EQUIPMENT DISPOSAL POLICY

					     ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT DISPOSAL REGULATIONS AND
                             PROCEDURES

Issue 2 - August 2005

    1.       Legislation on Equipment Disposal
             a. What is WEEE/ROHS?
             b. When will the legislation apply?
             c. Who will pay for disposal of WEEE?
    2.       Categories of Equipment that fall under the WEEE Directive
    3.       Registering equipment on Purchase
    4.       Re-use of Surplus Equipment
    5.       Disposal for Recycling
    6.       Method of Disposal
             a. IT Equipment
             b. Office Equipment
             c. Communications Equipment
             d. Refrigerators and Freezers
             e. Small Household Appliances
             f. Consumer Equipment
             g. Large Household Appliances
             h. Lighting Equipment
             i. Electrical and Electronic Tools
             j. Sports Equipment, Toys and Leisure Equipment
             k. Medical Devices
             l. Monitoring and Control Instruments
             m. Automatic Dispensers
             n. Other Equipment
    7.       Decommissioning of IT Equipment
    8.       Contractors who can dispose of redundant equipment
    9.       Historical Waste

    Attachment No. 1. - Categories of Equipment which fall under the regulations
    Attachment No. 2. - Electrical/Electronic Equipment Disposal request Form

Introduction

In Europe, over 90% of electrical and electronic equipment goes into landfill sites - around 6
million tonnes of waste every year. Emissions to the air that result are a risk to both health
and the environment.

In 1998 it was estimated that of the 6 million tonnes of electrical equipment waste arising in
Europe the potential loss of resource was:
2.4 million tonnes of ferrous metal
1.2 million tonnes of plastic
652,000 tonnes of copper
336,000 tonnes of aluminium
336,000 tonnes of glass

This was in addition to the loss of heavy metals, lead, mercury, flame-retardants and more.
The production of these raw materials and the goods made from them entails environmental
damage through mining, transport and energy use. For example, recycling 1kg of aluminium
saves 8kg of bauxite, 4kg of chemical products and 14 kilowatts of electricity. The nature of
many of these materials is such that they can be recycled with relative ease, preventing the
cost of using new raw materials.




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1) Legislation - WEEE/ROHS

New EU Legislation was due to become effective on August 13, 2005 No. 2002/96/EC. On
June 10, 2005 the Government advised that this would be postponed until June 2006 to
enable UK businesses and manufacturers of electrical and electronic equipment more time to
prepare for the new legislation and for local authorities to provide proper disposal facilities.
This Directive places complete responsibility for the proper disposal of our electrical or
electronic equipment with the University.

The purpose of this Directive is “as a first priority, the prevention of waste electrical and
electronic equipment (WEEE), and in addition, the reuse, recycling, and other forms of
recovery of such wastes so as to reduce the disposal of waste. It also seeks to improve the
environmental performance of all operators involved in the life cycle of electrical and
electronic equipment"

The Directive aims to minimise the impacts of electrical and electronic equipment on the
environment during the whole of the lifetime of that equipment and when it becomes waste. It
applies to a huge spectrum of products. It encourages and sets criteria for the collection,
treatment, recycling and recovery of waste electrical and electronic equipment. It makes
producers/suppliers responsible for financing most of these activities

The University and its employees have a responsibility to ensure responsible final disposal of
all Waste Electronic and Electrical Equipment under several EU Directives including the
Landfill Directive, the WEEE Directive and the Reduction of Hazardous Substances Directive,
as well as the Environment Protection Act 1990.
All equipment purchased after August 13, 2005 is subject to this legislation. Equipment that
falls into the categories included in WEEE, that is purchased prior to this date, is classed as
„historical waste‟ and is subject to different regulations.
a)      What is WEEE/ROHS?

The Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive (WEEE) aims to minimise the
impacts of electrical and electronic equipment on the environment during their life times and
when they become waste. It applies to a huge spectrum of products. It encourages and sets
criteria for the collection, treatment, recycling and recovery of waste electrical and electronic
equipment. It makes producers (suppliers) responsible for financing most of these activities
for all items purchased after August 13, 2005. (producer responsibility). “Historic waste”, i.e.
items purchased prior to August 13, 2005 will be subject to different arrangements.

The ROHS Directive (Restriction of the use of certain hazardous substances in electrical and
electronic equipment) will ban the placing on the EU market of new electrical and electronic
equipment containing more than agreed levels of lead, cadmium, mercury, hexavalent
chromium, polybrominated biphenyl (PBB) and polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame
retardants from 1 July 2006. There are a number of exempted applications for these
substances. RoHS takes its scope broadly from the WEEE Directive. Manufacturers will need
to ensure that their products - and their components - comply in order to stay on the Single
Market. If they do not, they will need to redesign products.

The main impetus is that it will be the producer‟s (supplier‟s) responsibility to finance the
                                                                                       th
recovery, transportation and recycling of WEEE i.e. any WEEE purchased after 13 August
2005. Different arrangements may be imposed for the financing of “historic WEEE” i.e. that
                     th
purchased before 13 August 2005.

b)      When will the legislation apply?




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                                                                  th
The Government must transpose the Directives into law by 13 August 2005. The ROHS
                               st
substance ban commences from 1 July 2006.

c)      Who will pay for disposal of Electrical and Electronic equipment?

Although the directive states that the producer/supplier of the waste equipment should pay, it
also goes on to state that it is up to producers and business users to agree other financing
methods. It has already become apparent that most producers/suppliers will pass on this
additional cost (which the government estimates will cost the UK £190-350m pa) to the
business users (e.g. the University). The European Commission estimates an average cost
increase of between 1% and 2% for most WEEE products and 3% to 4% for a few large or
more complex products.

Although the University may be able to find some waste collectors who will collect old
equipment at no charge because they can re-cycle large amounts and generate income from
the re-cycling, a large percentage of our WEEE waste will cost us money to dispose of. This
may be a visible cost (price per unit/tonnage) or an invisible one (increased purchase costs).

2) Categories of Equipment that fall under the WEEE Directive

See Attachment No.1.

3) Registering equipment on Purchase

All existing and incoming electrical and electronic equipment – including PCs, laptops, PDAs,
printers, docking stations, memory sticks, telecommunications, office, research, and audio
visual equipment and any other equipment capable of holding sensitive data – must be
recorded on the University Inventory system. In addition to electrical equipment, battery
powered items such as calculators, wall clocks, smoke alarms, telephones etc. must be
recorded on the University Inventory System. For a full list of all equipment see Attachment
No. 1. This will assist with the traceability of the equipment through the stages of its lifetime
and final disposal.
4) Re-use of Surplus Equipment
Faculties, Schools or Administrative Units should follow a general policy of internally
cascading any surplus equipment within their own department, or elsewhere in the University.
As at April 2005 the University is investigating the feasibility of implementing a formal
mechanism or intranet area for advertising equipment for redeployment. Further information
will be made available as appropriate.
If no immediate use can be found within the University, then the equipment may be loaned to
staff – for work on University business at home. All such loans – including of PCs and
laptops – must be formally recorded on the Inventory system as a loan. In this way
ownership and responsibility – including for all aspects of software licensing, data protection
and eventual disposal – remain with the University.
Any equipment permanently transferred to another Faculty, School or administrative unit, or
to an individual for University use at home – must be recorded as appropriate on the
transferring and receiving departments‟ inventory registers.
If there is no requirement for loan equipment within the University and equipment is still
functioning – even if judged obsolete for University use – then it may be offered for sale to
staff or students. Similar to disposal to another organisation, both data and any University-
owned or licensed software must be completely and systematically erased from the
equipment‟s memory (See Section 7 - Decommissioning of IT Equipment).
Finally, if the equipment cannot be sold to staff or students within the University and
equipment is still functioning – even if judged obsolete for University use – then it may be
donated to an appropriate organisation established for refurbishing for re-use by a voluntary



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organisation or charity. (See section 7 - Decommissioning of equipment and Section 8 -
Suppliers who can dispose of redundant equipment).
Sales to consumers are governed by legislation. We have a responsibility to ensure that any
equipment sold is safe to be used by the consumer otherwise the University could be liable
for a claim of negligence. In addition, consumers have legislative rights under the various
iterations of the Sale of Goods Act, supplemented by the Sale and Supply of Goods to
Consumers Regulations 2002. These are additional risks to those of potential breaches of
Data Protection legislation. Further guidance can be found at
http://www.dti.gov.uk/ccp/topics1/guide/sogtraderguide.pdf .
5) Disposal for Re-Cycling
If no use can be found within the University for unwanted equipment, or it is no longer
functioning, it should be disposed of by one of the University‟s authorised suppliers (see
section 8.)
6) Method of Disposal

When disposing of equipment the Inventory System record should be updated at the time the
equipment is sent from the department.

To gain access to any of the skips on b) - m) below you must contact either the Porters or
Trevor Savage in Facilities on 5044 (for equipment on the Hull Campus) or Margaret Webster
on 7205 (for equipment on the Scarborough Campus).

    a) IT Equipment

         All IT equipment (CPUs, Monitors, Laptops, Printers, keyboards, mice, docking
         stations, external zip and hard drives, PDAs etc) should be sent to the Computer
         Centre.

    b) Refrigerators/Freezers

         These should be disposed of by placing in the roll on/roll off skip designated for
         refrigerators or fridges in the compound next to the Kyle Building.

    c) Office Equipment

         All Office equipment (such as fax machines, photocopiers, desk fans, shredders,
         pocket and desk calculators, electric typewriters, answer phones etc) should be
         disposed of in the appropriate roll on/roll off skip in the compound next to the Kyle
         Building.

    d) Communications Equipment

         All telephones (desk, mobile, cordless, two way radios etc) should be disposed of in
         the appropriate roll on/roll off skip in the compound next to the Kyle Building.


    e) Small Household Appliances

         Small Household appliances such as toasters, irons, hairdryers etc should be
         disposed of in the appropriate roll on/roll off skip in the compound next to the Kyle
         Building.

    f)   Consumer Equipment

         Consumer Equipment such as video equipment, hi-fis (but EXCLUDING TVS) should
         be disposed of in the appropriate roll on/roll off skip in the compound next to the Kyle
         Building.


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         Televisions or monitors containing cathode ray tubes (CRTs) should be disposed of via
         Facilities. Use the form in Attachment No 2. to request collection of TV Monitors as
         care must be taken not to smash the tubes.

    g) Large Household Appliances

         Such as Washing Machines, cookers, etc should be disposed of in the appropriate
         roll on/roll off skip in the compound next to the Kyle Building.

    h) Lighting Equipment

         Lighting equipment but EXCLUDING fluorescent lamps) should be disposed of in the
         appropriate roll on/roll off skip in the compound next to the Kyle Building.

         Fluorescent lamps and tubes should be disposed of via the Maintenance Workshop
         on the Hull campus and will be placed in the skip near Loten Building.

    i)   Electrics and Electronic Tools

         Such as lawnmowers, sewing machines, drills should be disposed of in the
         appropriate roll on/roll off skip in the compound next to the Kyle Building.

    j)   Sports Equipment, Toys and Leisure Equipment

         Such as video games consoles, bike computers, slot machines should be disposed of
         in the appropriate roll on/roll off skip in the compound next to the Kyle Building.

    k) Medical Devices

         Such as ventilators and analysers (but EXCLUDING implanted and infected products)
         should be disposed of in the appropriate roll on/roll off skip in the compound next to
         the Kyle Building.

         Implanted and infected products should be disposed of in line with all current
         legislation relating to the disposal of these types of medical devices.

    l)   Monitoring and Control Instruments

         Such as Smoke Detectors, thermostats, heating controls, regulators and motors etc
         should be disposed of in the appropriate roll on/roll off skip in the compound next to
         the Kyle Building.

    m) Automatic Dispensers

         Such as Drinks Dispensers, chocolate/food dispensers should be disposed of in the
         appropriate roll on/roll off skip in the compound next to the Kyle Building.

    To gain access to the skips for b) - m) above you should contact either the Porters or
    Trevor Savage in Facilities on 5044. (Hull Campus) or Margaret Webster on 725
    (Scarborough Campus).

    n) Other Equipment

         The Facilities Directorate will be responsible for the disposal of all other equipment
         detailed in Attachment No.1. in the proper manner. The Equipment Disposal Request
         Form (Attachment No.2). should be completed and sent to Facilities at Hull Campus
         so that arrangements can be made for collection and disposal.




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7.      Decommissioning of IT Equipment

All data and any University owned or licensed software must be completely and
systematically erased from the equipment‟s memory or storage device such as the hard disk
drive. The University has to ensure that its legal obligations under the Data Protection Act are
met. This can be done by the organisation approved by the University for disposal who has
been vetted for compliance in the data cleansing/ equipment decommissioning. (See section
8 for details of Approved Contractors).
8.      Approved Contractors who can dispose of/recycle redundant equipment

The following contractors are approved by the University. If any department has equipment
that cannot be disposed of via any of these routes and selects an alternative supplier, it is
essential that they contact the Environment Agency at http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk
for England and Wales – and ask if the company has a licence to transport and/or refurbish
the equipment. If the company is licensed they will have measures in place for the final
disposal of the equipment with a licensed recycler and may even have ISO14001 or at the
very least have an agreement with a licensed recycler.

Any organisation that is not licensed may not have adequate provision for this so the
equipment may still find it‟s way into the general waste stream and cause harm to the
environment. The risk to the University is that its Duty of Care obligations under the
Environment Protection Act and Data Protection obligations will not be met by using
unlicensed organisations.
All the contractors listed in a), b) and c) below will provide the University with a report
detailing all the equipment collected and disposed of so that the University has an audit trail
of all redundant equipment. This Report is called a Duty of Care Transfer of Waste Note and
lists all the equipment collected (description and numbers), the appropriate EU Waste Code,
date of collection.
     a) IT Equipment
The Computer Centre has made arrangements for the disposal of IT equipment with Refurbit
- (Part of Kingston-upon-Hull City Council's Regeneration Services) - Tel: 01482 565999. All
IT equipment should be sent to the Computer Centre for disposal. Advance notice should be
provided to the Computer Centre by the completion of The Equipment Disposal Request
Form - Attachment No. 2. Refurbit will collect and dispose of the equipment in an
environmentally sustainable way. All collections are free and Refurbit guarantee that all
information on the systems is removed before they are re-furbished using trainees
undertaking NVQ qualifications. Waste Carriers Registration No: YRI/449196/CB Waste
Management Exemption Licence No: RP/exem/41.
     b) All categories c) to m) in section 6 above (except Exclusions)
The skips by the Kyle and Loten Buildings are provided by Biffa Waste Services Ltd who
will collect and dispose of all the equipment categories detailed in c) to m) in section 6 above
with the exception of those EXCLUSIONS. Waste Carriers Registration No:TWE/672683/CB.
If you use a contractor other than the a) or b) above it is essential that, Before selecting an
organisation to whom to give the equipment you contact the Environment Agency on
http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk for England and Wales – and check that the company
has a licence to transport and/or refurbish the equipment. If the company is licensed with they
will have measures in place for the final disposal of equipment with a licensed recycler and
may even have ISO14001 or at the very least have an agreement with a licensed recycler.
Under no circumstances use a supplier who does not have the appropriate licences in place.
     c) The original supplier of the equipment
The directive provides for producers (original supplier) to be required to dispose of waste or
obsolete equipment which falls under WEEE. Contact the original supplier and ask for them
to arrange for removal and disposal. Unless disposal and the cost of this was included in the
original tender/quotation, the supplier will almost certainly charge for collection and disposal
in accordance with the waste disposal rules. You will need to ensure that the supplier, or their


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nominated disposal company has the appropriate Waste Carriers Registration and Waste
Management Licence.
     d) Equipment Excluded from Section 6. above
Equipment detailed as excluded from Section 6 should be disposed of as follows:
            I. Category b) Refrigerators and Freezers
The Skip by the Kyle Building designated for freezers and refrigerators is provided by John
Hornby & Sons, Waste Carriers Registration No. YRI/446996/CB, Waste Management
Licence No. EAWML/60656.
           II. Category f) Televisions
John Hornby & Sons, Waste Carriers Registration No. YRI/446996/CB, Waste Management
Licence No. EAWML/60656 are able to remove Televisions. Staff should contact Facilities to
arrange for these to be collected and stored in a safe manner as care must be taken not to
smash the tubes. The form in Attachment No. 2. should be used to make requests for
television collections.

          III. Category h) Fluorescent lamps and tubes

Fluorescent lamps and tubes should be disposed of via the Maintenance Workshop on the
Hull campus and will be placed in the skip near Loten Building. The contractor who will
remove these from site is Mercury Recycling Limited, Waste Management Licence No. WML
80561, Waste Carriers Registration No. NSO/543825/CB

          IV. Other Equipment
Implanted and infected products should be disposed of in line with all current legislation
relating to the disposal of these types of medical devices.

9.      Historical Waste

Equipment falling into the categories listed in Attachment No.1. which is purchased before
August 13, 2005, is classified as „historical waste‟. Although the directive provides for
producers (original suppliers) to bear the cost of disposing of „historical waste‟ it states that
EU member governments may provide that business users may also be made “partly or
totally responsible” for this cost. It is highly likely that suppliers will wish to charge for this
service.

If equipment is being replaced by a new equivalent product or a new product fulfilling the
same function then the producer/supplier will have to fund the costs. There is a grey area
regarding what is a like-for-like function. If it does not apply then the University will be
responsible for funding disposal and will have a responsibility to provide the information to
demonstrate it has met its obligations to a national Clearing House.

It is believed that „like for like‟ will be along the lines of the examples given below:

A printer for a printer (irrespective of whether it is deskjet, laser etc)
A CPU for a CPU (irrespective of what the specification is)
A monitor for a monitor (irrespective of whether it is a CRT or a TFT)
A clock for a clock (irrespective of whether it is analogue or digital)
A television for a television (irrespective of size, flat screen, plasma etc)

To be confirmed/clarified as the directive becomes clearer.




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                                                                                 Attachment No.1.

Categories of Equipment which fall under the regulations:

Categories of electrical and electronic equipment covered by the WEEE Directive and a list of
products which shall be taken into account for the purpose of the WEEE Directive and which
fall under the regulations are:

1. Large household appliances

Large cooling appliances                             Washing machines
Refrigerators                                        Clothes dryers

Freezers                                             Other large appliances used for cooking and
Other large appliances used for refrigeration,       other processing of food
conservation and storage of food
Cooking                                              Electric stoves
Electric hot plates                                  Microwaves
Dish washing machines                                Electric radiators
Electric heating appliances                          Electric fans
Other large appliances for heating rooms,            Other fanning, exhaust ventilation and
beds, seating furniture                              conditioning equipment
Air conditioner appliances

2. Small household appliances

Vacuum cleaners                                      Carpet sweepers
Other appliances for cleaning                        Toasters
Appliances used for sewing, knitting, weaving        Irons and other appliances for ironing,
and other processing for textiles                    mangling and other care of clothing
Fryers                                               Electric knives
Grinders, coffee machines and equipment for          Appliances for hair-cutting, hair drying, tooth
opening or sealing containers or packages            brushing, shaving, massage and other body
                                                     care appliances
Clocks, watches and equipment for the                Scales
purpose of measuring, indicating or
registering time

3. IT and telecommunications equipment

Centralised data processing                          Mainframes
Minicomputers                                        Printer units
Personal computing: (CPU, mouse, screen              Personal computers Laptop computers (CPU,
and keyboard included)                               mouse, screen and keyboard included)
Notebook computers                                   Notepad computers
Printers                                             Copying equipment
Answering systems and other products or              Pocket and desk calculators and other
equipment of transmitting sound, images or           products and equipment for the collection,
other information by telecommunications              storage, processing, presentation or
                                                     communication of information by electronic
                                                     means
User terminals and systems                           Facsimile, Telex
Telephones                                           Pay telephones
Cordless telephones                                  Cellular telephones

Electrical and electronic typewriters




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4. Consumer equipment

Radio sets                                           Television sets
Video cameras                                        Video recorders
Hi-fi recorders                                      Audio amplifiers
Musical instruments and other products or
equipment for the purpose of recording or
reproducing sound or images, including
signals or other technologies for the
distribution of sound and image than by
telecommunications

5. Lighting equipment

Luminaires for fluorescent lamps with the            High intensity discharge lamps, including
exception of luminaires in households                pressure sodium lamps and metal halide
                                                     lamps
Straight fluorescent lamps                           Compact fluorescent lamps
Low pressure sodium lamps                            Other lighting or equipment for the purpose of
                                                     spreading or controlling light with the
                                                     exception of filament bulbs


6. Electrical and electronic tools (with the exception of large-scale stationary
   industrial tools)

Drills                                               Saws
Sewing machines                                      Tools for welding, soldering or similar use

Equipment for turning, milling, sanding,             Equipment for spraying, spreading,
grinding, sawing, cutting, shearing, drilling,       dispersing or other treatment of liquid or
making holes, punching, folding, bending or          gaseous substances by other means
similar processing of wood, metal and other
materials

Tools for riveting, nailing or screwing or           Tools for mowing or other gardening activities
removing rivets, nails, screws or similar uses


7. Toys, leisure and sports equipment

Electric trains or car racing sets                   Hand-held video game consoles
Video games                                          Computers for biking, diving, running, rowing,
                                                     etc.
Sports equipment with electric or electronic         Coin slot machines
components

8. Medical devices (with the exception of all implanted and infected products)

Radiotherapy equipment                               Cardiology
Dialysis                                             Pulmonary ventilators
Nuclear medicine                                     Laboratory equipment for in-vitro diagnosis
Analysers                                            Freezers
Fertilization tests                                  Other appliances for detecting, preventing,
                                                     monitoring, treating, alleviating illness, injury
                                                     or disability

9. Monitoring and control instruments




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Heating regulators                                   Smoke detector
Measuring, weighing or adjusting appliances          Other monitoring and control instruments
for household or as laboratory equipment             used in industrial installations (e.g. in control
                                                     panels)

Thermostats


10. Automatic dispensers
Automatic dispensers for hot drinks                  Automatic dispensers for hot or cold bottles
                                                     or cans
Automatic dispensers for solid products              Automatic dispensers for money
All appliances which deliver automatically all
kind of products




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  REQUEST FOR REMOVAL OF WEEE (WASTE ELECTRICAL, ELECTRONIC OR EQUIPMENT CONTAINING BATTERIES ETC)                                        Attachment No.2.
(Note: an electronic copy of this Form can be downloaded from http//www.hull.ac.uk/purchasing/ then click on the Link to Equipment Disposal)

To                            Trevor Savage, Facilities                                Date of Request
(delete as appropriate)       Graeme Murphy, Computer Centre
                              Margaret Webster, Scarborough Campus
From Name                                                                              From Department


                            Refrigerator/Freezer       Scientific/Medical/Research      Televisions (010)             Sports & Leisure Equip &      Clock/Calculator
 IT Equipment (001)         (004)                      Equip(007)                                                     Toys(013)                     (016)
                            Catering Equipment         Telecommunications               Flourescent Lamps &           Monitoring & Control          Other Equipment
 Lighting Equip. (002)      (005)                      Equip(008)                       tubes (011)                   Instruments (014)             (017)
                            Automatic Dispensers                                        Electric & Electronic Tools   Audio Visual Equipment
 Small Appliances (003)     (006)                      General Office Equip (009)       (012)                         (015)


Brief Description     Type of              Inventory       Date of          Date of       Value of             Weight of      Is item    If Y, details of   Has an alternative to
                      Equipment to be      Code            Acquisition      Disposal      Equipment            Equipment      Hazard     hazards            disposal as waste for re-
                      disposed of                                                         when                 (approx        ous                           cycling been
                      (enter code from                                                    purchased            Kg)                                          considered? (i.e.
                      above list)                                                                                                                           sale/donation etc)




For Facilities/Computer Centre use only:
Date Equipment Disposed of
Disposed of with which Contractor Cost to dispose to re-cycler
Cost to dispose to recylcer




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