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					HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY                                                              GREATER SEKHUKHUNE LED




                     2          HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY


2.1            INTRODUCTION

Skills development is not only a way to improve capacity for individuals within communities. It constitutes the strengthening
of the most important vehicle available to the country to achieve its goals for changing the entire South African society. Skills
development has to be aimed at making people better at the roles that they play in the developmental municipalities. In
addition, skills development becomes an important vehicle through which we can transform the less tangible aspects of the
local communities – their attitudes, their commitment, and the manner in which they engage in local economic development.


As a very important spin-off, it is expected that the local citizens, who make up a significant proportion of our population, can
play an increasingly important role in their respective communities to accelerate the achievement of our overarching goals for
this country even faster. Given the clear importance of skills development of the local people, it is thus an important goalpost
that has been reached by developing a Human Resources Development Strategy for Sekhukhune District Municipality
(SDM).


The strategy opens up the opportunity for the district to benefit from better co-ordination and alignment of development
initiatives that have been identified within the district. It is imperative that the district‟s developmental needs and the specific
skills shortages that currently exist in the district, should inform any skills development efforts. Further to this it has become
important that we get a better handle on the actual impact of the SDM‟s development efforts. The continued empowering of
individuals in ever increasing numbers should not be seen as the final outcome of skills development process. Instead, any
development opportunity should translate in greater effectiveness in the performance of the SDM economy as a whole.


It is trusted the district will be able to look back in a year‟s time or so, and unequivocally declare that the development of this
HRD Strategy has made a difference and has contributed to moving SDM closer to its ideal of a democratic society in which
it is managing to defeat poverty.



2.2            BACKGROUND

Andani HR Consulting performed a skills audit in the Greater Sekhukhune area. The objective of the skills audit was three
fold:


              The major objective of the skills audit was to determine the existing skills in the Greater Sekhukhune area,
               and provide the major findings of the empirical study;
              The secondary objective was to identify the shortcomings of skills in the area; and
              The third objective was to provide the District Municipality with the database containing the empirical results in
               a user-friendly manner.




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HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY                                                              GREATER SEKHUKHUNE LED




This report covers an analysis of some of the major findings of the skills audit exercise that was conducted in the
Sekhukhune District Municipality (SDM). See Annexure A for a summarised version of the Skills Audit Report. The purpose
of analysing these findings is to formulate a HRD Strategy for SDM.



2.3             DEVELOPING A HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

For the SDM to succeed in its mandate of promoting Local Economic Development (LED), providing effective and efficient
service delivery for the citizens of the district, it needs to promote and support training and development. By definition, Local
Economic Development is “an outcome based on local initiative and driven by local stakeholders” involving identifying and
using primarily local resources, ideas and skills to stimulate economic growth and development…” Within this context, the
development of local skills would contribute and would give individuals an opportunity to be involved in local economic
initiatives and hence contribute to the economic developments of their area.


Skills development in this context is not only a way to improve capacity for an individual within the community, it constitutes
the strengthening of the most important vehicle available to the municipality to achieve its goals of encouraging positive
economic growth of the area that it is responsible for. This positive economic growth is expected to improve the standard of
living for the local communities by creating job opportunities and alleviate poverty.


Skill development has to be aimed at supporting the economic sectors and initiatives that are active in the municipalities. In
addition, skill development becomes an important vehicle through which we can transform the less tangible aspects of the
public servants – their attitudes, their commitment and the manner in which they engage with our people.


As a very important spin-off, it is expected that public servants, who make up a significant proportion of our population, can
play an increasingly important role in their respective communities to accelerate the achievement of our overarching goals for
this country even faster. Given the clear importance of skill development of the district municipality, it is thus an important
goalpost that we have reached by developing the Human Resources Development Strategy for the Sekhukhune District
Municipality. It builds on the findings of the skills audit exercise that was conducted in the SDM.


The strategy opens up the opportunity for local communities to benefit from capacity building and training that could be
offered by the local organisations as well as the NGOs that are operational in the district. It is imperative that the district‟s
developmental needs and the specific shortages that currently exist in the area and what we can already identify as
shortages for the district in years to come, should inform any skills development efforts. Further to this it has become
important that we get a better handle on the actual impact of our development efforts. The continued certification of
individuals in ever increasing numbers is not the final outcome that we have in mind. It is imperative that any development
opportunities translate in greater effectiveness in the performance of the municipalities‟ economies and support the identified
potential within the district.


The HRD Strategy has an emphasis on training and empowerment of local communities. These are only some of the
important aspects of the overall menu of interventions that fall within the broad ambit of human resource development. We
deliberately chose to focus on developing skills that are identified as lacking in various municipalities.




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HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY                                                              GREATER SEKHUKHUNE LED




1.3.1           RELEVANT GOVERNMENT POLICIES AND LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK

The Government‟s commitment to promoting active labour market policies and guaranteeing the quality of training and
education provided is well demonstrated in the Skills Development Act, 1998, the Skills Development Levies Act, 1999, and
the SAQA Act, 1995. This legislation introduces new institutions, programmes and funding policies designed to increase
investment in skills development. There are two overriding priorities that this legislation seeks to address.


               The first is the ever-present reality of the global economy and the imperative to increase skills within the
                country to improve productivity and the competitiveness of its industry, business, commerce and services.
               The second is to address the challenges of an unequal society, to make it more inclusive and to encourage
                greater cohesion.


For the SDM to succeed in its mandate of promoting Local Economic Development (LED), providing effective and efficient
service delivery for the citizens of the district, it needs to promote and support training and development.


By definition, Local Economic Development is “…outcome based on a local initiative and driven by local stakeholders”
involving identifying and using primarily local resources, ideas and skills to stimulate economic growth and
development…”.Within this context, the development of local skills would contribute and give the local people an opportunity
to be involved in local economic initiatives and hence contribute to the economic developments of their area.


Skills development in this context is not only a way to improve capacity for individual within the community, instead it
constitutes the strengthening of the most important vehicle available to the municipality to achieve its goals of encouraging
positive economic growth of the area that it is responsible for. This positive economic growth is expected to improve the
standard of living for the local communities by creating job opportunities and alleviate poverty.


Skills development has to be aimed at supporting the economic sectors and initiatives that are active in the municipalities.
Given the clear importance of skills development of the district municipality, it is thus an important goalpost that we have
reached by developing the Human Resources Development Strategy for the Sekhukhune District Municipality. It builds on
the findings of the skills audit exercise that was conducted in the SDM.


The strategy opens up the opportunity for local communities to benefit from capacity building and training that could be
offered by the local organisations as well as the NGOs that are operational in the district. It is imperative that the district‟s
developmental needs and the specific shortages that currently exist in the area and what we can already identify as
shortages for the district in years to come, should inform any skills development efforts. Further to this it has become
important that we get a better handle on the actual impact of our development efforts. The continued certification of
individuals in ever increasing numbers is not the final outcome that we have in mind. It is imperative that any development
opportunities translate in greater effectiveness in the performance of the municipalities‟ economies and support the identified
potential within the district.


The HRD Strategy has an emphasis on training and empowerment of local communities. These are only some of the
important aspects of the overall menu of interventions that fall within the broad ambit of human resource development. We
deliberately chose to focus on developing skills that are identified as lacking in various municipalities.


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HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY                                                             GREATER SEKHUKHUNE LED




1.3.2           HUMAN RESOURCE STRATEGY FOR SDM

The HRD Strategy for SDM aims at addressing the major human resource capacity constraints currently hampering the
effective and equitable delivery of services. SDM needs the relevant skills to support the identified economic development
programmes and projects that would have been introduced to improve living standards and reduce levels of poverty. The
paragraphs to follow provide the reader with the Vision, Mission and some Strategic Objectives for the Sekhukhune District
Municipality.


(A)             VISION

The vision for human resource development for the Sekhukhune District Municipality is “To involve local resources, ideas
and skills to stimulate economic growth and development”.


(B)             MISSION

To maximize people participation in the local economic development initiatives through skills development processes that
support economic growth and benefit the lead sectors in the SDM economy.



1.3.3           STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE

The overall objective is to improve the efficiency, effectiveness and co-ordination of service delivery by the SDM in support of
the developed LED Strategy and Plan.


(A)             THE STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

The strategic objective will be achieved by attainment of the following key results:
               Improving the foundations for human development;
               Improving the supply of appropriate skills (particularly scarce skills), which are more responsive to societal
                and economic needs;
               Increasing community participation in the Local Economic Development initiatives;
               Development of sustainable SMME‟s;
               Empowering individuals so that they can start their own small businesses;
               Alleviating the problem of „skills drain‟ in the area; and
               Discouraging the practice of „importing‟ scarce skills into the district.


(B)             THE STRATEGIC GOALS

The strategy has three overarching goals, namely-
               To improve the social infrastructure of SDM;
               To reduce disparities in wealth and poverty and develop a more inclusive society; and
               To improve international confidence and investor perceptions of the district.


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HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY                                                                                    GREATER SEKHUKHUNE LED




(C)                MAIN ACTIVITIES

This subsection point out the activities that need to be carried out in order to reach the set objectives. The objectives are not
discussed in the order of their priority.


  TABLE 1 - STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES, SUCCESS INDICATORS AND ACTIVITIES TO ENSURE SUCCESSFUL HUMAN RESOURCE
                     DEVELOPMENT IN SEKHUKHUNE

  STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 1

  STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE                                                            SUCCESS INDICATOR

   Improving the foundations for human development
                                                                                 The availability of skilled people in the local labour markets.


  ACTIVITIES FOR STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 1

  1.1. Identify the skills that need to be developed in the economy.

  1.2. Identify the organizations that have vested interest in the skills development process.

  1.3. Market the training interventions to the local communities.

  STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 2

  STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE                                                            SUCCESS INDICATOR

                                                                                 Acceptance and support of HRD Strategy by the private sector, key
  Improving the supply of appropriate skills (particularly scarce skills),
                                                                                 stakeholders, communities, education institutions, NGO‟s, CBO‟s and
  which are more responsive to societal and economic needs.
                                                                                 government departments.

  ACTIVITIES FOR STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 2

  2.1. Identify organizations to be involved in developing skills required for supporting economic growth.

  2.2. Set up presentation meetings with identified organizations and key stakeholders.

  2.3. Present the HRD Strategy for buy in and support.

  2.4. Ongoing Communication of the HRD strategy to key stakeholders and other local organisations

  STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 3

  STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE                                                            SUCCESS INDICATOR

   Increasing community participation in the Local Economic
      Development initiatives.                                                   Growing participation of local people in local economic affairs.



  ACTIVITIES FOR STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 3

  3.1. Develop training programmes to address skills required in the economy.

  3.2. Conduct awareness campaign to attract participation of local people in the training interventions.

  STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 4

  STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE                                                            SUCCESS INDICATOR

                                                                                 Empowered individuals who are capable of running the businesses
   Development of sustainable SMME‟s.
                                                                                 successfully.



  ACTIVITIES FOR STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 4

  4.1. Develop training interventions for small businesses.

  4.2. Establish information centre for small businesses.

  4.3. Conduct knowledge sharing workshops for small businesses.

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HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY                                                                                      GREATER SEKHUKHUNE LED




    TABLE 1 - STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES, SUCCESS INDICATORS AND ACTIVITIES TO ENSURE SUCCESSFUL HUMAN RESOURCE
                          DEVELOPMENT IN SEKHUKHUNE

    STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 5

    STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE                                                           SUCCESS INDICATOR

    Discouraging the practice of „importing‟ scarce skills into the district.     The majority of the working people in the various economic sectors are from
                                                                                  the local areas.

    ACTIVITIES FOR STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 5

    5.1. Develop skills development programmes/training interventions that would address the shortage skills in the area.

    5.2. Determine the demand for skills required by the local sectors and organizations.

    5.3. Conduct workshops with the sector representatives to share light in connection with hiring local people.




1.3.4                 FEATURES OF THE SDM

The Human Resource Development Strategy was adopted to support a holistic approach to human resource training and
development in SDM. To enable it to actualize its constitutional mandate of ensuring creation of jobs, the government
envisages a municipality that is guided by an ethos of service delivery and commitment to the provision of high quality
service. The Sekhukhune District Municipality is faced with the challenge of training and transforming its community in a
manner that will not only benefit government in its quest for excellent service delivery, but also empower the individuals in
the community.


The following are the challenges facing human resource development in SDM:
                     The need to develop skills that support identified opportunities for economic growth and development in the
                      district;
                     The practice of importing mining skills from neighbouring provinces as that creates anonymity within
                      communities;


The conducted skills audit exercise has shown the shortage of skills per municipality as indicated in Table 3.2. This table
indicates that there is an urgent need to develop skills that would boost economic growth within SDM. The only set of skills
that seem to be adequate is in the agricultural sector.


    TABLE .2 - SKILLS SHORTAGES IN SEKHUKHUNE

    NAME OF                       GREATER                    GREATER MARBLE                                                             GREATER
                                                                                    MAKHUDUTHAMAGA                  FETAKGOMO
    MUNICIPALITY                  GROBLERSDAL                HALL                                                                       TUBATSE

    SKILLS REQUIREMENT

    Agricultural skills           Adequate                   Adequate               Inadequate                      Adequate            Inadequate

    Mining skills                 Inadequate                 Inadequate             Inadequate                      Inadequate          Inadequate

    Tourism skills                Inadequate                 Inadequate             Inadequate                      Inadequate          Inadequate

    Manufacturing skills          Inadequate                 Inadequate             Inadequate                      Inadequate          Inadequate

    Entrepreneurial skills        Inadequate                 Inadequate             Inadequate                      Inadequate          Inadequate




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HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY                                                                          GREATER SEKHUKHUNE LED




Manufacturing skills and entrepreneurial skills seem to need to be developed in order to support the up-coming mining
initiatives and also the tourism initiatives that are in the process of being revived within the SDM. The secondary skills that
are associated with development such as education skills, etc seems to be adequate for now. Hence the development of
secondary skills is not priority. They could be developed in the future only if there is a need for them.



1.3.5          DETAILED SKILLS REQUIRED

The detailed skill requirements were obtained from the respective SETA‟s functioning in the area of Mining, Agriculture,
Entrepreneurial Skills, Small Business Management Skills and Tourism Skills. The following table is merely an example of
the priority skills required to function in these primary economic sectors. As is evident, the spectrum of skills is very broad.
While the data is specific to skills needs, it needs to be considered in relation to other processes such as employment equity
plans.


TABLE 3 – DETAILED SKILLS REQUIREMENTS

SECTOR                        SUB SECTOR

AGRICULTURE                   HORTICULTURE

                                 Plant propagation
                                 Plant protection
                                 Forestry
                                 Packing and liquefying of fruit including citrus.

                                 Occupational health and safety training.
                                 Tobacco graders
                                 Pest Control Officers

                                 Safety related to pesticides and chemicals
                                 Fruit processing operators
                                 Agriculture machinery “artisans”.

                              ANIMAL CARING SKILLS

                                 Intensive production, slaughtering, deboning and packaging of meat and livestock products, including birds.

                                 Breeding, rearing, slaughtering, dressing and packaging of poultry.
                                 Keeping of hens to produce eggs,
                                 Packing of eggs.

                                 Processing of wool.
                                 Primary processing of cotton including ginning.
                                 Feather processing

                                 Pest and pest control.
                                 Hatchery
                                 Different breeds

                                 Incubation
                                 Brooding systems
                                 Housing

                                 Feed and feeding
                                 Lighting
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HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY                                                  GREATER SEKHUKHUNE LED




TABLE 3 – DETAILED SKILLS REQUIREMENTS

SECTOR                    SUB SECTOR

                             Abattoir management
                             Slaughter operators
                             Caring for livestock
                             Bee Keeping
                             Wild life
                             Fishing



                          CROP GROWING SKILLS

                             Storage and handling of grain.
                             Manufacture of grain mill products
                             Sugar milling and sugar refining.
                             Tobacco processing.
                             Coffee and tea production, processing and marketing.
                             Selection of planting material.
                             Soil Fertilizing
                             Harvesting
                             Marketing.

                             Crop rotation
                             Seed development, processing.
                             Ploughing

                             Miller (e.g. maize miller, etc)
                             Pest/Insects/Weed Control
                             Hammermill operators.

                             Pellet machine operators.
                             Millers
                             Supervisory skills

                             Pack house management
                             Dispatch management
                             Marketing skills

                             Stock storage
                             Merchandising
                             Pricing of merchandise

                             Stock levels (ability to determine)
                             Stock control

TOURISM                   GENERIC

                             Communication
                             Flexibility

                             Focus on Feedback
                             Customer Relations
                             Information Technology

                             Communication skill (oral) Interpretation
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HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY                                                        GREATER SEKHUKHUNE LED




TABLE 3 – DETAILED SKILLS REQUIREMENTS

SECTOR                    SUB SECTOR

                          OTHERS

                            Welcome Host
                            Welcome Golfer
                            SA's Best Service
                            Marketing and Promotion
                            Natural Cooking of SA
                            Bed & Breakfast Seminars
                            Quality Housekeeping

                            World Class Welcome
                            Local Product Knowledge Tours
                            Telephone Techniques
                            Bar Service
                            Food and Restaurant Service
                            Wine Service and Appreciation
                            Group Training Techniques
                            Supervisory Skills
                            Green Tourism Awareness

                            Hospitality Assured Awareness
                            Cultural, heritage and rural tourism
                            Tourism Retail and Service Skills,
                            Local Guiding,
                            Foreign Linguistic abilities.
                            Tour Guide
                            Bookings maintenance
                            Telephone /switchboard skills
                            Game

                            Culture Studies
                            Arts and Craft (e.g. beading, cloth painting, etc.)
                            Catering for functions (e.g. chef, tent / venue hire, etc.)

                            Accommodation services
                            Housekeeping services & supplies

ENTREPRENEURIAL SKILLS    GENERIC

                            Leadership
                            Innovative

                            Ability to take initiative
                            Good judgment skills
                            Ability to work independently

                            Identification of opportunity
                            Business plan / proposal
                            Research skills

                            Problem solving
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HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY                                  GREATER SEKHUKHUNE LED




TABLE 3 – DETAILED SKILLS REQUIREMENTS

SECTOR                    SUB SECTOR

                            Creativity
                            Persuasive

SMALL BUSINESS            GENERIC

                             Leadership
                             Innovative
                             Ability to take initiative
                             Good judgment skills
                             Ability to work under no supervision

                             Problem solving
                             Creativity
                             People management
                             Financial management
                             Budgeting
                             Cost control

MINING                    PLATINUM GROUP METALS (PGM)

                             Health and safety skills
                             Engineering (mechanical) skills
                             Rock Engineering skills
                             Metallurgy skills

                             Engineering skills (electrical)
                             Mining Process skills
                             Platinum working skills

                          OTHER MINERALS

                             Health and safety skills

                             Surface mining skills
                             Sales/ marketing skills
                             Metallurgy skills

                             Mining and exploration skills
                             Engineering skills (electrical)
                             Engineering skills (mechanical)

                          UNDERGROUND HARD ROCK

                             Health and safety skills

                             Engineering skills (mechanical)
                             Risk assessment skills
                             Engineering skills (electrical)

                             Metallurgy skills
                             Management and supervisory skills
                             Rock engineering skills

                             Diversity management skills
                             Team building skills

                          SMME SKILLS
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HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY                                                                                     GREATER SEKHUKHUNE LED




TABLE 3 – DETAILED SKILLS REQUIREMENTS

SECTOR                               SUB SECTOR

                                        Health and safety skills
                                        Environmental skills
                                        Skills to improve business processes
                                        Basic understanding of legislation, e.g. regarding safety regulations and labour
                                        Basic business skills
                                        Project management skills
                                        Exploration skills
                                        Fundamentals of rock engineering in certain organizations
                                        Stone setting skills
                                        Gold and platinum smithing skills.




1.3.6             PROBLEMS TO BE ADDRESSED

The following are the key challenges facing human resource development in the Greater Sekhukhune Municipality:


 TABLE 4 – KEY CHALLENGES FACING HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT IN SEKHUKHUNE

 KEY CHALLENGES IN GREATER SEKHUKHUNE

 Fragmented and uncoordinated approach to training and education across SDM, resulting in the absence of appropriate skills for ensuring that the
 identified economic potential would be sustainable to address the problem of unemployment in the district.

 Lack of a strategic, needs-based, and skills-based approach to human resource development, education, and training.

 Limitation of the nature of the training and education that is provided by education centres, e.g. teachers‟ training colleges, technical colleges, etc.

 Continuous changing of required skills in local economy.

 Inadequate resources to implement the HRD strategy.

 AIDS pandemic coupled with other diseases is a serious threat to the stability of the SDM economy.

 HIV/AIDS will have a negative effect on HRD planning.

 There is no commitment from local economic sectors and organisations to enhancing and developing the local skills.

 Current levels of skills in the district do not match the current and future demand for skills in the area.

 Inadequate levels of investment in training and development.

 Training and education are seen as marginal issues and not as priorities.




1.3.7             RECOMMENDED SUPPORTING INTERVENTIONS

(A)               HRD AGENCY

The formation of an HRD Agency in the SDM will be required to oversee the overall human resource development process.
The suggestion is that a District Training Centre be established for building capacity in the community. The project team
suggests that organized business get involved from both a financial and a social perspective. In this way, organized
businesses can identify, “groom” and train school leavers, and potential graduates in the required skills as identified in the

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HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY                                                                       GREATER SEKHUKHUNE LED




workplace skills plans from the respective businesses. This can potentially work on the same basis as a bursary holder, but
at a lower skill level, for example a Blasting Operator in the Mining Sector.


(B)               NGO’S

The involvement of NGO‟s in the formation of such a District Training Centre could add value to the development of relevant
and appropriate skills required by the growing developing economy.


(C)               FORMATION OF SECTION 21 COMPANY

One way of driving skills development is for the municipality to partner with another company that would look and run with
the skills development process. The District Training Centre could potentially be a “Not for Profit” organization geared at
providing the appropriate skill levels to the labour market.


(D)               OTHER INTERVENTIONS

The participation of the private sector, donor agencies, educational institutions, organizations, and relevant CBO‟s is required
to support and drive the HRD strategy for the area.



1.3.8             STAKEHOLDERS

Table 5 provides a list of stakeholders.


TABLE 5 – LIST OF STAKEHOLDERS

STAKEHOLDER                                        ROLE

                                                   Develop National Skills Development Strategy

Department of Labour                               Monitor
                                                   Implement

DPSA                                               Human Resources Policy formulation & advice for SDM

                                                   Quality assurance
                                                   Develop sector skills plan

                                                   Funding
SETAs                                              ETQA
                                                   Accreditation

                                                   Learnerships
                                                   Ensure that transversal training is catered for

                                                   Develop training programmes
Local sectors and organisations
                                                   Effective training of local people

                                                   Provide expert advice and support for sectors and local organisations that are applying the

                                                   Human Resource Development Strategy
Human resource development professionals
                                                   Facilitate the formulation and implementation of plans for personal development of the local
                                                   people.
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HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY                                                                        GREATER SEKHUKHUNE LED




TABLE 5 – LIST OF STAKEHOLDERS

STAKEHOLDER                                          ROLE

                                                     Every government department is required to appoint a skills development facilitator, whose
Skills development facilitators
                                                     main task is to develop and implement the departmental workplace skills plans (WSPs)

                                                     Determine their training and development needs
                                                     Plan and manage learning and career development
Individuals
                                                     Demonstrate willingness to grow
                                                     Participate in learnerships and skills programmes

Organized labour                                     Motivate members to take up opportunities for self-development

                                                     Gender mainstreaming
Government agencies/Commission for Gender Equality
                                                     Promote gender equity
                                                     Monitoring

SAQA                                                 Assess and accredit courses

                                                     Networking
SA Development Community (SADCC)
                                                     Sharing of information

Training institutions                                Provide training




1.3.9               STRATEGIC HRD GUIDELINES AND PROGRAMMES

The following programmes serve as a guide for the type of programmes that could be instituted to address the problem of
skills shortage in the district:


(A)                 LEARNERSHIPS AND SKILLS PROGRAMMES

One of the key vehicles for rapid skills development in South Africa is a learnerships programme, which combine short to
medium-term theoretical training with practical workplace experience. Learnerships and skills programmes are
occupationally structured learning programmes that are offered by accredited providers and constitute credit(s) towards a
qualification within the NQF.


Every government department is required to appoint a skills development facilitator, whose main task is to develop and
implement the departmental workplace skills plan, which reflects the department‟s strategic objectives as well as the
individual worker‟s development needs. These workplace skills plans will be incorporated into the relevant SETA‟s sector
skills plan. The workplace skills plans and the sector skills plans will in turn be implemented through the learnerships or skills
programmes.


(B)                 VOLUNTARY INTERNSHIPS

An Internship Programme is one way of offering students valuable learning assignments that represent structured pathways
from an academic environment to the world of work. Whilst students should not to be regarded as lower-cost alternatives to
regular employees, they are recognized as trainees and do not receive the same benefits as full employees.


The learning will be achieved through the establishment of an internship programme for SDM students that will –
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              Contribute towards developing a new cadre of competent and skilled people for the service oriented
               municipality;
              Develop the employability skills of interns and improve their ability to find employment within SDM sectors and
               organisations after graduation;
              Offer insights into future employment opportunities within the economy; and
              Help the interns evaluate their career options within the SDM economy.


The learning acquired during the internship programme should be accredited to allow for subsequent combination of subjects
into a full learnerships and a recognized education.


(C)            SPECIALISED TRAINING TO SUPPORT MINES AND OTHER RELEVANT SECTORS AND
               LOCAL ORGANISATIONS

              ABET Programmes


Illiteracy is very prevalent in South Africa, particularly among older persons who were marginalised from educational
opportunities under the apartheid system. Three million South Africans cannot read or write at all, and million more are semi-
literate. This can have devastating negative consequences on their ability to participate fully in the political, economic and
social spheres of life. The need for adult education is acute. A high proportion of South African adults aged 20 years and
older have never been to school. Regional strategies to encourage participation in lifelong learning, and proportional to the
disparities in participation rates, will need to be developed.


              HIV/AIDS-Related Capacity-Building Programme


The DPSA‟s Impact and Action Project aims to address the drop in skills levels owing to the loss of skilled and experienced
staff as a result of AIDS.



2.4            IMPLEMENTATION FRAMEWORK

The implementation framework is underpinned by the vision of an integrated human resource management system. In order
to ensure that required skills are effectively utilized, developed and nurtured, it is crucial that the development of human
resources in SDM is integrated with other human resource processes and systems. The established HRD Agency will
facilitate, coordinate and monitor the implementation of the strategy.


The implementation framework should be based on the needs of the various local municipalities. In order to ensure that
required skills are effectively developed to support the identified economic sectors, it is crucial that the development of
human resources among the local municipalities is administered from a central point to avoid duplication of work.




2.4.1          THE CENTRALISED HRD SYSTEM
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The centralised HRD system will provide a common link between strategic human resource development processes with the
local municipalities in the district. Training and development programmes should be packaged to meet the needs of each
local municipality and hence provide the required economic support for various sectors within the district.



2.4.2          LEARNING PRINCIPLES

The HRD Strategy has been developed in accordance with the following principles:


(A)            ACCESS AND ENTITLEMENT TO TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT:

The SDM HDR Agency should create and make accessible on ongoing basis meaningful opportunities for community
training, education and development.


(B)            NEEDS-BASED (DEMAND-LED) TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT:

For training and development programmes to have meaning and to assist the district in achieving its objectives, the
programmes should be based on a detailed assessment of economic trends and individual needs. The emphasis must be on
the skills required supporting economic development.


(C)            COMPETENCY-BASED TRAINING:

Training and development should be aimed at developing the skill competencies required for growing economy.


(D)            CAREER GUIDANCE:

To facilitate the development individuals within local communities, all learning should be accredited and portable.


(E)            EQUITY AND EMPOWERMENT:

Training and development initiatives should be aligned with the broader plans and programmes aimed at promoting equity
and empowerment of the previously disadvantaged groups. It is thus of vital importance that the HRD Strategy for SDM is
aligned with the National Equity and Affirmative Action.



2.4.3          ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

(A)            THE SEKHUKHUNE DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

The SDM will in consultation with other local sectors and organisations, specify skills areas that are priority for the local
economy. The district should also promote gender equity and monitor the implementation of the HRD Strategy.
(B)            RELEVANT INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENT (E.G. HRD AGENCY)
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The HRD Agency will be responsible for arranging logistics for training and development. It will also be responsible for
identifying possible donors and raise or apply for funds to develop local skills. Furthermore, the agency will play the role of an
HRD coordinator within the district.


(C)            THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (DOE)

The Department of Education will assist with providing the required facilities, e.g. training venues for off- the job training. The
Department of Education will also be responsible for reporting on the supply-side characteristics of the education and training
system.


(D)            TRAINING INSTITUTIONS

The training institutions should provide the necessary training as and when required.


(E)            PRIVATE SECTOR AND OTHER LOCAL ORGANISATIONS

The private sector should assist with providing on the job training opportunities and also provide sponsorship for the training
and development.


(F)            LINE SETAS

These organisations should assist with the accreditation of the training programmes, on-the-job training programmes and
other related training and development programmes. Also, they should assist with funding and learnerships programmes


(G)            COMMUNITY BASED ORGANISATIONS (CBO’S)

The CBO‟s should serve as representatives of their local communities and also market the training and development
programmes within their respective communities.


(H)            DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR (DOL)

The Department of Labour should ensure that information regarding training and development programmes is available to
local communities by putting it on their notice boards and other appropriate places.



2.5            FINANCE AND BUDGETING

The budget for human resource development within the district will have to be administered by the district municipality. Since
the local municipalities do not have sufficient funds, the training and development budget will have to be raised through
fundraising and applying for funds from private sectors, external organisations, Department of Labour and other
organisations that have vested interest in the development of skills within the district.


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2.6              MONITORING, REPORTING AND EVALUATION

2.6.1            SDM

The Sekhukhune District Municipality will monitor the implementation of the HRD Strategy through the following
mechanisms:
                Audits carried out by the HRD Specialist from the district and local municipalities;
                Annual HRD reports that will be submitted to the district municipality on an annual basis.


The Department of public service and Administration will report on the PSETA. The impact of skills development and training
on overall district Local Development Strategy and goals will be measured against the skills required by each sector in the
economy. This system will need the full cooperation of the private sector, key stakeholders and key sectors within the district,
which must be mandated to provide accurate and up-to-date information regarding the skills requirement of their
organisations.



2.6.2            THE NATIONAL SKILLS AUTHORITY

The National Skills Authority will review the implementation of sector and provincial strategies on a regular basis.



2.6.3            THE DISTRICT HRD FORUM

The District HRD Forum (made up of local and district HRD groups and other identified key stakeholders) will be required to
collect data on all the approved indicators, at least annually. This data will be analysed and summarized in a report.



2.6.4            THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (DOE)

The Department of Education will be responsible for reporting on the supply-side characteristics of the education and training
system.



2.6.5            THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR (DOL)

The Department of Labour will be responsible for monitoring and reporting on the functioning of SETAs, including the state of
skills planning in each sector, the development of learnerships to address identified skills shortages, and other matters
related to information flows.


The Department of Labour will also be required to report on the participation of government departments in the relevant
economic SETA, and/or the PSETA, and to monitor state contributions to these.
2.7              CONCLUSION
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This document outlines the HRD Strategy that is formulated for the Sekhukhune District Municipality. The aim of this
document is to indicate the implications of the findings that were made during the skills audit exercise that was conducted in
the SDM. The HRD Strategy provides guidelines to addressing the identified skills gaps within the district. It focuses on the
specific skills that are required to support economic growth and development, and also empower individuals within
communities.


The strategy emphasises the importance of developing local skills with the aim of encouraging local people to be actively
involved in their local economy. Furthermore, the strategy is aimed to discourage the practise of „importing‟ skills from other
neighbouring provinces.




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