity requesting permission to waive the regular competitive search process. They should Include the action number assigned to the action, so OAAEO can easily access it I the system. The Unit Contact/Manager should copy employee.relations@oregonstate.edu on the email to OAAEO. An associate in the OAAEO will reply to the Unit Contact/Manager by email (and copy Employee Relations), approving or denying the request.

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Office of Human Resources, Employment Services, 122 Kerr Administration Building, (541) 737-0549

Exhibit D – Sample Advertisements
Sample #1
Assistant Professor, Tenure Track Position (Position Title), (Department), Oregon State University. Responsibilities include ***. Position is a full/part time, 12/9-month tenure-track position. Salary is commensurate with education and experience. Required qualifications include ***. Preferred qualifications include ***, and a demonstrable commitment to promoting and enhancing diversity. To review posting and apply, go to http://oregonstate.edu/jobs Posting #000****. Closing Date: --/--/--. OSU is an AA/EOE, and has a policy of being responsive to dual-career needs.

Sample #2
Sample Ad for Full/Part-Time Instructor Positions Oregon State University, Department of ***, is recruiting for full/part-time Instructors to teach on a term by term basis for the 2007-2008 academic year. These are fixed-term appointments, w/renewal at the discretion of the department chair. Courses to be taught may include ***. Salary is commensurate with education and experience. Required qualifications: MS, MA, or Ph.D. in ***; evident commitment to cultural diversity & educational equity; teaching experience at the college or university level (in some cases this qualification may be preferred rather than required and is based on department need). Preferred qualifications include *** and a demonstrable commitment to promoting and enhancing diversity. For consideration to teach Fall 2006, applications should be received by MM/DD/YYYY. To review posting and apply, go to http://oregonstate.edu/jobs . Posting #000****. You will be required to electronically submit a letter of application describing your experience, qualification and interest (if recruiting for multiple disciplines, ask applicants to identify which discipline(s) they are qualified to teach), curriculum vita, evidence of teaching excellence (optional * see below), and names/phone #’s of three professional ref. (Optional: For additional information you may contact: ***). OSU is an AA/EOE. Sample (Cost Saver) Instructor Positions (Department), Oregon State University. Required qualifications include ***. To review posting and apply, go to http://oregonstate.edu/jobs . Posting #000****. OSU is an AA/EOE. * If teaching experience at the College or University level is a required qualification, you may request evidence of teaching excellence. If this is preferred, evidence of teaching excellence should not be requested.

Sample #3
Professional Faculty Position (Non-leadership) (Position Title), (Department), Oregon State University. Responsibilities include ***. This is a full-time, 12-month fixed-term position with renewal at the discretion of the supervisor. Annual full-time salary range is $32,000 – $48,200/yr). Required qualifications include ***. Preferred qualifications include *** and a demonstrable commitment to promoting and enhancing diversity. To review posting and apply, go to http://oregonstate.edu/jobs Posting #000****. Closing Date: --/--/--. OSU is an AA/EOE, and has a policy of being responsive to dual-career needs. Sample #4 Cost Saver) (Position Title), (Department), Oregon State University. Required qualifications include ***. To review posting and apply, go to http://oregonstate.edu/jobs Posting #000****. Closing Date: --/--/--. OSU is an AA/EOE.

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Office of Human Resources, Employment Services, 122 Kerr Administration Building, (541) 737-0549

Exhibit E – Writing Position Announcements That Will Meet Department of Labor Requirements for Tenure-Track Positions With Teaching Duties
The following is a suggested guide for writing position announcements that will meet Department of Labor requirements for labor certification petitions. The labor certification process is the first step of some employment-based permanent residency petitions. If you have additional questions, please contact the Office of International Student & Faculty Services at 541-737-6475. Position Announcement Overview (read below for details) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Job title Duties State rank (e.g. Assistant Professor ) Include the word “teaching”

Employment FTE Note that the position is full-time Experience Degree Disciplines Position Announcement Plainly state “___ years & ___ months” List explicitly: “PhD by start of employment” or “PhD at time of offer” or “PhD in XX” Refer to all disciplines acceptable for position Advertise in at least 1 print journal with a national circulation

Following these guidelines will allow for greater flexibility when pursuing permanent residency in the event that the candidate selected for hire is not a U.S. citizen or permanent resident.

1. Job title(s): If you are uncertain about the specific rank, include all possibilities. E.g.: “Appointment is anticipated at the Assistant Professor rank, but candidates with exceptional qualifications may be considered for appointment at the rank of Associate Professor or Professor.” Please remember that listing “tenure-track faculty member” is not acceptable. 2. Duties: The advertisement must explicitly state that job duties include “teaching.” 3. Employment FTE: Full-time job offers are required for all employment-based permanent residency petitions. The department may want to consider allowing themselves some flexibility in hiring by using the following wording: The appointment for this position will be made in one of two ways, at the discretion of the Department Head: 1) Full-time 9-month appointment. Tenure track will be offered at 1.00 FTE. The appointee will be expected to generate grants and/or contracts for any appointment during the summer months. 2) Full-time 12-month appointment. Tenure track will be offered at 0.75 FTE. The appointee will be expected to generate 0.25 FTE in sponsored grants and/or contracts to raise their appointment percent to 1.00 FTE. 4. Experience requirements: For the Department of Labor “experience” means “full-time work.” In the position announcement, plainly state “___ years & ___ months”. Avoid general terms like “Post-doctoral experience required” or “must be an experienced scientist.” The department must document that the selected candidate met each and every requirement.

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5. Degree requirement: If you anticipate that your applicant pool will include individuals who have not yet completed the PhD, suggested language would be “candidates must have earned a PhD by the start date of employment” or “candidates must have earned a PhD at the time of offer”. Avoid saying “PhD required” if you will actually consider applicants who are ABD. 6. Disciplines acceptable for position: Clearly state degrees and disciplines that will be considered acceptable to fill this position. E.g. “PhD in Genetics, Molecular Biology, Biochemistry or Microbiology” 7. Position announcement: Must be published in at least one print journal with national circulation. Web postings are excellent supplements, but cannot substitute for a published advertisement in a print journal. A word of caution: avoid “unduly restrictive” job requirements and document “business necessity.” The Department of Labor may consider an experience requirement of more than two years “unduly restrictive” and the department will need to document business necessity for the additional experience. Position Announcement Check list Yes         No        

Job title explicitly states rank The word “teaching” is included in the description of duties The position description includes a clear reference to “full-time” employment Experience is listed in number of years (and months) Degree requirements clearly communicated All acceptable disciplines are included in requirements Position was advertised in at least one print journal with a national circulation There are no “unduly restrictive job” requirements

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Exhibit F – Sample Screening Summary
Position: ___________________________________________ Applicant:__________________________________________ Evaluator:__________________________ Date:______________________________

Required Qualifications:

Yes/No

Strengths

Advance Applicant to the Next Round of Screening

B.A. in Business Administration or related field, or equivalent combination of education and experience. (List degree and related experience) Five years experience in career development and employee relations. (Llist number of years experience) Knowledge of higher education employee relations issues and practices. Preferred Qualifications: MBA degree. Budget management experience.

Comments:

IMPORTANT: OAR 580-20-005 prohibits one from simultaneously holding the status of faculty member (all unclassified positions; those with and without rank) and graduate student. Thus, students are considered to be in active student status from the time of matriculation until degree certification and, thus, are ineligible for faculty positions unless the Dean of the Graduate School has granted an exception to the OAR. Criteria by which exceptions may be considered are found at http://oregonstate.edu/dept/grad_school/faculty/facultystudent.html. Please note that this OAR applies for each term, including summer term. Please contact the Graduate School if you have any questions about this OAR.
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Exhibit G – Guidelines for Conducting Reference Checks
The Importance of Conducting Reference Checks
The hiring official must check professional references prior to seeking approval to appoint the selected candidate. Checks may be conducted prior to requesting pre-interview approval OR after interviews have been completed. When conducting a reference check, hiring officials are encouraged to talk with a former supervisor as well as former colleagues, peers, students, staff and other professional associates. A former supervisor can speak specifically to an applicant’s quality and quantity of work, reliability, potential problem areas, and specific job behaviors. It is recommended that hiring officials contact at least three past employers to find consistent trends in the applicant’s past performance. Calling several employers will also help balance the information received and guard against making a decision based on opinions or information that may not be factual. It is important that the solicited information relates directly to the applicant’s ability to carry out the responsibilities of the job. It can be challenging to persuade the former employers to speak frankly about the candidate. ORS.30.178 protects current or former employers from civil liability when they, in responding to the request of prospective employers, disclose information about employees “in good faith”. “Good faith” is violated if the information is knowingly false or deliberately misleading, is rendered with malicious purpose, or violates any civil right of the former employees (such as disclosure of confidential medical information, or other protected information).

Managing the Conversation with a Professional Reference
Identify yourself and the applicant and ask the reference if this is a good time to talk. Briefly describe the position. Assure the reference that the information they provide will be held as confidential as the law allows. Confirm the dates of employment and the reference's relationship with the applicant. Verify the job titles, both formal and informal. Inquire about job-related skills, experience and performance. Ask open- ended questions. Discuss attendance records, including unexcused absenteeism and tardiness. Specific information, such as the average number of days absent (excused or unexcused) or tardy per month, may be the most helpful. 8. Inquire about reason for termination. Although a human resources office can provide an official reason, a supervisor generally can provide a more thorough explanation. 9. Ask about the possibility of rehire. A former employer’s reluctance to rehire should be a cause for concern. However, some firms have general policies prohibiting rehires. If this is the case, it should be noted. 10. Seek information about disciplinary actions. It is important to know if the applicant was ever reprimanded or disciplined, and the reasons for this action. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Sample Questions
        What is/was your relationship to (applicant)? From what month and year until what month and year did you work with (applicant)? Can you verify the position(s) he or she held? Did you have the opportunity to observe (applicant) in his/her position as ***? How would you describe his/her performance in this position? How would you describe (applicant) scholarly potential? Was s/he published while working in your organization? What did (applicant) accomplish in the way of outreach and public service while working in your organization? If hired to work at OSU, (applicant) will be expected to work well in an academically diverse environment. Can you tell me, based on your past personal observations, how s/he would meet this expectation?

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            

What is your assessment of his/her teaching skills? Describe (applicant’s) relationship with students and his/her teaching style. Describe (applicant) ability to take on and learn new tasks. In what areas does (applicant) need additional development/improvement? Describe (applicant) organizational/time management skills. How much supervision did (applicant) require? How would you compare the performance of (applicant) with that of others who have held the same job? Describe (applicant) communication skills with customers/co-workers/supervisors. What type of business correspondence did (applicant) compose? Describe the quality of his/her writing including grammar, spelling and punctuation. Please describe (applicant) work ethic in the context of tardiness, absenteeism, attitude, abuse of sick or vacation time, dependability, trustworthiness, or completion of assigned tasks. Why did (applicant) leave your organization? Would you hesitate to re-employ or work with (applicant) if you had the opportunity? Is there any additional information that you feel we should have in considering (applicant) for employment?

The information received from a reference is a critical part of the evaluation of each applicant. If the reference raises any doubts, additional references and follow-up interviews with the applicant should be scheduled. Never reveal the information received from a previous employer to the applicant. This information is to be kept as confidential as the law will allow. The information received from a reference must be filed with the recruitment file, separate from employee's files.

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Exhibit H – Guidelines for Conducting Interviews
Appropriate Interview Questions
Good interview questions will illuminate the experience of an applicant well enough to indicate the prospects for his or her success in the position. Generally, all questions should be related to the knowledge, skills and abilities necessary to successfully carry out the duties and responsibilities of the job. Questions about basic workplace competencies, work ethic, decision making, problem-solving, and interpersonal relations that indicate a person’s professional character, are also appropriate. Each applicant should be asked the same set of questions; follow-up questions can and will vary from applicant to applicant. The criteria for determining which questions are acceptable are: (1) ask only for information that you intend to use to make a hiring decision, (2) know how you will use the information to make that decision, and (3) recognize that the practice of seeking information that you do not use can be difficult to defend. These rules suggest that the best questions will emerge from a careful analysis of the position.

Types of Interview Questions
Interview questions can be informational, situational, or behavioral. Informational questions ascertain the facts of a person’s education and career. Situational questions ascertain an applicant’s response to a hypothetical or real-life situation and also test an applicant’s ability to analyze and solve a problem or make decisions. Behavioral questions ascertain the nature of the applicant’s past behavior, which may indicate future performance.

Practice Behavioral Interviewing
Behavioral interviewing is a technique that focuses on specific job-related experiences. The questions are designed to address the knowledge, skills, and abilities for the position. Behavioral interviewing questions focus on specific examples of an applicant’s past behavior in an effort to predict future behavior. These are “situation-problem” questions that are useful in evaluating an applicant’s problem solving or judgment skills. Examples of behavioral interviewing questions include:   “Think of a difficult person you have had to deal with on your last job. Tell us exactly what happened and how you handled the situation." “Tell us about an important goal you set in the past and how successful you were in accomplishing it.”

Follow-up Questions
When a follow-up question is necessary, use a directive question, to draw specific information or clarify information. Examples of directive questions include:    “Can you tell us more about that?” “Can you give us a specific example of what you mean?” “Can you cite an example please, and tell us step-by-step exactly what happened?"

Closing Questions
It is recommended that both of the following questions be asked of each applicant at the close of the interview:   “Do you have any questions about this position, the duties, etc?” “Reference checking is an important part of our screening process. Do we have all of the information we need to check your professional references? “ (Offer the applicant the option of signing a Reference Release Form.)

Inappropriate Interview Questions
Interview questions must be job-related. Avoid asking questions that will elicit information that can later be used in a discriminatory manner when making a hiring decision.
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The following subjects include factors that when used or considered during an interview, might be interpreted to violate non-discrimination laws. These subjects should be avoided. Address Age Specific inquiry into foreign addresses, which would indicate national origin. Age, date of birth or any other inquiries which would require candidates to disclose their age. Candidate’s nationality, lineage, ancestry, national origin, descent or parentage; length of residency in the United States; ancestry of immediate family or spouse's family; and questions regarding how the candidate acquired the ability to read, write or speak a foreign language.

Ancestry

Birth Place

Birth-place of candidate, candidate’s parents, spouse, or other relatives, or any other inquiry into national origin. Any inquiries regarding the number, age, child care arrangement for the candidate's children or other dependents, or intentions regarding becoming a parent in the future. Such questions could be regarded as discriminatory against single parents. Inquiries regarding country or citizenship other than the United States; inquiries to naturalized citizens regarding citizenship status of parents or spouse; or date of acquisition of U.S. citizenship. Any inquiries regarding arrests; questions regarding conviction and court records which are not substantially related to the function and responsibilities of the position. Inquiries regarding an applicant's disability. If a candidate volunteers this information during the course of the interview, it can be considered in relation to the candidate’s ability to perform the essential functions of the position. If a candidate has an obvious disability that causes the supervisor concern about whether that person could perform the essential functions of the job, the supervisor should point out the essential functions listed on the position description and ask, "Is there any reason you don’t believe you could perform all the essential functions of this position?" However, if this question is asked of one candidate, it must be asked of all candidates, not just those with obvious disabilities. Any inquiry asking specifically the nationality, racial or religious affiliation of a school. These questions are unrelated to the applicant’s ability to perform the requirements of the position and tend to discriminate against certain groups. Financial status inquiries regarding past ownership, bankruptcy or garnishment of wages.

Children or Dependents

Citizenship

Convictions, Arrests and Court Records Disabilities

Education

Financial Status, Credit Record, or Car Ownership

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Graduation dates Health Issues

Any inquiries concerning the dates that an applicant graduated from high school or college, which might indicate an applicant’s age. Any inquiries related to a candidate’s health, especially in regard to whether a candidate has AIDS or is HIV positive. Any inquiry regarding whether the applicant is married, single, widowed, separated or engaged to be married may imply discrimination against women because of common societal assumptions that women often leave jobs when they get married or have children. In addition, societal assumptions regarding married and single, divorced, widowed or separated people may contribute to an atmosphere of perceived discrimination. Discrimination on the basis of marital status is illegal under Oregon Law and Board Rule. Any inquiry regarding the nature of a person’s discharge.

Marital Status

Military Discharge Military Service

Inquiries into the dates that a candidate either joined or left military service, which could be used to determine an applicant’s age. Questions should not be asked about the nature of the person’s military discharge or whether they ever served in another country’s armed services. Inquiries about name which would indicate the candidate’s lineage, ancestry, national origin, descent or marital status. Any inquiries regarding how an applicant would feel about working or traveling with members of the opposite sex may be considered discriminatory because answers are not always considered equally from men and women. Inquiries regarding organizations which would indicate by their character or name the race, religion, color or ancestry of the applicant. No photographs may be requested or required prior to selection. Any questions regarding political party affiliation or opinions on political issues. Any inquiries regarding pregnancy or potential pregnancy of an applicant. Any inquiries regarding the candidate’s race, the racial group with which the applicant may identify, or regarding other physical features which may be directly or indirectly indicative of race or color. To the extent that inquiry regarding spouse’s name indicates marital status, inquiry might be considered illegal. Inquiries regarding a spouse’s marital status may indicate to some applicants a reluctance to hire a woman if her husband already has a substantial income or if there is concern that her employment would disrupt her husband’s career. Names or addresses of any relatives certainly should not be requested.
22

Name

Opposite Sex

Organization

Photographs Political Issues Pregnancy Race or Color

Relatives

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Religion

A candidate’s religious denomination or affiliation, church, parish, pastor, or religious holidays observed should not be discussed during an interview. The relationship of a person’s religious beliefs to their professional employment is an improper area of inquiry until after the selection is completed. At that time, any potential need for accommodation to a person’s religious beliefs or practices may be discussed. Though candidates may not be told that employees are required to work on religious holidays, they may be asked if they are available to work on specific days (for example, Saturdays or Sundays), but it must be asked of every candidate and should not be phrased in the context of religious observances. However, a candidate’s religious beliefs must be accommodated unless such accommodation creates undue hardship to the university or department. Any questions regarding current or past union membership or activities should be avoided. Inquiries into an applicant’s workers compensation history are inappropriate. An employer may not discriminate against an applicant because that applicant has utilized the workers’ compensation system, nor may an employer base a hiring decision on the likelihood that an applicant may cause increased workers’ compensation costs in the future.

Union Membership Workers Compensation

Interviewing Foreign Nationals
As a potential employer, you will want to know if a foreign national applicant is eligible to work in the United States. Many individuals have permanent resident status (a "green card") that allows them to work in the U.S. without restriction. Others have Employment Authorization Documents (EADs), but only for specific time periods (most can be renewed relatively easily, however). Still others do not have work authorization and would be dependent upon the employer petitioning the INS for the appropriate employment-based visa status. The process of obtaining work authorization varies in terms of time and complexity, depending upon the type of visa status for which the individual is qualified. The Office of International Education is available to assist departments with this process. However, concern about national origin discrimination in the workplace requires careful attention to the phrasing of work eligibility-related questions. The following question is an appropriate one to ask in order to obtain information about work eligibility: "Employment at Oregon State University is subject to verification of an applicant's identity and eligibility for employment as required by immigration laws. If hired, will you be able to provide evidence that you are legally permitted to work in the United States?"

Sample Interview Questions
Opener  What did you see in the position description that interested you the most and tell us how your background has prepared you for this position?  Please cite examples of your past work experience that you think would help you in this position.  What do you think most uniquely qualifies you for this position? Teaching, Research, and Public Service  How would your background and experiences strengthen this academic department?  Describe your teaching style/philosophy  How do you create a compelling learning environment for students in your classes?  How do you see future development of your research and outreach programs?  What potential funding sources would you be targeting for your work? How can the unit help you with your objectives?

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    

What technology applications have you utilized in the classroom. How do you engage students, particularly in a course for non-majors? How would your background and experiences strengthen this academic department? Tell us about a specific research project that included the involvement of your students. What courses have you created or proposed in the past 5 years?

Computer/Training  Describe your computer experience. Which software programs have you used? What kinds of documents were you producing?  Give us some examples of computer or other office equipment troubleshooting and problem solving you have performed.  Give us some examples of new skills that you have learned within the last year.  What is your experience with Banner Financial Information Systems (FIS) and/or other online, real-time accounting systems? Customer Service  A respect for privacy and confidentiality is important to this position. Tell us about a time when someone asked you to share information regarding your employer or customer. What was the nature of the inquiry and how did you respond?  Describe your customer service experience. Describe how you have solved problems for your customers.  Tell us about a time you had a miscommunication with a customer or coworker. What was the outcome?  Please give us an example of an experience at work that involved dealing with people who were under stress and experiencing strong emotions. Tell us what you learned about how to interact with people in such situations.  Give me an example of a time when you were able to communicate successfully with another person, even when that individual may not have personally liked you.  Describe a situation in which you did “all the right things” and were still unsuccessful. What did you learn from the experience? Diversity OSU seeks to build an organizational culture that will allow each individual to enter, participate and thrive, unimpaired by his/her identity-group status. In this culture, each of us will be valued for our uniqueness. This initiative is designed to help us select employees who can best demonstrate their commitment and skills to promote, sustain, and enhance this ideal. Develop one or more interview questions to elicit information from applicants about their experiences in or their thoughts about promoting and enhancing diversity. These questions should not be used to obtain personal information about an applicant’s identify status, but rather to determine what skills they bring to an increasingly diverse workplace. Your question might be to simply ask applicants to describe how their background has prepared them to be effective in an organization that values diversity. Another variation is to give each applicant a copy of the OSU Mission Statement, draw their attention to the value statement about diversity, and ask them to describe how their background and experience have prepared them to be effective in an environment that holds this value. For a list of other sample questions, go to http://oregonstate.edu/leadership/president/hiringQuestions.html.

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Organizational/General Skills      Describe a work environment where you were constantly interrupted. How did you organize and complete your work in a timely manner? Tell me about a time when you had to handle multiple projects all at once. Tell us about a time when you were required to perform what you felt were boring or mundane tasks. How did you keep yourself motivated while performing these tasks? In your last position, what types of decisions did you make without consulting your manager? In past work, have you ever had to rely on policy manuals for information? What types of manuals did you use; how often; and for what purpose?

Teamwork  What did you do in your last position to contribute to a teamwork environment? Please be specific.  Describe your most recent group effort in your last or current job. What were your responsibilities and how did you go about completing them.

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Exhibit I – Interview Evaluation Form
Position: ______________________________________ Evaluator: ________________________________ Applicant: _____________________________________ Interview Date: ____________________________ What are the applicant’s strengths (focus on stated criterion)?

What are the applicant’s weaknesses (focus on stated criterion)?

Did the applicant answer all of the questions to your satisfaction? If not, explain.

Does the applicant appear to be able to perform the job duties? Why or why not?

Do you have any reservations about this applicant’s ability to succeed in this position and/or at this institution? Why or why not?

How does this applicant compare in relation to the other applicants who have been interviewed?

Other comments:

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Exhibit J – Sample “No Interview” Letter
Date

Applicant Address

Dear (Name): Thank you for your interest in the (position title) position in the (department) at Oregon State University, and taking the time to submit your application information. We received applications from many qualified individuals for this position opening. After reviewing the applications, we had to determine those individuals who would receive further consideration in our search process and those who would not. You were not among those selected for further consideration. We sincerely appreciate the time and effort you dedicated to applying for this position and wish you success in your job search. Sincerely,

Supervisor’s Name Title

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Exhibit K – Sample Letter to Applicants Interviewed – Not Selected
Date

Applicant’s Name Applicant’s Address

Dear (name of applicant): Thank you for your interest in the (position title) position in the (department name) Department, at Oregon State University. At this time, I regret to inform you that we have selected another applicant for the position. I encourage you to continue to seek employment at OSU, and hope that you are successful in your future endeavors. Regards,

Hiring Supervisor Title

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