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					                                               FINAL DRAFT

         2007 Camden County
           Comprehensive
     Economic Development Strategy




                         Prepared by:
The Camden County CEDS Advisory Committee in Coordination with
           The Camden County Improvement Authority
                 CAMDEN COUNTY
  COMPREHENSIVE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

                     TABLE OF CONTENTS


CONTENTS                                                        PAGE

TAB 1: CEDS NARRATIVE

SECTION I: INTRODUCTION ……………………………………...……………                    1

SECTION II: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ………………………....…………….                 3

SECTION III: BACKGROUND ANALYSIS ………………….………………                  17

3.1 Introduction ……………………………………………………………………..…..                 17
3.2 Area Description and Historical Overview ………………………………….      20
3.3 The City of Camden ………………………………………………………….……                 24
3.4 History of Camden County ……………………………………………….……..             28
3.5 Demographics and Economic Overview …………………………………….           29
3.6 Infrastructure ………………………………………………………………………..                 41
3.7 The County Economic Structure ……………………………………….………            44
3.8 Housing ………………………………………………………………………….……..                    50
3.9 Education ………………………………………………………………….…………..                   52
3.10 Quality of Life Indicators ……………………………………………..………...        53
3.11 Agriculture ……………………………………………………………………………                   54
3.12 Strengths and Weaknesses of the County ……………………..…………       55
3.13 External Forces ………………………………………………………..……………                58
3.14 Potential Partners and Resources ……………………………………………          61

SECTION IV: POLICY DEVELOPMENT …………………………………..…                  63

4.1 The Policy Making Process ……………………………………………………..             63
4.2 Revising the Vision for Economic Development …………………..…….    63

SECTION V: ACTION AGENDA …………………………………………………                     68

5.1 Projects and Initiatives ……………………………….…………………………             68
5.2 Matrix Development ………………………………………….…………………..                85
CONTENTS                                                         PAGE

SECTION VI: MARKETING ……………………………………………………..…                     101

6.1 Target Audiences …………………………………………………………………….                  101
6.2 An Internal Marketing and Communication Program ………………....    103

SECTION VII: CONCLUSION AND SUMMARY ………………..………..                 117


APPENDICES

TAB 2: The Public Outreach Process
TAB 3: The Task Force Survey Form
                  CAMDEN COUNTY
   COMPREHENSIVE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY
                    October 2007




                                     SECTION I
                                INTRODUCTION


1.0 UPDATING THE CEDS

In the spring of 2007, Camden County government, through its Improvement Authority,
began a comprehensive review and update of its Comprehensive Economic Development
Strategy, CEDS. There are considerable changes in the County that have occurred since
the 2001 CEDS was prepared and County officials wanted to ensure that their principal
economic development plan reflected those changes and commensurate adjustments in
County policy.

The Improvement Authority, as the lead agency, assembled the 2001 CEDS Committee
and added members as appropriate. The Authority then hired a consultant team
comprised of Triad Associates, Public Solutions, Inc., and Economic Development
Associates, L.L.C. to assist with the data gathering and facilitation of the planning
process.

The first meeting of the Committee was in June 2007. This was followed by several
other Committee meetings and three public meetings to solicit comments and input.

This document is the result of a comprehensive examination of data, trends, and public
comment that has contributed to current background information; a revised economic
development vision; a modified set of goals and objectives; and a new series of projects
and strategies to chart the coordinated development and redevelopment of Camden
County.

1.1 OVERVIEW OF THE PLAN

The Plan is broken into seven principal sections and contains supporting documentation
in an appendix. The sections of the Plan are as follows:

   I. Introduction.

  II. Executive Summary.          This section highlights the principal findings and
      directions of the CEDS.

________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                          Page 1
 III. Background Analysis. The background analysis updates the demographic and
      other statistics that provide the foundation for policy and recommendations for
      strategies and projects. It highlights the strengths and weaknesses of the
      County economy; examines external forces that may impact on the economic
      future of the County; and outlines the partnerships and resources that could be
      included in a comprehensive economic development program.

  IV. Policy Development. This section outlines the public process through which
      policy revisions were made. A vision statement is provided along with goals,
      objectives, and specific priorities and performance measures.

   V. Action Agenda. The Action Agenda provides a detailed set of projects and
      strategies that represents the County’s principal, priority projects for the coming
      five years.

  VI. Marketing. The marketing plan defines the various tools and venues through
      which the County will make the community aware of the plan and advance the
      action agenda.

 VII. Conclusion and Summary.

While this document is a comprehensive update of the County’s economic development
strategies and policies, it is not a static document. The County recognizes that
circumstances can change. Planning is a fluid process and as such, the CEDS must be a
fluid document.

The CEDS Committee will meet on a regular basis to discuss priorities and make
adjustments to the CEDS as needed. The County, through its annual summits, will
ensure that municipal and community input continue to guide any modifications to the
document.

The following pages contain the various sections of the CEDS Plan outlined previously.
The document provides Camden County and its member communities with a definitive
guide for advancing, expanding, and making the necessary adjustments to the economy
so that the County remains a leading center of jobs and economic opportunity in
southern New Jersey. The Plan also makes recommendations to ensure that areas of
blight and distress are addressed and that those communities and stakeholders that may
not currently share in the County’s economic prosperity have an opportunity to do so.




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                           Page 2
                                      SECTION II
                            EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


2.0 INTRODUCTION

Under the leadership of the Camden County Improvement Authority (CCIA) a committee
of local citizens and stakeholders was reconstituted and intensive Committee Meetings
and four Public Meetings were held over several months in 2007 to update the County’s
Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy, (CEDS.) These meetings were
conducted to ensure that the revised CEDS reflects the changes and adjustments in
County policy since the original CEDS was completed in 2001.

The CEDS leadership believes that Camden County’s economic culture ultimately makes
a difference in the County’s economic performance in productivity, prosperity and
economic growth.

To achieve this goal the CEDS Committee and CCIA have identified a broad range of
federal, state and local private/public partners that form “Team Camden County”. The
County is committed to foster a culture of collaboration which focuses on an innovation
based economy with a shared vision.

The Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS) that follows reflects the
County’s belief in these principles.

2.1 CAMDEN COUNTY’S REGIONAL SETTING

Camden County is located in the center of the Delaware Valley Region and the heart of
the Northeast Corridor. It has a land area of 222 square miles. The County is bordered
to the north by Burlington County, to the south by Gloucester County, to the east by
Atlantic County, and to the west by the Delaware River. The City of Philadelphia lies
across the Delaware River for the entire length of the County.

The County has a rolling topography, the land rising slowly away from the river to the
east. It is a part of the Coastal Plains geologic area of the state. This area is marked by
deposits of soil, clay and sand from periods of glaciation as recently as 20,000 years
ago. These glacial deposits are important sources of construction material and glass
sands in particular, though they do contain substantial amounts of other minerals. The
riverfront areas, once highly industrialized, are increasingly becoming park, recreation
and open space areas, and entertainment/tourist venues.

The County is densely populated in its western portions, with the population density
diminishing as one travels east. The County goes from urban to suburban to rural. A
significant part of the county is still farmland. Approximately 20 percent of the eastern
portion of the County is in the thinly populated Pine Barrens Region where development
is restricted due to its environmentally sensitive nature.



________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                             Page 3
Camden County is connected to the region and the nation by several major highways:

   •   The New Jersey Turnpike and Interstate 295 run north to south;
   •   Interstate 676 connects Camden to the City of Philadelphia via the Benjamin
       Franklin Bridge, and connects to the Walt Whitman Bridge and to Route 42,
       which becomes the Atlantic City Expressway;
   •   U.S. Route 130 connects the industrial areas along the riverfront;
   •   U.S. Route 30 extends east to Atlantic City;
   •   State Routes 38 and 73 have significant commercial districts; and
   •   State Route 70, in addition to its commercial districts, connects the County with
       Central Jersey shore points.

The Benjamin Franklin Bridge, the Walt Whitman Bridge in the south and the Betsy Ross
Bridge in the north connect Camden County to Philadelphia. The Tacony-Palmyra
Bridge, just north of Camden County provides additional access to Pennsylvania.

Norfolk and Southern (formerly Conrail), with two lines running north/south and
east/west provide rail service in the County. Amtrak passenger rail service is available
at the 30th Street Station in Philadelphia. The Port Authority Transit Corporation
(PATCO) provides rail service between Lindenwold in the central part of the County and
downtown Philadelphia. This high-speed line carries over 200,000 persons per week to
Center City Philadelphia. New Jersey Transit provides rail service between Philadelphia
and Atlantic City. The RiverLine, a light rail line operated by New Jersey Transit which
began operations in 2004, provides service between Camden and Trenton and has
sparked new transit oriented development opportunities along the route 130 corridor.

Philadelphia International Airport, the major facility providing passenger and air cargo
service for the area, is approximately a twenty-minute drive from the City of Camden.
The County has one general aviation airport serving private and corporate flyers. The
Camden County Airport in Winslow Township, base to over 50 aircraft, has a 3,102-foot
runway.

The Port of Philadelphia-Camden has three major cargo handling terminals. Two of
these facilities are located in the City of Camden, operated by the South Jersey Port
Corporation. The third facility, operated by Holt Cargo Systems is located in Gloucester
City. Crowley Marine has a large terminal on Petty’s Island in Pennsauken and provides
weekly service to Puerto Rico and the Caribbean.

The map on the following page illustrates the outstanding location of the County.

2.2 ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT

The CEDS Committee was drawn from all the major public/private partners of the
County including women and minorities to continue the planning process from 2001.




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                            Page 4
Camden County                                                                                                                                                        CEDS 2007
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                                                                                                   Legend
                                                                                                                Delaware Valley County Boundaries
                  20

               Miles


Data Source: NJDEP, ESRI, DVRPC
                                                      ¯                                                         New Jersey Pinelands
                                                                                                                Major Rivers

                                                                                                        August 2007                         EJR
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                                                                                                                                                                                                         Dresher, PA 190 25
                                                                                                                                                                                                      www.triadi ncorporated.co m




                                                                                                                                                                                     Created by Triad Associates
The CEDS document:

   1.   Analyzes the problems, needs and resources of the County.
   2.   Identifies the vision, goals and objectives of the development process.
   3.   Presents the strategies, action plans and projects to achieve these goals.
   4.   Outlines the marketing plan to advance the Action Agenda.

2.3 ANALYSIS OF THE COUNTY’S ECONOMY

The initial approach for analyzing the economy of the County was gathering data using
the 2000 Census from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Federal and State
Departments of Labor and local sources. Present and past labor force characteristics
were analyzed.

The principal finding is that Camden County and the Delaware Valley Region’s economy
is diverse and relatively strong with an elaborate transportation network that effectively
serves the region.

The County’s economic base continues to shift from a goal producing sector to a service
producing sector.

The County has continued to gain recognition as an important center for high
technology industry, chiefly in healthcare, pharmaceuticals, telecommunications and
higher education.

Camden County’s location within a thriving region is among its assets. Market proximity,
transportation access and the presence of significant educational and technological
resources are complemented by moderate population growth and the transition to the
“new economy” of high value service employment.

The CEDS Committee, to better understand the County’s regional characteristics,
approached its analysis by organizing the County into four Sub-regions:

   1. Delaware River Waterfront Sub-region, including Pennsauken Township, Camden
      City, Gloucester City and the Borough of Brooklawn.
   2. Inner Ring Sub-region including the Municipalities that surround the City of
      Camden.
   3. Growth Sub-region including Cherry Hill, Voorhees Township, Gloucester
      Township, Berlin Borough and Berlin Township.
   4. Restricted Growth Sub-region including Winslow Township, Waterford Township
      and Chesilhurst.

These sub-regions are depicted on the map on the following page.

The Strategies and Action Agenda that is at the heart of the CEDS used the Sub-region
approach as the framework for its findings and is elaborated in the CEDS document.



________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                            Page 5
 Camden County                                                                                                                                      CEDS 2007
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                                                                                                                                                            Atlantic


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                                                                                           Legend
                                                                                                    Delaware River Waterfront Sub Region

                  5

                 Miles


Data Source: NJDEP, ESRI, DVRPC
                                                 ¯                                    July 2007
                                                                                                    Growth Sub Region
                                                                                                    Inner Ring Sub Region
                                                                                                    Restricted Growth Sub Region


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                                                                                                                                                                              715 Twining Road Suite 215
                                                                                                                                                                                  Dresher, PA 19025
                                                                                                                                                                              www.triadincorporated.com




                                                                                                                                                            Created by Triad Associates
The City of Camden

In addition, the CEDS devoted special attention to the City of Camden because of its
contrasts to the County in terms of demographics, income levels, unemployment and
economic structure.

The City of Camden presents significant contrasts to the picture of the region and the
County. Camden is the largest of the 37 municipalities in the County in terms of
population. The City’s most important competitive advantages are its highly strategic
physical location and its outstanding access to the diverse area transportation
infrastructure. This multi-faceted transportation network greatly complements the
County’s logistically powerful location at the crossroads of the Mid-Atlantic and
Northeastern regional markets.

Camden has continued to make significant progress in attracting new development to its
waterfront area. In February 2007, the Campbell Soup Company, which has maintained
a presence in Camden for nearly 140 years, announced its intentions to invest $72
million to expand and redevelop its corporate headquarters.

Camden City is also investing in industries that represent areas of regional strength and
future growth, such as the health care and high technology sectors. Major expansions
are currently underway at the Cooper Health System, which is carrying out a $117
million capital program on its medical campus; and Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center,
which recently completed a $56 million patient tower and which is expanding its School
of Nursing Facility and Emergency Department. The Waterfront Technology Center is a
100,000 square foot, state-of-the-art facility that is designed to attract high tech firms
and firms specializing in the life sciences. Completed in 2006 with support from the New
Jersey Economic Development Authority, the Center’s primary tenant is the Rutgers-
Camden Business Incubator, which maintains a 20,000 square foot facility at the
complex. The Waterfront Technology Center adds to a growing cluster of high
technology and biotechnology firms and research centers located at the Camden
waterfront, including L-3 Communications Corporation and the Coriell Institute for
Medical Research.

These are only the highlights of what the Southern New Jersey Development Council
estimates to be a $3 billion infusion of private and public investment in the Camden
downtown area, much of it catalyzed with assistance of the State’s Economic Recovery
Board.

One of the other significant differences between the City of Camden and the County is
the racial composition. The City has almost half of Camden County’s African American
population and two-thirds of the County’s Hispanic population. In 2000, the City’s
population was 53.3 percent African American, 16.8 percent White, 2.5 percent Asian,
and 0.5 percent American Indian.




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                            Page 6
Unemployment is an ongoing concern in the City of Camden. In 2006, the City of
Camden had a 10.7 percent unemployment rate for the year, which contrasts sharply
with the County’s and State’s rates of 5.1 percent and 4.6 percent respectively for the
same year.

Because the City of Camden presents a different set of problems and concerns, their
resolution requires innovative and aggressive actions that build upon the City’s physical
advantages and market strengths. Of the eight high priority projects in the Action
Agenda, two are located in Camden City.

2.4 STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES OF THE COUNTY

Camden County possesses a number of strengths that it can call upon in promoting
economic growth and development. These include:

   •   An excellent geographic position;
   •   Solid transportation system including highways, rail, air and deep water ports; as
       well as a new light rail system, The River Line, which links Camden City to
       Trenton and intermediate cities and towns;
   •   Infrastructure in place and serving the entire county;
   •   Fiber optic cable capacity throughout the County;
   •   Successful transitioning to a service oriented economy;
   •   Strong regional healthcare sector;
   •   Location for corporate and regional headquarters (modern business parks);
   •   Good educational system and access to post secondary institutions;
   •   Adequate supply of buildings for business expansion or relocations (modern
       business parks);
   •   Active redevelopment efforts in a number of municipalities;
   •   Good quality of life, including housing selection, top-rated park system, and
       overall affordable cost of living.

However, despite these advantages the County does have some areas of weakness that
should be addressed or considered in any economic development planning program.
These include:

   •   Slow to moderate population and labor force growth;
   •   Pockets of low labor force participation rates;
   •   Pockets of low income levels and relatively high levels of poverty;
   •   High percentages of female headed households with minor children;
   •   Few sites for new development projects;
   •   Perceptions of the County point to a need for better “branding” and market
       identity;
   •   Need for Smart Growth “Centers of Place” approach to redevelopment efforts;
   •   Need to “reposition” some of the older retail centers and projects;
   •   More diversity needed in land ownership. Too much publicly held land diminishes
       the potential for redevelopment in many communities;
   •   Public Infrastructure – sewer, water, highway – is in need of upgrades and
       reconstruction.

________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                           Page 7
2.5 VISION, GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

The CEDS Committee was the principal policy making body in the development of this
Plan. The Committee met three times in the course of revising the document.

At the first two meetings of the Committee, members were asked to complete a survey
and help define priorities that assisted in shaping the CEDS, (see Tab 3.) A review of
Camden County’s strengths and weaknesses was completed.

The principal issues identified by the survey responses included:

   •   Expanding the County economy around technology, professional services,
       pharmaceuticals, light manufacturing, logistics, the healthcare industries;
   •   Focusing on Main Street and Downtown Redevelopment in the County’s older
       towns and cities;
   •   Creating new Transportation Opportunities;
   •   Building on Smart Growth Strategies that concentrate development around
       existing corridors and areas of development;
   •   Identifying “Shovel Ready” Sites and Development Opportunities;
   •   Creating a Business Recruitment Strategy that involves County CEOs and
       Integrated Workforce Development Services;
   •   Focusing on River-oriented Development Opportunities.

From this general policy foundation and outline of issues, a vision for the County’s
economic development and a series of goals and objectives were prepared.

2.6 REVISING THE VISION FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The vision statement provides a foundation for ensuring that Camden County will be a
strong and recognized location for a wide range of dynamic industries supporting a
sustainable economy for the long term. Built upon a diverse population and a strong,
mature economy, people across the County should be able to find job opportunities in a
wide range of firms.

The CEDS Committee continued to embrace the concept of “Team Camden County” that
was developed during the 2001 CEDS Planning process. This is a concept widely
recognized as an excellent example of regional economic development cooperation and
achievement. This was highlighted by the Governor’s designation of Camden County as
the State’s first “Cyber County” because of the pre-eminence of leading
telecommunications firms. The County’s leading position in health care support and
value-added logistics operations affirms the issues raised by the CEDS Committee and
underscores the importance of these issues as part of the County Vision.

The vision statement also recognizes that transportation infrastructure remains a key
part of the County’s success, and is a source of new business opportunities. The County
desires to continue to improve its capabilities for both passenger and freight traffic. The
new River Line rail system complements and shapes countywide transportation based


________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                             Page 8
development initiatives, especially along the Route 130/Riverfront corridor, that also
strengthen economic development.

The educational system at all levels, and the County’s training and job assistance
programs in particular, provide the workforce with skills and preparation for jobs that
offer a living wage and the opportunity for growth. Academic and health care
institutions in the County are working with businesses to create opportunities for
research and product development in industries that will enhance the County’s
competitive edge and have the potential to enhance the region’s economy.


                                    Vision Statement
                               Camden County CEDS Update, 2007

Camden County envisions a diverse and sustainable economy that includes a wide range of jobs for its
citizens; cutting edge technology and 21st century infrastructure; a growing and increasingly prominent
role for tourism; the revitalization of downtowns, brownfields and other underutilized commercial areas;
and health-care, logistics, telecommunications and other business development that takes advantage of the
County’s outstanding strategic location.

County officials recognize that this means adapting to new lifestyles and trends; engaging the educational
and workforce development communities to meet the needs of a changing economy; developing public-
private partnerships that enhance opportunities for new business; and working toward the implementation
of Smart Growth principles that limit adverse impacts of development and support a good quality of life for
all the County’s citizens.



This Vision Statement embraces the goals of a diverse and stable economy that includes
a wide range of jobs for its citizens, cutting edge technology and 21st Century
infrastructure; a growing role for tourism, the revitalization of downtowns as well as the
promotion of health care, logistics, telecommunications and associated business
development.

Careful and coordinated planning among the municipalities and the County, coupled with
citizen involvement, the redevelopment of riverfront, urban, and brownfields sites, and
concern for environmental and aesthetic considerations all serve to maintain a high
quality of life, offer broad economic development opportunities, and sustainable growth.
It will take a concerted effort by all parties in the County and at all levels of government
to advance this vision.

To implement the Vision, the CEDS identified 9 goals, 28 objectives and 63 projects that
will advance the County’s economic agenda.

The following nine (9) broad framework goals of equal priority were agreed to:

    1. Continue to build an economic development image and brand name for Camden
       County that reflects the County strengths and assets.
    2. Expand the diversity of the County economy by investing in new technologies,
       industries and commercial enterprise.

________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                                            Page 9
   3. Foster a more unified approach to economic development in the County.
   4. Enhance economic development resources and tools.
   5. Work in coordination with the County Workforce Investment Board to address
      opportunities in job development and training.
   6. Focus economic growth and development activity to capitalize upon the unique
      and different strengths of the County’s four Sub-regions.
   7. Promote Smart Growth Strategies that concentrate on new economic
      opportunities around existing centers and commercial corridors, while conserving
      the County’s open spaces.
   8. Encourage a green industry and new technologies that help to reduce pollution,
      promote a clean environment and promote a good quality of life for County
      residents.
   9. Invest in the future of Camden City to enhance economic opportunity and
      promote a prosperous and stable regional economy.

2.7 ACTION AGENDA

Consistent with the Vision and Goals discussed above and believing that a strategy is
barren unless it leads to implementation, the Committee and CCIA identified 63 projects
which comprise the fundamental core of the CEDS. This project inventory along with 8
key project priorities are included at the end of this Executive Summary.

The County plans to focus economic development resources on the redevelopment of its
waterfront bank on the Delaware River from the Big Timber Creek in Gloucester City to
the Pennsauken Creek in Pennsauken Township.

Eight major development projects will be the focus of the revised Strategy:

   •   Campbell’s Business Park, Camden
   •   The Educational and Medical Cluster, Camden
   •   The Golden Triangle, Cherry Hill
   •   Lindenwold PATCO Station Transit Village, Lindenwold
   •   The College Drive Interchange Area Development, Gloucester Township
   •   Develcom Project, Bellmawr
   •   Virtua Hospital, Route 73 Development, Voorhees
   •   Delaware River Waterfront Development: Gloucester City, Camden and
       Pennsauken

The County is committed to a master planning process for the next five years and
beyond. The County will dedicate staff time, infrastructure investments and assist in
coordinating financial resources to execute the projects in this waterfront zone.

2.8 MARKETING

Although the Federal Economic Development Administration (EDA) does not require a
Marketing component in the CEDS, the County has wisely added a significant chapter in
the CEDS to this effort.


________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                        Page 10
The CEDS Committee and the County’s Improvement Authority believe that Camden
County is poised to build on future growth through its economic development marketing
effort. The marketing objectives include the following activities:

   •   Retention of existing businesses
   •   Expansion of existing businesses
   •   Creation of new businesses from within the County
   •   Attraction of targeted industry from outside the County

The County has identified the many marketing tools that are needed in any successful
outreach. Most importantly, the County has identified the specific targeted industries
that are a match for the County assets. They are:

   •   Value-Added Logistics & Distribution Centers
   •   Data, Information and Telecommunication Operations
   •   Healthcare Industries
   •   Tourism Operators and Property Developers
   •   Pharmaceuticals
   •   Light Manufacturing
   •   River Oriented Port Development
   •   Site Relocation Consultants and Professional Service Companies

In addition, the CEDS and CCIA recommend that, based on the County’s extensive, high
quality and continually improving telecommunications infrastructure, Camden County
market itself as New Jersey’s First Cyber County.

Finally, the CEDS and CCIA realize that for “Team Camden County” to be truly effective,
there is a clear need for a dedicated economic development marketing budget and
increased staffing.

2.9 PROJECT SUMMARIES

The following are summary narratives that encompass each of the eight project priorities
identified on the previous page. The project map on the following page illustrates the
locations of these key project priorities. These priorities were extracted from the
inventory of 63 projects, which is outlined following these summary descriptions.

Delaware River Waterfront Redevelopment, Gloucester City, Camden &
Pennsauken

The County plans to focus economic development resources on the redevelopment of its
waterfront lands on the Delaware River from the Big Timber Creek in Gloucester City to
the Pennsauken Creek in Pennsauken Township. This ten mile long development area
also includes Petty’s Island, which is in Pennsauken Township. The depth of the
waterfront area parcels vary but generally extend 500 feet from the river’s edge. Many
of the sites within this zone are classified as Brownfields and will require significant
resources in order to be redeveloped into new job-generating and residential uses again.


________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                         Page 11
CAMDEN COUNTY
S t r a t e g i c P r o j e c ts
    Delaware River
                                                                          The Educational and
                                                                                                                                 Legend
Waterfront Redevelopment                                                                                         Camden County Strategic Project
                                                                            Medical Cluster
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                                                                                                                 Delaware River Waterfront Sub-Region
                                           PENNSAUKEN




                                                                       Campbell’s Business Park
                                                                                                                 Growth Sub-Region
                                                                                                                 Restricted Growth Sub-Region
                                           MERCHANTVILLE



          kk k
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                      CAMDEN               k
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                                                                                                                 The Golden Triangle
                        WOODLYNNE
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                                                         LAWNSIDE




                                                                                                                                 Vitrua Hospital/Rt. 73 Development
                           BELLMAWR

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Develcom Project                                                          k
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                                                                                                                          Lindenwold PATCO Station
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                                                                     SPRINGS


                                                                                                    BERLIN
                                                                                                   TOWNSHIP
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                                                   k
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       The Coll ege Drive Interchange
            Area Development
                                                                                                                                                  WATERFORD




                                                                                                                        CHESILHURST



                                                                                                              WINSLOW
The County plans to undertake a waterfront master planning process that will evaluate
current local and regional plans that will serve as the basis for a new community and
economic development master plan for the County Delaware River Waterfront for the
next five years and beyond. Within this development opportunity zone, various land
uses will be evaluated to develop a unified plan that will include recreational and public
access areas, preservation areas, residential, commercial, entertainment, port and
industrial uses. This development zone has the potential for creating thousands of new
jobs and housing opportunities within this area of the County that has long suffered
from underutilization and abandonment.

Following the completion and adoption of the new waterfront plan, the County will work
with local municipalities and private developers to implement individual projects on the
waterfront. The County will dedicate staff time, infrastructure investments and assist in
coordinating financial resources to execute projects within this development zone.

Campbell’s Business Park, Camden

The Campbell Soup Company has long been a mainstay in the City of Camden since its
founding in 1869. Campbell’s has announced a plan to serve as the master redeveloper
of a new 110-acre business park located at Campbell Place south of Admiral Wilson
Boulevard in the City-designated Gateway Redevelopment Area. The business park will
be planned to facilitate the construction of up to 500,000 square feet of new office
buildings that have the potential to create an estimated 2,000 new employment
opportunities within the city.

Campbell’s is working with the City, County and State of New Jersey in redeveloping the
former Sears Building. Campbell will invest up to $72 million to expand and upgrade its
World Headquarters including the construction of a new state-of-the-art 80,000 square
foot employee services building. This addition will bring the amount of space the
company occupies to 750,000 square foot of research and development and
management space.

The public sector will invest approximately $26 million in the business park infrastructure
including water and sewer lines and transportation projects provide improved access to
and from the business park.

The Educational and Medical Cluster, Camden

The Educational and Medical Cluster is key to the revitalization of the downtown area of
the City of Camden and is an integral element of Camden County’s strategic plan to
strengthening its higher educational and health care research and delivery system. The
City and County have designated the area from the Benjamin Franklin Bridge south to
Benson Street and from I-676 west to Third Street as the Educational and Medical
Cluster.

Rutgers University, Rowan University, Camden County College and UMDNJ continue to
expand their facilities within this area of downtown Camden. Cooper University Hospital
has commenced a $200 million capital investment program on its campus including a

________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                            Page 12
new patient services tower, a 1,600 space new parking garage and major planned
improvement to the appearance of its campus, which will give this key intersection a
strikingly modern appearance.

The cluster includes the world recognized Coriell Institute and a proposed new stem cell
research facility is planned to be added in the next few years. The investment by the
colleges and medical facilities will stimulate additional retail, office and residential
projects within the downtown area of Camden. The County will continue to support the
investment within the Education and Medical Cluster by supporting new infrastructure
and offering bond financing for capital development projects.

The Golden Triangle, Cherry Hill

The County is planning to commence a study of the redevelop potential and planning
issues related to The Golden Triangle area of Cherry Hill Township.     This study area
runs roughly from the Cooper River on the south to the north side of Route 38 and from
the “point” of Routes 70 and 38 on the west to the east side of Haddonfield Road.
Within this triangle are several potential development opportunities that could lead to
the creation of thousands on new jobs and significant new tax ratables. The County
study, which will be funded by the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission
(DVRPC) will study key issues within the triangle including the Cherry Hill NJ Transit
Train Station, the Cherry Hill Corporate Center, and the office development at Garden
State Park, and the Cherry Hill Mall redevelopment. The plan will look to address traffic
and circulation issues throughout the area.

Lindenwold PATCO Station Transit Village, Lindenwold

The County supports the effort of the Borough of Lindenwold and the Delaware River
Port Authority’s PATCO transit line’s plans for the development of a transit village in the
transit lines terminus in Lindenwold. This key station provides regional ridership an
opportunity to connect to trains to and from Philadelphia and Atlantic City.

The large parking lot and adjacent lands could be transformed into to office, commercial
and residential development that would create new jobs for county residents and
provide housing opportunities. This project also will serve as a major development of
the White Horse Pike, a state highway that provide access through the county.
Although a recent DRPA funded study targeted several other PATCO stations for initial
transit village development within the county, which the County will continue to support,
the County plans to assist the Lindenwold Station due to the potential large-scale
economic impact of the transformation of the Lindenwold Station area.

The College Drive Interchange Area Development, Gloucester Township

The County has been working on the development of the area around the planned
College Drive Interchange with The North-South Freeway (SR 42) since the 1992 CEDS
was prepared. This long-term project is now nearing implementation with over 700



________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                            Page 13
acres of both private and public lands near the interchange being planned for
development.

Camden County College is underway with a $83 million campus development of its
academic and support buildings. The college is also planning to open its Center for Civic
Leadership in a new 22,500 square foot building and a completely renovated existing
academic building. The college also owns additional lands that could be developed by
the private sector into job-generating offices or research and development facilities.

The County owns over 500 acres of land near the proposed new interchange that will be
studied to determine its highest and best use.   While maintaining certain key county
functions on this campus is important to the County’s operations and local recreational
groups, over 300 acres of land could be developed into job-generating and/or residential
development.

Develcom Project, Bellmawr

The County plans to assist the Borough of Bellmawr and its development partner
Bellmawr Waterfront Development, LLC redevelop a site containing three former 1970s
landfills south of Creek Road and west of NJ Rt. 42. The project may include recreation
areas, retail, office and residential components depending on the site suitability and
local and state approvals. The project is currently being planned in three phases of
development.

The project also involves a cooperative effort with Deptford Township in Gloucester
County, where one of the landfills is located. Infrastructure improvements addressing
the drainage issues will be one of the initial components of the project. Issues relating
to NJ Green Acres funding, the possible extension of the PATCO transit line and the
development program will need to be addressed.

The County will also be involved in evaluating the benefits of the so-called “Missing
Moves” project which is being studied by the State DOT to provide an interconnect
between I-295 and Rt. 42 near the Develcom Project. Other major road improvements
in the Bellmawr area including the “Al-Joes” curve will also need to be coordinated with
the County’s planning efforts in this area.

Virtua Hospital/Rt. 73 Development, Voorhees

Virtua Hospital has recently received local approval for the construction of $500 million
new medical campus on Rt. 73 and Dutchtown Road on the eastern edge of the county.
This new state-of-the-art medical campus will serve as the catalyst for additional
medical and non-medical related development along the Rt. 73 Corridor. The Rt. 73
Corridor is currently seeing major new investment in retail and service businesses
locating into sites along the highway.

A major investment in infrastructure will be required for the project including the
extension of sewer lines and the construction of a new pumping station for the project.
In addition, the County also plans to work with Virtua on the reuse of the existing

________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                          Page 14
hospital site on Evesham Road in Voorhees Township.       This site may offer unique
opportunities for job-generating development and provide other benefits to County and
local residents.

The Complete Project Inventory

The complete project inventory, which was collected from the ongoing inventory of 2001
projects, new ideas from the CEDS Committee, stakeholders, and public is outlined on
the following pages.

                              CAMDEN COUNTY, NEW JERSEY
                                2007 CEDS Project Inventory


CONTINUED IMPLEMENTATION/ENHANCEMENT FROM 2002 CEDS

1. Promote CCIA capabilities to assist in economic development
2. Continue County-wide marketing program -- “Making It Happen” or develop new campaign
3. Continue to host annual economic summit on regional basis with adjoining counties
4. Maintain County inventory of private land and development opportunities
5. Promote Brownfield and Redevelopment Center (BARC) that was developed in 2002
6. Provide ongoing staffing and support to implement CEDS
7. Enhance “Briefing Center” at CCIA to help prospective developers make locational decisions
8. Identify ongoing infrastructure needs and priorities
9. Encourage the use of Smart Growth Principals
10. Capitalize on the use of PATCO and other transit to promote new development centers
11. Focus on logistics, telecommunications, healthcare and tourism as top priorities
12. Promote health care and educational opportunities
13. Cooperate with Philadelphia-based marketing organizations to promote the County’s location
14. Strengthen relationships between CCIA, County College, and WIB to promote workforce readiness

NEW ADDITIONS FOR 2007 CEDS
15. Focus on Delaware River Waterfront Redevelopment
16. Redevelop key commercial corridors such as White Horse and Black Horse Pikes
17. Reposition the County’s retail centers including “grayfields” to ensure continued competitiveness
18. Focus new development around “Centers of Place”
19. Promote “Transit Oriented Development Opportunities”, e.g. NJT RiverLINE
20. Place more emphasis on Public /Private Partnerships
21. Distribute more information on training and educational opportunities in the County
22. Create partnerships with non-profit organizations
23. Create livable and walkable neighborhoods
24. Significantly bolster County Tourism efforts
25. Work to get tax-exempt lands into more productive and taxable uses
26. Focus more workforce development efforts in the food service and hospitality industries
27. Promote sustainable energy issues and energy independence throughout the County
28. Track the baby boomers and their impacts on housing, transit and other County services
29. Promote growing public interest in returning to urban lifestyles and urban living
30. Find ways to streamline the development review and approval process
31. Develop capacity building opportunities among local governments and organizations
32. Incorporate the future of Camden City into the County CEDS
33. Provide new water and sewer infrastructure where needed
34. Incorporate the goals of the CEDS into a County Master Plan and Smart Growth Plan
35. Ensure an available inventory of “shovel ready” properties linked to marketing efforts


________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                                                Page 15
36.   Provide Assistance on the proposed Gateway Business Park with Campbell’s and City of Camden
37.   Focus efforts on The Educational and Medical Cluster in “downtown” Camden
38    Assist in the visioning and development of the “Golden Triangle” area of Cherry Hill
39.   Actively work on the development of private and County-owned properties at new College Drive Interchange
40.   Provide technical and financial support for the Develcom Project on Creek Road in Bellmawr
41.   Support the development of the area of Rt. 73 near new Virtua Hospital in Voorhees
42.   Focus resources on the development of a transit village at the Lindenwold PATCO Station
43.   Utilize new Center for Civic Leadership to increase economic development skills of local leaders and citizens
44.   Focus on the attraction and internal development of nano-technology
45.   Assist in the expansion of wireless access and broadband development throughout the County
46.   Assist in the development of an indoor water park in Berlin Township
47.   Continue to support the growth of new restaurants within the county
48.   Seek to attract manufacturing firms that provide jobs for production related skilled workers of the county.
49.   Provide assistance in reducing heavy truck traffic through residential neighborhoods
50.   Assist in the redevelopment of the area between Lourdes Healthcare and Ferry Ave. PATCO station
51.   Support the redevelopment of the Oak Road Redevelopment Area of Lawnside
52.   Retain Bancroft Neurohealth within the county
53.   Support the improvements at Camden County Airport in Winslow Township
54.   Support the relocation of the correctional facilities in Camden to encourage downtown redevelopment
55.   Assist in the development of the interconnect of RiverLINE and NJT line at Delair Junction in Pennsauken
56.   Provide assistance in the development of the proposed Kroc Community Center in Camden
57.   Focus on assisting municipalities improve their “Main Street” areas
58.   Investigate the development of an aquaculture production plant within the county
59.   Support programs that encourage local entrepreneurs and small business growth
60.   Encourage the development of recycling industries
61.   Support the construction on residential projects that support economic development efforts
62.   Provide resources for environmental cleanup of contaminated sites and buildings
63.   Encourage the extension of the PATCO transit line to the cites of Glassboro and Millville




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                                                        Page 16
                                    SECTION III
                           BACKGROUND ANALYSIS


3.1 INTRODUCTION

Camden County lies in the heart of the eleven-county Delaware Valley Region that also
includes Salem, Mercer, Gloucester, and Burlington Counties in New Jersey, New Castle
County in Delaware, and Philadelphia, Bucks, Montgomery, Chester, and Delaware
Counties in Pennsylvania. Understanding the regional backdrop provides insight into,
and a better understanding of, the economic and demographic aspects of the County as
well as assistance in evaluating possible courses of action.

Philadelphia is the center of this region, which includes other large metropolitan areas
such as Chester, Pennsylvania; Camden City, New Jersey; and Wilmington, Delaware.
According to a recent report published in 2007 by the CEO Council for Growth, Greater
Philadelphia is the fourth largest metropolitan region in the nation, with 2006 regional
estimates of population and employment totaling nearly 6 million people and 3 million
jobs. Its central location along the densely populated Northeastern corridor makes the
region the second largest market area in the country in terms of population and income
within a 200-mile radius. Approximately 46 million people, with annual earnings close to
$1.3 trillion, reside within 200 miles of Greater Philadelphia.

The Delaware Valley is also an important center of national productivity. A recent report
published by the U.S. Conference of Mayors estimated the region’s 2005 Gross
Metropolitan Product (GMP) at $264.8 billion, making it the 6th largest metropolitan
economy in the nation, and the 33rd largest economy in the world, exceeding Gross
Domestic Product (GDP) measures for countries such as Denmark ($259 billion) and
South Africa ($241 billion). Map 1 on the following page shows Camden County in
relation to the Delaware Valley.

An elaborate transportation network effectively serves the region. The area includes
thirty-six airports, with Philadelphia International as the leading passenger and air-
freight facility. Norfolk Southern, Canadian Pacific, and CSX provide regional cargo rail
service. Amtrak provides passenger rail service along the entire Northeastern Corridor.
Port facilities are available along the 130 miles of Delaware River’s deep-water channel
that runs to Trenton. The ports handle container cargo, general cargo, and bulk
cargoes such as crude oil, salt and iron ore. This port, which is managed by the South
Jersey Port Corporation and the Philadelphia Regional Port Authority, is a part of the
nation’s second largest deepwater port.

The extensive highway network also serves the area well. The principal highways
include Interstate Routes 95, 195, and 295 in the Philadelphia-Trenton area, Interstate
76, which provides access to western Pennsylvania from the Philadelphia area, the
Pennsylvania Turnpike, and the New Jersey Turnpike, a major regional north-south
route. A system of U.S. highways and major state routes complement these major
arteries, providing access to all parts of the region.


________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                          Page 17
Camden County                                                                                                                                                        CEDS 2007
 New Jersey                                                                                                                                                   Delaware Valley Region
  Map 1

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                                                                                                   Legend
                                                                                                                Delaware Valley County Boundaries
                  20

               Miles


Data Source: NJDEP, ESRI, DVRPC
                                                      ¯                                                         New Jersey Pinelands
                                                                                                                Major Rivers

                                                                                                        August 2007                         EJR
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The Delaware Valley Region’s economy is diverse and relatively strong. Although
estimated population growth in the region as a whole continued to trail national growth
rates between 2000 and 2006, it has sustained a stable, upward trend. Moreover,
estimated population growth rates in counties such as Gloucester and Burlington in New
Jersey, and Chester County in Pennsylvania exceeded national growth figures during the
first half of the decade. Total employment figures for the region have increased in the
constituent jurisdictions of the Delaware Valley Region (except Philadelphia) since 1995.
Camden County suffered significant job losses in the early 1990s, but recovered much of
its loss in the 1995-1997 period and is currently showing modest growth. Philadelphia
County slowed its rate of loss during the same period. Overall, the region experienced a
2.02 percent increase in non-farm jobs between 2000 and 2006, with New Jersey
recording a 2.32 percent increase statewide. Since leveling off earlier in the decade,
employment growth in the region is now on pace with population growth.




                                                    Figure 1
                                       Total Non-farm Employment Trends

                                                     Philadelphia PMSA
                                                 Total Nonfarm Employment

                            2,900
                            2,800
                            2,700
           (in thousands)




                            2,600
                            2,500
                            2,400
                            2,300
                            2,200
                            2,100
                                Jan-90 Jan-92 Jan-94 Jan-96 Jan-98 Jan-00 Jan-02 Jan-04 Jan-06

                                                      Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington

         Source: Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, U.S. Dept. of Labor, BLS




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                                         Page 18
                                      Table 1
                           Comparative Population Analysis


                                             2000            2006        Est. Percent
        Population by County                 Count         Estimate        Change
        Pennsylvania
           Bucks                                 597,635       623,205         4.28%
           Chester                               433,501       482,112        11.21%
           Delaware                              550,864       555,996         0.93%
           Montgomery                            750,097       775,688         3.41%
           Philadelphia                        1,517,550     1,448,394        -4.56%
        PA 5-County Subtotal                   3,849,647     3,885,395         0.93%

        New Jersey
            Burlington                           423,394       450,627         6.43%
            Camden                               508,932       517,001         1.59%
            Gloucester                           254,673       282,031        10.74%
            Mercer                               350,761       367,605         4.80%
            Salem                                 64,285        66,595         3.59%
        NJ 5-County Subtotal                   1,602,045     1,683,859         5.11%

        Delaware
            New Castle                          500,265        525,587         5.06%

        Regional Total                         5,951,957     6,094,841         2.40%
        United States                        281,421,906   299,398,484         6.39%
         Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census



The Region’s economic base continues to shift away from the goods-producing sector to
the service-producing sector. According to a report published by the Greater Philadelphia
Chamber of Commerce, “as recently as 1990, the manufacturing sector accounted for
13.7% of total non-farm employment in the region. By 2006, this share had fallen to
7.7%, below the U.S. share of 10.4%.” The most recent data available for the Region as
a whole indicate that 55 percent of the Region’s private sector employment is in the
service sector, compared to 48 percent for the nation. Further, 15 percent of the
Region’s workers are in the Professional and Business Services sector, compared to 12.9
percent for the nation. The Region’s transition from the “old” economy to the “new” is
also illustrated in the growth of employment in the knowledge economy, with
approximately 432,500 new jobs created in private service industries between 1990 and
2006.

It should also be noted that the Delaware Valley Region has continued to gain
recognition as an important center for high technology industry and activity. Chief
among these industries is healthcare, pharmaceuticals, telecommunications, and higher
education. The Region has a national reputation in medical and pharmaceutical
research with over forty major healthcare facilities and the nation’s highest percentage


________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                                Page 19
of physicians engaged in research among the U.S. Metropolitan areas. In 2005,
approximately five percent of the region’s total employment was in the area of
Information Technology. Camden County itself is within a sixty-minute drive of some of
the leading educational and technology centers in the country.

Thus, Camden County’s location within a thriving region is among its assets. Market
proximity, transportation access, and the presence of significant educational and
technology assets are complemented by moderate population growth and a transition of
the economy away from its traditional manufacturing base.

3.2 AREA DESCRIPTION AND HISTORICAL OVERVIEW

Camden County, located in the center of the Delaware Valley Region described above,
has a land area of 222 square miles. The County is bordered to the north by Burlington
County, to the south by Gloucester County, to the east by Atlantic County, and to the
west by the Delaware River. The City of Philadelphia lies across the Delaware River for
the entire length of the County. The County has a rolling topography, the land rising
slowly away from the river to the east. It is a part of the Coastal Plains geologic area of
the state. This area is marked by deposits of soil, clay and sand from periods of
glaciation as recent as 20,000 years ago. These glacial deposits are important sources
of construction material and glass sands in particular, though they do contain substantial
amounts of other minerals. The riverfront areas, once highly industrialized, are
increasingly becoming park, recreation and open space areas, and entertainment/tourist
venues.

The County is densely populated in its western portions, with the population density
diminishing as one travels east. The County goes from urban to suburban to rural. A
significant part of the county is still farmland. Approximately 20 percent of the eastern
portion of the County is in the thinly populated Pine Barrens Region where development
is restricted due to its environmentally sensitive nature.

Camden County is connected to the region and the nation by several major highways:

   •   The New Jersey Turnpike and Interstate 295 run north to south;
   •   Interstate 676 connects Camden to the City of Philadelphia via the Benjamin
       Franklin Bridge, and connects to the Walt Whitman Bridge and to Route 42,
       which becomes the Atlantic City Expressway;
   •   U.S. Route 130 connects the industrial areas along the riverfront;
   •   U.S. Route 30 extends east to Atlantic City;
   •   State Routes 38 and 73 have significant commercial districts; and
   •   State Route 70, in addition to its commercial districts, connects the County with
       Central Jersey shore points.

The Benjamin Franklin Bridge, the Walt Whitman Bridge in the south and the Betsy Ross
Bridge in the north connect Camden County to Philadelphia. The Tacony-Palmyra
Bridge, just north of Camden County provides additional access to Pennsylvania.




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                           Page 20
The Norfolk Southern Railroad, (formerly Conrail), with two lines running north/south
and east/west provides freight rail service to the County. Amtrak passenger rail service
is available at the 30th Street Station in Philadelphia. The Port Authority Transit
Corporation (PATCO) provides rail service between Lindenwold in the central part of the
County and downtown Philadelphia. This high-speed line carries over 200,000 persons
per week to Center City Philadelphia. New Jersey Transit provides rail service between
Philadelphia and Atlantic City. The RiverLine, a light rail line operated by New Jersey
Transit which began operations in 2004, provides service between Camden and Trenton
and has sparked new transit oriented development opportunities along the route 130
corridor.

Philadelphia International Airport, the major facility providing passenger and air cargo
service for the area, is approximately a twenty-minute drive from the City of Camden.
The County has one general aviation airport serving private and corporate flyers. The
Camden County Airport in Winslow Township, base to over 50 aircraft, has a 3,102-foot
runway.

The Port of Philadelphia-Camden has three major cargo handling terminals in Camden
County. Two of these facilities are located in the City of Camden, operated by the South
Jersey Port Corporation. The third facility, operated by Holt Cargo Systems is located in
Gloucester City. Crowley Marine has a large terminal on Petty’s Island in Pennsauken
and provides weekly service to Puerto Rico and the Caribbean. Map 2 shows Camden
County and its major highways and rail lines.

Fundamental to the preparation of an overall economic development strategy for
Camden County is an understanding of the County’s regional characteristics. The
geography, history, land-use patterns and other qualities of the county’s thirty-seven
municipalities suggest that the County can be organized into four sub-regions for the
purpose of developing a comprehensive economic development plan, (see Map 3.)
Identifying the principal characteristics of the municipalities and classifying them into
development districts facilitates sub-regional planning, the application of resources, and
the overall effectiveness of the CEDS plan. Establishing a planning framework also
generates a more extensive understanding of the County’s economy, further
strengthening the quality of this CEDS. Map 4 depicts the County and its member
municipalities.

Defining Sub-Regions of the County

The four sub-regions are:

       1.     Delaware River Waterfront Sub-region
       2.     Inner Ring Sub-region
       3.     Growth Sub-region
       4.     Restricted Growth Sub-region.

For purposes of reconciliation, Camden County’s two country club communities,
Tavistock and Pine Valley, are excluded from this analysis.



________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                           Page 21
Camden County                                                                                                                                                   CEDS 2007
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  Map 2                                                                                                                                                          and Rail Lines
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Data Source: NJDEP, ESRI, DVRPC
                                                         ¯                                   August 2007                                      EJR
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                                                                                                                                                                                                     Dresher, PA 190 25
                                                                                                                                                                                                  www.triadi ncorporated.co m




                                                                                                                                                                             Created by Triad Associates
  Camden County                                                                                                                                                      CEDS 2007
    New Jersey                                                                                                                                                        Sub Regions
      Map 3


    Philadelphia

                                               Pennsauken
                                                Township

                                                    Merchantville


                       Camden City
                                        en
                                      yn




                                          Collingswood
                                     dl
                                 oo
                                W




                                                    Haddon
                                          Oaklyn
                                                                                                                                                        Burlington
                        Gloucester
                                     Audubon
                                       Park
                                                                           Cherry Hill Township
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                           City
                                             Audubon       Haddonfield
                                               Boro
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                                      Mount     Haddon
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                        Brooklawn                Heights
  ar




                                     Ephraim
                                                                Tavistock
  law




                                    Bellmawr       BarringtonLawnside
De




                                                                                       Voorhees Township
                                                            Magnolia
                                             Runnemede
                                                                Somerdale
                                                                       la
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                                                                                                             Gibbsboro
                                                                    i- N
                                                                 H




                                                                     Stratford
                                                                             Laurel
                                                                            Springs                    ro
                                                                                                  Bo
                                                                                       w   ol d
                                                                                    en
                                                    Gloucester             L   i nd
                                                                                                                            Berlin
                                                                                                                          Township
                                                    Township                                Clementon


                                                                                  Pine Hill                              Berlin
                                                                                    Boro                     Pine        Boro
                                                                                                            Valley




                                                                                                                                                        Waterford Township
                                                                                                                                          Chesilhurst
                                                                                                                                             Boro




                           Gloucester                                                                                             Winslow Township




                                                                                                                                                                             Atlantic


     Salem




                                                                                                             Legend
                                                                                                                     Delaware River Waterfront Sub Region

                   5

               Miles


 Data Source: NJDEP, ESRI, DVRPC
                                                 ¯                                                July 2007
                                                                                                                     Growth Sub Region
                                                                                                                     Inner Ring Sub Region
                                                                                                                     Restricted Growth Sub Region


                                                                                                                                             EJR
                                                                                                                                                                                               715 Twini ng R oad Su ite 21 5
                                                                                                                                                                                                   Dresher, PA 190 25
                                                                                                                                                                                                www.triadi ncorporated.co m




                                                                                                                                                                             Created by Triad Associates
Camden County                                                                                                                                              CEDS 2007
 New Jersey                                                                                                                                                 Municipalities
  Map 4




                                                           r
                                                        ve
                                                      Ri
 PHILADELPHIA                                                                                                                                                                  Legend




                                                       e
                                                    ar
                                                                                                                                                                               Municipalities

                                          law
                                        De                                                                                                                                          Audubon Borough
                                                                                                                                                                                    Audubon Park Borough
                                                    Pennsauken Township                                                                                                             Barrington Borough
                                                                                                                                                                                    Bellmawr Borough
                                                                                                                                                                                    Berlin Borough
                                                                                                                                                                                    Berlin Township
                                                         Merchantville
                                                                                                                                                                                    Brooklawn Borough
                                                                                                                                                                                    Camden City
                   Camden City                                                                                                                                                      Cherry Hill Township
                                                                                                                                                                                    Chesilhurst Borough
                                                                                                                                                                                    Clementon Borough
                                                e
                                        l   yn n
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                                   od        Collingswood                                                                                                                           Collingswood Borough
                                                                                                                                                                                    Gibbsboro Borough
                                                          Haddon                                                                                                                    Gloucester City City
                                            Oaklyn       Township
                                                                                                                                                                                    Gloucester Township

                   Gloucester
                                  Audubon
                                   Park
                                                                                    Cherry Hill Township                                                                            Haddon Heights Borough
                                                    Audubon     Haddonfield
                      City                           Boro                                                                                              BURLINGTON
                                                                                                                                                                                    Haddon Township

                                 Mount                                                                                                                                              Haddonfield Borough
                   Brooklawn    Ephraim               Haddon                                                                                                                        Hi-Nella Borough
                                                      Heights          Tavistock
                                                                                                                                                                                    Laurel Springs Borough
                               Bellmawr                  Barrington
                                 Boro                                 Lawnside                                                                                                      Lawnside Borough
                                                                                                                                                                                    Lindenwold Borough
                                                                  Magnolia
                                                                                                   Voorhees Township
                                                                                                                                                                                    Magnolia Borough
                                             Runnemede                                                                                                                              Merchantville Borough
                                                                      Somerdale
                                                                                                                                                                                    Mount Ephraim Borough

                                                                                    ll   a                                                                                          Oaklyn Borough
                                                                             -   Ne                       Gibbsboro
                                                                          Hi                                                                                                        Pennsauken Township
                                                                          Stratford                         Boro                                                                    Pine Hill Borough
                                                                                             Laurel                                                                                 Pine Valley Borough
                                                                                             Springs
                                                                                 Lindenwold Boro                                                                                    Runnemede Borough
                                                                                                                          Berlin                                                    Somerdale Borough
                                                                                                   Clementon             Township
                                                                                                                                                                                    Stratford Borough
                                                                                                      Boro
                                                                                                                                                                                    Tavistock Borough
                                                                                                                      Berlin                                                        Voorhees Township
                                                                                              Pine Hill Pine          Boro                                                          Waterford Township
                                                                                                Boro    Valley                                                                      Winslow Township
                                                                                                                                                                                    Woodlynne Borough

                                                                   Gloucester Township




                                                                                                                                                     Waterford Township
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                                                                                                                                         Boro




                                                                                                                               Winslow Township



                                               GLOUCESTER




                                                                                                                                                                          ATLANTIC



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              5

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Data Source: NJDEP, ESRI, DVRPC
                                                        ¯                                              August 2007                       EJR
                                                                                                                                                                                         715 Twini ng R oad Su ite 21 5
                                                                                                                                                                                             Dresher, PA 190 25
                                                                                                                                                                                          www.triadi ncorporated.co m




                                                                                                                                                                          Created by Triad Associates
Delaware River Waterfront Sub-Region

The Delaware River forms the western border of Camden County.         The four
municipalities constituting the waterfront sub-region are: Pennsauken Township,
Camden City, Gloucester City, and the Borough of Brooklawn.

Camden City and Gloucester City are largely traditional old urban centers that were
initially developed as centers of manufacturing. Areas of Pennsauken Township,
particularly those sharing a common border with Camden, have many of the same
characteristics. Brooklawn is more residential and suburban in character, but shares a
common link with the other three because of its waterfront geography.

Economic development strategies in this sub-region have typically evolved from the
waterfront and moved into neighborhoods and commercial corridors as secondary
initiatives. Camden City has been particularly successful with commercial and
recreational waterfront redevelopment. Gloucester City’s waterfront is largely industrial
and commercial. The City has initiated preliminary analyses of reuse alternatives.
Pennsauken is in the process of redeveloping its waterfront that was almost exclusively
industrial with a primary focus on oil storage and distribution. Brooklawn historically has
been more residential in nature and the waterfront areas of the borough are not under
study for reuse at this time.

Strategies in this waterfront sub-region are focused on redevelopment, incorporating
both industrial and commercial/recreational uses. As such, environmental clean-up is a
major issue, as are demolition and related redevelopment factors.




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                            Page 22
Inner Ring Sub-Region

This sub-region is comprised of a number of municipalities that border or otherwise
surround the City of Camden. They are older, smaller communities that primarily grew
from the extension of railroad lines through Camden County or from highways that
emanated from Camden. These municipalities include: Audubon, Audubon Park,
Barrington, Bellmawr, Collingswood, Clementon, Gibbsboro, Haddon Township,
Haddonfield, Haddon Heights, Hi-Nella, Laurel Springs, Lawnside, Lindenwold, Magnolia,
Merchantville, Mount Ephraim, Oaklyn, Pine Hill, Runnemede, Somerdale, Stratford and
Woodlynne.

For the most part, these communities are almost fully developed, with some exceptions
such as Lawnside. Economic development in these communities is largely centered on
the in-fill of smaller development parcels and the redevelopment of central business
districts and targeted redevelopment sites. For example, many of these towns have
traditional “main street” commercial corridors which are the subject of various
revitalization initiatives.  Many of these communities have utilized New Jersey’s
redevelopment statute and/or Special (Business) Improvement District designation to
support revitalization. The State of New Jersey provided a Smart Growth Grant to
facilitate sub-regional planning among four communities that share the Haddon Avenue
Corridor (Camden City, Collingswood, Westmont and Haddonfield). The planning effort
won an award from New Jersey Future and has sparked further planning work among
the communities as well as innovative mixed-use, transit oriented development (TOD)
projects and Smart Future grants for the White and Black Horse Pike corridors.




Growth Sub-Region

The Camden County Growth Sub-Region represents communities that are significantly
developed but still have land available with few growth restrictions. These communities
include: Cherry Hill (eastern portions), Voorhees Township, Gloucester Township, Berlin
Borough, and Berlin Township. Issues in these areas typically center on the competition
for open space preservation, traffic congestion, and highway access. Infrastructure
access is typically not a constraint on growth, as utilities are already in place. Much of
the growth in these areas centers on access to major state highways, most notably
Route 42 and the Atlantic City Expressway (Gloucester Township), Routes 70 and 38
(Cherry Hill), and Route 73 (Berlin Borough and Township).


________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                           Page 23
Restricted Growth Sub-Region

These communities form the eastern border of Camden County and are classified as
restricted growth because much of their available land is within the New Jersey
Pinelands area. These municipalities include: Winslow Township, Waterford Township,
and the Borough of Chesilhurst. Much of the permitted development in these
communities centers on the Route 73 commercial corridor. Limited development that
would cause the least environmental impact is permitted in the Pinelands area. The
focus of development efforts is on assembling adequate sized parcels, and identifying
uses that maximize the benefits to the communities in terms of ratables and job
creation.




3.3 THE CITY OF CAMDEN

The City of Camden presents significant contrasts to the picture of the region and the
County. As a very significant part of the County in terms of population, jobs, and
economic impact, the City is especially important to the economic health of the area.
The City is sufficiently large to have its own plans and strategies, including a
Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy for the United States Department of
Commerce - Economic Development Administration (USEDA), and a Consolidated Plan
for the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

Camden is the largest of the 37 municipalities in the County in terms of population.
Located in the western extreme of the County, the City has an extensive waterfront
along the Delaware River. It is bordered by Pennsauken to the east, Woodlynne and
Collingswood to the southeast, and Gloucester City to the south. Most sources concur
that the City consists of twenty-three (23) neighborhoods divided among the City’s
twenty (20) census tracts.


________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                       Page 24
Camden’s most important competitive advantages are its highly strategic physical
location and its outstanding access to the diverse area transportation infrastructure.
The City’s deep-water port on the Delaware River, strong internal and external highway
network (including Interstate Highway 676, and US Routes 30 and 130), proximity to
the Philadelphia International Airport, and railway facilities offer multiple options for
delivery of resources, final market products, and people from and to Camden. This
multi-faceted transportation network greatly complements the City’s logistically powerful
location at the crossroads of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern regional markets.
Indeed, according to statistics referenced by the Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce,
approximately 25% of the nation’s population resides within 300 miles of the Camden
area.

Camden has continued to make significant progress in attracting new development to its
waterfront area. The Adventure Aquarium (formerly the New Jersey State Aquarium)
recently completed a $57 million renovation project that added several new exhibits,
including a shark tank and a 4-D IMAX theatre. Attendance figures have almost tripled
since the facility reopened in 2005. The aquarium upgrades constitute the first phase of
a $200 million, multi-phased, mixed-use project planned for the Cooper’s Ferry district,
which is being carried out by the Columbus, Ohio based development firm Steiner and
Associates. The second phase, a $20 million office complex, which will serve as the new
headquarters for Susquehanna Patriot Bank, is scheduled to open in the fall 2007. When
fully built out, the project will provide 1,500 units of housing, as well as office, retail,
dining and entertainment venues. Meanwhile another former RCA building is slated to be
redeveloped as the Radio Lofts Condominiums by developer Carl Dranoff, who
completed a similar condominium conversion of the Victor Building in 2004. The new
$35 million, 86-unit development is expected to be completed in the spring of 2009.

In February 2007, the Campbell Soup Company, which has maintained a presence in
Camden for nearly 140 years, announced its intentions to invest $72 million to expand
and redevelop its corporate headquarters. The LEED (Leadership in Energy and
Environmental Design) certified project will be sited on a 110-acre campus, and create
an additional 500,000 square feet of office space, bringing the total square footage for
the office and research facility up to 750,000.

Camden City is also investing in industries that represent areas of regional strength and
future growth, such as the health care and high technology sectors. Major expansions
are currently underway at the Cooper Health System, which is carrying out a $117
million capital program on its medical campus; and Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center,
which recently completed a $56 million patient tower and is expanding its School of
Nursing Facility and Emergency Department. The Waterfront Technology Center is a
100,000 square foot, state-of-the-art facility that is designed to attract high tech firms
and firms specializing in the life sciences. Completed in 2006 with support from the New
Jersey Economic Development Authority, the Center’s primary tenant is the Rutgers-
Camden Business Incubator, which maintains a 20,000 square foot facility at the
complex. The Waterfront Technology Center adds to a growing cluster of high
technology and biotechnology firms and research centers located in downtown Camden,
including L-3 Communications Corporation and the Coriell Institute for Medical Research.


________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                            Page 25
These are only the highlights of what the Southern New Jersey Development Council
estimates to be a $3 billion infusion of private and public investment in the Camden
downtown area, much of it catalyzed with assistance of the State’s Economic Recovery
Board. The cooperation between the public and private sectors in promoting economic
development as well as the new, innovative resources and facilities available to
businesses are gaining national recognition. Inc. magazine recently ranked Camden sixth
on its list of the 25 top cities for businesses.

Camden City is a highly urbanized area of 8.82 square miles with 79,904 residents,
according to the 2000 U.S. Census. Although this population figure represents a decline
of 7,588 (-8.6%) from the 1990 Census figure, the 2003 population estimate of 80,089
represents a 0.2% increase since 2000. The modest population increase projected by
the U.S. Census is not replicated in ESRI estimates (provided in the table below), which
continue to predict small but persistent population declines for the city.

One of the significant differences between the City of Camden and the County is the
racial composition. The City has almost half of Camden County’s African American
population and two-thirds of the County’s Hispanic population. In 2000, the City’s
population was 53.3 percent African American, 16.8 percent White, 2.5 percent Asian,
and 0.5 percent American Indian. Of this population, 38.8 percent considered
themselves Hispanic. The following table provides Census data on the City’s population
by race and ethnicity for 2000, in comparison to ESRI projections for 2007 and 2012.


                                          Table 2
                       City of Camden Population by Race and Ethnicity

          Race                     2000       2000     2007        2007    2012        2012

                              Census #      Census %   Est. #     Est.%    Est. #     Est. %

White
                                   13,454       16.8    12,175    15.6%     11,522    14.9%
African American
                                   42,628       53.3    38,944    49.9%     36,731    47.5%
Am. Indian
                                      435        0.5        468    0.6%         464     0.6%
Asian/Pacific Is.
                                    2,017        2.5     1,873     2.4%      1,856      2.4%
Other
                                   21,370       26.7    24,584    31.5%     26,756    34.6%
TOTAL
                                   79,904     100.0     78,045    100.0%    77,329    100.0%
Hispanic
                                   31,019       38.8    35,198    45.1%     37,891    49.0%
Source: ESRI, U.S. Census Bureau




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                              Page 26
Between 1990 and 2000, the African American population increased by 4.3 percent,
while the White population declined by 5.1 percent. However, the decline in the White
population (6,258) exceeded the overall population decline of 5,307. Growth in the
American Indian and Asian populations also occurred. The total Asian population,
despite growing at a rate of 27 percent between 1990 and 2000, remains relatively
small, making up approximately 2.5 % of the total population. ESRI projects that in
2007 and 2012, the White population will continue to decline in absolute numbers and
as a percentage of population. The same holds true for the African American
population, which by 2012 is projected to decline by 5,897, a number greater than the
decline in the total population (2,575). The Hispanic population will continue to grow
throughout this period, increasing significantly both in total numbers and as a
percentage of the population. By 2012, ESRI projects that Hispanics will make up almost
50 percent of the city’s population.

Unemployment is an ongoing concern in the City of Camden. In 2006, the City of
Camden had a 10.7 percent unemployment rate for the year, which contrasts sharply
with the County’s and State’s rates of 5.1 percent and 4.6 percent respectively for the
same year. Although the City’s 2006 unemployment rate represents a slight decline
from the 11.4 percent for 2000, City unemployment remains at a level that is roughly
double the County and State figures. There was an average of 13,973 persons in the
county seeking employment each month in 2006. Although the labor force in the City of
Camden makes up only 10 percent of the County’s labor force, Camden’s unemployed
constitute 21 percent of the unemployed persons countywide.

This high level of unemployment is reflected in the City’s income figures. Both actual
income figures and projections show growth, but in most cases the growth appears to
be at, or only slightly above, the rate of inflation. For example, ESRI estimates of per
capita income growth between 1990 and 2007 show a 67.14 percent increase, or a
growth rate of 3.07 percent per year over the seventeen-year period. Median household
income also is growing at a comparable rate: 3.13 percent per year between 1990 and
2000. It is projected to grow by 2.49 percent per year between 2000 and 2007.
Furthermore, median household income is growing even more slowly than average
household income, which indicates that some portions of the population are able to
make significant income gains, but that the majority is frustrated in their efforts to
increase household incomes.

The median family income provided in the 2000 Census for the City of Camden was
$24,612. ESRI projects Camden City’s 2007 median family income to be approximately
$29,641. The 2007 HUD Adjusted Median Family Income figure (which is used by HUD
to qualify families for its many programs) for Camden County is $71,600. An annual
income of $57,700 for a family of four in Camden County is considered moderate-
income. Thus, there is a wide gap between the income levels in the City and those in
the County. ESRI estimates show that 75.2 percent of households in the City of Camden
in 2007 have an income of less than $50,000, and that 10.6 percent have incomes over
$75,000. Furthermore, households with incomes under $15,000 represent an estimated
30.8 percent of all households in 2007. Although the percentage is projected to decline
to 27.4 percent in 2012, this still represents over 6,500 households.



________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                         Page 27
HUD defines a low- to moderate-income area as one in which the household income is
80 percent or less of the Median Family Income for the area. The City’s 2005-2009
Consolidated Housing Plan noted that nine neighborhoods were considered to be areas
of low-income concentration (in which 80 percent or more of the population qualified as
low-income). They are the Central Business District (100 percent of households),
Lanning Square (82.9 %), Bergen Square (76.6 %), Central Waterfront (96.2 %), Pyne
Poynt (86.3 %), Cramer Hill/Pavonia (82.2 %), Marlton (81.4 %), Centerville (92.2 %),
and Morgan Village (81.9 %). These correspond to Census Tracts 6001, 6003, 6004,
6005, 6009, 6009, 6013, 6017 and 6019 respectively. In 2000, all of these tracts had
levels of median household income below $25,000. Map 5 illustrates the location of
census tracts throughout the County.

Thus, the City of Camden presents contrasts to the profile of the Delaware Valley
Region, the southern New Jersey Labor Market Area, and Camden County itself in terms
of demographics, income levels, unemployment, and economic structure. These
differences are indicators that development/redevelopment within the City of Camden
presents a different set of problems and concerns than those faced by the County or the
region. The resolution of these problems requires innovative and aggressive actions that
would build upon the City’s advantages and capitalize upon market strengths and
developer interest from the private sector. The Action Agenda section of this document
includes priority projects within the City of Camden, as part of the County’s strategy.

3.4 HISTORY OF CAMDEN COUNTY

Camden County’s rich history dates back to the mid-1600s when the first European
settlers, Quakers from England, settled in a portion of land then known as West Jersey.
By 1688, a ferry service was in place connecting Philadelphia with the rural farmlands on
the eastern shore of the Delaware River through a village known as Cooper’s Ferry. The
descendants of the ferry operator, William Cooper, purchased land for a subdivision in
what is now Camden, but there were few residents until after the Revolutionary War.

The City of Camden, named for an Englishman who had supported the American cause
in the British Parliament, did not begin to grow significantly until the completion of the
Camden and Amboy Railroad in 1834. By 1850, the City had 9,500 residents. Camden
County, formed by separating lands from Gloucester County in 1844, grew to some
25,000 people by mid-century. The Camden and Atlantic Railroad began service to
Haddonfield in 1853 and soon extended to Atlantic City. After the Civil War, industrial
growth began in earnest. Joseph Campbell and Abram Anderson founded a company
that preserved and marketed the crops and products from the County’s rich agricultural
fields.   This firm later became The Campbell Soup Company, whose corporate
headquarters remain in Camden today. A machine shop owned by Eldridge Johnson
became the Victor Talking Machine Company, which in turn became RCA Victor, a firm
that operated in the City of Camden until 1988. The Esterbrook Pen Company and the
New York Shipbuilding Company are among the more recognized firms that had facilities
in Camden over the years, though a host of smaller firms had emerged across the
County producing leather goods, food products, metal products, terra cotta items, and
cigars.



________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                           Page 28
Camden County                                                                                                                                                                   CEDS 2007
 New Jersey                                                                                                                                                                     Census Tracts
  Map 5




                                                     r
                                                  ve
                                                                                                                                                                                                Legend




                                                 Ri
 PHILADELPHIA                                                                                                                                                                                        Census Tracts




                                                 e
                                              ar
                                                                     6101                                                                                                                       Municipalities

                                        law
                                                                                                                                                                                                     Audubon Borough
                                      De                   6028
                                                                                                                                                                                                     Audubon Park Borough
                                          6027.01                                                                                                                                                    Barrington Borough
                                                       6027.03
                                                                   6029.01
                                                                                                                                                                                                     Bellmawr Borough
                                        6010 6027.026030.016029.02
                      6007                          6030.02                                                                                                                                          Berlin Borough
                           6008 6009       6011.02
                     6006                                 6031                                                                                                                                       Berlin Township
                                        6011.01
                         6001                60126026.02                                                                                                                                             Brooklawn Borough
                                       6013
                   6005 6003 6002           6025.03                                                                                                                                                  Camden City
                                                   6026.01    6032
                          6004                                                 6033.02                                                                                                               Cherry Hill Township
                                      60146025.016025.02
                             6016                                    6033.01                                                                                                                         Chesilhurst Borough
                                    6015                                    6033.03                                                                                                                  Clementon Borough
                             6017             6042
                       6018          6041          6043 6038                           6034                                                                                                          Collingswood Borough
                               6019      6045 6044                                                                                                                                                   Gibbsboro Borough
                                 6040.01                                 6037
                                                       6039.01    6062             6036.03
                                 6020       6046                                                                                                                                                     Gloucester City City
                                                  6039.02
                          6049       60486047                                 6036.02
                                                                                           6035.01                                                                                                   Gloucester Township
                                   6040.02                    6061
                        6050 6051                   6057                                                                                                                                             Haddon Heights Borough
                   6102                   6056.01                   6063
                                                                                                                  6035.06
                               6052
                                               6056.02         6064      6036.01                                                                                           BURLINGTON                Haddon Township
                                         6055            6060                                                                                                                                        Haddonfield Borough
                        6053         6054                                              6035.03
                                             6058           6066                                                                                                                                     Hi-Nella Borough
                                                   6059                                                           6035.07
                                                                                         6035.04                                                                                                     Laurel Springs Borough
                           6070    6069.01
                                               6068                    6065        6035.05                                                                                                           Lawnside Borough
                                   6069.02               6067                                                           6075.03                                                                      Lindenwold Borough
                                                                  6073                                                                                                                               Magnolia Borough
                                                  6072
                                        6071                                          6075.01          6075.02                                                                                       Merchantville Borough
                                                       6082.06     6074.016074.02                                                                                                                    Mount Ephraim Borough
                                             6083.02         6082.05        6081
                                                                                                                                                                                                     Oaklyn Borough
                                                                                                           6076                6075.04
                                                                                 6080.01                                                                                                             Pennsauken Township
                                                                           6080.02                                     6075.05                                                                       Pine Hill Borough
                                                                 6082.02                    6077.02
                                                                                   6079                                                                                                              Pine Valley Borough
                                                6083.01                               6078.02                                                                                                        Runnemede Borough
                                                                            6078.01                        6077.01
                                                                  6082.09                                                    6088                                                                    Somerdale Borough
                                                                                                6086                                                                                                 Stratford Borough
                                                                                6085.03
                                                 6082.07                                                                                                                                             Tavistock Borough

                                                                                                                            6087                                                                     Voorhees Township
                                                                  6082.08
                                             6082.04                                  6085.04       6085.01                                                                                          Waterford Township
                                                                                                                                                                                                     Winslow Township
                                                                                                       6085.02                                                                                       Woodlynne Borough
                                                                                        6084.01                                                6089.01
                                                                                                                                                                      6089.03
                                                                     6084.04
                                                                                                 6084.02

                                                                                                                                     6091.03
                                                                                6084.03                    6092.03



                                                                                                                                                     6090                        6089.04
                                                                                       6092.01
                                                                                                       6092.02


                                                                                                           6092.04                                       6091.04




                                                                                                                                                            6091.02
                                         GLOUCESTER                                                                                        6092.05




                                                                                                                                                                                           ATLANTIC



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              5

           Miles


Data Source: NJDEP, ESRI, DVRPC
                                                   ¯                                             August 2007                                       EJR
                                                                                                                                                                                                          715 Twini ng R oad Su ite 21 5
                                                                                                                                                                                                              Dresher, PA 190 25
                                                                                                                                                                                                           www.triadi ncorporated.co m




                                                                                                                                                                                           Created by Triad Associates
The opening of the Benjamin Franklin Bridge in 1926 paved the way for commuters to
work in Philadelphia and live in the Camden County suburbs. The opening of the Walt
Whitman Bridge in 1957 and the coming of the PATCO line accelerated the development
of the Camden County suburbs. The late 1960s and the 1970s were very difficult times
as the U.S. economy in general and the Camden County economy in particular began to
make the shift from the old, industrial economy to the new, service oriented economy.
As noted above, after a period of economic decline and turmoil, the Camden County
economy has diversified and become stronger, changing its base to high technology and
service businesses.

3.5 DEMOGRAPHICS AND ECONOMIC OVERVIEW

The 2000 population of Camden County was 508,932, an increase of 6,108 from the
1990 Census. This represents a population increase of 1.2 percent for the decade,
which lagged the State’s stronger than expected growth rate of 8.6 percent. The U.S.
Census estimates that Camden County’s population increased by 1.59 percent between
2000 and 2006, projecting a 2006 total of 517,001 persons. Camden County is the
eighth most populous county in the state following Bergen, Middlesex, Essex,
Monmouth, Hudson, Ocean, and Union. The 2006 population estimate indicates that
there is an average of 2,325.7 persons per square mile in the County’s 222.3 square
mile area. This figure is double the New Jersey average of 1,176.2 persons per square
mile.

Camden County’s population tracks State figures very closely in many areas. For
example, according to recent census estimates, at the State level the population is 48.7
percent male and 51.3 percent female. The County figures are 48.4 and 51.6 percent
respectively. The median age of the State population is 38.2 years while the County
population median age is a somewhat younger 37.1. The median age for the nation is
younger yet (36.4), so that both the County and the State populations are older than
the national norm.

As the table below shows, the state, the County and the nation are close in the
percentages of population by age group. There are a few areas of divergence, and the
County has a higher concentration of youth than either the State or the nation.

As with most urban counties, the following statistics, taken in the aggregate, need to be
considered in the context of the dual challenges that the County faces. These include
first, the need to address the pockets of poverty, unemployment and underemployment
in the County; and second, the need to properly publicize the locational resource
advantages that are among the County’s assets.




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                          Page 29
                                          Table 3
                              Percentage of Population by Age:
                            Camden County, New Jersey and U.S.
                                 2006 Population Estimates

      Age Group                    Camden Co.                New Jersey       U.S.
            <5                           6.5                    6.4           6.8
           5 –9                          6.6                    6.4           6.6
         10 – 14                         7.2                    6.9           6.9
         15 – 19                         7.3                    6.8           7.1
         20 – 24                         6.7                    6.2           7.1
         25 – 34                         12.6                   12.4          13.5
         35 – 44                         15.3                   15.9          14.6
         45 – 54                         15.2                   15.2          14.5
         55 – 59                         6.2                    6.2           6.1
         60 – 64                         4.4                    4.6           4.5
         65 – 74                         6.0                    6.4           6.3
         75 – 84                         4.4                    4.6           4.4
           >85                            1.7                    1.9           1.8
      18 and Over                        75.0                   76.1          75.4
      65 and Over                        12.1                   12.9          12.4

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, New Jersey Department of Labor



The percentage of persons under the age of 18 (25 percent) is the fifth highest
percentage for this age group among all counties in the State (following Passaic, Essex,
Somerset and Union). The percentage of the County’s population under the age of 20
(27.5 percent) remains slightly higher than the State figure (26.5 percent) and is on par
with the U.S. percentage of 27.4 percent. The implication for the County is that it
remains well situated in terms of providing a labor force for the future. Census
estimates for 2006 also indicate that the age distribution within the County now
corresponds much more closely to the State distribution across most age groups. A
small deficit in the 25 to 34 age group may in particular imply first, that younger
workers may be seeking opportunities elsewhere, and second, that the potential for a
future labor shortage could exist in a strong economy.

The New Jersey Department of Labor (NJDOL) makes population and work force
projections for the State and the counties on a regular basis. According to the U.S.


________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                            Page 30
Census, the total population of Camden County in 2000 was 508,932. The NJDOL
revised population estimates indicate that the population of Camden County was
515,000 in 2005 and is expected to grow to 536,400 by 2015. There is evidence that
Camden County may be closing the gap between its rate of population growth and the
State of New Jersey’s growth rate. According to the NJDOL, between 2000 and 2005
Camden County is expected to see population grow by 1.2 percent, which is
approximately one-third of the State’s growth rate of 3.9 percent for the same period.
However, projections between 2005 and 2015 show Camden County growing at a rate
of 4.2 percent, which is just over one-half the State’s projected growth of 7.5 percent.


                                        Figure 2
                  Projected Population Growth Rates for Camden County


                              Projected Population Growth Rates
          Pop. Increase
           ('05 - '15)
          Pop. Increase
           ('00 - '05)




                     0.0%   1.0%   2.0%   3.0%   4.0%   5.0%    6.0%   7.0%   8.0%

                                          Camden   New Jersey

       Source: NJ DOL



Camden County differs from the State and the nation in terms of the racial composition
of the population. The percentage of persons categorizing themselves as white in the
County is about seven percentage points lower than the national figure and about three
percentage points lower than the State figure. At the same time, the percentage of
persons defining themselves as African American in Camden County is almost eight
percentage points higher than the national percentage, and is six points above the State
figure. The percentages for other categories are in the same range as national and
State figures, except that the percentage of persons classifying themselves as Latino
(which can be persons of any race) is below both State and national percentages by
more than three percentage points. The table below summarizes this information.




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                             Page 31
                                            Table 4
                               Racial and Ethnic Characteristics
                          Camden County, New Jersey – 2006 Estimates

               Race/Group                     Camden County   New Jersey               U.S.
                                                   %              %                     %
    Total Population                                517,001    8,724,560          299,398,484
    White Persons                                     72.9        76.4                 80.1
    Black/African-American
                                                      20.6        14.5                 12.8
    Persons
    American Indian                                    0.3         0.3                 1.0
    Asian Persons                                      4.6         7.4                 4.4
    Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
                                                       0.1         0.1                 0.2
    Persons
    Persons - Two or More Races                        1.5         1.3                 1.6
    Hispanic or Latino                                11.7        15.6                 14.8
    Source: N.J. Department of Labor, U.S. Census Bureau


Ninety-eight percent of the population of Camden County resides in a household 1. In
2000, this amounted to 498,526 persons. The other two percent of the population
(10,406 persons) lives in group-quarters; three-quarters of this segment are
institutionalized persons (persons residing in a correctional institution, juvenile
institution, nursing home, or other group facility). The percentage of institutionalized
persons in Camden County (1.5%) is higher than the State (1.3 %) or the nation (1.4
%). The percentage of group-quarters population is lower than the 2.8 percent for the
nation and the 2.3 percent for the State in some measure because of the few academic
institutions that offer dormitory living.

Of the 185,744 households in Camden County, a total of 129,844 reside in families, a
number that represents 69.9 percent of the total households. The other 30.1 percent
are non-family households, that is, persons primarily living alone, or unrelated persons
living together. The average household size figure for the County (2.68) is the same as
that for the State, and both are slightly larger than the national percentage (2.59).

The following table presents figures in various categories for Camden County, and
compares percentages in these categories to state and national figures.




1
  The Census Bureau defines a household as persons living together in a housing unit, whether
related or not.

________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                                Page 32
                                    Table 5
                       Percentage of Households by Type
              Camden County, New Jersey and the United States, 2000

                                           Camden         Camden       New Jersey      U.S.
                                           County #       County          %             %
                                                            %
Family Households                           129,844        69.9            70.3        68.1
Married Couple Households                    92,536          49.8          53.5        51.7
Female Householder, No Husband               28,534          15.4          12.6        12.2
Present
Female Householder, No Husband               15,890          8.6            6.4         7.2
Present and Children < 18
Non-Family Households                        55,900          30.1          29.7        31.9
Householders Living Alone                    46,556          25.1          24.5        25.8
Householders Alone & 65 +                    18,054          9.7            9.8         9.2
Average Household Size                                       2.68          2.68        2.59
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

The table is revealing in several aspects. The percentage of married couple households
is below State and national figures, though it is closer to the national percentage than
the State one. However, the percentage of female head households is well above State
and national percentages, and is the fifth highest percentage in the State following
Essex, Cumberland, Hudson, and Passaic Counties. The percentage of female head
households with children under 18 years of age is also above State and national
percentages. Indeed, 55.6 percent of female head households in Camden County have
minor children. This fact has implications for the provision of social programs, wage
rates, and the labor force. The relatively high percentage of female head households
implies that there may be a significant untapped labor pool that may require targeted
training and support (day care, after school programs, and transportation) to strengthen
its attachment to the labor market.

The percentages of householders living alone are in line with national and State figures,
though the percentage of householders over 65 and living alone exceeds the percentage
at both the county and state levels. Again, this statistic implies that this segment of the
population may require targeted initiatives to address special needs.




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                            Page 33
Measures of Economic Vitality

The Bureau of Economic Analysis provides a picture of Per Capita Personal Income
(PCPI) and Total Personal Income (TPI) for Camden County. In 2005, Camden County
had a PCPI of $36,297, which ranked 14th (of 21 counties) in the state. This figure was
83 percent of the State average of $43,831, but was 105 percent of the national
average of $34,471. This represents a reversal of recent trends, which saw Camden
County’s PCPI (as a percentage of U.S. PCPI) decline incrementally between 1996 (when
it was 101.9 percent of the U.S. figure) and 1999 (when it fell to 98 percent). The
County’s position, in terms of PCPI, has rebounded relative to both the State and the
nation.

Total Personal Income (TPI) is the total income of persons in the County, and is
comprised of 1) earnings (wages and salaries, proprietor’s income and other labor
income); 2) dividends, interest, and rent; and 3) transfer payments which include Social
Security payments, unemployment compensation, and other benefits payments. In
2005, the County’s Total Personal Income of $18,706,858 ranked 10th in the State and
accounted for 4.9 percent of the State total. This represented a 29.7 percent increase
from the 1999 figure, which was on par with a 29.6 percent increase at the state level,
and just slightly below the national change of 31 percent. The average annual growth
rate for Total Personal Income in Camden County over the decade 1995 to 2005 was 4.5
percent, which slightly trailed the State’s 5 percent increase and the U.S. growth rate of
5.2 percent.

The composition of the changes in TPI is also revealing. In 2005, earnings were 68.6
percent of TPI, which was essentially unchanged from the 1999 figure of 68.1 percent.
Dividends, rent and interest declined modestly, from 15.5 percent of the total in 1999 to
12.3 percent in 2005. These declines were offset by growth in the transfer payment
area, which increased from 14.6 percent in 1999 to 16.5 percent in 2005. The difficulty
with this type of growth is that it does not stem from increased production, investment,
or productivity, but rather from non-production sources and government payments to
individuals. The other category that exhibited substantial gains as a percentage of Total
Personal Income were Employer Contributions to Employee Pension and Insurance
Funds, which rose from 5.5 percent in 1999, to 6.8 percent in 2005.

According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis figures, Camden County experienced
increases in personal income and kept pace with the State in the short term (between
1999 and 2005), but lagged both the nation and State in the long-term growth figures.
Further, the growth in transfer payment income, which is not associated with increased
production or investment, continues as a troubling trend in the local economy.

The New Jersey Department of Labor also calculates Per Capita Personal Income for the
State, the area MSAs, and the counties. These figures vary from the Bureau of
Economic Analysis due to differing definitions, but they do provide additional insight into
the state of the County economy. According to the Department of Labor, the 2005 PCPI
in Camden County was $36,297, or $7,534 less than the State figure, and $4,430 less
than the Philadelphia CMSA. The 2005 figure for Camden County was 82.8 percent of
the State figure. The County PCPI increased 53.6 percent in the decade between 1995

________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                           Page 34
and 2005, while the State figure increased by 51.4 percent. Thus, according to this
analysis, Camden County experienced increases in personal income that outpaced the
State over the past decade.

The Census Bureau periodically estimates poverty and income data to provide
assessments of the state of the economy between Census counts. The latest estimates
that include figures at the county level are from 2004. The figures for the County, the
State and the United States are presented in the table below.


                                        Table 6
                           Income and Poverty Figures, 2004
                  Camden County, New Jersey, and the United States

                                      Camden         New Jersey          United States
                                      County
Median HH Income                      $48,748          $57,338              $44,334
% Persons below Poverty               10.6%              8.4%                12.7%
% Children below Poverty              13.2%             10.2%                17.8%
NJ Department of Labor, U.S. Census

As can be seen, the County’s median household income exceeds that of the nation, but
is only 85 percent of the State, despite the influence of affluent areas of the County
including Voorhees and Cherry Hill. The percentage of persons in poverty is lower than
the national figure, but is well above the State percentage. It should be noted that the
number of persons in poverty is 53,858. The percentage of persons under the age of 18
in poverty is below the national percentage however the Camden County figure is 3
percentage points above the State figure, reflecting the impact of Camden City’s
extraordinarily high childhood poverty rate (45.5 percent in 2000).

The picture that emerges is one of an economy that, while growing, continues to lag
behind State and national growth rates. However, the gaps are not large, and in some
measures they appear to be closing, suggesting that the County economy has
experienced relative improvement in the first half of the decade.

Retail Markets

The retail markets sector provides another measure of local economic vitality, but also
represents an important indicator of job growth and economic confidence. Because
these measures go beyond a statement about the strength of an area, they are treated
separately.

According to the 2002 Economic Census, retail sales in Camden County were over
$4,797,754,000, and made up 4.7 percent of the state’s total retail sales (down from 5.7
percent in the previous Economic Census). Per capita retail sales were $9,370 in
Camden County, trailing the state figure of $11,910 by $2,540 or 27 percent.


________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                         Page 35
Over 23,800 persons were employed in 1,959 retail establishments in Camden County in
2002. The most abundant group of retail establishments is the Food and Beverage
Stores category, which accounts for 20.5 percent of the total number of retail outlets
and is also the category with the largest number of employees (5,795). Clothing and
Clothing Accessories Stores are the second most numerous (293) and employ the third
most people (2,694), while Miscellaneous Store Retailers are third in number of
establishments (205). General Merchandise Stores (which include big-box retailers such
as Target and Wal-Mart), although relatively few in number (75) employ the second
highest number of workers (3,463). In terms of percentage of total sales, Food and
Beverage Stores (22.4 percent) and Motor Vehicle and Parts Dealers (21.6 percent) are
the highest ranking categories. The General Merchandise Stores category is a distant
third with 10.8 percent of total sales, followed by Health and Personal Care Stores (9.4
percent).

                                              Table 7
                                   Retail Sector, Camden County

 Description (NAICS code)                                             Establish-          Sales         Paid
                                                                       ments            ($1,000)      Employees
 Retail trade (44-45)                                                        1,959     4,797,754           23,896
      Motor vehicle & parts dealers (441)                                      148     1,036,305            2,212
      Furniture & home furnishings stores (442)                                116       177,990              861
      Electronics & appliance stores (443)                                      95       104,156              607
      Building material & garden equip / supplies (444)                        113       333,857            1,553
      Food & beverage stores (445)                                             401     1,073,501            5,795
      Health & personal care stores (446)                                      170       452,981            2,408
      Gasoline stations (447)                                                  149       282,178              938
      Clothing & clothing accessories stores (448)                             293       321,681            2,694
      Sporting goods, hobby, book, & music stores (451)                         92       122,137              913
      General merchandise stores (452)                                          75       520,155            3,463
      Miscellaneous store retailers (453)                                      205             D      (1000-2499)
      Nonstore retailers (454)                                                 102             D      (1000-2499)
D = Withheld to avoid disclosing data of individual companies; data are included in higher level totals
Source: 2002 Economic Census


Retail spending in Camden County is overall greater than in the nation as a whole. ESRI
provides an index system in which average expenditures across the nation are 100. Out
of the forty-two total categories of expenditure provided by the indexing system, only
seven are below the national norms. Moreover, three of the seven categories that are
below the national standard fall under the general category “Apparel and Services”
(which has an index of 98). The other categories trailing the nation include Women’s
Apparel and Services (96), Children’s Apparel and Services (99), Footwear (88), Satellite
Dishes (95), Recreational Vehicles and Fees (97), and Sports/ Recreation/Exercise
Equipment (93). Expenditures for Apparel Products and Services show an index figure
of 122 for the County, while Fees for Recreational Lessons, and Membership Fees for
Clubs have indexes of 114 and 113 respectively.                          Admission to


________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                                                    Page 36
Movie/Theatre/Opera/Ballet, and Admission to Sporting Events both have an index of
112, while Watches and Jewelry, and Fees for Participant Sports have an index of 111.

The point is that the retail economy is robust and varied, and is a key part of the area
economy. The types of expenditures and the levels of spending reinforce the relatively
affluent nature of the area economy as well.

Labor Market and Employment

Camden County’s civilian labor force is expected to grow at a relatively high rate over
the next few years, just exceeding the State’s rate of growth. However, County labor
force growth continues to trail State growth rates in long run projections. In 2000,
Camden County had a civilian work force of 250,470 persons for a 64.6 percent labor
force participation rate. The estimate for the labor force in 2009 is 279,200,
representing a 9 percent increase over the nine-year period from 2000. The New Jersey
Department of Labor projects that the State’s labor force will increase by 8.26 percent
over the same period. It also projects that the labor force will number 287,700 by 2020,
which would represent a 14.8 percent growth over the twenty-year period, compared to
a 16.3 percent projected increase at the state level.

It is noteworthy that Camden County continues to be a net exporter of labor.
Historically, neighboring, then rural counties provided a labor pool for Camden County.
Although 26,164 persons still commute from Burlington County and 22,737 come from
Gloucester County to Camden County for work, these figures are well behind those for
Camden County residents who work elsewhere. According to the 2000 Census, 54
percent of the Camden County labor force works within the county while the other 46
percent works in neighboring counties. Almost 32,000 Camden County residents
commute to employment in Burlington County, and another 15,234 commute to jobs in
Gloucester County. Approximately 33,000 out of more than 43,000 Camden County
residents commuting to Pennsylvania work in the City of Philadelphia. This represents a
substantial increase since the 1990 census, when only roughly 20,000 Camden County
residents commuted to Pennsylvania, with 10,083 working in Philadelphia.

Figures for 2006 provided by NJDOL show that Camden County unemployment levels
were on par with State unemployment levels throughout much of the year. In contrast
to trends in the late 1990s, Camden County’s annual average unemployment rate now
exceeds the State level. The following table compares Camden County and New Jersey
unemployment percentages for the available months of the current year.




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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                         Page 37
                                        Table 8
                       Unemployment in Camden County, New Jersey
                            January through December, 2006


         Month            Camden County           Camden County      New Jersey Percent
                            Number of           Percent Unemployed      Unemployed
                           Unemployed
 January                     14,700                        5.5                 5.1
 February                       15,400                     5.7                 5.2
 March                          14,400                     5.3                 4.9
 April                          14,200                     5.2                 4.7
 May                            13,900                     5.1                 4.7
 June                           14,700                     5.4                 4.7
 July                           16,200                     5.9                 5.3
 August                         14,300                     5.3                 4.7
 September                      13,700                     5.1                 4.4
 October                        12,300                     4.5                 3.9
 November                       12,300                     4.5                 4.0
 December                       11,500                     4.2                 3.9
 Annual Average                 14,000                     5.1                 4.6
Source: New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development


As the table illustrates, the rate of unemployment in Camden County has tracked that of
the State very closely over the twelve-month period. Variation has been in the range of
one-tenth of one percent in either direction from the State figure. The most recent data
released by the Department of Labor for July 2007 indicate that the New Jersey
economy started off the year in a downturn, but began to witness sustained
employment growth beginning in May 2007. The July 2007 unemployment rate in the
State rose to 4.6 percent, after holding steady at 4.3 percent between March and June.
The national unemployment rate for July was also 4.6 percent.

Despite the relatively low rate of unemployment as a countywide calculation, the figures
show that over 16,000 persons were actively seeking employment in Camden County in
July of 2006. This is evident in several of the County’s older urban/industrialized areas
where there is high unemployment and low per capita income. Several Camden County
municipalities exhibit sufficient distress to qualify for USEDA programs at this time.
These include the City of Camden, Gloucester City, and the Boroughs of Clementon,
Lindenwold, and Magnolia. An examination of the Municipal Distress Index (MDI) and
Ranking of all 566 New Jersey municipalities maintained by the New Jersey Office of
State Planning reveals that the following municipalities are among the 100 most stressed
municipalities in New Jersey.

________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                          Page 38
                                       Table 9
                            Municipal Distress, New Jersey


                        Municipality                      MDI Rank

          City of Camden                                       1
          City of Gloucester City                             15
          Woodlynne                                           22
          Laurel Springs                                      32
          Audubon Park                                        42
          Collingswood                                        43
          Chesilhurst                                         59
          Audubon                                             61
          Clementon                                           65
          Magnolia                                            70
          Brooklawn                                           79
          Lindenwold                                          84



Employment levels in the Greater Camden Labor Area, which includes Burlington,
Camden, and Gloucester counties, reached 641,000 in July of 2007, an increase of 3,200
jobs over the July 2006 figure. The service sector is projected to continue on a trend of
sustained, gradual growth. The NJOL is projecting the percentage of service jobs in
Camden County to slowly rise from 87 percent in 2004 to 89 percent by 2014. In a
broader context, Camden County can expect significant growth in several industries for
the period 2004 to 2014. NJOL projections indicate that total employment will grow by
9 percent, with 12,400 new jobs created in the top five growth industries over this
period – all in the fast growing service sector, as illustrated in the following table.




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                          Page 39
                                     Table 10
                        Private Sector Industries with the
            Greatest Employment Growth: Camden County, 2004 – 2014

          Industry Title                    2004                2014             Increase        %
                                           Number              Number          (2004 – 2014)   Change
Administrative and Support Services          16,850             20,900            4,050          24.1
Ambulatory Health Care Services               9,950             13,100            3,150          31.5
Social Assistance                             5,400              7,400            2,000          37.5
Eating and Drinking Places                   11,750             13,550            1,800          15.4
Merchant Wholesalers, Durable                 7,600               9,000           1,400          18.7
Goods
Source: New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, Feb. 2007



The 9 percent rate of job growth projected by NJDOL exceeds its projected rate of
increase for the labor force, which is expected to grow by 6 percent between 2004 and
2014. In short, there is likely to be a serious imbalance between supply and demand if
both sets of projections unfold as presented. Tapping the supply of unemployed
persons, luring additional persons into the workforce, and retaining the growing
numbers of young persons currently in schools in the county will all be important to
facilitating the growth and expansion of the economy in Camden County in light of this
potential shortfall in labor supply.

An analysis of 2000 census data on the occupations and employment of persons 16 and
older shows an emphasis in the work force in the area of Management, Professional and
Related Occupations. The decade between 1990 and 2000 featured significant increases
in this sector, as well service occupations, for Camden County, the State and the nation
as a whole. The decade also witnessed a steep decline in the percentage of employment
in Farming, Forestry and Fishing across all geographic categories. The table below
compares the percentage of workers by category for the County, the state, and the
nation.
                                         Table 11
                    2000 Occupation / Employment Percentages
                 Camden County, New Jersey and the United States

               Occupation Group                          Camden Co.           New Jersey %      U.S.
                                                            %                                    %
Managerial / Prof. Specialist                                 35.5                38.0          33.6
Sales and Admin. Support                                      29.3                28.5          26.7
Service Occupations                                           14.4                13.6          14.9
Farming / Forestry / Fishing                                  0.1                 0.2            0.7
Const. , Extraction and Maintenance                           8.4                 7.8            9.4
Prod. Transport and Material Moving                           12.3                12.0          14.6
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000, SF3 Matrices P49, P50, and P51


________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                                       Page 40
These figures confirm that the Camden County economy continued its transition to the
“new” economy throughout the past decade. By 2000, only 10.3 percent of Camden
County’s adult population worked in manufacturing, compared to almost 15 percent in
1990. Similarly, manufacturing employment fell by 5 percentage points in New Jersey
(from 17 percent in 1990 to 12 percent in 2000), and by 3.5 percentage points for the
nation (from 17.7 percent down to 14.1 percent).

The overall labor market picture is a cause for concern for Camden County. The County
has made, and is making, definite strides away from a manufacturing base and
emphasis. However, despite relatively high unemployment and a potential pool of
workers not currently in the labor force, projected economic growth in Camden County
has the potential to outstrip the County’s ability to provide workers. Although labor can
be “imported” from neighboring areas, the inability to provide an adequate supply of
appropriately trained workers could lead to firms locating or expanding to other areas.

3.6 INFRASTRUCTURE

Infrastructure is a broad term that includes a number of elements that support economic
development. These include transportation aspects, such as highways, ports and
airports, energy utilities, including electricity and natural gas, communications elements,
water and sewer services, and sites and buildings.

A review of the transportation aspects of the County is included previously in this
document. ESRI projections indicate that there are approximately 408 firms providing
transportation and warehousing services to firms in Camden County, employing over
6,834 persons. In addition, there are a full range of courier and overnight delivery
services in the County.

The County is completely served with electric power, and almost completely served with
natural gas except for a few areas in the Pinelands part of the County. Public Service
Electric and Gas Company provides electric and natural gas service to the northern and
western portions of the County. The firm is the largest utility in the state and has an
established presence in the urbanized parts of the County in particular. Atlantic City
Electric (formerly Conectiv Energy) provides electricity to the southern and eastern
portions of the County. South Jersey Gas Company provides gas service in a few areas
of the County as well.

Water and sewer services are also widely available across the County, the only
exceptions being in the thinly developed and development restricted eastern portion of
the County. New Jersey American Water Company, the state’s largest water utility,
serves 23 of the 37 municipalities. This water company has undertaken the construction
of new surface supply facilities, as well as new treatment and distribution systems to
anticipate future growth and demands. Aqua New Jersey, Inc. (formerly Consumers
New Jersey Water Company) provides service in other areas of the County. Fourteen of
the County’s municipalities obtain water from wells. The Camden County Municipal
Utilities Authority maintains and operates two wastewater treatment facilities. These
two operations treat the County’s daily 58 million gallons of wastewater flow.



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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                            Page 41
Telecommunications service is available throughout the County and Verizon is the major
supplier of phone service. Wireless telecommunications service is also widely available
and a number of national carriers are competing within the County. It should be noted
that the County has very large fiber optic capacity in the northern section of the County
with lines coming from Philadelphia running westward through Camden and turning
north in the area of Lawnside. These large fiber optic lines offer the opportunity for the
County to attract firms requiring such technology to locate along or near these lines to
take advantage of this capability.

The ability to provide a company considering expansion or relocation with an
appropriate site or building is an essential part of economic development activity.
Camden County faces some challenges in this area because of the built out nature of
much of the County, and restrictions on development in other parts. As described
earlier, the southeastern portion of the County is in the Pinelands area, which has been
designated a natural area to be preserved. Most types of growth and development are
severely restricted in this part of the County, which comprises almost twenty percent of
the County’s land area. It should also be pointed out that this area has historically not
been well served by utilities and transportation access, so that growth has always been
difficult in this area.

The central portion of the County faces a different set of development issues. Efforts to
limit “sprawl” and preserve farmland and natural areas have led to development
restrictions, and competition for the remaining land for residential as well as commercial
uses has increased the costs of development of any type.

The western, urban areas face yet a third challenge in that much of the land in the old
industrial communities, such as Camden, Gloucester City and Pennsauken or the older
residential communities, such as Collingswood and Merchantville, are built out. In these
places, applying the State’s Smart Growth principles and utilizing the redevelopment
process, including brownfields development, is the only viable option, but costs are
increased not only by the price of land, but by the concerns of contamination on the
older industrial sites known as brownfields.

In addition to these considerations the Camden County real estate market faces some
pressures from the market itself. Camden County lease rates tend to be low relative to
other parts of the New Jersey and Philadelphia area market. C.B. Richard Ellis reported
that in the first quarter of 2007, the average asking lease rates for Class A office space
were $19.45 per square foot in Camden County, as compared to $21.67 in Burlington
County and $20.00 in Gloucester County. All Southern New Jersey rates were
substantially behind the asking lease rate for downtown Philadelphia of $24.13 per
square foot. As of the first quarter of 2007, Camden County maintained a total of
6,769,088 rentable square feet of office space, and had another 344,469 under
construction. The vacancy rate for office space in Camden County in the first quarter
2007 was 12 percent, which was higher than the vacancy rate in Center City
Philadelphia (10.31 percent), but significantly below the average rates for Suburban
Philadelphia (15.52 percent) and Northern Delaware (15.92 percent). The vacancy rate
for Camden County was also higher in 2007 than in 2006, when it was as low as 10.14
percent. This rise in vacancy is likely due to the substantial increase in office space that


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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                            Page 42
has occurred in the past five years. Leasing activity remained strong in early 2007, with
a net absorption of 21,822 square feet for the first quarter alone.

Demand and supply for office space in Camden County are both clearly experiencing an
upswing. The planned expansion of the Campbell Soup Company Corporate
Headquarters and Business Park in Camden City will add another 500,000 square feet of
new office space in the County, in addition to the many new office developments
planned for Camden City’s waterfront. A major expansion of the headquarters for A.C.
Moore Arts and Crafts was completed in Winslow Township in 2004, and the Garden
State Park development in Cherry Hill – a large scale, mixed-use project on the former
site of the landmark Garden State Park racetrack – is expected to create an additional 1
million square feet of office space.

In terms of sites for new development, the situation is more difficult. There are only a
handful of undeveloped sites across the County. The available sites identified in the
2002 CEDS are now much closer to redevelopment. The 500-acre Lakeland site in
Gloucester Township was designated as an area in need of redevelopment, and plans
are in place to develop roughly one fifth of the site. The County has initiated a master
planning process with the CCIA, which has retained a consultant to prepare the master
plan. Two redevelopment proposals are under review for a 120-acre site in the Borough
of Lawnside. Both proposals include a mix of uses including open space, single family
residential, and commercial. Gloucester Township designated the 40-acre former Nike
missile base site as an area in need of redevelopment and issued a Request for Proposal
in 2006. The Township is currently reviewing development alternatives.

As noted, redevelopment is a key component of future growth in Camden County.
Camden city has led the way, with public and private investments recently superseding
the $3 billion mark. In 2002, the State of New Jersey created a State Economic
Recovery Board (ERB) to oversee and administer $175 million in State funding for
economic development projects within “qualified municipalities” – a designation that is
currently met only by Camden City. The ERB has had enormous success in catalyzing
new development projects in Camden City, including large scale residential
developments and major investments in medical and educational facilities such as the
expansions of Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center, Cooper Hospital and Camden County
College. The ERB has also been a factor in the highly publicized rebirth of the Camden
City waterfront, supporting projects such as the $57 million expansion of the Adventure
Aquarium.

Other large scale redevelopment projects in Camden city include the multi-phased,
mixed-use Cooper’s Crossing development, which is currently under construction;
upscale condominium conversions such as the renovation of the old RCA Nipper building
into the Victor Building; and the pioneering waterfront projects of the early 1990s, such
as the Tweeter Entertainment Center and Campbell’s Field. The planned expansion of
the Campbell Soup corporate headquarters, which is expected to begin construction in
2007, represents another multi-million development project in the city of Camden.

Pennsauken also has plans to transform its waterfront into a community amenity. The
Township of Pennsauken used the findings from its USEPA Brownfields Demonstration


________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                          Page 43
Pilot Grant to further explore redevelopment potential on Petty’s Island, and the area of
the waterfront south of the Delaware River Railroad Bridge to 36th Street. The site was
designated as an area in need of redevelopment, and Cherokee Pennsauken was
selected as redeveloper. Concerns by some residents and environmental activists over
the environmental impact of a large scale development plan for Petty’s Island led the
Township to recently authorize a scaled back proposal that would leave almost 75
percent of the island undeveloped. Details of the proposal, which was approved in the
spring of 2007, are being worked out. However, the new development will continue to
provide a mix of uses, as well as open space for public recreational use and to support
the sensitive island ecology.

Collingswood has witnessed a revival that is gaining notice as an example of the
successful intersection of “Main Street” and Transit Oriented Development (TOD)
revitalization strategies. Haddon Avenue in Collingswood has grown into a thriving
dining, retail and entertainment district, drawing a diverse mix of ethnic restaurants,
cafes and specialty stores. The Lumberyard Condominiums, a $40 million phased
development which is currently under construction, represents the county’s first
suburban mixed-use TOD project. The demand for the appealing quality of life in
Collingswood is reflected in its rapidly rising real estate market, which in 2006 was
among the fastest growing in the Greater Philadelphia region.

The redevelopment of the Garden State Park racetrack in Cherry Hill into a massive
mixed-use retail, office and residential complex represents one of the largest projects
currently underway in the County. Plans for the 225-acre site include a new town center,
one million square feet of new office space, active adult condominiums, luxury
townhouses, popular restaurants such as The Cheesecake Factory, Brio Italian Grill, and
McCormick and Schmicks; upscale retail establishments; and large anchors such as
Wegmans Food Markets and the Home Depot. The project, which attracted more than
$500 million in private investment, will create a new regional destination for living,
working, shopping and entertainment in Camden County.

3.7 THE COUNTY ECONOMIC STRUCTURE

The economy of Camden County is diverse and growing stronger. According to ESRI
projections, there were over 20,700 businesses in the County employing more than
205,000 persons in 2007. Dun and Bradstreet data indicate that several establishments
in the County, in the health care area in particular, have over 1,000 employees. The
largest employers in the County include Lockheed Martin (Cherry Hill), Cooper Health
Care Systems (Camden), Our Lady of Lourdes Healthcare (Camden), and United Parcel
Service (UPS; Lawnside). Other large employers include L-3 Communications
Corporation (Camden), NJ Protocall Inc. (Cherry Hill), Commerce Bank (Cherry Hill), A.C.
Moore (Winslow Township), and Virtua Hospital (Vorhees). The Campbell Soup Company
leads the County in terms of sales volume, with over $7.3 billion in annual sales,
followed by Lockheed Martin, which reported $2.5 billion in sales for the same period.
The following table shows the percentage of employment among the major industry
groups in the County in relation to the percentages those industries employ nationwide.




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                          Page 44
                                        Table 12
                          Comparison of the Economic Structure
                         The United States and Camden County, 2005


Group                                  US % of                Camden       Number of     Difference
                                      Employees             County % of   Employees in    US and
                                                             Employees      Camden        Camden
                                                                            County       County %

11 - Forestry, Fishing                       0.1                >0.1              b          --

21 - Mining                                  0.4                >0.1              b          --

22 - Utilities                               0.5                 0.4            674         -0.1

23 - Construction                            5.8                 5.7          10,504        -0.1

31-33 – Manufacturing                      11.8                  8.8          16,092        -3.0

42 - Wholesale Trade                         5.1                 6.0          10,918        +0.9

44 - Retail Trade                          13.2                 13.5          24,667        +0.3

48 - Transportation &
     Warehousing                             3.6                 3.7           6,724        +.01
51 - Information                             2.9                 2.2           4,040        -.07

52- Finance and Insurance                    5.5                 4.5           8,167        -1.0

53 - Real Estate                             1.8                 1.6           2,987        -0.2

54 - Professional and
     Technical Services                      6.6                 9.4          17,238        +2.8
55 - Management of
     Companies                               2.5                 2.3           4,223        -0.2
56 - Administration, Support
     & Remediation                           8.0                 9.1          16,644        +1.1
61 - Educational Services                    2.5                 1.7           3,151        -0.8

62 - Health Care and Social
     Assistance                            13.8                 17.8          32,572        +4.0
71 - Arts, entertainment and                 1.7                 1.2              g          --
     Recreation
72 - Accommodations and
     Food Service                            9.5                 7.1          12,960        -2.4
81 - Other Services (except
     public administrative)                  4.6                 5.1           9,433        +0.5
99 - Unclassified                            0.0                 0.0             27         0.0
     Establishment
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2005 County Business Patterns
b - 20 to 99 employees
g - 1,000 to 2,499 employees




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                                     Page 45
The data in the table above serve to highlight the differences between Camden County
employment patterns and those of the nation. The most obvious points are the strength
of the Health Care and Social Assistance and Professional and Technical Services sectors
in Camden relative to national percentages. The proportion of County employees in the
Health Care exceeds the national percentage by four percentage points, while
Professional and Technical Services is almost three percentage points ahead of the
national figure. Administration and Support and Wholesale Trade are also ahead of
national figures.        The County lags national percentages in Manufacturing,
Accommodations and Food Services, and Educational Services. Since the last CEDS
report in 2002, the County has gained employment in the Transportation and
Warehousing industry sector, and the County percentage now slightly exceeds the
national percentage. This may reflect the increasing importance of ground transportation
services with the growth of internet sales. United Parcel Services, which has a large
facility in Lawnside, is one of the county’s largest employers, with 2,500 employees and
more than $138.3 million in sales.

The table also shows the number of employees in each of the major industry groups.
Not surprisingly, the Health Care sector is far and away the leading employer with over
30,000 persons employed. Retail follows with 24,667 employees, and manufacturing,
though much diminished from two decades earlier, still has over 16,000 employees in
the County. Professional and Technical Services, which gained almost 4,000 jobs
between 1999 and 2005, has 17,238 employees. Another sizable sector, employing
16,664, is Administration, Support, and Remediation, which includes establishments
engaged in office administration, employment and temporary help agencies, business
service centers, and waste collection and treatment firms. As noted, these figures
confirm the continued transition of the Camden County economy from a manufacturing
base to a service economy. Industry growth trends are evident even in the short period
between the 2002 Economic Census and the 2005 business patterns discussed above.
The following table shows the changes in numbers of employees for selected industry
groups between 2002 and 2005.

                                           Table 13
                            Differences in Numbers of Employees,
                                        2002 and 2005
                                 Camden County, New Jersey

                                                            2002               2005     Change
                 Industry Group
                                                                                       (2002 to 2005)

  Manufacturing                                            17,008             16,092      -916
  Professional & Technical Services                        15,243             17,238    1,995
  Healthcare and Social Assistance                         28,809             32,572    3,763
  Accommodations and Food Service                          11,949             12,960    1,011
  Other Services (except public)                           6,304               9,433    3,129
 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Economic Census 2002, 2005 County Business Patterns


________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                                     Page 46
Even in this short period of time during a period of economic expansion there is
evidence of an appreciable gain in employment in the various service sectors identified
above, and a corresponding decline in manufacturing employment.

According to the U.S. Census, County Business Patterns data, there were 12,669
establishments operating in Camden County in 2005. The largest number of companies
was in the retail sector, which had 1,940 firms (15.3% of all firms). Professional and
Technical Services followed with 1,653 firms (13.0% of all firms). Healthcare followed
with 11.4 percent of establishments (1,449) reflecting the large size of the major
hospital complexes and operations, and construction which had 1,324 jobs and 10.5
percent of the total number of firms, was fourth in terms of the number of
establishments. The latter numbers reflect the relatively small size of many of the firms
operating in this classification.

Even more interesting than the number of firms is the contribution that each sector
made to the County’s total payroll. Four industry sectors accounted for 50.2 percent of
the 2005 payroll of $6,885,005,000. These were Health Care, with 19.6 percent of the
total payroll; Professional, Scientific and Technical Services (11.1 percent);
Manufacturing (10.9 percent); and Retail (8.5 percent). The chart at the end of this
section shows the percentage of employees by industry group compared to that industry
group’s percentage of total payroll. The contrasts are striking and show the relative
importance of some sectors in terms of their economic impact, and distinguish those
sectors that pay higher than average, and lower than average, wages.

While the Health Care percentage of payroll is roughly equivalent to its employment
percentage, Manufacturing, and Professional Services payroll contributions exceed their
employment percentages significantly. Construction, Wholesale Trade, Management of
Companies, and Finance and Insurance also have payroll percentages that well exceed
their employment percentages. These are industries that tend to pay higher than
average wages. When these sectors are also substantial fractions of total employment,
they constitute the key regional economic sectors that are capable of generating quality
employment opportunities. In contrast, the Retail Trade sector makes up a much higher
percentage of County employment than it contributes to County payroll, as do
Administration and Support, Accommodations and Food Services, and Other Services
(which includes a variety of maintenance and repair functions, personal care services,
religious and labor organizations). These are jobs that, while plentiful in some cases,
tend to pay lower wages and therefore contribute less than their total share to the
County payroll. The key point is that the transition to a service economy has been
characterized by a polarization of the labor market into high paying service sector jobs in
fields such as Finance and Insurance, and Professional, Scientific and Technical Services,
and lower paying jobs in sectors such as Retail Trade, and Accommodations and Food
Service. This trend suggests that additional resources may be needed to ensure that the
Camden workforce receives the education and training necessary to gain access to the
quality jobs that are being generated by the new economy.

The implications of the polarizing labor market are also evident in the projections for
County employment growth by sector. As noted in the preceding section on the labor
market, the County is expected to see continued and substantial growth especially in


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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                            Page 47
Health Services, Administrative and Support Services, Social Assistance, Eating and
Drinking Establishments, and Merchant Wholesalers, Durable Goods.                    Overall
employment in Camden County between 2004 and 2014 is expected to increase by
19,850 jobs or 9 percent. This will include the creation of 21,950 Service-producing jobs
and the loss of 2,100 Goods-producing jobs. The greatest growth between 2004 and
2014 is anticipated to be the creation of 7,700 jobs in the Health Care fields, followed by
4,150 jobs in Business Services. Though other industry groups will see solid growth, the
numbers of jobs created in any one of these other areas will be less than one-half of the
number expected in the Business Services area.

The range of positions created will call for all types of educational and training levels.
The New Jersey Department of Labor anticipates that between 2002 and 2012, the
number of jobs in Camden County with high educational or training requirements will
increase by 16.4 percent, which is almost twice the rate in total employment growth.

Thus, the greatest numbers of job openings are anticipated to be in relatively low paying
positions such as cashiers, retail salespersons, office clerks, and food preparation
workers, though this follows the general trends for numbers of persons employed. The
overall greatest employment growth will be for nurses, home health aides, and nurses’
aides in the Health Care field, again requiring a range of skill sets depending upon the
position. It is clear however, that better paying, high requirement positions in sectors
such as health care, professional and technical services, and finance and insurance, will
remain a significant part of job growth in Camden County.

It should be noted that the types of jobs with the least expected growth will be in the
manufacturing sector (assemblers and technicians), and among word processors,
switchboard operators, and computer operators.




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                            Page 48
                                                        Camden County Industry Profile, 2005

                           Other services (except public administration)
                                        Accommodation & food services
                                         Health care & social assistance
                                                    Educational services
   Administrative & support & w aste management & remediation service
                               Management of companies & enterprises
                            Professional, scientific, & technical services
                                           Real estate & rental & leasing
                                                    Finance & insurance
                                                              Information
                                          Transportation & w arehousing
                                                              Retail trade
                                                         Wholesale trade
                                                           Manufacturing
                                                            Construction
                                                                  Utilities

                                                                         0.0%              5.0%               10.0%               15.0%            20.0%   25.0%

                                                                              Percent of Employees       Percent of Payroll

 Arts, entertainment & food services: data withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies; data are included in higher level totals.
 Source: U.S. Census, 2005 County Business Patterns




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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                                                                                                    Page 49
3.8 HOUSING

There were 199,679 housing units in Camden County according to the 2000 Census. Of
these units, 185,744 were occupied and 13,935 (7.0%) were vacant. This 7 percent
vacancy rate was below the national vacancy rate of 9.0 percent, and reflects the overall
tight residential real estate market in many parts of the County. The 1.8-percent
vacancy rate for owner-occupied units and the 6.8 percent vacancy rate for rental units
match the national percentages of 1.7 and 6.8 percent respectively.

The number of housing units increased by 9,534 from the 1990 Census, which
represented a 5 percent increase for the decade. The vacancy rate increased by one
percent over the period. Census estimates show an increase of approximately 4,000
units between 2000 and 2005, with the current estimated total at 203,760 units.

Of the occupied housing units in 2000, 130,043 or 70 percent, were owner-occupied and
55,701, or 30.0 percent, were renter-occupied units. These figures changed significantly
from the 1990 figures when 65.6 percent of occupied units were owner-occupied and
28.4 percent were renter occupied. Most of the increase in the number of occupied
housing units (178,758 in 1990 to 185,744 in 2000) was in the owner-occupied
category. This number went from 124,704 units in 1990 to 130,043 in 2000, an
increase of 5,339 units or 76.4 percent of the total increase. The number of renter-
occupied units increased by 1,647 units.



                              Owner-Occupied Housing (% by type)


                                                                1-person household

                              13.4                18.4          2-person household
                    18.3
                                                                3-person household


                                                         30.8   4-person household
                            19.1
                                                                5 or more-person
                                                                household



               Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2000



The home ownership rate in Camden County is appreciably higher than the national
figure of 66.2 percent.      Among the owner-occupied housing units, two-person
households constitute the largest group of occupants (30.8%) followed by three- and
one-person households (19.1 and 18.4 percent respectively). As one would expect one-
person households constitute the largest percentage of renter households (40.7%),
followed by 2-person households (25.6%). The average household size in Camden
County is very close to the national figure for both owner-occupied and renter-occupied


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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                             Page 50
units – 2.69 persons per household for owner-occupied units nationally and 2.85 in
Camden County and 2.4 persons per household for renter-occupied units nationally and
2.29 for renter units in Camden County.

The 2000 census also provides insight into the structure and age of the County’s
housing stock. Of the 199,679 total housing units in the County in 2000, 74.6 percent
were single units, attached or detached. Structures with 50 or more units were the next
most numerous, 12,962 in number or 6.5 percent of the total. This represents a
substantial increase from 1990, when there were only 8,627 units in structures of 50 or
more units, constituting 4.5 percent of the total.

The housing stock in Camden County overall is younger than that of many other parts of
the state. Though some of the older, industrial municipalities along the Delaware River
in particular have older housing, the development that took place almost continuously
after the Second World War through the 1970s has given the County a balanced age
distribution as the following table shows:

                                            Table 14
                                    Housing Units by Year Built
                                    Camden County, New Jersey

           Year Built                    Number of Units           % of Units
         1990 to 2000                         16,754                   8.0
         1980-89                              23,058                   11.5
         1970-79                              33,132                   16.6
         1960-69                              34,358                   17.2
         1950-59                              34,428                   17.2
         1940-49                              20,392                   10.2
         Before 1939                          37,557                   18.8
         Total                               199,679                  100.0
 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2000

The most noticeable fact about this table is the relative evenness of the construction of
units over time. The pre-World War Two construction accounts for less than one-
quarter of all housing units, and though there is an expected drop in the number of
units added during the decade of the 1940s, construction moved along briskly and
evenly over the following three decades.

The trend toward a smooth flow of new housing has continued. In 1999, Camden
County municipalities authorized the construction of 867 new housing units, 80 percent
of which were single-family units. The following year these municipalities authorized
796 new units, 83 percent of which were to be single-family units. In the first eight
months of 2001 489 units were authorized, 88 percent of which were single-family. This

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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                          Page 51
489-unit figure would project to 733 units for the year, a number slightly behind the
previous year, perhaps reflecting the economic slowdown that began early in the year.

Thus, in terms of housing stock, Camden County can offer a wide range of alternatives
extending from older, urban structures to established suburban communities to new
developments.

3.9 EDUCATION

Camden County includes 37 school districts, which operate 103 elementary and middle
schools and 19 high schools. In addition, the county has two vocational-technical
schools that provide day and evening classes to youth and adults in a range of subject
areas. Some of the schools and districts in the County are participants in the STAR
programs, which are “cutting edge” schools with identified specializations. Other
schools are Best Practices schools that have implemented innovative practices to meet
specific needs of their student populations. The most recent statistics available (for
2006-07) indicate that the public school system in Camden County had 87,688 students
in pre-K through Grade 12 and Special Education and Vocational programs. This was
the fifth largest student population in the state of New Jersey, and constituted 6.3
percent of public school students in the state.

The vocational education programs had 1,459 enrolled students in the 9-12 grade
programs, the seventh largest program behind Passaic, Essex, Burlington, Middlesex,
Bergen and Monmouth Counties. The percentage of minority enrollment for Camden
County was 49.3 percent in 2006, a figure just above the state percentage of 44.3.

Also, there are 83 private and parochial schools offering Grade One through Grade
Twelve education within the County.

As noted above in this document, Camden County is located in the middle of an
excellent educational environment. There are several nationally and internationally
known universities in Philadelphia and its immediate area, including the University of
Pennsylvania, Temple University, St. Joseph’s University, LaSalle University, Villanova
University, and Drexel University; while Princeton University, Rutgers University, and
Rowan University are within an easy drive.

The County itself has significant higher education opportunities. Camden County
College is a public two-year college offering an associate degree in high technology
fields such as engineering technology, computer aided design, and computer aided
manufacturing. Rutgers University has an established campus in Camden and offers
liberal arts degrees as well as Master of Arts degrees in several fields and a Juris Doctor
degree through the School of Law. The Cooper Hospital/University Medical center is
affiliated with the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, as is the Kennedy
Memorial Hospitals system.

Data from the 2005 American Community Survey provides an estimate of the
educational attainment levels for residents of Camden County. The data reveal a



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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                            Page 52
relatively well-educated workforce. The following table compares the educational
attainment levels of the population 25 and over for the County and the nation:

                                        Table 15
                           Educational Attainment Percentages
                                  Population 25+ Years
                            Camden County and the US – 2005

     ATTAINMENT LEVEL                       CAMDEN COUNTY %                 US %
     Less Than 9th Grade                                  4.2                 6.2
      th     th
     9 to 12 Grade, No Diploma                           11.0                 9.5
     High School Graduate                                33.2                29.6
     Some college, No degree                             16.5                20.1
     Associate Degree                                     7.0                 7.4
     Bachelor’s Degree                                   19.0                17.2
     Graduate of Professional Degree                      9.1                10.0
   Source: U.S. Census, 2005 American Community Survey



The percentage of persons without a high school diploma in Camden County is almost
the same as that percentage nationally, though Camden County has a smaller
percentage of persons with less than a 9th grade education. The County does have a
higher percentage of persons with a high school diploma, though this is offset somewhat
by the lower percentages of persons with some college and an Associate degree. The
County does have a higher percentage of persons with a Bachelor’s degree, and is
roughly equivalent in the percentage of persons with advanced or professional degrees.

3.10 QUALITY OF LIFE CONSIDERATIONS

Contemporary companies typically seek environments that offer a high quality of life, a
subjective measure. Many firms include access to cultural events, a variety of
recreational activities, the availability of upscale housing, and consideration for the
overall cost of living as part of the quality of life. As a part of the Philadelphia
Metropolitan Area, Camden County faces no difficulty in marketing itself and its sites
based on quality of life measures.

Philadelphia offers the requisite menu of cultural attractions, such as museums, art
galleries, theater, and restaurants. In addition, several universities in the city offer their
own programs of cultural and intellectual activities that can appeal to almost any taste
or interest. The City of Camden, Cherry Hill Township, and other nearby communities
offer a range of amenities themselves including restaurants, entertainment, theater
groups, museums, and historic sites. The Tweeter Music Entertainment Center,
Campbell’s Field Minor League Baseball Stadium, and the Adventure Aquarium are part


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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                              Page 53
of Camden’s on-going waterfront redevelopment efforts. Added to this are new retail,
dining venues, as well as condominium units offering extraordinary views of the
Philadelphia skyline.

A wide range of recreational activities is also readily available, ranging from professional
sports to college athletics to league sports for adults and children. Golf, tennis, and
other facilities are found almost at every turn, as are parks, lakes and other facilities.
Camden County itself has 14 major parks in 12 municipalities for activities ranging from
picnicking to biking to softball and tennis. Hunting, fishing, and day trips to historic
sites or the shore are easy to find or arrange from any point in the Camden County
area. The County is also within a short drive of the Pocono Mountains and the New
Jersey Shore Communities.

The housing boom that occurred in the first half of the current decade has not had the
distorting effects on the local real estate market that other parts of the country have
experienced. Options exist for those seeking to restore an older home in an urban
environment, those seeking a house in an established neighborhood, or those seeking a
new home in a suburban setting. For example, persons relocating to the area can find
new homes in Voorhees, purchase existing homes (many architecturally significant) in
older established communities such as Collingswood, Merchantville, Haddonfield, etc., or
row houses for restoration in Camden or Gloucester City.

In general, there is a high quality of healthcare in the Camden County area. As noted,
the County is the home to several major health care facilities that are associated with
teaching hospitals. These facilities offer a wide range of services and capabilities. In
addition, the proximity of several nationally ranked and noted hospitals and research
centers in Philadelphia with satellite offices in the County is a great advantage. The
County’s capacity for in-county treatment is rapidly increasing and many of the area
hospitals offer world-class care.

The Cost of Living Index for the Philadelphia Metropolitan area in the last quarter of
2005 was 123.9 on a scale in which 100.00 is the national norm. Though the figure
seems high, it must be compared to areas such as New York (204.3), Los Angeles
(159.0), and Washington, DC (142.4) to appreciate it. Other well-known growth areas
are not that far from the Philadelphia figure. For example, Portland, OR has an index of
115.5, Las Vegas, NV has an index of 109.9, and San Bernadino, CA weighs in at 128.1.
Only in retreating to lesser-known growth centers such as Huntsville, AL (89.9), or
Boise, ID (97.9) does one find relief from the cost of living.

3.11 AGRICULTURE

Camden County has a rich heritage in agriculture, though the role of this industry has
greatly diminished over the last century. According to the 2002 Census of Agriculture,
there were 216 farms in Camden County encompassing 10,259 acres of land. Farmland
made up 7.2 percent of the total land in Camden County.

The amount of land in farmland had increased 8.6 percent between 1997 and 2002,
going from 9,446 acres to 10,259, and the average farm size had increased by almost

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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                            Page 54
18 percent, from 40 acres in 1997 to 47 acres in 2002. The median farm size was 15
acres, however, indicating the existence of numerous small farms. Indeed, 30 percent
of Camden County farms were nine acres or less. It should also be noted that the
number of full-time farms shrank from 85 in 1997 to 80 in 2002, a 6 percent decrease in
five years.

The market value of agricultural products sold fell 23 percent to $13,638,000 in 2002
with crop sales constituting 99 percent of this market value. The average value of
products sold per farm declined from $74,586 in 1997 to $64,141 in 2002, a 15 percent
fall. Average expenses per farm were $43,848 so that the average net income per farm
was $17,560, a figure more than $30,500 below the median household income in
Camden County for 2000.

Also, to put these figures in perspective, it should be noted that in 2002 manufacturers’
shipments in Camden County were over $3.8 billion and retail sales were over $4.7
billion. Thus, agriculture had a minor but important impact on the County’s overall
economic well-being.

3.12 STRENTHS AND WEAKNESSES OF THE COUNTY

Camden County possesses a number of strengths that it can call upon in promoting
economic growth and development. These include:

   •   Excellent geographic position
   •   Solid transportation system including highways, rail, air, and deep water ports;
       as well as a new light rail system, The River Line, which links Camden City to
       Trenton and intermediate cities and towns
   •   Infrastructure in place that serves the entire county
   •   Fiber optic cable capacity throughout the County
   •   Successful transitioning to a service oriented economy
   •   Strong regional healthcare sector
   •   Location for corporate and regional headquarters
   •   Excellent educational system and access to post secondary institutions
   •   Adequate supply of buildings for business expansion or relocations
   •   Active redevelopment efforts in a number of municipalities
   •   Good quality of life, including housing selection, top-rated park system, and
       overall affordable cost of living

The following matrix ties these strengths to each of the four development Sub-Regions described
earlier in this study.




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                          Page 55
                                WATERFRONT        INNER RING      GROWTH         RESTRICTED
                                SUB-REGION        SUB-REGION     SUB-REGION       GROWTH
                                                                                 SUB-REGION
Geographic Position                    4               4               4              4
Transportation System                  4               4               4
Infrastructure                         4               4               4
Fiber Optic Cable                      4               4
Economic Transition                    4               4               4                  4
Healthcare Sector                      4               4
Headquarters Function                  4               4               4
Educational System                     4               4               4                  4
Buildings                              4               4               4
Quality of Life                        4               4               4                  4
Redevelopment Effort                   4               4




Challenges for Camden County

However, despite these advantages the County does have some areas of weakness that
should be addressed or considered in any economic development planning program.
These include:

    •   Slow to moderate population and labor force growth
    •   Pockets of low labor force participation rates
    •   Pockets of low income levels and relatively high levels of poverty
    •   High percentages of female headed households with minor children
    •   Few sites for new development projects
    •   Poor perceptions of the County point to a need for better “branding” and market
        identity
    •   Need for Smart Growth “Centers of Place” approach to redevelopment efforts
    •   Need to “reposition” some of the older retail centers and projects
    •   More diversity needed in land ownership.           Too much publicly held land
        diminishes the potential for redevelopment in many communities
    •   Public Infrastructure (e.g., sewer, water, highway) is in need of upgrades and
        reconstruction

The lack of available space for development of any kind (not including the Lakeland
Property or limited sites in Lawnside and Gloucester Township), whether commercial,
industrial or residential, poses one of the greatest threats to the continued economic
growth and strength of the County. This is especially true in the older and built out
municipalities, which must seek innovative and creative ways to redevelop for both
community and economic reasons.


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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                        Page 56
Opportunities

There are, however, significant opportunities which the County may pursue. While
some of these opportunities apply to the County as a whole, there are specific
opportunities that will vary by the characteristics and needs of the four zones described
earlier.

The first of these is the development of a consistent and countywide approach to
economic development. Despite significant growth and change in the County, there is a
sentiment that the County needs a unified and comprehensive approach to promote
development, and better coordination of resources and efforts. A more coherent
approach would also assist in developing an appropriate image for the County as a
whole, distinct from the City of Camden, which tends to overshadow the County.
County officials have been working to coordinate a “Team Camden County” strategy
since the 2002 CEDS was prepared. This strategy has seen some success in the
coordination of workforce needs, smart growth strategies, redevelopment opportunities,
and marketing. Specifically, the County can point to the following achievements.

   •   An Inventory of Brownfield and Grayfield sites has been prepared
   •   The County is working to coordinate Transit Oriented Development (T.O.D.)
       opportunities around the newly opened River Line
   •   The County has initiated several redevelopment corridor studies and is working
       with municipal coalitions to address problems along the White Horse Pike, and
       other areas

A second opportunity for the County is to capitalize upon its location and transportation
system to develop its position and role as a regional distribution center, especially in the
context of value-added/industrial planned unit developments or high-tech warehouse
and distribution facilities. These types of operations not only generate more, and better
paying jobs than traditional warehouse and distribution facilities, but offer opportunities
for career advancement for their employees. These facilities also fit into the Camden
County scenario quite well in that they are smaller than traditional warehouse operations
and more readily fit into the smaller sites available for redevelopment.

A third opportunity for the County is to capitalize upon the presence     of the large fiber
optic cable capacity in the northern and western parts of the             County both for
telecommunications providers themselves and for services related to       or making use of
this fiber optic capacity. The latter include information service firms   and data storage
and retrieval firms.

The four development sub-regions each have their specific opportunities as noted. The
County can, through its waterfront redevelopment/smart growth activity, position itself
as a tourist and recreation destination. The riverfront, long blocked from public use by
large industrial facilities, is now being opened to mixed uses, as noted earlier. As
additional areas are opened to the public for parks and reused as cultural or
entertainment venues, the County increasingly can position itself as a part of the multi-
dimensional Philadelphia tourist market. The advent of the Select Greater Philadelphia
marketing initiative points to a growing spirit of cooperation between the central cities

________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                             Page 57
and the surrounding suburbs, both in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Camden County is
a participating partner in that regional marketing effort.

The Inner Ring District communities should focus on commercial redevelopment, health
care services, and telecommunications. As noted, commercial redevelopment of the
existing “Main Street” areas is an on-going concern and activity. The health care sector,
which is very strong in Camden County, may provide opportunities for the growth of
ancillary and support services to the major health care facilities in Camden and its
immediate environs.        At the same time, the presence of state-of-the-art
telecommunications infrastructure in some of the communities provides the potential for
small- to medium-sized firms that can make use of this capability and capacity.

The Growth Sub-regions have additional potential because of the presence of some
medium- to large-sized developable sites. The communities may look not only to health
care support and telecommunications firms, but to value-added logistics operations,
some of which may take advantage of the fiber optic infrastructure, as well.

Finally, the Restricted Growth Sub-regions in the eastern portions of the County may
seek limited warehousing, commercial and retail growth opportunities, but are well
positioned to seek recreation and eco-tourism opportunities as well. The presence of
the Pinelands and large state parks affords options not available to other parts of the
County.

3.13 EXTERNAL FORCES

Context of the County Economy

Camden County has been experiencing a transition from a manufacturing economy to an
economy based on retail and service oriented businesses. This is a trend that is
experienced nationwide.

As such, this trend has a number of implications for the County and its relationship to
the national, international, and regional economies within which the County is operating.
These implications help to point the County in a number of directions that will have
impacts on the future of the County and its member communities. These include:

Global Implications

Even the most isolated economies are no longer immune to international market forces.
Exports, imports, interest rates, currency rates, trade barriers and other links to the
global economy all impact Camden County. The County must find its niche and diversify
the economy sufficiently to protect against the sometimes volatile changes of the world
market.




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                          Page 58
Technology

In order to compete in a global economy, county business and industry must be able to
exchange information rapidly and efficiently with customers and suppliers around the
world. This means that the infrastructure to provide that capability must be in place and
constantly updated. One of the principal roles of the public sector in ensuring a
competitive marketplace is to work with communication providers to create the
environment within which state-of-the-art infrastructure is available to local business.

Workforce Competitiveness

In a world where standardization of quality control is an increasingly important issue, it
is important that training programs and other educational opportunities are available to
local business to help them meet the growing challenges of international business.

Costs of Manufacturing

The relocation of many manufacturing businesses to sites overseas, illustrates how
competitive the world market is today. Manufacturing companies that will be successful
in Camden County are those that have a special, value added component to their
product line or that have unique manufacturing or mechanized process that cannot be
readily duplicated by foreign firms with more affordable labor.

National Implications

Market Trends and Positioning

Camden County is located in the heart of the Northeastern United States, at center of
one of the great markets of the world. Consumer trends in this market will help to drive
the demand for Camden County produced goods and services. The globalization of
commerce continues to place stress on manufacturing operations in the United States,
and the balance of trade continues to favor imports over exports even as the United
States businesses learn to market services and operate abroad. Recent talk (Summer
2007) of recession and shrinking credit markets are causing a number of firms to cut
back on expansions and acquisitions.

Strengths of Current Economic Sectors

Because the County’s position in the national economy is strong, a strategy to build on
these strengths to enhance the competitiveness of the County in the national market is
important. Concepts that build on some of the County’s principal industries to create
ancillary businesses or that enhance a firm’s ability to remain in the County are key
considerations in such a strategy.




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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                           Page 59
National Trends and Conditions

Economic changes in national economic policy will clearly impact on the County
economy. Such trends are being experienced today, in terms of the national monetary
policies, credit policies, import and export obligations, and trade agreements.

Forces in the Regional Economy

Available Land/Facilities

Locally and regionally, the County is more vulnerable to alternatives sites and venues in
competing communities. For example, there are very few large tracts of land left in the
County to develop as industrial or business parks. That means the County will have to
focus on redevelopment opportunities that can often be more costly. Often, these
redevelopment efforts are coupled with the need to clean up sites (brownfields) prior to
them being reintroduced into the market.

Labor Force Availability

Companies seeking locations in the greater Northeast will focus much of their attention
on a community’s ability to provide a skilled and dedicated workforce. To compete
effectively with the City of Philadelphia and the surrounding counties, workforce
readiness that is in line with the demographic and economic changes in the region will
remain a critical issue. For example, as the population of the County ages, the potential
to tap older residents for jobs where they are not currently engaged, may provide the
County with a competitive edge. Similarly, meeting the needs of changes in the retail,
service, and hospitality industries will also help provide needed guidance in tailoring
workforce needs to suit local and regional demands.

Repositioning Needs

Because there are a number of older, commercial properties (gray fields) in the County,
there needs to be repositioning of these sites relative to the changing retail and service
markets. The County needs to advance public/private partnerships that bring a
collaboration of efforts, funding, and investment possibilities to the redevelopment and
repositioning of key sites in the County.

GENERAL IMPLICATIONS

The implications of these external forces on the future of the County economy are
considerable. The best defense against national and international changes in economic
conditions is to have a varied and diversified economy. That means that while
manufacturing in Camden County may be on the decline it should remain a relevant
component of the economy. Actions that the County can take to address workforce
issues, competitiveness issues, and other needs of the local manufacturing sector should
be addressed. Similarly as new trends emerge, whether they are in the retail, service,
or hospitality sectors, these needs should also be met.

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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                           Page 60
The concept of public-private partnerships is increasingly critical. There are many areas
where such partnerships will be essential to growing the County economy. These
include providing infrastructure and technology support; repositioning existing
underutilized or undermarketed retail facilities; and marketing county businesses and
services generally. Workforce development partnerships between education and
business and workforce development agencies and government are also essential
components to advancing the local economy.

Incubator projects and other initiatives that provide new products or offer significant
value added benefit to existing products and services produced in the County will
enhance the ability of Camden County to compete locally, regionally, nationally and
internationally.

3.14 POTENTIAL PARTNERS AND RESOURCES

One of the means that Camden County has to limit the negative impacts of external
developments and to capitalize upon the positive aspects of the economy is to continue
to engage a network of agencies and organizations that can provide technical assistance
and financial resources. In fact, the County undertook, during the 2002 CEDS process,
to coin the term “Team Camden County” to emphasize the importance that it placed on
a collaborative and partner-driven economic development program.

The following list notes a number of resources available to Camden County in the
pursuit of its economic development goals:

                               POTENTIAL PARTNERS

Federal Partners:

   -   U.S. Department of Commerce, Economic Development Administration
   -   U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
   -   The U.S. Small Business Administration
   -   U.S. Department of the Interior
   -   The U.S. Department of Transportation
   -   The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
   -   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

State Partners:

   -   The New Jersey Economic Development Authority
   -   The New Jersey Redevelopment Authority
   -   The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection
   -   The New Jersey Department of Transportation
   -   The New Jersey Office of Smart Growth
   -   The New Jersey State Planning Commission
   -   The New Jersey Department of Community Affairs
   -   The New Jersey Department of Labor
   -   Prosperity New Jersey
   -   New Jersey Council on Affordable Housing

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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                          Page 61
Local and Regional Partners:

   -   The Camden County Board of Chosen Freeholders
   -   The Camden County Improvement Authority
   -   The Camden County Planning Board
   -   Local Chambers of Commerce
   -   Local Downtown Committees and Main Street Programs
   -   Local School Boards
   -   Local Economic Development Committees/Commissions
   -   The Workforce Investment Board
   -   The Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission
   -   PSE&G
   -   The Delaware River Port Authority
   -   Select Philadelphia
   -   The Southern New Jersey Development Council
   -   The South Jersey Chamber of Commerce
   -   The Casino Reinvestment Development Authority

Private Sector Partners:

   -   Colleges
   -   Foundations
   -   Hospitals
   -   Charitable individuals




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                          Page 62
                                     SECTION IV
                            POLICY DEVELOPMENT


4.1 THE POLICY MAKING PROCESS

The CEDS Committee was the principal policy making body in the development of this
Plan. The Committee met three times in the course of revising the document.

At the first two meetings of the Committee, members were asked to complete a survey
and help define priorities that assisted in shaping the CEDS. A review of Camden
County’s strengths and weaknesses was completed.

The principal issues identified by the survey responses included:

   •   Expanding the County economy around technology, professional services,
       pharmaceuticals, light manufacturing, logistics, the healthcare industries;
   •   Focusing on Main Street and Downtown Redevelopment in the County’s older
       towns and cities;
   •   Creating new Transportation Opportunities;
   •   Building on Smart Growth Strategies that concentrate development around
       existing corridors and areas of development;
   •   Identifying “Shovel Ready” Sites and Development Opportunities;
   •   Creating a Business Recruitment Strategy that involves County CEOs and
       Integrated Workforce Development Services;
   •   Focusing on River-oriented Development Opportunities.

From this general policy foundation and outline of issues, a vision for the County’s
economic development and a series of goals and objectives were prepared.

4.2 REVISING THE VISION FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The vision statement provides a foundation for ensuring that Camden County will be a
strong and recognized location for a wide range of dynamic industries supporting a
sustainable economy for the long tern. Built upon a diverse population and a strong,
mature economy, people across the County should be able to find job opportunities in a
wide range of firms.

The CEDS Committee continued to embrace the concept of “Team Camden County” that
was developed during the 2001 CEDS Planning process. This is a concept widely
recognized as an excellent example of regional economic development cooperation and
achievement. This was highlighted by the Governor’s designation of Camden County as
the State’s first “Cyber County” because of the pre-eminence of leading
telecommunications firms. The County’s leading position in health care support and
value-added logistics operations affirms the issues raised by the CEDS Committee and
underscores the importance of these issues as part of the County Vision.



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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                       Page 63
The vision statement also recognizes that transportation infrastructure remains a key
part of the County’s success, and is a source of new business opportunities. The County
desires to continue to improve its capabilities for both passenger and freight traffic. The
new RiverLINE rail system complements and shapes countywide transportation based
development initiatives, especially along the Route 130/Riverfront corridor, that also
strengthen economic development.

The educational system at all levels, and the County’s training and job assistance
programs in particular, provide the workforce with skills and preparation for jobs that
offer a living wage and the opportunity for growth. Academic and health care
institutions in the County are working with businesses to create opportunities for
research and product development in industries that will enhance the County’s
competitive edge and have the potential to enhance the region’s economy.


                                   Vision Statement
                             Camden County CEDS Update, 2007

Camden County envisions a diverse and sustainable economy that includes a wide range of jobs for its
citizens; cutting edge technology and 21st century infrastructure; a growing and increasingly prominent
role for tourism; the revitalization of downtowns, brownfields and other underutilized commercial areas;
and health-care, logistics, telecommunications and other business development that takes advantage of the
County’s outstanding strategic location.

County officials recognize that this means adapting to new lifestyles and trends; engaging the educational
and workforce development communities to meet the needs of a changing economy; developing public-
private partnerships that enhance opportunities for new business; and working toward the implementation
of Smart Growth principles that limit adverse impacts of development and support a good quality of life for
all the County’s citizens.



Careful and coordinated planning among the municipalities and the County, coupled with
citizen involvement, the redevelopment of riverfront, urban, and brownfields sites, and
concern for environmental and aesthetic considerations all serve to maintain a high
quality of life, offer broad economic development opportunities, and sustainable growth.
It will take a concerted effort by all parties in the County and at all levels of government
to advance this vision.

4.3 DEVELOPING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

As noted earlier, the Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Committee
reviewed and discussed the needs of Camden County, and examined the future needs of
the area. The goals and objectives that were part of the 2001 CEDS document were
revised and discussed with the public at two local forums held in Lindenwald and
Camden City.

The following broad goals and objectives reflect the review and public discussion that
were held:


________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                                          Page 64
Goal I: Continue to build an economic development image and brand name
for Camden County that reflects the County’s strengths and assets.

1) Adapt Camden County identity program to support economic development efforts.
2) Define Messages: Exactly how is CCIA “Making It Better, Together?” Consider
applications for Recruitment, Retention and Expansion
3) Define internal (In-County) audiences and mediums for promotional activity
4) Implement local communications and promotions designed to build awareness of
economic development services, deliver value to stakeholders and demonstrate ROI
created by CCIA
5) Develop a comprehensive marketing program including targeted industries and the
approach to reach them, with the following objectives:

   •   Define Target Markets for Recruitment
   •   Define and demonstrate features & benefits of Camden County
   •   Plan and develop marketing tools
   •   Implement and track marketing program

Goal II: Expand the diversity of the County economy by investing in new
technologies, industries, and commercial enterprise.

1) Position Camden County as the “Cybercounty.”            Given the high technology
infrastructure and the proximity of high tech resources and operations, the County
should work to attract high tech firms focusing on telecommunications as well as
relevant support functions, with the following objectives:

   •   Develop a roster of high tech companies to use as a basis for establishing a
       prominent High Tech Council, the Camden County Cyber Council or the “4-Cs”
       with the appropriate number that reflects the County’s focus
   •   Have the “4-Cs” identify and work for industry needs
   •   Coordinate and integrate local high tech programs and initiatives with state and
       regional organization efforts
   •   Assure that marketing & promotional tools are reflective of a “CyberCounty”

2) Reposition the County’s older retail centers by investing in site improvements, new
retail opportunities, and niche markets that make these areas more competitive.
3) Invest in the County’s tourism industry to promote new jobs and opportunities in
hospitality, food services, entertainment, and lodging.

Goal III: Foster a More Unified Approach to Economic Development in the
County. Develop coordination and cooperation in economic development among the
numerous entities in this field across the County.

1) Continue to build “Team Camden County” with objectives that would include:

   •   Maintaining the tradition of an annual regional Economic Summit, in conjunction
       with neighboring counties;
   •   Continue to foster a philosophy of sharing ideas, information, and leads


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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                        Page 65
   •   Conduct a quarterly roundtable for presentations on current topics

2) Promote additional public-private partnerships that encourage shared solutions to
some of the challenges facing builders, residents, investors, and the community at large.
3) Work with the public and non-profit sectors to find ways to release land for
development that is currently non-taxable

Goal IV: Enhance economic development resources and tools, using the
following objectives:

1) Maintain and expand the current inventory of sites and buildings
2) Develop and link countywide GIS to respond to inquiries
3) Identify economic development needs and priorities
4) Build additional capacity at the local and organizational levels that help to address
and implement the goals and objectives of the CEDS

Goal V: Work in coordination with the County Workforce Investment Board
to address opportunities in job development and training.

1) Expand the key elements of the County’s very successful Welfare to Work Program
with emphasis on worker readiness for the workplace. These elements include:

   •   Analyze employer needs; conduct labor market study
   •   Develop programs to meet identified needs
   •   Coordinate or adapt elements from current successful Workforce Preparedness
       Programs

2) Coordinate job readiness goals with the New Jersey Department of Labor and other
State training programs.
3) Focus new training and education on economic opportunities stemming from
changes in the demographic composition of the County such as baby boomer and
lifestyle trends.

Goal VI: Focus economic growth and development activity to capitalize upon
the unique and different strengths of the County’s four development sub-
regions. This development will likely assume the following overall patterns:

1) Waterfront Sub-region – tourism, recreation, also with the redevelopment of
industrial sites for commercial and office uses
2) Inner Ring – Redevelopment of sites for commercial and office uses capitalizing upon
location, proximity to transportation and infrastructure
3) Growth Sub-region – focused growth in selected industries, retail, logistics, and office
4) Restricted Growth Sub-region – analyses of growth options, identification and
assembly of sites with a focus on selected commercial and retail opportunities and
tourism




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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                            Page 66
Goal VII: Promote Smart Growth Strategies that concentrate new economic
opportunities around existing centers and commercial corridors, while
conserving the County’s open spaces.

1) Coordinate economic development with the work of the County Planning Board and
the NJ Office of Smart Growth to manage the placement of new infrastructure,
transportation improvements, and other investments that encourage growth.
2) Develop programs to market brownfield and grayfield properties and create
opportunities to bring such locations back into productive use.
3) Promote the redevelopment of commercial corridors.
4)    Encourage the development and redevelopment of liveable and walkable
neighborhoods that make it possible for residents to meet demands for goods and
services without a heavy reliance on automobiles and transit.

Goal VIII: Encourage green industry and new technologies that help to
reduce pollution, promote a clean environment, and promote a good quality
of life for County residents.

1) Work with local governments to develop design guidelines that foster investments in
green building and other sustainable technologies.
2) Promote clean energy usage and sustainable

Goal IX:    Invest in the future of Camden City to enhance economic
opportunity and promote a prosperous and stable regional economy.

1) Should the City of Camden elect to prepare its own Comprehensive Economic
Development Strategy (CEDS), secure adequate funding to support the CEDS planning
process
2) Continue to promote new investment in the development and redevelopment of the
Camden Waterfront
3) Coordinate State, County, and local investment in the City to ensure that shared
goals and objectives are met effectively
4) Work with the State Office of Smart Growth to continue to target new infrastructure,
neighborhood, and other redevelopment dollars at the future of City, per the promise of
the State Plan
5) Redevelop brownfield and other commercial sites in the City for new retail and
industrial uses.




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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                        Page 67
                                      SECTION V
                                ACTION AGENDA


5.0 INTRODUCTION

From the goals and objectives developed through the CEDS Committee and various
public meetings, a number of project ideas and concepts were identified. These projects
and concepts advance the goals and objectives defined.              They represent a
comprehensive inventory of projects that serve as the foundation for a long-term
economic development strategy and are described in detail as follows.

5.1 PROJECTS AND INITIATIVES

Camden County plans to execute a comprehensive program of projects and initiatives
described below that are consistent with the Goals and Objectives discussed in this
Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS). These projects and initiatives
form a comprehensive and integrated economic development program that is designed
to address a wide array of issues and opportunities that have been determined by the
CEDS task force, County officials and county residents.

Eight of these projects are Strategic Projects that have been determined to be critical to
the economic development of the county over the next five years. The other projects
are important undertakings that address certain needs or opportunities for job creation,
investment and improvements to the quality of life of the residents of the county. The
first 14 of these projects were articulated in the 2002 CEDS and will continue to be
important components of the County’s continuing economic development effort. This
CEDS adds 49 new activities for the County to work on over the next five years.

These projects and activities are the essential foundation on which an improved
economic development delivery system and the resulting performance should be based
and measured. The County and CEDS Committee will continuously monitor the progress
on completing these projects and will periodically suggest modifications of the action
agenda when warranted. This program should be viewed as a dynamic program of
action and not a static document that will gather dust on the book shelf.

1. Promote CCIA Capabilities to Assist in Economic Development

In order for the County to execute an effective economic development program it is
important that one agency be designated as the lead economic agency within the county
that is responsible to leading the economic development effort. By a series of
resolutions passed by the Camden County Board of Chosen Freeholders, the Camden
County Improvement Authority (CCIA) has been charged with this responsibility. In
order to be successful in carrying out its economic development responsibilities, all
sectors of the community must be made aware of the role and responsibilities of the
CCIA. Therefore, it is important that the County and the CCIA undertake an aggressive
program of promoting the capabilities of the Authority so that public officials,


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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                           Page 68
developers, realtors, bankers, business owners, non-profits, investors and citizens know
that the CCIA is responsible for economic development and serves as the “go-to” agency
within the county.

Capabilities and services available should be widely marketing through a number of
channels including, print, video, Internet, radio and cable television. The County and
the CCIA will develop marketing and outreach programs that will make all sectors of the
county economic development community aware of the capabilities of the Authority.

2. Continue County-wide Marketing Program – “Making It Happen” or
Develop a New Campaign

Since the previous CEDS of 2002, the County has implemented a highly-effective
branding and marketing program. This award-winning comprehensive marketing
program has created a unique brand identity with a distinctive logo for the county name,
a consistent style of letters and colors, all with a positive fast-paced modern image of a
governmental organization that is geared to providing top-quality services in a
competitive environment.

The County’s recent campaign of “Making It Happen” has been very successful in
portraying the County’s can-do attitude. The County should evaluate the results of the
current campaign and determine if the approach should be continued, enhanced,
modified or replaced with a new campaign that maintains the results of the current
message. Competition for new jobs and investment is a national and international
phenomenon that will only increase in the future. Because of the plethora of areas
competing for economic growth (a minimum of 11,000 in the United States alone
according to a recent “census” by Growth Strategies Organization of Vail, Colorado),
communities are considered to be commodities in a highly competitive marketplace.

Consideration should be given to featuring some of the County’s recent economic
development success stories in the marketing message. The use of testimonials by
developers, business owners or workers should be continued. As in the prior CEDS, the
development of a “unique selling proposition” with a related theme line, logo and other
economic development marketing tools and materials, is a necessity in stimulating
investment in Camden County to meet the County’s capital investment and job creation
objectives.

3. Continue to Host Annual Economic Development Summits on a
Regional Basis with Adjoining Counties

Camden County has had a long history of sponsoring economic development dinners
and other events targeted at stimulating economic development and recognizing the
achievements of diverse participants in the county’s economic development landscape.
Since the prior CEDS of 2002, the County has enhanced this activity by holding
economic development summits that brought even more participation and media
attention to the County’s economic development success stories while providing valuable
information to members of the economic development community.


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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                           Page 69
During the past two years, the County has worked with neighboring Burlington and
Gloucester Counties on hosting regional “Tri-County Economic Development Summits”.
The regional summits have been valuable in solidifying the cooperation between these
three inter-related counties in Southwest New Jersey. The County plans to continue to
support cooperation with other counties in the region and possibly add additional
counties to these regional summits.

4. Maintain County Inventory of Private Land and Development
Opportunities

One of the problems Camden County currently faces, and will continue to face, is the
difficulty in finding suitable tracts of land and sites for large-scale economic
development activities. Due the relatively small size of the county at 222 square miles
and the extent of its currently developed land, finding suitable sites for economic
development is becoming more challenging. Over the past several years, the ability to
have an adequate choice in real estate opportunities has been the number two
consideration for most companies conducting a site search, second only to having an
adequate supply of the necessary skilled labor. For this reason, the County will enhance
its program of maintaining an inventory of private land and development opportunities.
In addition, the County will continue to subscribe to a real estate database that not only
provides up to date detailed information on site and buildings within Camden County,
but throughout the region.

5. Promote Brownfield and Redevelopment Center (BARC) That Was
Developed in 2002

Camden County’s Brownfield and Redevelopment Center or BARC has been a key
component of the County economic development strategy since the CEDS of 2002. The
BARC, which is located within the CCIA, has developed a unique capability to provide
technical assistant to local officials, developers, investors, property owners and citizens
interest in advancing redevelopment and environmental cleanup projects throughout the
county.     The BARC has developed an inventory of potential development sites and
buildings within the county. It has the ability to provide potential redevelopers this
important data on the sites in a wide variety of formats. The BARC also has developed
sophisticated mapping and computer-based presentation capabilities that are extremely
useful in promoting economic development opportunities within the county.

The County plans to continue to support the activities of the BARC and increase the
promotion and marketing of the services provided by the experience staff members that
work at this center. The County will increase its outreach effort through a sustained
campaign that touts the benefits of working with the BARC on undertaking
redevelopment project within the county.

6. Provide Ongoing Staffing and Support to Implement the CEDS

Camden County will continue to support the staffing and financial support necessary to
implement the CEDS and the wide array of project listed below. The CCIA has been
successful in generating operating revenues from its bond issuance program. This

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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                            Page 70
revenue will continue to be the primary source of funding for the County’s successful
economic development program. As needs arise for the additional personnel to handle
various aspects of the CEDS activities, the County will hire highly qualified staff
members to execute the projects and activities.

7. Enhance “Briefing Center” at CCIA to Help Prospective Developers
Make Locational Decisions

The CCIA developed a briefing center for prospective developers within its current
offices following the adoption of the previous CEDS. The briefing center utilizes a large
conference room that has a built-in overhead projector and screen linked to the Internet
and a computer. The room has the capability to provide prospects with a visual tour of
potential sites without leaving the room. Mapping programs such as Google Earth can
take prospects on a “flight” over the county and then focus on potential sites.

There are improvements that need to be made to increase the capability and quality of
the briefing center. The County plans to allocate funds to upgrade both the technology
and the functionality of the room to make the briefing function more effective in
convincing companies to choose Camden County sites for their planned investments.

8. Identify Ongoing Infrastructure Needs and Priorities

The County will coordinate its programs that identify various infrastructure needs and
priorities throughout the county. The CCIA will work with County departments and
agencies, private utilities, local infrastructure public agencies, port authorities, transit
agencies and other entities to develop an inventory of current infrastructure, the needs
for expansion and upgrades. The County will establish a priority system that clearly
identifies the most critical improvements necessary for successful economic
development. The resultant plan will serve as the basis for funding applications to state
and federal agencies.

9. Encourage the Use of Smart Growth Principals

Camden County has been a leader in the region and the State of New Jersey in utilizing
the principals of smart growth in its economic development program. The County will
continue to encourage private and public developers to consider the key principals of
smart growth in all current and future projects. The County has been emphasizing
locating projects near current infrastructure, redeveloping existing sites, creation of
more walkable communities, providing mixed uses to reduce dependence on private
automobiles, the use of mass transit and the use of “green” technology and other
sustainable building technologies. The County will continue to promote the principals of
smart growth in its marketing, regulatory and financial incentive programs.

10. Capitalize on the Use of PATCO and Other Transit to Provide New
Development Centers

The County intends to capitalize on its existing transit lines and stations to encourage
new investment in and around these stations. Transit-oriented development or TOD will

________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                            Page 71
be a major theme of the County over the next five years. A recent study by the PATCO
has given a basis for the County to work with local communities, transit agencies
including the PATCO and New Jersey Transit in developing compact mixed-use
developments near these transit stations. In fact, the development of the transit village
at the PATCO Lindenwold Station will be one of the Strategic Projects of the County that
is articulated in this CEDS. PATCO and the Borough of Collingswood plan to begin the
development of a transit village at the Collingswood station during the next two years.

11. Focus on Logistics, Telecommunications, Healthcare and Tourism
As Top Priorities

The 2002 CEDS identified four key sectors of the economy for the County to focus its
economic development program on. These are logistics, telecommunications, healthcare
and tourism. After reviewing these sectors of the economy and how they fit into the
County’s CEDS, the County has determined to continue its effort to focus on these four
components of the county’s economy. These sectors continue to have the potential for
the creation of new jobs and investment, particularly in the older waterfront areas of
Gloucester City, Camden and Pennsauken.

12.    Promote Healthcare and Educational Opportunities

The County will promote healthcare and educational opportunities as an important
economic and quality of life strategy. Not only will the growth of healthcare and
educational facilities generate new jobs and investment within the county, but
encouraging the county’s residents to utilize our modern healthcare delivery system,
adopt a healthier lifestyle and increase their skills and education will be a strong
ingredient in making Camden County more competitive in the arena of economic
development. The County has actively participated in promoting the use of its parks and
recreational facilities, provided free flue shots, and held fairs all in an effort to assist
county residents remain healthy and productive. The County active promotes the use
of its County College and two campuses of its Technical School for all residents, job
training and skill enhancement through its Resource Center and Workforce Investment
Board. The County will seek programs to increase the health and skill level of all of its
residents and promote these resources to its residents.

13. Cooperate with Philadelphia-based Marketing Organizations to
Promote County Location

The County will continue to cooperate and support the efforts of regional economic
development entities such as Select Philadelphia, which has significant resources to
promote the Philadelphia region, including all of Camden County, to prospective
business and industry. The County will encourage regional economic development with
other adjacent counties and the State of New Jersey.




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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                            Page 72
14. Strengthen Relationship Between CCIA, County College, and WIB
to Promote Workforce Development

The County has had a strong working relationship between its various operating entities
particularly among its four entities that are involved in education, economic
development and workforce investment. The County will continue to strive to improve
the working relationship between the CCIA, County College and the WIB to increase the
effectiveness of the County’s workforce development program.

15. Focus on Delaware River Waterfront Redevelopment

The County will focus efforts on revitalizing the Delaware River waterfront area of the
County from the Big Timber Creek to the Pennsauken Creek. The County will work with
Gloucester City, Camden City and Pennsauken Township and the Delaware River Port
Authority and the South Jersey Port Corporation to develop a comprehensive waterfront
redevelopment plan. The County will target infrastructure improvements, financing
programs through the CCIA and marketing resources for projects planned within the
waterfront area of the county. In addition, the County will work with the State of New
Jersey on the relocation of Riverfront State Prison from the current site in North Camden
to a more suitable site within South Jersey.

16. Redevelop Key Commercial Corridors Such as the White Horse and
Black Horse Pikes

The redevelopment of key commercial corridors throughout the county will be a major
effort of the County’s economic development program. In particular, the redevelopment
of the White Horse and Black Horse Pikes will be priorities for staff time and resources.
The County will complete additional planning and market studies of the needs for
improvements on both of these major corridors. The County will work with the local
municipalities along these corridors on the implementation of redevelopment projects
along these roadways.

17. Reposition the County’s Retail Centers Including “Grayfields” to
Ensure Continued Competitiveness

Many of the county’s older retail centers that were developed in the 1950s, 1960s and
1970s are functionally obsolete and not competitive in the current retail marketplace.
The County will work with local officials, property owners and potential redevelopers in
determining new uses for these “Grayfield” sites. The County will provide technical
financing assistance through the Brownfield and Redevelopment Center and the CCIA
for eligible redevelopment projects. The County will apply for state grants to assist in
the planning of the redevelopment of these shopping centers. It will also work with the
State of New Jersey’s new Greyfields Interagency Team (GRIT) to secure resources and
approvals for these projects.




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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                          Page 73
18. Focus New Development around “Centers of Place”

Consistent with the County’s established smart growth policies, the County will focus its
development activities around “Centers of Place” where existing transportation
infrastructure and development is in place. The State of New Jersey has established
new funding for projects that are in designated “Centers of Place” under the State
Development and Redevelopment Plan.           Mixed use development that can take
advantage of transit systems will have strong appeal in future years. With rising costs of
fuel and the increasing auto traffic congestion on county and Philadelphia metropolitan
area highways these developments will increasingly appeal to residents and businesses.
The County received strong sentiment from its residents that concentrating new
development in these areas of the county is the right direction for the county to be
moving. The county will complement this focus on centers of place with its successful
program which preserves rural and undeveloped area of the county, thereby channeling
new development into the established “Centers of Place”.

19. Promote “Transit Oriented Development Opportunities”, e.g. NJT
RiverLine

The County will work on implementing transit oriented development (TOD) along the
existing transit stations of the PATCO line, NJ Transit’s Atlantic City Line and the NJ
Transit’s RiverLine. The Collingswood, Haddonfield, Woodcrest and Lindenwold PATCO
stations will be priority TOD development opportunities. The Lindenwold Station TOD
will be one of eight strategic development projects included in this plan. It has the
potential for the creation of the new most new jobs and housing opportunities within the
county of any potential TOD site. The Cherry Hill Station of NJ Transit will be rebuilt and
to serve as an anchor of a planned one million square foot office park at the former
Garden State Park, which also includes major new housing and retail development. The
County will also work with NJ Transit and the City of Camden and Pennsauken Township
to advance TOD development along the RiverLine.            The County will support the
completion of a feasibility study for creating a TOD at NJ Transit’s Atlantic City Line’s
Atco Station in Waterford Township near Route 73.

20. Place More Emphasis on Public/Private Partnerships

The County recognizes that it has limited resources and that the county has an
experienced and well funded and active private sector development community. By
entering into public/private partnerships the County will join with profit motivated
developers in the execution of most of the projects articulated in this plan. The County
and the CCIA will investigate legal and financial arrangements that create effective
working relationships that will successfully complete projects throughout the county.

21.   Distribute More Information on Training and Educational
Opportunities in the County

The County has an established robust system of education and training. With two
campuses of its technical school, the state largest community college and a number of
proprietary training centers, residents can avail themselves of a wide array of state-of-

________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                           Page 74
the-art training and education. Within an hour’s drive are located some of the nation’s
most prestigious universities including Princeton, Pennsylvania, Drexel and Rutgers
Universities. However, many county residents may not be familiar with all of these local
resources. Therefore, the County will increase the marketing of these educational and
skill development opportunities.       The County will use direct mail, mass media
advertising, web site content and will hold educational and skill development fairs and
other special events to distribute information to the public.

22. Create Partnerships with Non-Profit Organizations

The County has a large number of experienced and dedicated non-profit organizations
that have been undertaking substantial community and economic development projects,
often with limited resources. The County will seek ways to partner with non-profit
organizations to execute many of the development projects included in this plan. In
some instances, the County will assist in the creation of new non-profit organizations
where warranted to undertake projects. The CCIA will provide tax-exempt bond
financing for eligible projects within the county.

23. Create Livable and Walkable Neighborhoods

The creation of livable and walkable neighborhoods is a component of the County’s
smart growth oriented community and economic development strategy. By bringing
new jobs, shopping, entertainment, parks and transportation close to residential
development, the residents will be able to walk more, take interest in their neighbors
and neighborhoods, help reduce crime and remove automobiles from local streets. This
goal will improve the quality of life in county neighborhoods which will make them more
attractive to existing and future residents. Quality neighborhoods will be important to
attracting and maintaining a competitive workforce that employers will need in the
future.

24. Significantly Bolster County Tourism Efforts

Tourism is the second leading industries in New Jersey, behind only pharmaceuticals,
and is becoming increasingly important to Camden County’s balance economy. The
County seeks to increase its share of this $31 Billion state industry. The county has a
number of attractive recreational, historical and ecological attractions. From the
Battleship New Jersey on the Camden Waterfront to the Pineland National Reserve in
the southernmost area of the county, spending and the creation of jobs is becoming
increasingly important.

The county will seek ways to bolster the tourism sector of the local economy through
active marketing, support of museums and attractions and the development of new
attractions within the county.   Activities such as attracting rowing regattas, special
events and concerts, visits to the Walt Whitman House in Camden and Indian King
Tavern in Haddonfield, the Camden Waterfront and the development of a new indoor
water park will be supported. The County will work with Philadelphia and Atlantic City
tourism organizations on packages side trips to sites within the county.


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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                         Page 75
25. Work to Get Tax-Exempt Lands into More Productive and Taxable
Uses

The county has a large amount of tax-exempt land that could become job-generating
sites and new taxable ratables. The County will undertake an analysis of the amount
and location of tax-exempt lands within Camden County. A plan will be developed that
the County will use to work with owners of tax-exempt lands to evaluate if new tax-
generating uses of these properties are economically viable. The County will also
analyze its own properties to determine if these sites could be sold or developed into
more productive uses. An additional benefit of this initiative will be the sale of these
sites by non-profits will provide these entities with needed funds for their core mission
of helping local residents.

26. Focus More Workforce Development Efforts in the Food Service and
Hospitality Industries

The food service and hospitality industries have the potential to create thousands of
additional jobs for county residents. A significant portion of the jobs in these sectors are
located outside of the county in Philadelphia, Burlington, Gloucester and Atlantic
Counties. The County will focus on providing job training assistance to county residents
interested in entering or upgrading their skills in restaurant, hotels, casinos and the
entertainment businesses that are growing in the region.

27. Promote Sustainable Energy Issues and Energy Independence
throughout the County

The County recognizes the need to promote the use of sustainable energy in its
development throughout the county. The County will lead the way in promoting
sustainable energy in all development projects that it is involved in. The use of green
technology will be incorporated into development projects. Another energy related
development opportunity will be the development of alternative energy projects that will
steer Camden County away from the use of foreign fossil fuels. The County will
promote the location of industries that manufacture alternative energy systems and
components.

28. Track the Baby Boomers and their Impacts on Housing, Services,
and Transit etc.

America’s first Baby Boomer is a resident of Cherry Hill Township. The County
recognizes that the baby boom generation has and will continue creating major impacts
upon the economy and quality of life the county. The County will track this large
population cohort to determine if County policies and priorities need to be changed to
deal with the unique needs and desires of this sector of the county’s population. Issues
such as early retirement, second careers, spending preferences, smaller housing needs,
transportation needs and recreational interests will need to be factored into the policies
of the County and its economic development planning.



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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                            Page 76
29. Promote Growing Public Interest in Returning to Urban Lifestyles
and Urban Living

Since the county has a large urban sector that needs revitalization, particularly in the
northern area of the county, the County plans to promote the return to this area of the
county by residents, employers and investment dollars. This “urban lifestyle” appeals to
a growing segment of the regional population, especially young adults and empty
nesters who seek an urban living’s benefits of compact housing, nearby cultural
attractions, dining places and historically interesting communities. Many of these
residents will invest in housing and small businesses in these urban communities, which
need such investment by this sector of the population.

30. Find Ways to Streamline the Development Review and Approval
Process

New Jersey has over the past fifty years established a system of long and expensive
review and approval of development projects. This has put this state and county at a
competitive disadvantage with other states and has deterred many development
projects. The County will investigate ways to have development applications move
promptly through both state and local approval agencies. If the County is successful in
getting approval agencies to more promptly approve projects, the County may consider
marketing this process to prospective business and industry. As an example, Babylon,
New York currently has an economic development marketing program based upon their
rapid 60-day approval process.

31. Develop Capacity Building Opportunities among Local Government
and Organizations

The County has had a successful program of assisting local governments and agencies
increase their development capacity through the use of the Brownfield and
Redevelopment Center (BARC). The County plans to significantly increase the local
economic development capacity though the use it new Center for Civic Leadership at
Camden County College. This new state-of-the-art resource will bring speakers, training
programs, public issue forum and other activities together in one place to help local
development organizations to a better job of creating jobs and rebuilding their
communities.

32. Incorporate the Future of Camden City into the County CEDS

The County will make a concentrated effort to develop policies and programs that will
address the needs of the City of Camden. Improving the working relationship with
Camden officials and development agencies will be a goal of the County. In addition,
the County will insure that the needs of the City of Camden are given priority for funding
from state and federal agencies.        Three of the County’s eight strategic projects
developed in this CEDS are located within the City of Camden.




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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                           Page 77
33. Provide New Water and Sewer Infrastructure Where Needed

The County will prioritize the construction of new water and sewer lines and the
rebuilding of older lines to areas that are linked to key economic development projects.
Although most of the water and sewer lines are the responsibility of local governmental
units, the County will provide support for strategic projects that have the potential to
create new jobs and investment within the county. The County will share its economic
development program with local officials, water utility companies and state regulatory
agencies to insure that the goals of this CEDS are not impeded by the lack of
coordination of new water and sewer projects.

34. Incorporate the Goals of the CEDS into a County Master Plan and
Smart Growth Plan

The goals of this CEDS will be incorporated into the County’s new master plan and smart
growth plan. Economic development is an important element of the overall planning
and development program of the County and will be incorporated into all future plans of
the county.

35. Ensure an Available Inventory of “Shovel Ready” Properties Linked
to Marketing Effort

The County needs to increase the number and variety of sites that are ready for
development. Having sites pre-approved for certain types of economic development
projects will provide a competitive advantage over other counties within the region.
Therefore, the County will work with local officials and developers to have sites pre-
approved and ready for development. The County will inventory these sites and develop
a marketing effort touting the fact that these sites are pre-approved and “shovel ready”.

36. Provide Assistance on the Proposed Gateway Business Park with
Campbell Soup Company and the City of Camden

The City of Camden and the Campbell Soup Company have proposed a new 110-acre
office park in the Gateway Redevelopment Area of the city. The project is one of the
County’s eight strategic projects under this CEDS. The new office park will include an
estimated 500,000 square feet of new office space and will create over 2,000 new
employment opportunities. Campbell’s will build a new 80,000 square foot addition to
its world headquarters. The County will work with the State of New Jersey, the USEDA,
NJEDA, the City of Camden and Campbell’s to undertake the various components in
order to implement the successful redevelopment of the project. The project will require
new infrastructure, estimated to cost $26 million, in order to move forward.

37. Focus Efforts on the Educational and Medical Cluster in Downtown
Camden

The County will focus its economic development effort on supporting the development
of the Educational and Medical Cluster in Downtown Camden. The colleges and health

________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                          Page 78
care institutions located in this area of the City of Camden have the potential to create
hundreds of new jobs permanent jobs and construction jobs. This initiative is one of the
County’s eight strategic projects. The CCIA will continue to provide tax-exempt bond
financing for projects located within this strategic project area.

38. Assist in the Visioning and Development of the “Golden Triangle”
Area of Cherry Hill

The County will assist the Township of Cherry Hill in the visioning and development of
the so-called “Golden Triangle” of the township. This strategic project will commence
with a DVRPC-funded study of the area. Following the completion of the study, the
County will work to implement recommendations of the report.

39. Actively Work on the Development of Private and County-owned
Properties at the New College Drive Interchange on Rt. 42

The County will actively work on the development of key tracts of land near the planned
new interchange at College Drive on Route 42.       This strategic project involves the
development and redevelopment of over 700 acres of land owned by the County
College, the County, Cooper Hospital and other private property owners. This project
has the potential create hundreds of new jobs and return publicly-owned land to the
County and Gloucester Township tax rolls. This strategic project will be dependent upon
the approval and funding of the NJDOT’s new interchange.

40. Provide Technical and Financial Support of the Develcom Project
on Creek Road in Bellmawr

A private developer, Develcom, has proposed a redevelopment of two former landfills
and other lands along Creek Road in Bellmawr. The County plans to support this
strategic development project which has the potential to create hundreds of new jobs
and significant new tax ratables for the County and the Borough. This project will
require the cooperation of both Gloucester County and Deptford Township a portion of
the site is located. This project is an example of the County recent efforts to work in a
regional manner.

41. Support the Development of the Area of Route 73 near the New
Virtua Hospital in Voorhees

The County will continue to support the plans of Voorhees Township to develop the
Route 73 Corridor. Virtua Hospital’s plan for a new $500 million health care complex will
serve as a driver of commercial, retail and professional office development along this
strategic project corridor.




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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                          Page 79
42. Focus Resources on the Development of a Transit Village at the
Lindenwold PATCO Station

As discussed in early action items in this CEDS, the development of transit oriented
development (TOD) is an important component of the County’s economic development
strategy. The Lindenwold Station, which is the terminus of the transit line that runs to
Philadelphia, has the potential for the creation of new employment opportunities and
housing units. This strategic project can serve as a model for additional TOD
development within the county.

43. Utilize the New Center for Civic Leadership to Increase Economic
Development Skills of Local Leaders and Citizens

The County has made a significant investment in the construction of a new building at
the County College that will serve as a Center for Civic Leadership. This new center will
serve as a center for discussing economic development opportunities and will provide
training for local officials and citizens interested in gaining skills in civic leadership
including economic development.

44. Focus on the Attraction and Internal Development of Nano-
Technology

Nano-Technology is an emerging technologically-related industry which is well suited for
growth and development in Camden County. With its strong historical legacy of
electronic, cell and biological research and medical products, this industry would be a
good match for our current research and development labor force. The County will seek
grant funding to develop a feasibility study and implementation plan to guide the
attraction and growth of nano-technology.

45.   Assist in the Expansion of Wireless Access and Broadband
Development throughout the County

The County will continue its program of providing wireless access throughout key areas
of the county, which started at Wiggins Waterfront Park in Camden and continues to
rollout throughout the County parks and other areas.            The county’s broadband
backbone, one of the finest in the country, will continue to be improved to maintain the
county’s competitive edge due to this key infrastructure.        The County will market
locations along this broadband “highway” to communications and high-technology
companies that require high speed broadband capacity.

46. Assist in the Development of an Indoor Water Park in Berlin
Township

A private developer has proposed an indoor water park in Berlin Township. This project
will create new jobs, attract tourists to the county, and provide a recreational resource
for county residents. This County will seek ways to support the development of this



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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                           Page 80
project along the Route 73 Corridor, which will support the County’s tourism
development and recreational improvement strategies.

47. Continue to Support the Growth of New Restaurants within the
County

During the past several years, the County has seen strong growth in the number of new
restaurants throughout the county. These establishments have created hundreds of
new employment opportunities for county residents. The County intends to continue to
support the growth of restaurants and seek ways to integrate them into mixed-use and
transit oriented development.

48.  Seek to Attract Manufacturing Firms that Provide Jobs for
Production Related Skilled Workers of the County

The County recognizes that it has lost a significant number of manufacturing
establishments and related jobs since 1950. However, manufacturing is still a good
source of well-paying jobs that provide employment for production related skilled
workers and will remain an important component of the County’s economic development
strategy. The County will assist municipalities and industrial park developers attract new
industrial establishments to the county and assist in the retention of existing
manufacturers.

49. Provide Assistance in Reducing Heavy Truck Traffic through
Residential Neighborhoods

County residents have expresses concerns over the amount of heavy truck traffic that
has increased on certain neighborhood street, particularly within the City of Camden.
The County will investigate alternate routes or the construction on new truck routes to
relocate heavy truck traffic off of residential streets. Three neighborhoods that will be
initially studies are the Waterfront South neighborhood in South Camden, the River
Avenue corridor in the Cramer Hill neighborhood of East Camden and the port truck
traffic on King Street in the waterfront area of Gloucester City.

50. Assist in the Redevelopment of the Area between Our Lady of
Lourdes Medical Center and the Ferry Avenue PATCO Station

The East Gate Redevelopment Area of the City of Camden will be an area that the
County will provide development assistance on. The area along Haddon Avenue from
Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center to the Ferry Avenue PATCO Station will be a major
area of redevelopment and investment. Providing a safe and visually appealing link
between these two neighborhood anchors will be a County priority.




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                           Page 81
51. Support the Redevelopment of the Oak Road Redevelopment Area
of Lawnside

The Oak Road Redevelopment Area of the Borough of Lawnside has been a strategic
development project of the County since its inclusion in the 2002 CEDS. The area has
superior highway and mass transit access. The Borough has recently completed a
Request for Proposals from redevelopers interested in this redevelopment area. The
County will work with the Borough and the selected redeveloper on development
approvals and project financing.   This development will provide an impetus for the
potential of a TOD development of the nearby Woodcrest PATCO line station in Cherry
Hill Township.

52. Retain Bancroft NeuroHealth within the County

Bancroft NeuroHealth is a major non-profit employer founded in 1883 and located in the
Borough of Haddonfield in a fully developed neighborhood. Bancroft provides leading-
edge treatment for autism, developmental disabilities, brain injuries and other
neurological impairments for adolescents and adults, many of which are residents of the
county. The County will work with Bancroft to find a suitable new site within the
county. Lands owned by the County may be viable option for the retention of this
important non-profit organization.

53. Support the Improvements at Camden County Airport in Winslow
Township

Camden County Airport in Winslow Township is the only remaining general aviation
airport within the county. This airport provides an important transportation resource to
the county for business and recreational travelers, including those who play golf at the
top-ranked Pine Valley Golf Club, located nearby. The County will complete a feasibility
study of the future needs and necessary improvements to the airport. Following the
completion of this report, the County will pursue funding to support the preservation of
the airport and to undertake improvements to keep the facility functional.

54. Support the Relocation of the Correctional Facilities in Camden to
Encourage Downtown and Waterfront Redevelopment

The County will work with the State of New Jersey on the investigation of the relocation
of the Riverfront State Prison on the Delaware River in North Camden and the Camden
County Correctional Facility in downtown Camden to more appropriate locations. Both
of the locations of these correctional facilities are impediments to revitalization of two
strategic projects of the county, the waterfront and downtown areas of the City of
Camden. The County will develop plans for the alternate use of these key sites. It is
anticipated that the resultant new development both on and adjacent to these prisons
will create hundreds of new jobs and millions of dollars in new tax ratable for both the
County and the City of Camden.




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                           Page 82
55. Assist in the Development of the Interconnect of the RiverLine and
the NJ Transit line at Delair Junction in Pennsauken

Two major transit lines cross over one another in the Delair section of Pennsauken
Township near the Delaware River. However, there is currently no connection between
the NJ Transit’s Atlantic City Line and the new RiverLine. The County will work with NJ
Transit and Pennsauken Township to insure that this interconnection is completed
during the five year period covered by this CEDS. This improvement will assist County
residents travel to employment opportunities in Philadelphia, Atlantic City, Trenton and
Camden in a more efficient manner. It also will support the redevelopment of the
Pennsauken waterfront area.

56. Provide Assistance in the Development of the Proposed Kroc
Community Center in Camden

The Salvation Army has been awarded a $57 million grant from the bequest of Joan
Kroc, the wife of one the principals behind the McDonald’s restaurants chain. The grant
will be used to build a new community center in the Cramer Section of East Camden.
The County will assist the Salvation Army raise matching funds and/or provide project
bond financing for this major community asset.

57. Focus on Assisting Municipalities Improve their “Main Street”
Areas

There are numerous classic commercial corridors with historic architectural buildings
that are termed “Main Street” areas within the county. The County plans to focus
resources on assisting local officials, property owners and community groups strengthen
the economic activity along these corridors. The CCIA’s Brownfield and Redevelopment
Center will serve as a resource for the improvement of these areas by the provision of
detailed mapping, economic analysis and bond financing for eligible improvements.
Linking “Main Street” areas to transit stations will also be a focus of the County’s
revitalization effort.

58. Investigate the Development of an Aquaculture Production Plant
within the County

Aquaculture is a growing industry that the County will investigate to determine if it has a
competitive advantage for attracting fish farming firms to the more rural areas of the
county. This type of business, which requires large land areas and thermal energy,
could be a good fit for Camden County since the county is located close to major fish
markets in New York City and Philadelphia.

59. Support Programs that Encourage Local Entrepreneurs and Small
Business Growth

The County is a strong supporter of small business and entrepreneurs. The County
recognizes that small business is the spark for economic power throughout the county.

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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                            Page 83
The County will support the growth of small business by providing incentives for
business creation, reductions of governmental “red tape”, and the packaging of
financing from both private lenders and governmental sources such as the SBA and the
NJEDA.

60.    Encourage the Development of Recycling Industries

As part of the County’s effort to both stimulate the local economy while improving the
environment of the county, the County will encourage the development of recycling
industries within the county. A number of recycling businesses are concentrated within
the Atlantic Avenue area of South Camden, which serve as a recycling targeted
industrial park. In addition, the County will support industries that strive for zero landfill
output similar to Subaru’s Lafayette, Indiana auto assembly plant.

61. Support the Construction of Residential Projects that Support
Economic Development Efforts

Residential development is considered by the County to be an important component of a
comprehensive economic development strategy. Locating new or rehabilitated housing
near economic development projects will reduce traffic congestion, increase business
productivity and create economically balanced mixed-use developments. The County
will support zoning changes and redevelopment planning that encourages a more
mixed-use development scheme. The CCIA will target bond financing for mixed-use
redevelopment projects that integrate living and working into a project.

62. Provide Resources for Environmental Cleanup of Contaminated
Sites and Buildings

The County will target resources to cleaning up contaminated sites and buildings
throughout the county. The CCIA’s Brownfield and Redevelopment Center (BRAC) will
provide technical assistance to local officials, private redevelopers and community
organizations that are working on cleaning up and re-using these brownfield sites and
buildings.   The CCIA will provide bond financing to eligible projects and help
communities secure state and federal funding to assist in the necessary cleanup and the
planning of the reuse of these tough to develop sites.

63. Encourage the Extension of the PATCO Transit Line to the Cities
of Glassboro and Millville

The County will encourage the extension of the PATCO transit line to be extended
through the county south towards the cities of Glassboro, Vineland and Millville. The
planning for this new transit line will need to consider both the positive benefits for
community and economic development and the negative issues generated by cutting off
street access. If designed to address the negative impacts on county neighborhoods,
the project will provide impetus for additional community and economic development
throughout the county and the region.



________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                              Page 84
5.2 MATRIX DEVELOPMENT

From the inventory of projects identified, the County prepared a project matrix that
outlines potential projects and strategies to implement a number of the key proposals.
Possible funding sources, partners, and a suggested priority framework have been
identified.

A.        Overall Projects

Project                         Funding Source(s)           Suggested Actions               Priority
                                                                                          Framework

1. Promote CCIA in order to      Camden County         •   Update marketing materials     NEAR
   emphasize its function,                                 identifying CCIA services      TERM
   capabilities and resources                              and programs                   Early 2008
   to municipal/county                                 •   Meet with municipalities
   officials and their                                     commissions, chambers of
   counterpart economic                                    commerce and business
   development                                             associations on a regular
   commissions/committees                                  basis.
   in the County (internal
   marketing.)


2. Continue the County’s         Camden County         •   Coordinate CCIA’s efforts      NEAR
   successful marketing                                    with County’s program to       TERM
   program focusing on                                     include:                       Early 2008
   economic development                                    a. Image identification
   in the County as an                                     b. Enhanced County
   expansion of the                                             webpage with strategic
   existing promotional                                         links
   efforts.                                                c. Aggressive promotion
                                                                to target markets as a
                                                                cybercounty, for
                                                                example
                                                           d. Target selected
                                                                regional markets for
                                                                marketing efforts


3. Continue to host an           Camden County         •   Seek prioritization from the   NEAR
   annual regional                                         CEDS Committee and             TERM
   economic development          US EDA Capacity           pursue pre and full            Early 2008
   summit for municipal          Building Initiative       application USEDA process
   economic development                                •   Develop a regional
   entities to encourage         DRPA Regional             approach premised on:
   unified activities.           Economic                  a. Economic base
                                 Development                   expansion through
                                 Program                       “Business Retention,
                                                               Expansion, Creation,
                                                               Attraction”
                                                           b. Level of organizational
                                                               effectiveness


________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                                     Page 85
4. Maintain County             USEDA Capacity   •   Seek prioritization from the   NEAR
   inventory of available      Building             CEDS Committee and             TERM
   private and public land                          pursue pre and full            Early 2008
   and buildings for           DCA – REDI           application USEDA process
   promotion of “developable                    •   Implement International
   sites”                      User Fees            Economic Development
                                                    Council standards for
   a. Utilize countywide                            database development
      GIS system to create
      a property
      inventory/data
      source for CCIA and
      its public
      counterparts for use
      in responding to
      inquiries from the
      private sector

   b. Establish a webpage
      linked to the GIS
      database

   c.   Include “developable
        sites” in GIS
        database

   d. Identify necessary
      site preparation
      (including
      Brownfields) and
      infrastructure needs
      to facilitate
      redevelopment


5. Promote the                 Camden County    • Identify funding sources for     NEAR
   Brownfields and                                private and public               TERM
   Redevelopment Center                           remediation                      Early 2008
                                                • List appropriate sites in NJ
                                                  Brownfield Site Mart
                                                  database.
                                                • Inform the public at large,
                                                  including the real estate
                                                  community about the
                                                  benefits and resources for
                                                  brownfields redevelopment




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                              Page 86
6. Provide ongoing staffing    OSP – Smart       •   Conduct                       NEAR
   and support to implement    Growth Planning       seminars/workshops for        TERM
   the CEDS                    Grant                 municipal governments         Early 2008
                                                     and economic
                               Camden County         development entities
                                                     about the redevelopment
                                                     process

                                                 •   Provide technical

                                                     assistance, including
                                                     planning and legal
                                                     consultation to determine
                                                     the appropriateness and
                                                     feasibility of delineating
                                                     redevelopment areas

                                                 •   Pursue Office of Smart
                                                     Growth– Smart Growth
                                                     funding to assist County’s
                                                     older urban areas
                                                     (waterfront and inner ring
                                                     sub-regions) in formal
                                                     delineation of
                                                     redevelopment areas and
                                                     formulation of
                                                     redevelopment plans
                                                 •
7. Enhance the CCIA            Camden County     •   Investigate the possibility   NEAR to
   Briefing Center to help                           of creating a separate        MID TERM
   prospective developers                            interactive Briefing          Early – Mid
   make locational decisions                         Center, and/or                2008

                                                 •   Evaluate improvements
                                                     that can be made to the
                                                     existing CCIA conference
                                                     room to make a more
                                                     effective briefing center

                                                 •   Formulate a plan to
                                                     establish a permanent
                                                     facility including
                                                     equipment and other
                                                     technical resources

                                                 •   Conduct periodic realtor/
                                                     developer information
                                                     sessions to apprise them
                                                     of this County resource

                                                 •   Incorporate Briefing
                                                     Center services in County
                                                     economic development
                                                     marketing materials



________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                              Page 87
8. Identify ongoing                 DVRPC           •   Pursue USEDA grant for            NEAR
   infrastructure needs and                             engineering analysis to           TERM
   priorities                       NJDOT               identify infrastructure needs     Early 2008
                                                        in areas with development
     a. Prioritize areas for        USEDA               potential.
        construction of
        infrastructure              Camden County   •   Coordinate this effort with the
        improvements                                    input received from the
        premised on near/mid-                           economic summit (see
        term development                                Activity #3 above)
        opportunities
                                                    •   Work with County Engineer
     b. Identify infrastructure                         to include targeted areas for
        and transportation                              study of highway and public
        needs for targeted                              transit needs as part of
        areas                                           Regional Plan by the DVRPC

     c.    Encourage multi-
           jurisdictional
           development
           projects through the
           instrumentality of a
           CCIA-CDC for land
           assembly, site
           development, and
           marketing
           resources/coordination

9.        Encourage use of smart    NJOSP – Smart   • Conduct meetings with               NEAR
          growth principles         Growth Grant       municipalities in waterfront       TERM
          throughout the county.                       and inner ring sub-regions         Early 2008
                                    NJDEP –            where smart growth
                                    Brownfields        principles have the greatest
                                    Program            applicability.

                                                    • Assist in identifying potential
                                                       redevelopment areas for
                                                       study.

                                                    • Assist municipalities in
                                                       ascertaining appropriate
                                                       funding source(s) to pursue
                                                       for redevelopment area
                                                       delineation and plans

                                                    • Coordinate interagency/inter-
                                                       organizational efforts

                                                    • Recommend follow-up
                                                       application to NJOSG for
                                                       next phase of redevelopment
                                                       planning/implementation in
                                                       selected participating
                                                       jurisdictions.



________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                                  Page 88
10.   Capitalize on geographic      PATCO          • Evaluate PATCO plans for       MID
      location and critical                           existing stations             TERM
      mass at existing PATCO        NJ Transit     • Conduct market and             Mid 2008
      and light rail stations for                     economic feasibility study
      development of transit        NJDOT             for site(s) development
      villages                                     • Secure funding for
                                    DRPA              implementation
                                                   • Use the study as a model for
                                    Federal           developing zoning
                                    Highway           ordinances and design
                                    Trust Fund/       guidelines for other
                                    TEA-21            locations
                                                   • Engage PATCO in the
                                                      process of formulating
                                                      development venture at
                                                      selected stations that will
                                                      stimulate new private
                                                      investment and create more
                                                      jobs

11.   Continue a targeted           USEDA          • Prepare pre and full           NEAR
      marketing effort by                             applications for public       TERM
      conducting research of        US Dept. of       funding                       Early 2008
      key sectors.                  Commerce       • Implement RFP process for
      a. Identify by industry       Minority          targeted marketing services
          those companies           Business       • Select firm to undertake
          that would fit within     Development       target marketing research
          the following market      Program           study
          categories:
          i. Value-Added            DRPA
               Logistics and
               Distribution         Select
          ii. Data,                 Philadelphia
               Information and
               Telecommunicat
               ions Operations
          iii. Healthcare,
               Support and
               Products
          iv. Travel, Tourism
               and Recreation
      b. Apply the research as
          part of the targeted
          industry study to
          formulate an addition
          to the County web
          page designed to
          elicit the interest of
          those companies
          with the best fit.




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                               Page 89
12.   Promote health care          Private          • Formulate an outline of           LONG
      and education                Foundations         issues/opportunities for         TERM
      opportunities by                                 improvement and growth           2008-
      engaging hospitals,          Department of       along with Project Profiles      2012
      university medical           Health and          for presentation to
      centers and elderly          Human               foundations and other
      health care facilities and   Services            public funding agencies
      service providers to         (state and       • Meet with Foundation
      assess the status of         federal)            officials
      services in relation to
      existing and future
      needs for such facilities

13.   Capitalize on the            Camden           •   Work with and support the       NEAR
      destination created by       County               efforts of the Camden           TERM
      the Philadelphia market                           Waterfront Marketing            Early 2008
      and use it as a link from    DRPA                 Bureau and Delaware River
      which to market county                            Regional Tourism Council
      resources such as            NJ Office of         to increase Camden
      hotels, restaurants,         Travel &             County’s share of State
      conference centers,          Tourism              Tourism Revenues and
      ecotourism opportunities                          benefit from the direct and
      (Pinelands) and                                   indirect economic
      resources                                         investments to accrue to the
                                                        County

14.   Strengthen                   Camden           •    Continue to work closely       NEAR
      relationships between        County                with County College and        TERM
      CCIA, County College         County College        WIB on promotion of            Early 2008
      and WIB to promote           Workforce             County’s locational
      County location              Investment            advantages
                                   Funding
15.   Focus on Delaware            Camden           •   Complete a detailed study       MID
      River Waterfront             County               of development and              TERM
      Redevelopment                DRPA                 redevelopment                   Mid 2008
                                   DVRPC                opportunities along the
                                   NJOSG                Delaware River waterfront
                                   NJDEP            •   Assist waterfront
                                                        redevelopment efforts
                                                    •   Invest in waterfront projects

16. Redevelop key                  Camden           •   Support local economic          NEAR
     commercial corridors          County               development planning            TERM
     such as the White Horse       NJOSG                committees                      Early 2008
     and Black Horse Pikes         DVRPC            •   Target CCIA financing to
                                   NJEDA                such corridors
                                                    •   Add information regarding
                                                        potential development
                                                        opportunities to County web
                                                        site




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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                                   Page 90
17. Reposition the County’s     Camden       •   Continue BARC effort to          MID
     retail centers including   County           identify retail centers that     TERM
     “grayfields” to insure     NJOSG            need redevelopment               Mid 2008
     continued                  NJEDA        •   Provide technical
     competitiveness                             assistance to property
                                                 owners planning
                                                 improvements or wishing to
                                                 sell properties
                                             •   Assist local municipalities
                                                 development
                                                 redevelopment plans
                                             •   Coordinate financing
                                                 packages for
                                                 redevelopment
                                                 implementation

18. Focus new development       NJOSG        •   Assist local municipalities      MID
     around “Centers of         Camden           on master planning and           TERM
     Place”                     County           zoning code development to       Mid 2008
                                NJDCA            channel new development
                                                 in targeted centers
                                                 consistent with Smart
                                                 Growth principals
                                             •   Promote this targeted
                                                 development on County
                                                 web site

19. Promote Transit             Camden       •   Focus assistance on key          MID
     Oriented Development       County           transit stations including the   TERM
     Opportunities at           DRRP/PATCO       Lindenwold Station               Mid 2008
     PATCO and NJ               DVRPC        •   Work closely with PATCO
     RiverLINE stations         NJOSG            and NJ Transit to assist in
                                NJDCA            identifying potential
                                NJEDA            development opportunities
                                NJDOT        •   Identify potential mixed-use
                                                 developers for TOD sites

20. Place more emphasis on      Camden       •   Enlist private sector            NEAR
     Public/Private             County           participation early on in the    TERM
     Partnerships               NJEDA            development process              Early 2008
                                NJOSG        •   Encourage private sector
                                USEDA            implementation of
                                                 development project
                                             •   Increase utilization of
                                                 private funding sources
                                                 including development
                                                 capital and bank financing




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                             Page 91
21. Distribute more              Camden           •   Produce and distribute          NEAR
     information on training     County               printed material on all         TERM
     and educational and         Camden               educational and training        Early 2008
     educational opportunities   County College       programs within the County
     in the County               WIB              •   Enhance the County web
                                                      site to more effectively link
                                                      various educational and
                                                      training resources
                                                  •   Promote the idea of all
                                                      county workers to seek
                                                      ways to improve the skills
                                                      and knowledge

22. Create partnerships with     Camden           •   Identify all non-profit         NEAR
     non-profit                  County               organizations and develop a     TERM
     organizations               Private              listing of services provide     Early 2008
                                 Foundations      •   Work with development
                                                      oriented non-profits on job
                                                      creating projects with the
                                                      county
                                                  •   Consider creating
                                                      partnerships between CCIA
                                                      on non-profits on projects
                                                  •   Provide financing to non-
                                                      profits for eligible projects

23. Create livable and           Camden           •   Encourage use of smart          NEAR
     walkable                    County               growth principals in both       TERM
     neighborhoods               NJOSG                new developments and            Early 2008
                                 NJHMFA               redevelopment projects
                                 HUD              •   Provide financing
                                 NJ Green             assistance to encourage
                                 Acres                pedestrian walkways, parks
                                 Local open           and waterfront access
                                 space funds      •   Seek out developers that
                                                      are experiences in creating
                                                      this type of development

24. Significantly bolster        Camden           •   Provide increased funding       MID
     County Tourism efforts      County               to tourism development          TERM
                                 DRPA                 effort                          Mid 2008 -
                                 SJTDC            •   Add more tourism related        2010
                                 State of NJ          information to County web
                                 DVRPC                site
                                 Hospitality      •   Work with local tourism and
                                 sector               historic sites to promote
                                                      added visits
                                                  •   Provide additional signage
                                                      promoting directing
                                                      potential tourist to local
                                                      sites
                                                  •   Provide financing to eligible
                                                      projects that promote
                                                      tourism


________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                                 Page 92
25. Work to get tax-exempt        Camden          •   Identify all tax-exempt lands   LONG
     lands into more              County              within the county.              TERM
     productive and taxable       Private         •   Develop a plan that creates     Mid 2008 -
     uses                         Foundations         a basis from which to           2012
                                  State of NJ         discuss alternative uses for
                                                      tax-exempt lands
                                                  •   Work with non-profits and
                                                      governmental property
                                                      owners to develop plans for
                                                      selling or leasing tax-
                                                      exempt lands

26. Focus more workforce          WIB             •   Work with the WIB on            MID
     development efforts in       NJDOL               developing a targeted           TERM
     the food service and                             program for food service        Mid 2008
     hospitality industries                           and hospitality sectors
                                                  •   Promote available training
                                                      programs on County web
                                                      site
                                                  •   Target restaurant,
                                                      entertainment and hospital
                                                      developers to locate or
                                                      expand within the county

27. Promote sustainable           Camden          •   Promote energy                  LONG
     energy issues and            County              conservation measures           TERM
     energy independence          NJBPU               throughout County though        Mid 2008 -
     throughout the County.       PSE&G               seminars, web site              2012
                                  Atlantic City   •   Evaluate the feasibility of
                                  Electric            having all County building
                                  South Jersey        utilize alternation energy
                                  Gas                 sources
                                                  •   Encourage homeowners
                                                      and business owners to
                                                      invest in energy savings
                                                      measures
                                                  •   Investigate programs that
                                                      would provide financing
                                                      incentives to encourage
                                                      energy independence
                                                  •   Provide project financing for
                                                      alternative energy projects

28. Track the baby boomers        Camden          •   Secure research reports on      LONG
     and their impacts on         County              the trends being created by     TERM
     housing, services, transit   NJOSG               the baby boom generation        Late 2008-
     etc.                                             and how various elements        2010
                                                      of the County’s growth with
                                                      be effected
                                                  •   Taylor housing locations,
                                                      service delivery,
                                                      transportation and
                                                      employment programs to
                                                      this influential large
                                                      generation

________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                                 Page 93
29. Promote growing public      Camden        •   Create section of County       MID
     interest in returning to   County            web site geared to returning   TERM
     urban lifestyles and       DVRPC             to urban living options        Mid 2008
     urban living                             •   Target financing to
                                                  underdeveloped urban
                                                  areas of the county.
                                              •   Promote successful areas
                                                  of the county where
                                                  residents are moving into
                                                  and revitalizing older
                                                  neighborhoods

30. Find ways to streamline     Camden        •   Hold a forum on the            NEAR
     the development            County            development review             TERM
     review and approval        NJDCA             process to identify            Early 2008
     process                                      procedures issued that
                                                  delay local approvals of
                                                  projects
                                              •   Investigate successful
                                                  approval programs
                                                  throughout the country
                                              •   Consider promoting the
                                                  County’s prompt approval
                                                  process such as Babylon,
                                                  NY

31. Develop capacity            Camden        •   Hold workshops with local      MID
     building opportunities     County            municipalities on increasing   TERM
     among local                NJDCA             their local economic           Mid 2008
     governmental               Private           development capacity
     organizations              Foundations   •   Consider providing
                                                  matching funding to assist
                                                  local capacity building

32. Incorporate the future of   Camden        •   Increase the effort to         NEAR
     Camden City into the       County            identify opportunities,        TERM
     CEDS                                         projects and development       Early 2008
                                                  impediments within the City
                                                  of Camden
                                              •   Improve the working
                                                  relationship with Camden
                                                  development officials to
                                                  insure increased success
                                                  on projects
                                              •   Target resources to areas
                                                  of the City of Camden that
                                                  have the most development
                                                  potential and the greatest
                                                  need for jobs and
                                                  investment




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                            Page 94
33. Provide new water and       CCMUA            •   Target new water and             LONG
     sewer infrastructure       Local                sewer lines to areas that        TERM
     where needed               Authorities          have the potential for new       Mid 2008
                                                     job creation and private         to 2012
                                                     sector investment
                                                 •   Priority for upgrading
                                                     existing water and sewer
                                                     lines should be given to
                                                     major redevelopment
                                                     initiatives

34. Incorporate the goals of    Camden           •   Insure that the goals of this    MID
     CEDS into the County       County               CEDS are incorporated into       TERM
     Master Plan and Smart      Local                the new County Master            Mid 2008
     Growth plans               Municipalities       Plan
                                                 •   Work with local officials to
                                                     include applicable CEDS
                                                     goals into local master
                                                     plans

35. Ensure an available         Camden           •   Update records on available      NEAR
     inventory of “shovel       County               development sites                TERM
     ready” properties                           •   Add new sites to the County      Early 2008
     linked to marketing                             web site
     efforts                                     •   Work with local officials to
                                                     provide a “steady stream” of
                                                     “shovel ready” sites
                                                 •   Investigate having local site
                                                     pre-approved to increase
                                                     the marketability of the sites
36. Provide assistance on the   Camden           •   Provide funding for              NEAR
     proposed Gateway           County               necessary infrastructure         TERM
     Business Park with         City of Camden       improvements                     Early 2008
     Campbell Soup              State of New     •   Assist on replanning the
     Company and the City of    Jersey               circulation to and within the
     Camden                     NJEDA                proposed office park
                                Campbell Soup    •   Assist in the marketing of
                                Co.                  the site to prospective
                                USEDA                tenants
37. Focus efforts on The        Camden           •   Concentrate efforts on           MID
     Educational and            County               fostering the growth of the      TERM
     Medical Cluster in         State of New         medical and educational          Early 2008
     Downtown Camden            Jersey               institution on the Downtown      to 2012
                                NJEDA                Camden area.
                                USEDA            •   Improve infrastructure in the
                                Rutgers              area to permit orderly
                                University           growth and redevelopment.
                                                 •   Assist in providing new
                                                     housing opportunities
                                                     nearby for employees of the
                                                     institutions
                                                 •   Market adjoining sites to
                                                     business that provide
                                                     support for health care and
                                                     educational facilities

________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                                 Page 95
38. Assist in the visioningand    Camden       •   Retain consulting firm to       NEAR
   development of the             County           complete a visioning plan       TERM
   “Golden Triangle” of           DVRPC            for this key area of the        Early to
   Cherry Hill/Pennsauken                          county.                         Mid 2008
                                               •   Provide infrastructure
                                                   improvements based upon
                                                   the vision and plan for the
                                                   area
                                               •   Target redevelopment
                                                   efforts in accordance with
                                                   the plan
39. Actively work on the          Camden       •   Focus effort on coordinating    MID
   development of private         County           development surrounding         TERM
   and County-owned               NJDOT            this key interchange on Rt.     Early 2008
   properties at the new          USDOT            42                              - 2012
   College Drive                               •   Encourage NJDOT to
   Interchange                                     accelerate the completion of
                                                   the necessary ramp and
                                                   bridge construction
                                               •   Work with private property
                                                   owners and developers to
                                                   insure orderly and
                                                   coordinated development
40. Provide technical and         Camden       •   Target assistance to the site   MID
     financial support for the    County           remediation and                 TERM
     Develcom Project on          DRPA/PATCO       redevelopment of this           Late 2008
     Creek Road in Bellmawr       NJDEP            former landfill site on the     -2012
                                  NJDOT            Big Timber Creek and Rt.
                                                   42
                                               •   Encourage the completion
                                                   of major new highway
                                                   project within the area
                                               •   Improve access to and from
                                                   the site
41. Support the development       NJDOT        •   Provide bond financing for      NEAR
     of the area of Rt. 73 near   CCIA             the development of this         TERM
     the new Virtua Hospital                       major health care project on    Early - Mid
     in Voorhees                                   the eastern edge of the         2008
                                                   county
                                               •   Coordinate infrastructure
                                                   improvement to the area to
                                                   insure orderly future growth
                                               •   Encourage additional
                                                   commercial development
                                                   the new facility
42. Focus resources on the        CCIA         •   Work with PATCO and the         MID
     development of a transit     NJDCA            Borough of Lindenwold in        TERM
     village at the               NJDOT            planning the development        Mid 2008 -
     Lindenwold PATCO             DRPA             of a transit village            2012
     Station                      DVRPC        •   Once the plan is adopted,
                                  USEDA            work on attracting a private
                                                   developer to build the
                                                   housing and related
                                                   improvements at the station


________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                              Page 96
43. Utilize the new Center for    Camden          •   Encourage local officials        NEAR
     Civic Leadership to          County              and citizens of the county to    TERM
     increase economic                                utilize the resources of the     Early 2008
     development skills of                            new center at Camden
     local leasers and citizens                       County College
                                                  •   Promote economic
                                                      development planning and
                                                      capacity building through
                                                      the center

44. Focus on attraction and       USEDA           •   Identify existing firms active   MID
     internal development of      NJEDA               in the nano-technology           TERM
     nano-technology              NJ Technology       industry                         Mid 2008 -
                                  Fund            •   Research needs of the            2012
                                  NJ Com on           industry and develop
                                  Science and         resources and incentives to
                                  Technology          encourage expansion and
                                  Waterfront          attraction of companies in
                                  Technology          the nano-technology
                                  Center          •   Promote use of the
                                                      NJEDA’s Waterfront
                                                      Technology Center at
                                                      Camden

45. Assist in the expansion of    Camden          •   Expand the County’s              NEAR
     wireless access and          County              wireless coverage area.          TERM
     broadband                    Private         •   Encourage the private            Early 2008
     development throughout       providers           sector to invest in additional
     the county                                       broadband infrastructure to
                                                      support our current leading-
                                                      edge position

46. Assist in the development     CCIA            •   Assist in providing financing    NEAR
     of an indoor water park      NJEDA               for the development of an        TERM
     in Berlin Township                               indoor water park in the         Early 2008
                                                      center of the county

47. Continue to support the       SBA             •   Identify locations for new or    NEAR
     growth of new                NJEDA               expanding restaurants            TERM
     restaurants within the                           within the county                Early 2008
     county                                       •   Work with local “Main
                                                      Street” organizations to
                                                      encourage more new
                                                      restaurants

48. Seek to attract               NJEDA           •   Continue to work with            LONG
     manufacturing firms          SBA                 existing and prospective         TERM
     that provide jobs for                            manufacturing firms              Early 2008
     production related skilled                       interested in expanding or       to 2012
     workers of the county                            locating within the county
                                                  •   Market county site to
                                                      manufacturing firms that
                                                      require skills that match the
                                                      skill of county workers.


________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                                  Page 97
49. Provide assistance in       Camden        •   Work with local officials and    MID
     reducing heavy truck       County            residents to identify truck      TERM
     traffic through            NJDOT             traffic issues                   Early 2008
     residential                DRPA          •   Develop alternative routes       to 2012
     neighborhoods              SJPC              or other measures to
                                                  reduce or eliminate heavy
                                                  truck traffic in
                                                  neighborhoods
50. Assist in the               Camden        •   Assist in the development of     MID
     redevelopment of the       County            a plan to integrated OLMC        TERM
     area between Our Lady      DRPA/PATCO        and the Ferry Avenue             Mid 2008
     of Lourdes Medical         NJEDA             PATCO Station                    to 2010
     Center on Haddon           NJDOT         •   Target resources for the
     Avenue and the                               redevelopment of the area
     PATCO Ferry Ave.                             between these two anchors
     Station in Southeast                     •   Investigate the feasibility of
     Camden                                       the development of a transit
                                                  village with new housing
                                                  within the area
51. Support the                 Camden        •   Target county assistance in      NEAR
     redevelopment of the       County            the redevelopment of the         TERM
     Oak Road area of the       NJEDA             Oak Road area of Lawnside        Early 2008
     Borough of Lawnside        USEDA         •   Work with the Borough            to Mid
                                                  selected redeveloper on          2009
                                                  securing financial resources
                                                  to complete the proposed
                                                  redevelopment project
52. Retain Bancroft             Camden        •   Work with Bancroft               MID
     NeuroHealth within the     County            NeuroHealth in locating a        TERM
     county                     NJEDA             new location for their           Mid 2008-
                                                  current Haddonfield              2009
                                                  operation.
                                              •   Assist Bancroft and the
                                                  Borough of Haddonfield in
                                                  determining a community-
                                                  sensitive re-use of the
                                                  existing campus
53. Support the                 CCIA          •   Provide financial assistance     NEAR
     improvements at            NJDOT             for the development of           TERM
     Camden County              FAA               improvements at the airport      Early 2008
     Airport in Winslow                       •   Promote the use of this          to 2009
     Township                                     general aviation airport for
                                                  use by business travelers to
                                                  further economic
                                                  development
54. Support the relocation of   Camden        •   Investigate alternative          MID
     the correctional           County            locations for both the CC        TERM
     facilities in Camden to    State of NJ       Correctional Facility and        2008-2010
     encourage downtown                           Riverfront State Prison
     redevelopment                            •   Evaluate alternative uses
                                                  for the current sites that
                                                  would create jobs and
                                                  improvements to benefit the
                                                  area


________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                              Page 98
55. Assist in the development     NJDOT            •   Provide technical                 MID
     of an interconnect of        NJ Transit           assistance to the                 TERM
     the RiverLINE and NJ         USDOT                construction of an                2008-2010
     Transit Atlantic City        DRPA                 interconnect between these
     Line at Delair Junction in                        two commuter rail lines
     Pennsauken                                    •   Integrate plans for
                                                       waterfront redevelopment
                                                       adjacent to Delair Junction
56. Provide Assistance to the     Kroc             •   Provide assistance to match       NEAR
     development of the           Foundation           funding by the Kroc               TERM
     proposed Kroc                Salvation Army       Foundation for the                Early to
     Community Center in          NJEDA                construction of a new             Mid 2008
     Camden                       DRPA                 community center in
                                  NJDCA                Cramer section of Camden
                                  CCIA             •   Consider issuing CCIA
                                                       bonds to assist the
                                                       fundraising effort
57. Focus on assisting            NJ Main St.      •   Provide technical                 NEAR
     municipalities improve       Program              assistance to local               TERM
     their “Main Street” areas    NJEDA                communities on                    Early 2008
                                  SBA                  improvement their older
                                  CCIA                 commercial corridors
                                                   •   Target new restaurants and
                                                       other small retailers to
                                                       these areas of the county
                                                   •   Evaluate the benefits of
                                                       encouraging residential
                                                       uses within these areas
58. Investigate the               NJEDA            •   Conduct research on               MID
     development of an            NJ Dept. of          feasibility of production of      TERM
     aquaculture production       Agriculture          fish within the county            2008-2009
     plant within the county      USEDA            •   If feasible, identify potential
                                  SBA                  sites for facility
                                  Office of        •   Market available sites to
                                  Economic             prospective operators
                                  Growth
59. Support programs that         SBA              •   Provide technical                 NEAR
     encourage local              NJEDA                assistance and locational         TERM
     entrepreneurs and            Rutgers SBDC         information to local              Early 2008
     small business growth        CCIA                 entrepreneurs and small
                                  Office of            business
                                  Economic         •   Consider hiring of a part-
                                  Growth               time or full-time staff
                                                       member to focus on
                                                       assisting small businesses
                                                       get started or expand their
                                                       operations
60. Encourage the                 NJEDA            •   Work with industries that         NEAR
     development of               SBA                  concentrate on using              TERM
     recycling industries         NJDEP                recycling materials in their      2008-2010
                                                       production
                                                   •   Continue efforts to create
                                                       the recycling based
                                                       industrial park on Atlantic
                                                       Avenue in Camden

________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                                    Page 99
61. Support the construction   NJHMFA   •   Work with local officials on   NEAR
     of residential projects   HUD          encouraging mixed-use          TERM
     that support economic     NJDCA        development that includes      Early 2008
     development efforts       CCIA         residential components

62. Provide resources for      NJDEP    •   Provide technical              NEAR
     environmental cleanup     NJDCA        assistance to municipalities   TERM
     of contaminated sites     USEPA        and redevelopers interested    Early 2008
     and buildings                          in cleaning up brownfields
                                            within the county
                                        •   Target financial incentives
                                            to brownfields projects
                                        •   Give priority to
                                            infrastructure improvements
                                            that support environmental
                                            cleanup efforts

63. Encourage the extension    USDOT    •   Work with DRPA/PATCO           LONG
     of the PATCO transit      NJDOT        on selecting the optimum       TERM
     line through the county   DRPA         route for the expansion of     2008-2015
     and south towards                      the successful PATCO
     Glassboro and Millville                transit line south towards
                                            Millville.
                                        •   Consider the economic
                                            development benefits to the
                                            county in the selection of
                                            the final route




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                     Page 100
                                     SECTION VI
                                    MARKETING


6.0 OVERVIEW

Camden County is poised to build on future growth through its economic development
marketing effort. The County’s ongoing, and proactive marketing program will help
assure that the quality and type of growth that occurs will contribute to the future
development and redevelopment that the County’s municipalities desire. The purpose of
this plan is to aid the Camden County Improvement Authority (CCIA) in organizing and
expanding its communications to best achieve its service objectives and the priorities
identified by the CEDS Committee and public. These marketing objectives include the
following activities:

   •   Retention of existing businesses
   •   Expansion of existing businesses
   •   Creation of new business from within the County
   •   Attraction of targeted industry from outside the immediate area

Communications to support the efforts for the first three activities are typically directed
towards internal audiences (outlined on the next page). Communications to support the
attraction of targeted industries requires a concerted external marketing effort, but must
be supported by a strong internal effort as well.

6.1 TARGET AUDIENCES

Internal Audiences. This group is comprised of the people and organizations who
make up Camden County’s economic fabric:

   •   General business community
   •   Specific businesses which serve target industries or are an existing part of an
       industry cluster
   •   Developers, real estate executives, utilities & financial services
   •   County and municipal government leaders
   •   Chambers of Commerce and industry organizations
   •   EDOs (Economic Development Organizations) within County
   •   Port Authority (DRPA), Airports
   •   Tourism Marketing Groups (Public & Private)
   •   Media

These groups are the stakeholders in the success of any marketing plan because they,
in fact, are part of the product. Their understanding and buy-in of the community’s
ongoing vision for economic development is essential to its success.
Marketing communications to internal audiences will help in the following ways:


________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                          Page 101
Cluster Development: Businesses that understand economic development are more
likely to help build their own cluster. For instance, medical manufactures will encourage
suppliers and vendors to relocate nearby. This marketing concept will help promote a
key goal of the CEDS, which is to foster economic development clusters.

Government Support: Government leaders are more likely to support initiatives that
benefit economic development activities if they are attuned to the strategies that
fostered the programs/strategies.

Industry Commitment: Private industry, especially those service businesses related to
real estate transactions, are more likely to contribute time and resources (which can be
a force multiplier for any marketing effort). However, their commitment will only occur
if they are aware and involved in the program. The best economic development
marketing tool a community can have is the endorsement and enthusiastic support of its
existing industry base.

Synergistic Problem Solving: When chambers, industry organizations and other ED
organizations are united behind a regional marketing plan they are able to support each
other’s efforts and funding. A solid communication program will be required to support
the “Team Camden County” effort (as advocated in the Policy Development section.)

Prevention of Business Loss: Help prevent local businesses relocating elsewhere,
because they are aware of economic opportunities and assistance within the county.

Positive Public Relations:    Local media, educated to the benefits of economic
development, will relay favorable messages to the general public, creating community
support for economic development issues.


External Audiences: External audiences are of primary importance for the business
attraction function of economic development. This is an area that has recently been
development and promoted by the public sector. The CEDS advocates continuing these
marketing strategies with external marketing messages that target the following
industries:

   •   Value-Added Logistics and Distribution Centers
   •   Data, Information and Telecommunications Operations
   •   Healthcare Industries (both Support and Products)
   •   Tourism Operators & Property Developers
   •   Pharmaceuticals
   •   Light Manufacturing
   •   River-Oriented/Port Development
   •   Site Relocation Consultants and Professional Service Companies

Communications for these audiences should be designed to support a standard
business-to-business sales program. Of necessity, this program must accommodate:



________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                         Page 102
Diverse decision-making groups which typically are involved in a prospect’s relocation
choice. In addition to the CEO, decision-makers may include a financial representative,
a human resources representative, an operations representative, and various
consultants. Each of these people has different criteria upon which they will make their
recommendations for new offices. Marketing tools need to be cognizant of all their
needs and address all their varied perspectives.

Industry-specific information: Each business will require specific information to support
its relocation decision. This is an area in which existing industry partners are a
tremendous asset.

A long sales process: The average relocation sales period is between 18 months and
three years. During that time many varied contacts of different kinds will occur, making
an accurate prospect tracking system essential for a successful sales program.

Requirement for personal selling: While there is a national trend to make as much
information available by electronic and direct marketing media as possible, eventually a
personal presentation of some sort is required. Trained project managers are able to
organize the business and government leaders of a community in order to facilitate a
smooth presentation highlighting a community’s assets.

Tourism is a unique economic engine in a community. While promoting a region’s
historic, environmental and entertainment assets to tour operators and property
developers is a business-to-business function, it should not be confused with destination
marketing to tourists which is very much a retail function. Because retail marketing is
radically different, it is typically not handled by an economic development organization
but rather through tourism development councils. This is not to say there cannot be
support or some promotional tie-ins, but the media and positioning require different
sales process.

6.2 DEVELOP AN INTERNAL MARKETING AND COMMUNICATION
PROGRAM

Continue to develop Image/Brand for CCIA that prepares internal audiences for external
marketing to follow.

As a result of the 2001 CEDS effort, Camden County recently spent a great deal of time,
money and effort developing an identity campaign. A logo and a slogan feature the
message, “Making it Better, Together.”

Ostensibly, the campaign was designed to build a cooperative spirit within the
community as witness the campaign’s positioning statement: Working together the
Board of Freeholders has and will continue to improve the quality of life for county
residents and businesses.

It is recommended that the CCIA continue to build on this theme, rather than incur new
expense and confuse the marketplace with a new message. Building on the theme will
also reinforce the unity that the county government is seeking to develop.

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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                         Page 103
The following recommendations are offered for developing both the internal and
external economic development marketing program:

Promote New Brownfield Center. The County’s new Brownfield Center needs to be
promoted to existing businesses who need the technical and funding support to bring
these sites back into productive use.

Develop GIS Developable Sites Inventory. An inventory of existing “shovel ready”
and developable sites is needed to make investment opportunities in the County as easy
to find as possible for prospective investors.

Continue to promote the county’s logo with an Improvement Authority Tagline as
follows:




                                Improvement Authority
                              Making Business Better, Together




Develop Identity Tools. At a minimum, the following tools are needed:

Identity Brochure: Currently the CCIA produces a promotional brochure describing the
lifestyle and business advantages of Camden County. The brochures costs are
underwritten by advertisers, who have their ads throughout the piece. While this is a
helpful marketing tool, a small, non-commercial identity brochure that describes only
CCIA is also essential. CCIA’s current identity brochure should be updated to be
consistent with the successful County “Making It Better” campaign. An information
description of the CCIA and the services it provides should be distributed throughout the
community to help others identify how the authority can help them and how they can
play an active part in programs.

Identity Pocketfolder: This simple device will organize the assorted printed or written
materials the authority produces while continuing to reinforce identity.

Website: Without question the CCIA needs control over its own website. Ideally, it
should be accessible through the county’s website via direct link. This would reinforce
the identity tie-in, but would accommodate the CCIA’s need to manage the content. A
good example of this relationship can be seen on the City of San Mateo web link to their
economic development website (www.cityofsanmateo.org) The need for interactive
marketing and constant changes to the data offered on the site will drive the


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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                         Page 104
requirement for stand-alone control. This issue is addressed more thoroughly later,
during the external marketing discussion.

Define economic development messages to various internal audiences.

The CCIA functions in a wide variety of roles to assist organizations to achieve their
visions. This variety can create confusion as to exactly what the organization does. It is
important the CCIA staff review all the different groups in its internal audience and
decide exactly what identity messages are key to each one. By asking, “Exactly how is
CCIA “Making It Better?”, different answers may emerge for each internal audience.
Consider the applications this question might have for business retention and expansion.

Additionally, there is a very real need to promote the TEAM CAMDEN COUNTY concept.
This creates an ideal opportunity for the CCIA to play to the county’s original message:
“Making it Better, Together.”

Expand the Current Public Education Program.

When it comes to community communication, there is no substitute for showing up in
person and taking part in joint events and programs. No marketing tools will replace
personal involvement. A regular visitation schedule to make contact with all internal
audiences should be part of the communications program. Other ways to increase
public awareness about the CCIA might include:

   •   Public speaking & presentations
   •   Media relations – news releases, editorial articles
   •   Strategic planning technical assistance seminars
   •   Annual economic development summits

Implement local communications and promotions designed to build awareness of
ED services, deliver value to stakeholders

Newsletters or Bulletins: Regular publication and web-postings of accomplishments,
events and programs that the CCIA creates keep internal audiences aware and involved.

Continue the Annual Economic Summit.      The CCIA can increase local/regional
recognition by using this event to promote development, redevelopment and the
services of the CCIA in these matters.)

Health Care Forum. Local industry gatherings which focus on one target industry sector
make opportunities to involve sector representatives in economic development. By
explaining the benefits of cluster growth to its business leadership, Williamson County,
Tennessee has successfully deployed their existing healthcare sector to recruit new
companies to their region. The same strategy can work for Camden County.

Real Estate & Financial Industry Breakfast Meetings. The CCIA should resurrect its old
strategy of holding informal meetings with brokers and financial representatives.
Industry representatives have changed and they need to hear the new (and improved)


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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                          Page 105
messages. Also, their participation in marketing programs, such as website property
listings, will become essential. Frequent, short meetings with targeted messages are an
important communication vehicle.

Annual Economic Awards Dinner (47th Annual) – County recognizes businesses for their
excellence. This is a forum that provide great visibility for the County’s efforts and
should continue as a premier marketing venue.

Demonstrate return-on-investment created by CCIA thereby building confidence,
trust and program support

Out of necessity, the CCIA will eventually need to seek the investment of other
organizations to support a proactive economic development marketing campaign. But
before this support can be requested, an atmosphere of accountability based on
measurable results must be created. Begin to demonstrate this through:

Produce An Annual Report: Set your own metrics. Demonstrate the amount of public
financing created, the jobs created, the businesses retained, the office space filled and
the programs completed. This need not be an expensive undertaking, but it should be
accompanied by easily understood charts and graphs.

Seek to Regain County Investment: The county’s financial support is an important
signal to other organizations. Without their financial commitment it will be more difficult
to seek other investment sources for CCIA marketing programs.

External Goal: Develop A Marketing Program to Attract Target Industries

Business attraction is the most expensive and demanding part of economic
development. It requires entrepreneurial sales and marketing skills quite separate from
the service and attention typical of business retention and expansion. For this reason,
private sector alliances are both appropriate and valuable. The involvement of private
sector can contribute:

   •   Best marketing practices
   •   Industry Information
   •   Critical Testimonials
   •   Resources
   •   Financial Partnership

In order to develop a professional sales program, the County must continue to build its
market research capability and its prospect tracking system.

Expanding Market Research Capability: to locate and build accurate databases of
prospects. Company names and contact information can be had a number of ways:

   •   List purchase from professional research house
   •   Web-based industry research
   •   Industry organizations


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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                          Page 106
   •   Publication subscription lists
   •   Trade shows & expositions
   •   Inquiries from state offices
   •   A research capability also allows the ED project manager to stay current with the
       issues and concerns that are facing target industries.

Maintaining a Good Prospect Tracking System: to assure that each prospect is
moved through the sales process with timely and appropriate attention. Software
programs, such as Microsoft Access, can be adapted to this use, although more
sophisticated (and expensive) programs are available.

Prospects typically move through a relocation sales process in distinct stages:

   •   Awareness – company or owners decide it may be time to expand or relocate.
       They begin to notice options.
   •   Interest – Company or owner starts an active search for a new location.
   •   Evaluation – Company or owner compares alternatives and develops a short list.
       A preliminary visit may occur.
   •   Final Trial – A company wants to evaluate a site under confidential
       circumstances.
   •   Selection – Company decides on its first choice and negotiates the best deal
       possible.
   •   Close – A company invests in a detailed appraisal of the site, staffing and
       operations in preparation of the new occupancy.

It is important to track prospects as they move from one stage to the other, so as to be
attentive to their needs for information and service. It is also important to be able to
eliminate “cold prospects” and “dead leads” as early as possible so that valuable energy
and resources are not expended on them. A good prospect tracking system will help
make those determinations.

The world is a big place, and narrowing down the number of prospects available to a
manageable size can be a daunting task. It is important to identify the “low-hanging
fruit.” Recognizing that most companies that relocate do so within 300 miles of their
original location can help narrow the focus. It would be practical to place greater weight
on prospects in the Northeast, Eastern Seaboard, and surrounding states.

Adapt the Camden County brand for business attraction.

A “brand” is an identity that communicates value. It consists not only of the logo and
slogan, but also the messages and reputation of a region. In a highly competitive
marketplace, Camden County, with the exception of Cherry Hill and South Jersey, has no
awareness outside New Jersey. Tying the state locator to the Camden County name
may be worthy of consideration when placing advertising outside the immediate area.

As demonstrated, the locator need not interfere with the logo or the tag line, as long as
the headline message makes the state of New Jersey address clear. Look though site
relocation magazines and you will see this is a detail often missed by myopic advertisers.


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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                          Page 107
Image and branding provide the foundation for a marketing program intended to be
focused on a limited number of target markets, but they must be equally effective for
more general-purpose county promotion and “targets of opportunity”.

Oftentimes it is the headline message, rather than the brand, that relays the “Unique
Selling Proposition” to the target audience. These headlines may be customized to
specific industry hot-buttons. For instance, the headline above would be perfect for
recruiting value-added logistics and distribution centers, but not necessarily as important
to healthcare industries. Other headlines should be developed to reflect the other target
industries.

It is at this point that it becomes very important to define Camden County’s features and
resulting benefits. This exercise should be done by industry so as to identify the most
important benefit that can be offered to each industry.

Develop additional “branded” marketing tools which define and demonstrate the
benefits of Camden County in a meaningful way to targeted prospects.

As part of the relocation sales process, marketing tools should be developed to support
each stage and increase the chances of a successful close.




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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                          Page 108
                 Marketing Tools Which Address The Sales Process

    Stage in Decision               Communication Tool                 Marketing Goal

                                          Required

Awareness – company or         • Direct Marketing                Gain the attention of
owners decide it may be        • Direct Response Ads             potential prospects and
time to expand or relocate.    • Referrals from local            elicit a request for more
They begin to notice             clusters                        information
options.                       • Trade show




Interest – Company or • Website                                  Provide          engaging
owner starts an active • Direct response general                 information and encourage
search for a new location.   info brochure                       personal contact
                           • Telemarketing follow-up
                           • PowerPoint E-mail

Evaluation – Company or • Executive                 response     Develop      a      working
owner               compares      package including:             relationship    with    the
alternatives and develops a       -- Area video                  prospect      and      gain
short list. A preliminary visit   -- Demographic Data            credibility as an ideal
may occur.                        -- Industry Information        community
                                • Private tour of area
                                •
Final Trial – A company • Detailed tour to establish             Convince the prospect that
wants to evaluate a site          community connections          this community offers the
under confidential              • Customized information         most    advantages     for
circumstances                     on incentives                  business success
                                •
Selection      –    Company • Invitation          to      join   Make the prospect feel
decides on its first choice       community        by     key    comfortable       with        his
and negotiates the best           leaders                        decision      and      facilitate
deal possible.                  • Finalization of incentive      bringing it to reality
                                  package
                                • Regulatory assistance

Close – A company invests • Relocation      planning             Convert new arrival into a
in a detailed appraisal of  assistance                           testimonial to relocation
the site, staffing and • Local public relations                  success, and document
operations in preparation • Monitor transition into              process for ED stakeholers
for the move.               community




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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                                Page 109
Develop printed sales tools

“Branded” stationery and pocketfolder – This will be produced as part of the internal
marketing recommendation.

Direct response general information brochure – The CCIA already produces this
brochure/magazine. While it would be better if it were not an advertising piece, it does
the job of making a county introduction. Eventually, this format should be changed to
create more of a “lure” brochure. In the meantime, a wrap should be designed to go
around the current brochure, tying it in to new branding of the county and CCIA.

Printed components of executive response package – Identity graphics can be produced
that can be run off of a standard office color printer (as opposed to the expense outside
printing.) These will include report covers and labels, industry reports with charts and
graphs, as well as assorted target-industry profiles of Camden County’s demographic
data.

Develop direct marketing tools

E-mail broadcast – Assuming an accurate list of E-mail names and addresses can be
acquired, attractive and engaging letters can be sent at very low cost to prospects. A
word of caution however, many people find this contact intrusive unless they have
somehow indicated that they are willing to receive the communication. E-mail direct
marketing works well as follow-ups to trade show appearances or to members of
industry organizations where some prior association can be established.

Direct mail – Direct mail is the marketer’s opportunity to experiment. Clear, provocative
messages work best. Colorful large postcards can be as effective as more complicated
letters. The key lies in saying something that gets your prospect’s attention, and saying
it repeatedly.

Repetition is very important in direct mail marketing. Assuming the mailing list is good
to begin with, a qualified prospect may receive 3-4 mailings before responding.
Quarterly mailings with themed messages yield best results.

Telemarketing follow up – Depending on your resources, there are two ways to use
telemarketing.
-- As a follow up to every mail contact you send (which requires that you have highly-
qualified lists) or,
-- As a follow up to only the responses your direct mail generates (using a less qualified
list, this would imply that only interested prospects took the trouble to respond).

Naturally, the more personal calling, the better the success rate. Most EDOs, unless
they have purchased highly qualified (and expensive) prospect lists, are only able to
follow-up with direct requests for information. The leads may come from the website or
other direct referrals. Immediate attention is essential for success. If you have not


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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                          Page 110
responded to a request for information within 2 weeks, your chances of developing the
relationship further are greatly diminished.

PowerPoint E-mail Presentations – Extensive demographic and industry specific
information is created over the course of developing a relocation prospect. This can be
put to good use in the creation of short, industry-specific sales presentations created on
Microsoft PowerPoint. The content should demonstrate clear features, and present
graphics that emphasize the benefits. These PowerPoint presentations are useful during
both the “Interest” and the “Evaluation” stages of sales development. Each target
industry show should be ready to go, with simple customization features.

It cannot be stated emphatically enough, follow-up is the most critical ingredient for
success in direct marketing. A prospect’s contact to you through E-mail, mail or
telephone is made with an implicit expectation of immediate response. This also holds
true for trade show contacts and those responding to your website. If an EDO does not
follow-up in a timely manner, their credibility as a reliable organization is severely
compromised. This means that when developing Camden County’s prospect tracking
system, emphasis must be placed on the timely continuity of contact. This can be
achieved using in-house or contract professionals who are experienced in these matters.
It is better to have fewer prospects, well-managed than a multitude of prospects with
random contact.

Use tradeshow marketing to build prospect lists

Having the good fortune to be in such close proximity to large metropolitan areas such
as Philadelphia, Washington DC, Baltimore and New York, CCIA marketing reps have a
wonderful opportunity to visit and participate in target industry tradeshows. Even by
simply attending, these shows can afford the CCIA a forum in which to learn more about
their target industries and gain valuable contact lists.

Participation in such trade shows need not be complicated. At the more important
shows, state economic development organizations often have already made space
arrangements that can be shared. A modest, flexible display provides a backdrop for
meeting prospects. However, keep in mind that trade shows are only as good as your
follow-up.

Electronic directories of trade show events are an excellent resource for researching the
best shows at which to find your target industry. Each of the directories below contain a
database search engine that will assist your research. You can search on industry,
geographical area, or dates. Many listings will provide information necessary to contact
the show producer for obtaining more specific information (such as lists.)

www.TradeShowCentral.com

The largest and most complete of the directories with over 10000 events in electronic
format.

www.EXPOguide.com


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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                          Page 111
A directory of over 6000 trade shows, conferences and exhibitions

www.TechWeb.com
The Computer Events Directory is now part of TechWeb, a technology supersite which
focuses on computers, communications and technology events.

www.TradeShowNewsNetwork.com
A new, strictly industrial trade show web site.

Seek appropriate advertising opportunities

Unless a significant budget can be allocated to print advertising, this medium is largely
wasted. Print advertising requires repetition to yield results. The location advertising in
site selection and economic development publications is already very cluttered. To be
noticed, ads need to be large and attractive. Typically, only site relocation consultants
(and other economic developers) actually read the ads with any regularity.

Useful places for ads will include:

       -- In local papers to announce successful projects

       -- In tradeshow publications to draw prospects to the booth

       -- In state or regional overview publications

Develop a marketing website

Good marketing websites are works in progress. The navigation should be planned with
the end in mind, although it may be a long time until the full operating plan of the site is
implemented. Websites are usually built in phases as time and money allow. The
advance organizational plan (or navigation) of the site allows for new features to be
added without having to dismantle earlier information.

The following outline provides features that CCIA should consider for their site:

   •   Services and programs
   •   Applications and research requests: all easily submitted online
   •   General area information: link back to Camden County website

Facilities/property inventory: In most states, 60 to 70 percent of the initial inquiries
to the state economic development office are searches for an existing building. While
many companies will eventually construct new facilities, potential prospects appreciate
being able to check listings of availabilities first. Many EDOs across America are now
organizing their real estate brokers and developers to list their available property options
on their websites. By entering specific criteria, a prospect is able to call up listings of all
sites that meet his requirements. By creating a feature that allows those listing the
property to go online and update or change information (only on their listings) the
information stays fresh and requires little organizational maintenance.


________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                              Page 112
GIS Information: Camden County is fortunate enough to have GIS mapping as part
of their planning resources. GIS allows for the creation of complex projections and
community profiles – everything from traffic patterns along specific transportation
corridors at peak hours, to population densities resulting from different build-out
scenarios. It would be very fortunate indeed, if a means could be devised by which this
information could be accessible on the CCIA’s website.

Valuable GIS map options would include:
       -- Zoning
       -- Property inventory (demonstrating developable plots and their proximity
to one another)
       -- Population (by age, education, nationality, income)
       -- Technology corridors
       -- Business & Industry corridors (healthcare, distribution, etc.)
       -- Tourism corridors
       -- Parks & recreation

Photo tour of Camden County’s business districts: Compressed files make video
streaming more accessible than ever. Alternatively, 360 degree photographs allow a
visitor to stand in the center of an important hub and scroll in all directions.

Contact/ordering information:    Offer prospects the opportunity to order any of the
CCIA’s communication tools.

As already stated, the maintenance and potential complexity of the website make it a
good candidate for standing separate from – but linked to -- the county. A better name
would aid seekers to find the web address. Anticipating this, the CCIA has already
reserved www.SouthJerseySites.com

Goal: Positioning Camden as the “CyberCounty”

Based on the County’s extensive, high quality and continually improving
telecommunications infrastructure, and the fact that a Cyberdistrict is already under
study in the County, it has been suggested that Camden County has the opportunity to
position itself as New Jersey’s first CyberCounty.

Several cautions go along with the choice to pursue this positioning:

1. An organized council of Hi-Tech companies needs to form the core of the business
attraction effort. Their industry knowledge will drive the prospecting effort.

2. Local educational institutions must gear up to serve this sector.

3. Marketing and promotional tools need to be reflective of a“CyberCounty”. This would
certainly include sophisticated web-based marketing, CDs and other marketing
technology.



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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                        Page 113
The process of laying claim to a marketing niche such as this requires deep community
commitment to succeed. The creative adaptations of the brand can be easily
accomplished once the commitment and infrastructure are in place.

Goal: Support Tourism Marketing Efforts

Camden County already has sophisticated private sector tourism marketing organizations
in its community. Organizations such as the Camden Waterfront Marketing Bureau are
on the forefront of industry activity. These organizations can provide:

       --    Business leads for new tourism projects or entertainment venues
       --     Direction on where these projects might best succeed and under
what circumstances
       --     Opportunities for joint marketing
       --     Attention to economic development issues which affect the tourism
             industry

One issue that has posed a problem for Camden County’s tourism marketing is lack of
any revenue, such as a hotel/motel tax to support the county’s marketing efforts. This
circumstance has led to missed promotional opportunities in the past, in particular the
absence of South Jersey publicity at the new Independence Visitor’s Center in
Philadelphia.

E.     Responsibilities

       Based on the preceding marketing plan, the CCIA would need the following
personnel:

1. Marketing project manager

2. Retention project manager

3. Communications director with technology skills

4. Research and database manager

        In addition, a marketing firm might be required to produce some of the tools
outlined in the plan.




________________________________________________________________________
Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                        Page 114
F.     Marketing Budget & Funding

       i. The Budget: The following are rough estimates for a suggested annual

budget for the marketing program that has been outlined in the preceding pages:



Identity Definition, New Stationery CCIA Identity Brochure                          3,000

Website – Phase One: Creation of Initial Navigation & Design                      10,000

Website - Phase Two: Creation of GIS mapping and Facilities/
Property Inventory                                                            15 - 30,000

Newsletters, Annual Reports                                                     3 - 4,000

Events (Annual Summit, etc.)                                                      10,000

Prospect Tracking System Set-Up                                                     3,000

List Acquisition and Database Development                                         10,000

Assorted Design, Copywriting & Research Assistance
for other General Marketing Projects Itemized in this Plan                    30 - 40,000

Tradeshow Display & Selected Attendance at Regional Shows                     15 - 20,000

Advertising                                                                         5,000

Direct Marketing & Postage                                                    20 - 30,000

Minimum Estimated Budget for Marketing:                                   $115 - 165,000
(Not including Staff & Overhead)


For additional consideration: A budget for consultants and/or workshops for the
development of a public/private partnership to fund the above-mentioned marketing
activities.

Funding

Embracing a marketing program is not an inexpensive decision. Funding of such
programs is often difficult to justify using only public tax dollars. Therefore, it is not
uncommon to see the requisite investment found through the assistance of the private
sector. A vehicle for doing this does not now exist in Camden County, but the
opportunity to so may be at hand.

In Part B–i of this Section we discussed the importance of communicating with your
internal audiences and the six key ways they could assist your program. In Part C – vii

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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                          Page 115
we discussed the importance of demonstrating the return-on-investment of economic
development to these internal groups. Finally, in Part D we discussed how business
attraction requires entrepreneurial sales and marketing skills most commonly found in
the private sector. The conclusion was that private sector alliances are able to contribute
not only best marketing practices, but also the financial resources for marketing.
The reasons for this are obvious. It is through marketing that the private sector realizes
the most immediate benefits:

   •   Property will be developed
   •   Existing offices will be filled
   •   Appropriate workforce will be developed
   •   Industry sector vendors and customers will be attracted
   •   Investors will gain confidence in the region

If there is an organizational structure that assures private dollars will indeed be used for
designated marketing promotions (not salaries or overhead), and if it provides
measurement and accountability, many businesses feel economic development is
definitely worth their investment. Please note: the 3 success factors are underlined.
Public/private partnerships are most often formed with the assistance of an outside
facilitator who has no vested interest in either group. During the agreement process
mutual trust and goals must be established. Investment levels and their initial
promotion within a community must be advocated and championed by both groups,
although sometimes it is more practical to have a professional fundraising organization
handle the set-up.

The resulting entity truly is a TEAM CAMDEN COUNTY. It may be formed within the
existing CCIA, or as an “affiliate council” with its own board, but the important thing is
that it is composed of representative stakeholders who share a mutual economic
development marketing goal.




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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                           Page 116
                                   SECTION VII
                      CONCLUSION AND SUMMARY

This Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy is a significant revision of the 2002
document. As noted in Section V, an additional 49 project concepts have been added.
A new vision statement and a number of new and revised goals and objectives have
been included.

The County has set its priorities with the full cooperation and involvement of the CEDS
Committee, members of the public and community stakeholders. From this interaction,
eight (8) project concepts have been identified for implementation over the short term
and the remaining 55 projects will continue to be part of a longer-term agenda.

7.1 Implementation and Evaluation

The project matrix outlined in Section VI of the CEDS defines some of the key funding
sources, programs, and partners that may be engaged to implement this comprehensive
economic development agenda.

The CEDS Committee will remain in place to assist and guide the County in the
implementation of this program. The CEDS Committee will meet regularly – on a semi-
annual basis – to review the document and assess progress.

This will provide the County with an opportunity to revise and update the CEDS as
needed. There may be a need to reorganize priorities. New funding opportunities may
develop. Projects that are listed as current priorities may become impractical. New
projects may arise that the Committee feels should be included.

The point is that the CEDS Plan is a living document. It is not a document that should
be placed on the shelf and forgotten. It is a constant reference that can help the
County and its member communities sort through projects and revise the
implementation agenda. Because the document is so comprehensive, it will also be
extremely useful when demonstrating to Federal, State or other funding agencies, the
relationship of individual projects and programs to the County’s comprehensive
economic development agenda.

7.2 Next Steps

Upon adoption, this document will be the official Economic Development Strategy for
Camden County. The County will begin immediately to seek funding and program
support for the implementation of its eight (8) priority projects.

The County will also establish a formal calendar for meetings with the CEDS Committee
and review the protocol for reviewing and evaluating the document. It is envisioned
that the CEDS Committee will establish various evaluation criteria from which the


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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                       Page 117
successful implementation of the CEDS Plan will be measured.         These criteria may
include such things as:

   •   Successful Project Implementation
   •   Economic Indicators both Countywide and in Targeted Distressed Areas. These
       indicators can and should include updated median incomes and unemployment
       rates since these are the principal indicators of distress that are established by
       the U.S. EDA.
   •   Marketing and Promotional Efforts to heighten awareness of the County
   •   The integration of ideas and concepts stemming from the Annual Economic
       Summit hosted by the County
   •   New business and redevelopment activity measured countywide
   •   Economic Development Funding that is attracted to the County for CEDS
       projects.

These are exciting times for Camden County. The agenda outlined in this CEDS is an
aggressive and extremely comprehensive one. Success will depend on the continued
collaboration of County and municipal government, stakeholders and community
partners. With success, the County should remain one of the leading communities in
the State and region and an economic engine for future growth and development.




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Camden County CEDS, 2007                                                         Page 118
                              Appendix 1
         Camden County CEDS - Civic Engagement Process Summary


The 2007 Camden County CEDS development civic engagement process included four
elements: (1) the CEDS Committee, (2) two “plan development” public hearings, (3) a “draft
plan” public hearing and (4) web-based engagement. Together, these four elements
generated a diversity of opinions on the CEDS and provided several opportunities for public
input. In addition, the Camden County Board of Freeholders conducted public hearing at
their November 15th meeting at which the public was provided an opportunity to comment
on the plan. Throughout the process, the CCIA’s web site contained information on the
CEDS process.

CEDS Committee
Two Steering Committee meetings were conducted; June 27th and July 25th. The meetings
were facilitated by staff from the Camden County Improvement Authority and the consulting
team. The Committee (see listing in Appendix) included a diverse number of individuals
representing a number of key constituencies with relationships to the economic agenda of
the county. An agenda for both meetings was prepared and distributed in advance to all
members along with relevant reference materials.

At the June 27th meeting, the agenda included: a discussion of the CEDS process, an
overview of the Committee’s tasks, and elements and priorities from the 2004 CEDS Plan. A
principal focus of the meeting was the review of the 2004 CEDS and the discussion of the
relevancy of these items in the 2007 report. In addition the Committee was given a
questionnaire to solicit their opinions on the future of Camden County, its economy and
economic outlook. The outcome was a fresh list of potential priorities and projects relating
to these priorities which would be organized and presented at the July 25th meeting and a
revised mission statement.

On July 25th, the agenda included a review of the June 27th meeting, a presentation from
USEDA representative Calvin Edghill, a review of 2007 CEDS goals and objectives, a
discussion of a proposed project inventory and a discussion of a civic engagement strategy.
The meeting produced a preliminary summary of Committee priorities, goals and objectives
that would be tested and extended through the “plan development” by the public.

Plan Development Hearings
The two “plan development hearings” were held in geographically balanced locations chosen
because of their federal designation as US Department of Commerce and EDA eligible
communities. Hearings were conducted in Lindenwold on August 28th and in Camden on
August 29th. Their location facilitated access from diverse parts of the county.

A press release was prepared and issued announcing the forums. Articles announcing the
forums were published in the August 23rd edition of the Record-Breeze and August 27th
edition of the Courier-Post. In addition, the Camden County Improvement Authority issued a
blast email announcement to a data base of approximately 35,000 individuals.




                                             1
As a means to orient the public, a Power Point presentation was made at the beginning of
each session outlining: (1) the nature and purpose of CEDS, (2) the structure of the CEDS
development process, and (3) the draft goals of the CEDS Steering Committee. The
consulting staff then facilitated a question and answer period with an emphasis on soliciting
the public’s input.

Draft Plan Hearing

On September 17th a public hearing was conducted in Camden on the draft CEDS Plan. A
Power Point presentation was used to convey the background and contents of the plan. The
presentation showed the public the progression of: (1) the original draft goals of the
Steering Committee, (2) more than 50 specific projects which formed the CEDS ‘Action
Agenda,” and (3) the top 8 strategic projects. The public was then provided an opportunity
to comment on the draft plan.

Final Review: CEDS Committee
The final CEDS plan was circulated to the Committee on November 1st. This provided the
Committee with an opportunity to review the plan in final form and make any final
comments.

Public Notice: Public Hearing & Comment Period on Final CEDS Plan
On November XX a legal notice was published in the Philadelphia Inquirer informing the
public of a hearing on the final CEDS plan to be conducted at the November 15th meeting of
the Camden County Board of Freeholders. The notice listed the availability of the final CEDS
plan for review on the CCIA web site and the ability to forward comments via email or
through traditional means to the CCIA.

At the November 15th Freeholder meeting the hearing was conducted and testimony was
received on the final plan.

Federal Review: Final Plan
During this final review period, the CEDS Committee Chairman, Rev. Floyd White and CCIA
Executive Director Jeffrey Swartz conducted a meeting with USEDA official Calvin Edghill to
review the final draft.

Adoption: Camden County Board of Freeholders
At their public meeting on December 20 the Freeholders adopted a resolution approving the
CEDS plan and authorizing submission to the USEDA. The meeting was advertised in
advance and the public was provided an opportunity to comment on the proposed actions of
the Freeholders.

Civic Engagement via Web
The 2002 CEDS plan has been available on the CCIA web site since its adoption. An
Executive Summary of the draft CEDS plan was posted on the CCIA web site on September
21, 2007 with directions on how to email comments to the CCIA. The final draft plan was
posted on the CCIA web site for comment on November XX consistent with the publishing of
the public notice of the availability of the plan for public comment. The posting included




                                             2
directions for forwarding comments. The adopted CEDS plan will be posted on the CCIA
web site for ongoing reference.

The membership of the 2007 CEDS Committee and notice of all public hearings was listed
on the CCIA web site throughout the CEDS development process.

Minutes of CEDS Meetings

Attached to this narrative are minutes from the CEDS Committee and Public Meetings that
were held throughout the course of the planning process.




                                          3
                        Camden County CEDS Committee
                        Minutes from June 27, 2007 Meeting

A meeting of the Camden County CEDS Committee was held on Wednesday, June 27,
2007 at 12:00 noon at the offices of the Camden County Improvement Authority. The
following committee members were in attendance: Ken Long, Damiano Long/Schoor
DePalma; Anthony Ng; Latin American Economic Development Association; Fred
Berlinsky, Markeim-Chalmers, Inc.; Curt Jenkins, Camden City Council/Laborer’s Local
222; Bill Mink, Camden County College; Judi London, SJ Tourism Corp.; Leona Tanker,
Camden County Workforce Investment Board; Rev. Floyd White, Woodland
Development Corp.; Ed Fox, CCIA.

In addition, Jeffrey Swartz, CEO and Director of the CCIA was present, as were the
consultant team of Michael Zumpino and Stephen Kehs from Triad Associates; Louis
Bezich from Public Solutions, Inc.; and Philip Rowan from Economic Development
Associates. Triad will be coordinating the CEDS update. Public Solutions will handle
much of the outreach and consensus building process, and Economic Development
Associates will assist with project identification and plan implementation.

A questionnaire was circulated among the task force members (and subsequently e-
mailed to members) which asked some general questions about the future of Camden
County, its economy, and economic outlook.

After a brief overview of the CEDS background and process, the committee focused on
the vision statement in the current (2001) CEDS document and ways it could be
improved. The committee also began identifying specific projects and strategies that
should be included in the CEDS update. The following is a summary of that discussion.

Issues/Projects

   •   There have been a number of new plans completed since the 2001 CEDS
       Document was prepared. Ed Fox, County Planning Director is the contact to get
       an inventory of these plans;
   •   The County has grown as an important logistics center since the 2001 CEDS Plan
       was prepared;
   •   The CEDS Plan update must focus not only on new opportunities, but also on the
       redevelopment of key commercial corridors such as the White Horse Pike;
   •   The time horizon for the new CEDS should be 2015;
   •   Ed Fox has inventories of brownfield and grayfield properties;
   •   There needs to be a “repositioning” of many of the County’s retail properties and
       shopping destinations;
   •   The new CEDS needs to be based on Smart Growth principles, around “centers of
       place” in conjunction with the State Development & Redevelopment Plan;
   •   With development of “The River Line” there are more opportunities today to
       create Transit Oriented Developments, T.O.D.’s;
•   The costs of redevelopment must be shared with the public sector. There needs to
    be more emphasis placed on the creation of public/private partnerships that take
    some of the costs, tax burdens, and other hardships off the developer;
•   Information about public education and educational and training opportunities is
    integral to building a cohesive vision of the County;
•   Partnerships with non-profit organizations also need to be identified and pursued;
•   Creating liveable and walkable neighborhoods and good places to live are all
    critical to developing and maintaining a sustainable county economy;
•   There is too much government-owned and non-profit owned land on the books.
    We need to find ways to get some of that unused land into the hands of developers
    and the private sector to make it taxable and to identify new development
    opportunities;
•   There is a need to significantly bolster tourism’s impact on the County economy
    and to address ways that the tourism industry can help to expand economic and
    job opportunities. Ideas for promoting tourism included:
         o Ways to retain leisure dollars in the County
         o Creating destinations in the County such as Haddonfield
         o Finding ways to use the hotel tax revenue for tourism-related promotion
         o New infrastructure for signage and directional support
•   There is a disconnect between employment opportunities and the skill base of
    residents in some areas of the County, (eg. Camden City);
•   Providing new workforce development training programs to provide new skills to
    County residents must be a critical component of the CEDS. For example, there
    are career opportunities in the County’s food service and hospitality industries
    that are not being met;
•   The CEDS also needs to look at sustainable energy issues and issues of energy
    conservation and independence;
•   The impact of aging baby boomers will be critical to the future of Camden County
    and the economy, particularly in areas such as
         o Housing
         o Services
         o Transit
         o Senior Workforce development
•   There are also lifestyle changes that seem to point to a move back to urban areas
    from the suburban population centers that will be factors in the economy;
•   The approval process for new construction projects is an impediment to getting
    things done. By the time the project is approved, market conditions have often
    changed radically. The development approval process must be made more
    efficient;
•   There is a need to develop capacity among municipal and civic organizations to
    support the vision and implementation of the CEDS Plan;
•   The future of Camden City must be included in the vision for the County CEDS.
    A stable city means a stable region.
•   Water and sewer infrastructure is critical. Extensions as well as rehabilitation of
    existing systems are important.
   •   Tie the CEDS update into the County Master Planning and Smart Growth
       planning efforts;
   •   Marketing the County must match the inventory of available sites and
       opportunities.

Jeff Swartz indicated that he would like to see the document revision completed by
September 21, 2007 in time for the annual Tri-County Economic Summit involving
Camden, Gloucester, and Burlington Counties.

The next meeting of the CEDS Committee will be scheduled for late July at a time and
place to be named. Mr. Swartz indicated that he would like to move the meeting
locations around to various spots in the County.

Committee members were asked to complete their questionnaires and return them to Jeff
Swartz’s office and to review the SWOT analysis for the next meeting.

There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at approximately 1:45 pm.

Post Meeting Follow up

Based on the discussion at the meeting, staff at Triad Associates was asked to draft a
revised vision statement for the CEDS.

Note: We have attempted to condense the two pages of vision text from the 2001 CEDS
Plan into a more concise and workable statement, as follows:


                              Revised Vision Statement
                          Camden County CEDS Update, 2007

Camden County envisions a diverse and sustainable economy that includes a wide range
of jobs for its citizens; cutting edge technology and 21st century infrastructure; a growing
and increasingly prominent role for tourism; the revitalization of downtowns,
brownfields and other underutilized commercial areas; and health-care, logistics,
telecommunications and other business development that takes advantage of the County’s
outstanding strategic location.

County officials recognize that this means adapting to new lifestyles and trends;
engaging the educational and workforce development communities to meet the needs of a
changing economy; developing public-private partnerships that enhance opportunities
for new business; and working toward the implementation of Smart Growth principles
that limit adverse impacts of development and support a good quality of life for all the
County’s citizens.
                         Camden County CEDS Committee
                         Minutes from July 25, 2007 Meeting

A meeting of the Camden County CEDS Committee was held on Wednesday, June 25,
2007 at 12:00 noon at the Camden County College’s William G. Rohrer Campus. The
following persons were in attendance: Bill Mink, Leona Tanker, Rev. Floyd White, Jeff
Swartz, Ed Fox, Sandi Kelly, Fred Berlinksy, and Calvin Edgehill from U.S. EDA.

In addition, Michael Zumpino, Carolyn Brown and Steve Kehs were present from Triad
Associates, as were Louis Bezich from Public Solutions, Inc. and Phil Rowan from
Economic Development Associates. This is the consultant team that is assisting with the
CEDS.

Jeff Swartz and Mike Zumpino began the meeting by providing an update on the CEDS
process and the additional work that had transpired since the previous meeting. The
Committee reviewed and discussed a revised Vision Statement.

Jeff Swartz then introduced Calvin Edgehill who made a presentation on the CEDS
process, outlining EDA guidelines and expectations. A discussion ensued about possible
projects that might be priorities for Camden County. Mr. Edgehill indicated that EDA
was focusing a lot of attention on telecommunications and entrepreneurial services.
Louis Bezich mentioned the possibility that the Center for Civic Leadership that is being
proposed by the County College might be a possible project. Mr. Edgehill expressed
enthusiasm for this proposal.

There was also discussion about the Campbell’s Soup Industrial Campus in Camden City.
A question was raised about whether Camden City would need to assemble its own
CEDS in order to qualify for EDA funding. Calvin pointed out that EDA has funded
projects in Camden City recently, based on the justification provided by municipal and
other plans. He did not state positively that the City would need its own CEDS. Jeff
Swartz pointed out that there is considerable background information on the City as part
of the County CEDS; that a representative from the City sits on the CEDS Committee;
and that there will be specific projects for the City included in the County document.

The meeting then moved on to discuss public outreach. It was suggested that the County
sponsor two public meetings – possibly in Camden City and Lindenwald – to solicit input
on the CEDS. Jeff Swartz said that both communities are EDA eligible and that these
would be good locations. He will work with his staff and Lou Bezich to get these
meetings set and advertised.

The next steps will involve assembling materials for the public meetings and getting
information up on the County’s website. Mr. Swartz reiterated the target date of
September 21 as the date of the Tri-County Economic Summit – a meeting that provides
the County with another forum for publicizing the CEDS and the County’s economic
development strategy.
Phil Rowan asked that CEDS Committee members continue to pull together ideas for
economic development projects. Mr. Rowan reviewed an inventory of projects that had
been compiled to date from the existing (2002) CEDS and the suggestions of committee
members and the community. He indicated that the public meetings would offer another
chance to expand on the project list and suggestions for Strategy development.

There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at approximately 2:00 pm.
               MINUTES OF A PUBLIC HEARING
    CAMDEN COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

            MUNICIPAL BUILDING – BOROUGH OF LINDENWOLD
                           AUGUST 28, 2007

The Camden County Improvement Authority, Economic Development Agent for the
County of Camden, at the direction of the Camden County Board of Chosen Freeholders
conducted the first of two Public Hearings being held to provide information regarding
the Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy and the Community Participation
and Planning Process associated with the CEDS. A second Public Hearing is scheduled
for August 29, 2007 in the City of Camden. The Lindenwold and Camden sites were
selected so as to provide reasonable access in geographically strategic locations in the
County. In conducting the two Public Hearings, the Freeholders’ objective is to
maximize Community Participation in this Economic Development Planning Process in a
manner that will be complimentary to the efforts of the Comprehensive Economic
Development Strategy Steering Committee which is presently overseeing the update of
the current CEDS (2002) document.

In preparing for the Public Hearing and in an effort to reach as many residents,
businesses, civic, community, faith based, and other organizations within the County, the
notice was published in the Courier Post newspaper. In addition, the County distributed
over 13,000 e-mail notices to residents throughout the County, apprising them of the
Public Hearings and inviting them to participate in this important planning process. The
County also included a Public Hearing Announcement on the local cable channel with the
goal of affording the maximum opportunity for all interested parties to learn more about
the CEDS Planning Process and to participate in the County’s overall proactive efforts to
set forth a blueprint for economic development opportunities over the next three to five
years.

Attached to these minutes is a copy of the sign-in sheet identifying those persons in
attendance at the Public Hearing in Lindenwold. In attendance at the hearing, in addition
to interested citizens were Mayor Frank DeLucca and Ms. Sandy Kelly, Representative
from the Camden County Freeholder Director’s Office and representatives from Triad
Associates, Public Solutions and Economic Development Associates, Consultants
working with the County and assisting in preparing the update to the 2002
Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy.

Mr. Louis Bezich, President of Public Solutions, conducted the Public Hearing and
utilized a PowerPoint presentation highlighting the CEDS Planning Process and
providing information regarding the activities of the CEDS Steering Committee to date
and the economic priorities evolving from this planning process which is underway. As
an attachment to these minutes is a copy of the PowerPoint presentation which contained
a detailed description of the purpose for the Comprehensive Economic Development
Strategic Planning Process, the County’s efforts to develop a well documented strategy
that is representative of a broad perspective of issues, as well as opportunities for
economic growth and revitalization in Camden County from a regional perspective.
Mention was made of the County’s efforts to develop a CEDS that is consistent with
CEDS guidelines as promulgated by USEDA. Included in the PowerPoint presentation,
in addition to information about the CEDS Planning Process and the Public Hearings that
are currently being held, was notification of the CEDS Steering Committee meeting
schedule and the anticipated next public meeting, at which time the final draft of the
CEDS will be presented. Information was also provided regarding the CEDS Steering
Committee’s outline of the draft strategic planning goals for consideration by the public.

Citizens at the public hearing addressed issues of concern in regard to the County’s
economic diversity, redevelopment and reinvestment opportunities:

    •   It was suggested that the County include among its economic development
        objectives, the development of a fisheries facility noting that there is sufficient
        technology in the field of aqua culture. Moreover, it was noted that there are no
        such facilities in the County, notwithstanding the fact that there is land and
        existing building along with adequate infrastructure (sewer and water) that would
        support the operations of an aqua-culture/fisheries project. It was noted that there
        could be educational enrichment programs and potentially some water related
        recreational elements built into a facility if it were of sufficient scale and capacity
        to attract interest from Rowan University, Rutgers University and others in the
        science and technology fields.

    •   It was also noted that in the area identified in the 2002 CEDS, as the first ring
        suburbs, there were a significant number of obsolete, under utilized and or vacant
        structures that represent a blighting influence on the area. However, they also
        constitute opportunities for new private investment/reinvestment and
        redevelopment consistent with the principles of smart growth, particularly in
        these first ring suburbs as well as some of the urban areas. It was noted that
        considerable effort is underway in the Route 30 corridor area through planning
        initiatives with technical and financial support from the Delaware Valley
        Regional Planning Commission. Inclusion of this project will be consistent with
        goals of the municipalities that are located along the Route 30 corridor
        commonly referred to as the White Horse Pike. Moreover, there is a strong focus
        on economic diversity in terms of reuse of properties and redevelopment of these
        older suburban/urban corridors.

    •   While there was a general consensus on the need for continued revitalization of
        our older suburban and urban areas and a positive emphasis on economic
        diversity, there were concerns expressed regarding the extent of traffic
        congestion along such corridors as the Route 30, Route 73, Route 70 corridors as
        well as other feeder roads in the area.

It was noted that a second public hearing was going to be held the City of Camden and
all were invited to attend that hearing and alert their friends and associates of the
opportunity to participate. In addition, it was noted that there would be one additional
hearing to review the final draft of the updated CEDS prior to adoption by the Board of
Chosen Freeholders.

In closing the hearing, Mr. Bezich expressed his appreciation on behalf of the Board of
Chosen Freeholders to those who took the time to attend the hearing and to participate in
the discussions.

People in attendance expressed their appreciation for the opportunity to comment and to
learn more about the program. There being no further questions, the public hearing was
called to a close at approximately 8:30 pm.


R:\Clients\Lindenwold, NJ\MINUTES OF A PUBLIC HEARING 8-28-07.doc
                 MINUTES OF A PUBLIC HEARING
                        CAMDEN COUNTY
         COMPREHENSIVE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

                 CAMDEN COUNTY COLLEGE, CAMDEN CAMPUS
                             August 29, 2007

The Camden County Improvement Authority hosted an advertised hearing on the
Camden County CEDS at the Camden City Campus of the County College at 7 pm.. The
purpose of the hearing was to solicit input from the community about the CEDS along
with ideas for projects and programs. Approximately 15 people were in attendance.

Louis Bezich introduced the program and the Director of the CCIA, Jeffrey Swartz and
the CEDS Committee Chairman Reverend Floyd White. Mr. Bezich then reviewed a
powerpoint presentation that provided an overview of the County and the CEDS process.

After the formal presentation, an opportunity was provided for questions and comments.
The following are ideas presented by members of the community in attendance.

1. There needs to be more opportunity for shopping and recreation, particularly in
Camden City and some of the older towns (eg. Pennsauken). The restaurant and
hospitality industries are key sectors of the economy where people can get jobs.

2. Public Transportation is an issue. The safety and cleanliness of public transit facilities
is a concern. There are late night security issues at the Walter Rand Transportation
Center in Camden, particularly as they relate to coordinating schedules between PATCO
and the RiverLine. Suggestions were offered about expanding the Ambassador’s
Program and finding funds to enhance a PATCO Police presence.

3. Workforce Development. There is a need to clearly identify entry level jobs in light
manufacturing and other sectors for skilled and semi-skilled people. There are many
people in Camden County who need work and there should be better publicity provided
to help link these people with training programs and job opportunities.

4. Job Training and Support. Supportive services such as childcare, life skills training
and case work counseling (eg. drug/alcohol) should be made available to people moving
through the job training programs. There is currently too much bureaucracy for the
average person to handle.

5. Gray Field Reinvestment. There should be reinvestment in many of the County’s gray
fields and underutilized commercial centers. Example: Old Pennsauken Plaza. The
Golden Triangle along Route 70 and Haddonfield Road is a prime location for
reinvestment and redevelopment.
6. Pennsauken and Camden City Waterfronts. There should be some joint regional
planning done to bring waterfront opportunities into conformity. A redesign of the
Petty’s Island Project is probably warranted.

7. Minority Contractors. There should be a more aggressive approach to providing
opportunities for minority contractors as part of any State and Federal jobs provided in
the County.

8. Low Income Opportunities. In order to keep young people in the community, there is
a need for affordable and safe housing in the City of Camden and in the County. A new
High School is needed that offers state-of-the-art educational facilities.

9. Tying Jobs Growth to Targeted Cluster Development. The largest growth in
employment in Camden County today involves 1) Hospitality and Tourism, 2) Health
Care, 3) Information Technologies, 4) Transportation and Logistics, 5) Food, and 6)
Finance. The County should try to cluster new employment growth around these key
sectors.

10. Transportation and Logistics. Transloading facilities in the County would enhance
rail to truck transfers. The DelAir Bridge needs to be reconstructed to provide shipment
on rail of double stacked container freight. A truck route through Camden City,
Pennsauken, and some of the populated areas along the river should be identified so
traffic does not infringe on residential neighborhoods.

11. Relocate the Methadone Clinic. This facility should be relocated so it does not
intimidate passengers using the Walter Rand Transit Center.

12. Human Capital. While the CEDS addresses a number of construction and physical
development initiatives, it is important that it also address human capital needs and
promotes investment in services to keep young people engaged and interested in the
community.

There being no further business or discussion, the hearing was adjourned at 8:30 pm. with
an announcement of a follow up meeting in the next couple weeks prior to the release of
the final draft of the CEDS.
                            CEDS PUBLIC HEARING
                     Executive Summary and Project Priorities
                              Camden County CEDS

                              Camden County College
                               Camden City Campus
                                September 17, 2007


A public hearing on the draft Executive Summary of the Camden County CEDS along
with project priorities identified in the CEDS was held on Monday, September 17, 2007
at 7 pm. at the Camden County College, Camden City Campus.

A powerpoint presentation was prepared. People were given the opportunity to react to
the draft Executive Summary of the CEDS and the inventory of projects, programs and
priorities identified by the CEDS Committee and the County.

There were no public comments offered at the hearing and the hearing was adjourned at
7:30 pm.
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SURVEY
    Conducted in Preparation for Camden County
 Comprehensive Economic Development Survey, CEDS




                    Sponsored by:
    The Camden County Improvement Authority




                  Facilitated by:
                 Triad Associates
             Public Solutions, Inc. and
         Economic Development Associates



                     June 2007
                                         CAMDEN COUNTY
                                 Economic Development Questionnaire


      Here are a number of questions that will provide general guidance about the direction that
    Camden County should pursue in revising the Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy,
     CEDS, for the County. There are no right or wrong answers. Please feel free to express your
                    frank opinions. Individual responses will remain confidential.


   1. If you had to guess what the economy of Camden County might look like ten years from now,
   assuming that current trends continue, what sorts of jobs and types of companies would be part of
   that economy?

   ______________________________________________________________________________________

   ______________________________________________________________________________________

   ______________________________________________________________________________________


   2. Is the above description your vision for the County? If so why? If not, what do you believe can be
   done to change it?

   ______________________________________________________________________________________

   ______________________________________________________________________________________

   ______________________________________________________________________________________


   3. Which of the following uses or characteristics do we have too much of in Camden County?
   (Choose any number of responses.)

   _____   Brownfield and Old Industrial Sites

   _____   Underused Commercial Areas and Strip Malls

   _____   Manufacturing and Light Industry

   _____   Technology, Pharmaceuticals, and Scientific Facilities

   _____   Small Businesses

   _____   Big Box Retailers

   _____   Institutional Uses (eg. schools, hospitals, government facilities)

   _____   Distressed Neighborhoods and/or Downtowns

   _____   Industrial/Business Parks and Shovel Ready Developable Sites

   _____   Other: _________________________________________________________________________




CAMDEN COUNTY CEDS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SURVEY                                                       Page 1
   4. Which of the following uses would you like to see more of in Camden County?

   _____   Parks and Preserved Open Space

   _____   New Manufacturing Companies and Light Industry

   _____   Residential Development

   _____   Big Box Retail Development

   _____   Successful Downtown Redevelopment

   _____   Institutional Uses (eg. schools, hospitals, governmental facilities)

   _____   Industrial/Business Parks and Shovel Ready Developable Sites


   5. If you were to encourage new, commercial and/or industrial development in Camden County,
   what manner of new development would you like to see? (Choose any number of responses.)

   _____   Professional Office Parks

   _____   Small, Strip Malls

   _____   Large, Regional Malls and Shopping Centers

   _____   Industrial Parks

   _____   Small businesses and professional services

   _____   Downtown and Brownfield Redevelopment

   _____   River-oriented Port Development

   _____   Other: _________________________________________________________________________


   6. Which of the following, specific types of commercial development would you welcome in Camden
   County?

   _____   Big-box Retailers such as WalMart, Rite Aid, or Home Depot.

   _____   Theater/Cinema and Entertainment Complexes

   _____   Recreational Uses such as mini-golf, golf courses, and other sports facilities

   _____   Restaurants and Retail Businesses

   _____   Clean Manufacturing and Industrial Facilities

   _____   Technology, Pharmaceutical and Scientific Companies

   _____   Personal Service Establishments, (eg. insurance, real estate offices)

   _____   Small Businesses

   _____   Other __________________________________________



CAMDEN COUNTY CEDS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SURVEY                                                 Page 2
   7. Which of the following specific types of commercial development would you not want to see more
   of in Camden County?

   _____ Big Box Retailers such as WalMart, Rite Aid, or Home Depot

   _____   Theater/Cinema and Entertainment Complexes

   _____   Recreational Uses such as mini golf, golf course, and other sports facilities

   _____   Restaurants and Retail Businesses

   _____   Clean Manufacturing and Industrial Facilities

   _____   Technology, Pharmaceutical, and Scientific Companies

   _____   Personal Service Establishments, (eg. insurance, real estate offices)

   _____   Small Businesses

   _____   Other __________________________________________


   8. Which of the following statements best reflects your opinion regarding the future commercial
   growth and development of Camden County? (Choose only one response.)

   _____   There is too much development occurring in our community. I recognize the need
           for continued growth, but I would like to see it confined to locations in the County that
           are already developed and not in our remaining open spaces.

   _____   I believe many people would be happy if there was a total moratorium on new development
           in Camden County.

   _____   New commercial and industrial development are critical to our future and our tax
           base. We should take as much of it as we can get, so long as it is clean and attractive.

   _____   I’m not sure what is best at this point. We need to engage businesses and
           residents in a discussion about what they would like to see.

   _____   It’s not so much the amount of new development that’s the issue. If we can
           improve the look of new development so that it fits in with the scale and character
           of our community, I’ll be happy.


   9. If you had to choose between the following options for directing new commercial/industrial
   growth and development in Camden County, which one would be your top priority?

   _____   Directing new commercial/industrial activity around existing pockets of
           development, such as the older cities, towns, and suburbs in the County.

   _____   Creating new commercial/industrial zones in which to channel new development.

   _____   Focusing on the redevelopment of brownfield sites within which new commercial and/or industrial
           activity could be designed and located.

   _____   Creating more downtown development potential, with a more traditional mix of commercial,
           service, and other retail and professional uses.




CAMDEN COUNTY CEDS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SURVEY                                                         Page 3
   10. Which of the following do you believe are the two (2) most important development issues facing
   the County today? (Select only two.)

   _____   Preserving our few remaining farms and open spaces

   _____   Finding ways to channel and manage new development

   _____   Creating restrictions on new growth and development that significantly limit future activity

   _____   Creating new design guidelines that enhance the development that will inevitably occur

   _____   Creating more road and highway capacity to serve the commercial centers in the
           County

   _____   Developing new commercial and industrial uses that create jobs for our citizens
           and ratables for our tax base

   _____   Providing a greater diversity of commercial and industrial development and jobs.

   _____   Other _______________________________________________________________________


   11. What do you see as the County’s major assets for attracting new business? (Check as many as
   you think are critical.)

   _____   Quality of Life

   _____   Location: Close to Major Markets

   _____   Road and Highway Network

   _____   Crime Rate

   _____   Schools

   _____   Parks and Recreational Opportunities

   _____   Housing Stock

   _____   Natural Environment

   _____   Available Land and Buildings

   _____   Affordable Land and Buildings

   _____   Job Opportunities

   _____   Government Services

   _____   Public Transit

   _____   Job Training Programs and Business Partnerships

   _____   A Welcoming Business Environment

   _____   Regulatory Approval Process

   _____   Other ____________________________________________________________________



CAMDEN COUNTY CEDS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SURVEY                                                            Page 4
  12. Conversely, which characteristics do you believe are detriments to bringing new business to the County?
  (Check as many as you think are critical.)

  _____   Quality of Life
  _____   Location: Close to Employment Centers and large Urban Areas
  _____   Road and Highway Network
  _____   Crime Rate
  _____   Schools
  _____   Parks and Recreational Opportunities
  _____   Housing Stock
  _____   Natural Environment
  _____   Available Land and Buildings
  _____   Affordable Land and Buildings
  _____   Job Opportunities
  _____   Government Services
  _____   Public Transit
  _____   Job Training Programs and Business Partnerships
  _____   A Welcoming Business Environment
  _____   Regulatory Approval Process
  _____   Other ____________________________________________________


  13. If you had a million dollars to invest in a new project or program that you believe would have a
  positive and measurable impact on enhancing the County’s economy, what would it be?

  ______________________________________________________________________________________

  ______________________________________________________________________________________

  ______________________________________________________________________________________


  14. What are two actions that the County can take right away that you believe can make a
  positive difference in the economic opportunities open to County residents?


  ______________________________________________________________________________________

  ______________________________________________________________________________________

  ______________________________________________________________________________________




CAMDEN COUNTY CEDS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SURVEY                                                           Page 5
   15. Are there issues or challenges associated with the current or future economy of Camden County
   that have not been addressed in this survey, that you would like to see included in the CEDS?

   _____   I have no new issues to add

   I would also like to discuss the following items: _______________________________________________

   ______________________________________________________________________________________

   ______________________________________________________________________________________

   ______________________________________________________________________________________

   ______________________________________________________________________________________

   ______________________________________________________________________________________




CAMDEN COUNTY CEDS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SURVEY                                                   Page 6
Facilitated by:




                   Economic
                  Development
                   Associates