Mooresville High School

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					Mooresville High School
       School Profile
        2007 – 2008




         550 North Indiana Street
        Mooresville, Indiana 46158
        Telephone: (317) 831-9203
            Fax: (317) 831-9206
     E-Mail: cmuston@mcsc.k12.in.us
     Home Page: mcsc.k12.in.us/MHS
                                           Table of Contents
School Improvement Committee .......................................................................................3

Mission Statement, Vision, and Beliefs .............................................................................4

Belief Statement ..................................................................................................................5

School Profile ......................................................................................................................6

NCA Triangulation, Interventions, Assessments, Timeline ........................................... 13

Summary of Data .............................................................................................................. 16
      Student Achievement Outcomes
        ISTEP+
        Graduation Rate
        Attendance Rate
Areas for Immediate Improvement ................................................................................. 35

Benchmarks for Progress ................................................................................................ 35

Academic Honors Diploma, Core 40, and Other Academic Programs ......................... 35

Parental Participation ...................................................................................................... 36

Community Partnerships ................................................................................................. 36

Technology as a Learning Tool ...................................................................................... 37

Safe and Disciplined Learning Environment .................................................................. 38

Statutes and Rules to be Waived ..................................................................................... 38

Three-year Timeline .......................................................................................................... 39

Summary of Committee Meetings.................................................................................... 39

Professional Development Program................................................................................ 40




                                                               2
           School Improvement Committee



Chuck Muston - Principal
Cindy Bond – SIP Co-Chair
Maureen Wehmeier – SIP Co-Chair
Tricia Ferguson - Assistant Principal
Tim VanWanzeele – Assistant Principal
Mike Mossbrucker – Director of Athletics
Debra Page – Director of Guidance
Elizabeth Breidinger - teacher
Matthew Brewer - teacher
Jake Allen - teacher
Kelly Crawford - teacher
Joyce Gilly - teacher
Barb Goddard - teacher
Cathy Guy - teacher
Jeff Franklin - teacher
Wendy Dollarhide - teacher
Stacy Nelson – counselor
Jennifer Vaughn – EOC teacher
Jennifer Perkins - teacher
Christen Owens - teacher
Lindy Scott - teacher
Kori Swalls – teacher
Sophie Davis – student
Zachary Rothenberger – student
Rev. Jeff Newton – parent
Mrs. Judy Quyle – parent
Mrs. Mary Beth Branson – community member




                                3
         Mooresville Consolidated School Corporation
                      Mission Statement
       The Mooresville Consolidated School Corporation will cultivate an
educational environment which strives for individual excellence and lifelong
learning through a cooperative effort of students, staff, parents, and
citizens.

                       Mooresville High School
                         Mission Statement
       Mooresville High School will educate through a caring environment,
effective communication, and critical thinking.


                       Mooresville High School
                          Vision Statement
        The vision of Mooresville High School (MHS) is that all students
matter and all students can learn. Our Professional Development Program
will focus on understanding each student’s unique learning style and
developing strategies to insure each student’s academic improvement.
        Using “best practices” and a team-based approach, MHS faculty will
develop strategies to improve student performance skills in problem solving
and reading and writing across the curriculum. The process will be
facilitated through the use of state-aligned curriculum and assessments
such as NWEA, ISTEP, and authentic global assessments developed and
scored in-house by members of the MHS faculty and staff.
        The MHS staff is committed to the vision of continuous improvement,
working as a team to develop teaching strategies that address student
needs as identified by measurable assessments and other quantifiable as
well as anecdotal evidence. MHS faculty is committed to the symbiotic
relationship between developing teaching and learning strategies and
measuring the results of the implementation of those strategies to
determine future school improvement plans and models. As Mike
Schmoker, author of The Key to Continuous School Improvement says,
“Results tell us which processes are most effective and to what extent and
where processes need reexamining and adjusting. Processes exist for
results-and results should inform processes. We cannot afford to
emphasize one over the other."


                                     4
                           Belief Statements

1. Students, parents, and school staff should work together for the
   educational success of all students.

2. All students and staff members deserve the respect of each other.

3. A strong work ethic is fundamental to achievement and self-worth.

4. Every student has the ability to achieve and pursue individual
   aspirations.

5. Extracurricular activities enhance the regular curriculum and contribute
   to the student’s overall education and well being.

6. Students and staff members accomplish more in a safe, attractive, well-
   equipped learning environment.

7. Communication skills and technological expertise are essential for
   participation in today’s society and work force.




                                      5
                            School Profile
Tradition and Change

        As we proceed through the 21st century, the words “tradition” and
“change” continue to accurately describe both Mooresville High School and
its surrounding community. Sources of traditions and community pride
include the fact that Mooresvillian Paul Hadley designed the Indiana state
flag and that an academy built by Mooresville Quakers in 1861 was one of
the first high schools in Indiana. After restoration the academy was
reopened as a historical landmark in the spring of 2001. Mooresville
continues to develop and change, and its population growth of 14% ranks it
as one of central Indiana’s fastest growing counties. Since 2001, the
school corporation has increased in enrollment by 203 students (5%) and
assessed valuation has reached nearly 950 million dollars, a growth of
67%. Despite this increase, our school still ranks 204 out of 293 in
assessed valuation; 70% of our funding is provided by the state. As a
result of this growth and increased enrollment, our corporation currently
employs 279 full-time licensed personnel and 231 full-time support staff.
        The corporation is now the 57th largest school district in the state (out
of 294) with over 4,300 students. This growth has pushed the high school
facility beyond its capacity of 1260 despite continual building modifications.
Several classroom and instructional areas have been added; the student
services area has been enlarged, and the hallway traffic patterns have
been altered to alleviate the congestion.
        In addition, curricular changes have been made to meet state
standards and student needs. The Educational Opportunity Center was
opened in 1998 . It serves up to sixty students per semester and provides
students of a non-traditional nature the opportunity to earn a MHS diploma.
Our program consists of two three hour sessions, in which students attend
one and contains a job component that allows the students to earn money
will earning credit and valuable job skills. During the 2007-2008 school
year a program called Focus was also introduced to mean the needs of at
rish students earlier, at the freshmen level. Students were chosed from
academic records from middle school and a co-hort was formed. A team of
5 teachers, the guidance director, assistant Principal for curriculum and a
guidance intern followed the students meet with them on a regular basis
and provided a stricit schedule to help aclmate them to high school and


                                        6
catch them up with the skills they needed to be successful in the high
school environment.
      In addition to helping at risk students, in 2007-2008 two additional
Advanced Placement classes were started, brining the total offered at the
high school to 8 and 29 vocational classes through Area 31 are now
offered. The Project Lead the Way learning academy was also started to
help students who are interested in science, technology, engineering and
math. All students were required to take Algebra starting with the 2005-
2006 school year. Two full-size technology labs with 30 computers each,
including internet access, have been added. The number of computers in
the media center has also increased to 28.
      The school corporation is the largest employer in a town of
approximately 10,000. (The school also serves Brown, Harrison, and
Madison townships for a total of 24,825 residents.) Mooresville is located
17 miles southwest of Indianapolis, so many of its residents commute to
jobs in Indianapolis.




                                     7
Student Characteristics, Goals, Challenges

       Most of the high school’s students are white with fewer than 2% of
the present school population consisting of Asian, Native American, African
American or Hispanic students.
       Forty percent of the students are on a college prep curriculum, yet
67% say they plan to attend a four-year college. (40% are working for a
Core 40 diploma, and 34% are working toward an honors diploma.) The
present attendance rate is 97%, and the graduation rate is 85%.
       The school’s free and reduced lunch students make up 20% of the
population, with 13% free and 7 % reduced.
       The average SAT score for 2007 was 983 with a 478 average on the
verbal section and a 505 average score on the math section. (The top 20%
of the class scored 609 and 608 respectively on the verbal and math
sections. All students at MHS are encouraged to take the SAT, so the
overall average is lower than schools who encourage nonacademic
students to take the ACT.)
       Forty nine percent of the students have failed a class during a six
weeks’ grading period and 23% have failed more than one class in a six
weeks’ grading period. From those groups, 10% said they just did not care;
over 15% cited personal/family problems or attendance for failure; 10%
marked “other” and nearly 18% said they did not understand the material.
       Sixty percent or more of the student population has access to various
forms of technology (VCR, computer, internet services, video games) at
home. A survey completed by graduates from the 1994-1999 classes
indicated that although 80% were satisfied with the education they received
at Mooresville High School, many thought additional emphasis on
technology was important.
       Extracurricular activities tend to be a focus for many Mooresville High
School students. More than 69% participate in some of these activities.
Some of the most popular are music groups leading the rest with 43% and
athletics second with nearly 33%.

Local Background

     Many students and their families have lived in the community for
generations. In fact 44% of the students have attended Mooresville



                                      8
schools since preschool or kindergarten, and 53% have a parent or
grandparent who graduated from Mooresville High School.
       Although 28% say they are also involved in community activities, 72%
of the 1007 surveyed indicated that they don’t plan to live in Mooresville
when they become adults, although 47% says they plan to stay in Indiana.
       Fifty seven percent of the students live in a home with their biological
parents; 22% in a home with a divorced parent and his/her current spouse
or companion; and 13% live in a single parent home. Eighty-five percent of
the students’ families own their own home, while 7% rent. Eighty-three
percent of the students said both parents work; and 43% said both parents
worked full time. Consequently, nearly half of the students return home
from school each day with no parent or guardian at home. Almost 10% of
the parents do not have a high school degree.
       The desire to hold a job at the high school level continues to escalate.
At this time 72% of the seniors work; 62% of the juniors; 42% of the
sophomores; and 25% of the freshmen. Eleven percent of the freshmen
work an illegal number of hours per week. Consequently, homework often
becomes a low priority. More than 16% say they never do homework
outside of school with 63% saying they do three hours of homework or less
each week. (Both parents and students indicate that some subjects such
as math and foreign languages are difficult to do at home because the
parent is unable to provide help.) An offshoot to the job/extracurricular
activity/homework challenge is the fact that 65% of the students say they
get fewer than the eight to nine hours of sleep per night that is
recommended for teenagers each night, and 50% say they don’t eat
anything before they come to school in the morning.

Students’ “Worsts” and “Bests”

      The most frequent answers to the question, “What do you like least
about Mooresville High School?” were people (intolerance for specific
groups –“geeks”, “nerds”, “jocks”, “gothics”…) teachers, discipline policies,
the guidance department, ISTEP, a lack of technology, unattractive or small
restrooms, final exams, poor building temperature control, school starting
time, security cameras, schedule, and not having a weighted grading scale.
Several of the dislikes concerned recent changes. For example, the drug
testing policy was initiated after upperclassmen started high school, and
security cameras were added this year.



                                       9
       The most frequent answers to the question, “What do you like most
about Mooresville High School?” were relationships with students and
teachers, extracurricular activities, the small school atmosphere, lunch,
passing periods, and the feeling the school is a safe place to be. (New
students often emphasized this feeling of safety.)
       Once again the things students liked most were often linked to
tradition. Homecoming, Wagon Trails Revue (a three-night talent show that
has been a fall activity for over twenty-five years), prom. post prom, and
commencement – some of the school’s oldest activities – were also
mentioned as the favorites. These events are also sources of pride, for
although Mooresville High School has not won any state athletic team
championships due to its “small school” status in “big school” competition,
most students believe MHS has the “best homecoming”, the “best prom
and post prom”, and the “best commencement” of any school anywhere.
The faculty and community agree and contribute considerable amounts of
time and resources to preserve these special events for one of their
priorities – the only high school in town.


 MHS Strengths
 Strengths
1. Most students and teachers feel they attend a school that has a safe,
   friendly environment.

2. Many students and teachers enjoy the interaction between other
   students, faculty, support staff, and administration.

3. The school provides a broad curriculum and is beginning to add
   advanced placement and advanced college project classes.

4. Important figures – attendance rates, graduation rate, and test scores
   are acceptable.

5. Faculty members are well qualified, and many devote an incredible
   amount of time to extracurricular/cocurricular and community activities to
   give students additional enrichment.

6. MHS graduates do well in college/post high school programs of study.

7. Technology is increasing to provide more training across the curriculum.

                                     10
 MHS Weaknesses


1. Even though the high school’s technology has expanded, the school still
   struggles to keep up with technological expansion throughout the
   curriculum and in overall communication between faculty, parents and
   community.

2. Staff members could benefit from more camaraderie, encouragement
   and professional development.

3. Due to a variety of factors (especially the large number of students who
   have jobs) student motivation is low. Many students make it clear that
   they do not have time after school hours to do homework. In addition,
   many are too fatigued to approach school positively.

4. Many students lack skills in conflict resolution and struggle with personal
   relationships at home and at school.

5. Some students (and their parents) need additional help outside of school
   for certain classes, especially math and foreign languages.

6. Faculty, support staff and administrators feel overwhelmed by the factor
   to get everything accomplished.




                                      11
Description and Location of Curriculum


      The curriculum of Mooresville High School consists of information for
all subject areas taught. The subject areas are: art, computer, family and
consumer science, foreign languages, health, language arts, math, music
(band, choir, orchestra), physical education, science, social studies, and
technology. The curriculum information for each subject area includes:
course number, course description, state standard-aligned curriculum.
      Copies of the curriculum are located in the professional library at the
school corporation’s education center and in the public access section of
Mooresville High School’s library.


Titles and Descriptions of Assessment Instruments to be
Used in Addition to ISTEP+

      In addition to the ISTEP+ we intend to use several other assessment
instruments. We will use individual teacher assessments, Northwest
Evaluation Association, Core 40 Assessments, and Lexile level
assessment.
      The Lexile assessment is a new part of our Improvement plan. The
Lexile score is a unique assessment tool that shows both reading ability
and readability. Through Lexile scoring both a student’s reading ability
level and writing level can be assessed. The high school staff has been
very excited to start this program, combined with a reading initiative to
improve our students’ performance.




                                      12
                       Triangulation of Data
              Goal: Reading Comprehension
    To increase each student’s reading Lexile score by 1 level.


                           ISTEP/GQE Scores




      SAT/ACT                                                NWEA
                           All students will
                           increase Lexile
                           scores by one
                           level or 100
                           points.




                              Action Plan:
An identified weakness (ISTEP/GQE results) for many of Mooresville High
School’s students is the inability to effectively comprehend and apply
written material. Part of the problem is that the training of these skills often
falls solely under the domain of the Language Arts Department, which is
also responsible for delivery of the entire state English curriculum. After


                                       13
analyzing data to determine the areas of student deficiency, the MHS
School Improvement Committee set out to develop a comprehensive plan
to attack the specific problem, and emerge with a student body that is
better able to demonstrate proficiency in reading comprehension.

After identification of the area of deficiency, the team, under the direction of
building Principal Chuck Muston, began researching an appropriate
program to assist with the assessment of our students’ reading levels. It
was determined that finding the Lexile level of each student was an
important first step. Once the level is identified, an intervention will be put
into place for each individual student to improve his or her personal reading
level.

Training teachers to utilize interventions across the curriculum and
implement strategies within the classroom has begun. Additional training
will focus on creating and implementing strategies across the curriculum,
with the goal of improving individual student Lexile scores by one level/100
points.




 Interventions

    Students will receive classroom embedded, guided practice of
     content area strategies for improving literacy.
    Students and staff will participate in a school-wide reading initiative.


 Assessment

    ISTEP/GQE
    Individual classroom assessments
    Lexile testing

 Timeline




                                       14
 Research was completed to determine a method of assessing
  student baseline reading ability.
 Research is continuing to find and implement a reading initiative.
 Teacher training began in fall of 2007 and is on-going to familiarize
  staff with content area strategies for literacy.
 Interventions and Assessments will begin in 2008-2009.




                                  15
Summary
   Of
  Data




   16
                       1995                 1110
                       1996                 1156
                       1997                 1154
                       1998                 1215
                       1999                 1196
                       2000                 1125
                       2001                 1212
                       2002                 1270
                       2003                 1276
                       2004                 1296




                         2004        0      1994
         2003                                             1995

2002                                                               1996




  2001                                                           1997

                2000                               1998
                                     1999




                                17
                                  Percentage Passing ISTEP 10th graders

                                            2007    2006       2005    2004    2003          2002          2001
Top Schools (95th Percentiile)               90      91         94      92      91            88            90
       State Average                         66      65         65      68      68            66            68
  Mooresville High School                    71      71         73      76      75            58            70




  100
  90
  80
  70
  60
  50
  40
  30
  20
  10
   0
          2007             2006              2005       2004          2003        2002              2001

           Top Schools (95th Percentiile)             State Average           Mooresville High School




                                                      18
                  Mooresville High School
         Class of 2003 Post-Graduate Education

        2002-03 Retention                                 100 %

      Four Year College                                     159
      Two Year College                                      36
  Vocational Technical School                               35
            Military                                         6
     No Higher Education                                    26



180
160
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
 0
      Four Year   Two Year        Vocational   Military   No Higher
       College     College        Technical               Education
                                   School




                             19
                         Mooresville High School
                         College Attendance Rate

                    Class of 1995                  37.6%

                        Definition Change in 1996-97

                    Class of 1996                  53.8%
                    Class of 1997                  51.0%
                    Class of 1998                  40.1%
                    Class of 1999                  51.1%
                    Class of 2000                  57.9%
                    Class of 2001                  62.9%
                    Class of 2002                  67.0%
                    Class of 2003                  78.0%
                    Class of 2004                  74.0%




90.0%
80.0%
70.0%
60.0%
50.0%
40.0%
30.0%
20.0%
10.0%
 0.0%
        Class   Class   Class   Class   Class   Class   Class   Class   Class   Class
          of      of      of      of      of      of      of      of      of      of
        1995    1996    1997    1998    1999    2000    2001    2002    2003    2004




                                 20
21
                                             Mooresville High School
                                       Average Percent Passing ISTEP

                                            1998      1999          2000   2001   2002          2003          2004
Top Schools (95th Percentile)               88.8      88.5          89.8   88.8   88.5          90.4          92.0
      State Average                         66.6      66.2          66.4   65.4   65.4          68.7          71.0
  Mooresville High School                   64.7      60.8          69.7   70.5   59.4          72.9          75.0



 100.0
  90.0
  80.0
  70.0
  60.0
  50.0
  40.0
  30.0
  20.0
  10.0
   0.0
          1998              1999              2000           2001          2002      2003              2004

            Top Schools (95th Percentile)                 State Average           Mooresville High School




                                                     22
                                               Mooresville High School
                                                         SAT Scores
                                              College Bound-Senior Date


                                                                          Indiana Indiana   US      US
                                          Pupils % of Seniors
 Year             Verbal      Math                                        Average Average Average Average
                                          Tested   Tested
                                                                           Verbal   Math   Verbal  Math
1994-95            473            464          137             55             492          494         504           506
1995-96            475            460          136             54             494          494         505           508
1996-97            459            462          146             59             494          497         505           511
1997-98            464            454          114             47             497          500         505           512
1998-99            478            456          151             58             496          498         505           511
1999-00            477            472          161             61             498          501         505           514
2000-01            466            469          146             61             499          501         506           514
2001-02            482            499          981             48             498          503         504           516
2002-03            483            495          978             42             500          504         507           519
2003-04            495            505         1000             38             501          506         508           518




  1200


  1000


  800


  600


  400


  200


    0
           1994-95       1995-96    1996-97    1997-98    1998-99   1999-00     2000-01   2001-02   2002-03      2003-04


         Verbal                         Math                        Pupils Tested              % of Seniors Tested
         Indiana Average Verbal         Indiana Average Math        US Average Verbal          US Average Math




                                                          23
                                            Mooresville High School
                      Grade 10 Percentage Passing ISTEP + Math Standard

                                            1998         1999       2000    2001    2002          2003          2004
Top Schools (95th Percentiile)               83           85         88      90      88            91            92
       State Average                         59           60         65      68      66            68            68
  Mooresville High School                    56           53         68      70      58            75            76




  100
  90
  80
  70
  60
  50
  40
  30
  20
  10
   0
          1998             1999              2000            2001          2002        2003              2004

           Top Schools (95th Percentiile)                  State Average           Mooresville High School




                                                    24
                     Mooresville High School
                     9th Grade NWEA Scores
                            Fall 2001

Math                                     Low    Average   High
  Number Sense                            77      95      127
  Computation                             98      58      143
  Algebra                                 96      76      127
  Geometry                                79      122      98
  Measurement                             84      104     111
  Analysis                                67      96      136
  Problem Solving                        118      91       90
Language Usage                           Low    Average   High
  Writing                                 65      108     125
  Grammar                                 75      140      83
  Writing Mechanics                       52      90      156
Reading                                  Low    Average   High
  Work Recognition                        91      104     105
  Reading Comprehension                   88      94      118
  Literary Response                       92      113      95

                    Paul Hadley Middle School
                     8th Grade NWEA Scores
                            Fall 2001

Math                                     Low    Average   High
  Number Sense                            73      83      174
  Computation                             69      82      179
  Algebra                                 74      114     142
  Geometry                                78      149     103
  Measurement                             70      140     120
  Analysis                                65      108     157
  Problem Solving                         98      122     111
Language Usage                           Low    Average   High
  Writing                                 81      127     148
  Grammar                                106      148     102
  Writing Mechanics                       62      108     185
Reading                                  Low    Average   High
  Word Recognition                        84      124     131
  Reading Comprehension                   74      131     138
  Literary Response                       82      126     135



                               25
                              9th Grade NWEA Scores - Fall 2001
                                                                                   90
Problem Solving                                                                    91
                                                                                                          118
                                                                                                                      136
       Analysis                                                                         96
                                                                  67
                                                                                                 111
  Measurement                                                                                 104
                                                                              84
                                                                                         98
      Geometry                                                                                             122
                                                                         79
                                                                                                                127
       Algebra                                                          76
                                                                                        96
                                                                                                                          143
   Computation                                           58
                                                                                         98
                                                                                                                127
Number Sense                                                                            95
                                                                        77

                  0           20         40             60              80              100             120         140         160

                                   Low                   Average                              High




                          9th Grade Language Usage Scores - Fall 2001


                                                                                                                       156
Writing Mechanics                                                            90
                                                   52

                                                                        83
        Grammar                                                                                               140
                                                                   75

                                                                                                    125
          Writing                                                                        108
                                                             65

                      0       20         40         60             80         100             120         140         160       180

                                   Low                  Average                          High




                           9th Grade NWEA Reading Scores - Fall 2001


                                                                                                    95
Literary Response                                                                                                113
                                                                                               92

     Reading                                                                                                          118
                                                                                                   94
  Comprehension                                                                               88

                                                                                                          105
Work Recognition                                                                                          104
                                                                                               91

                      0            20         40                  60               80               100             120         140

                                   Low              Average                         High




                                                        26
                                8th Grade NWEA Scores - Fall 2001
                                                                                   111
Problem Solving                                                                          122
                                                                            98
                                                                                                            157
       Analysis                                                                   108
                                                       65
                                                                                         120
  Measurement                                                                                       140
                                                            70
                                                                                 103
      Geometry                                                                                        149
                                                                 78
                                                                                                    142
       Algebra                                                                         114
                                                             74
                                                                                                                        179
   Computation                                                    82
                                                        69
                                                                                                                   174
 Number Sense                                                     83
                                                             73

                  0        20        40           60         80            100         120     140         160     180        200

                                     Low                 Average                       High




                          8th Grade NWEA Reading Scores - Fall 2001


                                                                                                                  135
Literary Response                                                                                           126
                                                                                 82

     Reading                                                                                                        138
                                                                                                                 131
  Comprehension                                                            74

                                                                                                               131
Word Recognition                                                                                            124
                                                                                  84

                      0         20           40              60             80           100         120          140         160

                                  Low                   Average                        High




                          8th Grade Language Usage Scores - Fall 2001

                                                                                                                          185
Writing Mechanics                                                                  108
                                                        62

                                                                                 102
        Grammar                                                                                           148
                                                                                  106

                                                                                                          148
          Writing                                                                             127
                                                                      81

                      0      20         40         60            80        100         120     140         160     180        200

                                     Low                Average                        High



                                                       27
                                          Mooresville High School
                                   PSAT College-Bound Juniors

                              1996 1997 1998 1999                      2000         2001       2002            2003
Top Schools (95th Percentile) 103 104 152 153                           154          154        155             152
      State Average            96   97   141 143                        142          142        142             141
  Mooresville High School      91   90   141 137                        139          143        128             130




 180

 160

 140

 120

 100

  80

  60

  40

  20

   0
       1996         1997          1998          1999           2000    2001            2002             2003

          Top Schools (95th Percentile)                State Average          Mooresville High School




                                                        28
                                            Mooresville High School
                         SAT Composite Score College-Bound Seniors

                                            1997   1998      1999        2000    2001        2002       2003        2004
Top Schools (95th Percentile)               1054   1077      1070        1074    1079        1080       1090        1059
      State Average                         991    997       994         999     1000        1001       1004        1007
  Mooresville High School                   921    918       934         949     935         981        978         1000



 1150

 1100

 1050

 1000

  950

  900

  850

  800
         1997          1998               1999     2000           2001          2002           2003              2004

          Top Schools (95th Percentile)                 State Average                  Mooresville High School




                                                   29
                                              Mooresville High School
                                                       SAT Scores
                                             College Bound-Senior Data


                                                                      Indiana               Indiana   US      US
                                       Pupils % of Seniors
 Year        Verbal          Math                                     Average               Average Average Average
                                       Tested   Tested
                                                                       Verbal                 Math   Verbal  Math
1994-95           473         464        137                 55           492                494            504               506
1995-96           475         460        136                 54           494                494            505               508
1996-97           459         462        146                 59           494                497            505               511
1997-98           464         454        114                 47           497                500            505               512
1998-99           478         456        151                 58           496                498            505               511
1999-00           477         472        161                 61           498                501            505               514
2000-01           466         469        146                 61           499                501            506               514
2001-02           482         499        981                 48           498                503            504               516
2002-03           483         495        978                 42           500                504            507               519
2003-04           495         505       1000                 38           501                506            508               518




  1200


  1000


  800


  600


  400


  200


    0
          1994-95       1995-96   1996-97    1997-98    1998-99    1999-00        2000-01     2001-02     2002-03        2003-04


         Verbal                       Math                        Pupils Tested                    % of Seniors Tested
         Indiana Average Verbal       Indiana Average Math        US Average Verbal                US Average Math




                                                       30
                                            Mooresville High School
                                                ACT Composite Score

                                         1993   1994      1995   1996   1997       1998   1999    2000   2001   2002      2003
Top Schools (95th Percentile)            23.5   23.9      23.4   24.5   25.2       24.6   24.6    25.1   24.2   24.2      24.2
      State Average                      20.6   20.8      20.9   20.9   21.1       21.4   21.2    21.4   21.4   21.5      21.6
  Mooresville High School                19.1   21.6      22.9   21.7   19.5       19.6   20.1    21.7   18.6   20.7      20.4



30.0

25.0

20.0

15.0

10.0

 5.0

 0.0
       1993      1994        1995        1996      1997       1998          1999     2000        2001    2002          2003

         Top Schools (95th Percentile)                      State Average                    Mooresville High School




                                                       31
              Mooresville High School


        ACT Scores With College Prep

                        College Prep          General Ed
       Year
                          Scores               Scores
  1998-99                   21.5                 12.0
  1999-00                   23.5                 15.3
  2000-01                   22.6                 16.5
  2001-02                   21.4                 20.2
  2002-03                   20.8                 18.9



25.0



20.0



15.0



10.0



 5.0



 0.0
        1998-99    1999-00      2000-01   2001-02     2002-03


          College Prep Scores             General Ed Scores




                          32
                                              Mooresville High School
                                           Percent of Seniors Taking ACT

                              1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003
Top Schools (95th Percentile) 45    43   41   43   41   45   41   40
      State Average            17   17   16   16   17   17   16   17
  Mooresville High School      2    2    5    3    7    8    23   27



 50
 45
 40
 35
 30
 25
 20
 15
 10
  5
  0
         1996         1997           1998        1999        2000   2001          2002           2003

           Top Schools (95th Percentile)            State Average          Mooresville High School




                                            1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003
      Number Participating                   6    4    12   7    16   20   64   78




                                                        33
Student Achievement Outcomes


                                        Average Percent Passing ISTEP

                                             1998         1999        2000        2001   2002        2003          2004
Top Schools (95th Percentile)                88.8         88.5        89.8        88.8   88.7        90.4          92.0
      State Average                          66.6         66.3        66.4        65.4   65.4        68.7          71.0
  Mooresville High School                    64.7         60.8        69.7        70.5   59.4        72.9          75.0



 100.0
  90.0
  80.0
  70.0
  60.0
  50.0
  40.0
  30.0
  20.0
  10.0
   0.0
           1998               1999                2000        2001               2002     2003             2004

                  Top Schools (95th Percentile)                  State Average           Mooresville High School




                                                         34
Immediate Improvement

Mooresville High School’s Performance Goal is:
     1. All students will increase Lexile scores by one level or 100 points.


 Benchmarks for Progress

       Benchmarks for progress will be measured with Lexile scores. We
will be assessing Lexile scores at the beginning and end of the freshmen
year and each year there after in December. This will give us the ability to
assess our student population continuously to determine if goals are being
met, what further interventions may be needed, and when to develop new
goals.
       Additionally, we will utilize the ISTEP+, NWEA, and Core 40 Exams.
The progress will be documented through the AdvancEd School
Improvement process.


Academic Honors, Core 40, and Other Academic
Programs
      Mooresville High School publishes a document titled, Career
Pathways and Course Descriptions. Included in the book are the
provisions to offer courses that allow all students to become eligible to earn
the Academic Honors Diploma and provisions to encourage all students to
earn an Academic Honors Diploma or to complete the Core 40 curriculum.
MHS has articulation agreements with five state universities, allowing
students to obtain college credit and advanced placement in subjects such
as AP Biology, Physics, Calculus, Chemistry, US History, Literature and
Composition. In addition, MHS students may obtain CISCO certification in
our high school.




                                      35
Parental Participation


      Parents have an opportunity to be involved with the school in a
multitude of ways including Freshmean Orientation, Open House,
parent/teacher conferences, School Improvement Committee, high school
PTO and Post-Prom. They support their children in a number school
sponsored activities. E-mail, Harmony access, and the school web site are
some of the ways parents communicate and keep informed with the school.


Community Partnerships


       Mooresville High School is fortunate to have several community
partnerships. The Business/Education Community Partnership (BECP)
was founded four years ago when concerned parents, educators, business
people and community volunteers met to establish a line of communication
and action. According to the mission statement the BECP is committed to
preparing Mooresville students for careers and life-long learning by
expanding career exploration, providing service learning opportunities and
exposing students to the skills and characteristics needed to excel in a
constantly changing world. Career Days, speakers, volunteers, and their
support are used by MHS to further cross-curricular communication.
       One of the new programs that some of our students participate in is
with the St. Francis Internship Program. Students interested in healthcare
work at the hospital to get first hand experience in patient care. As Project
Lead the Way continues to progress, our engineering students will be
participating in internships with engineering firms.
       In addition, our students benefit financially from the Morgan County
Community Foundation with their scholarship contributions, and our local
Edward Jones office gives a Positive Student Award each month.
Mooresville High School gives back to the community too. The library
hosts classes for Indiana Wesleyan, and the school is also host to the
Manufacturers and REMC annual meetings. Additionally, our natatorium
offers year round swimming lessons, family swim time and opportunities for
the community to join swim teams and water aerobic classes. In the
summer our school partners with the local parks department so that acting,
science and cooking instruction can be offered to area youth.


                                     36
Technology and Learning Tool


       Technology use at Mooresville High School continues to grow. The
high school has an open lab for student and teacher use, a distance
learning lab, an automated media center with 18 computers, and a closed
circuit television studio. Teachers as well as students are encouraged to
utilize available technology which includes scanners, digital cameras,
presentation software, and projectors. Integrating technology into the
curriculum is encouraged and supported by administration and an
instructional technology specialist (ITS).




                                    37
Safe and Disciplined Learning Environment


      In an attempt to ensure the safety of our students, we have put
together an extensive Emergency Procedures handbook which covers a
wide variety of possible scenarios. Our safety plan utilizes a camera
system, hand held metal detectors, a variety of alarm systems, and school
security personnel. Occasional drug dog searches are conducted, and
administration acts swiftly on any information regarding a threat to student
or building safety.
      The purpose of discipline is to ensure an atmosphere which promotes
the best possible environment for all those involved in the educational
process. The discipline plan provides a standardized procedure which will
ensure that all students will be dealt with in a consistent and fair manner.
Each building may have minor differences in procedure, but maintaining a
positive learning environment and protecting individual rights are vital to the
success of a fair and consistent discipline policy. Success can only be
achieved with the full cooperation and support from the school, the family,
and the community.



Statutes and Rules to be Waived

     Mooresville High School is not asking for any statutes or rules to be
waived.




                                      38
Three Year Timeline


       The school improvement plan will be evaluated annually by the
school improvement committee and will also be subject to the AdvancEd
review process. The document will be ever changing as surveys are
conducted, data is disaggregated, areas of deficiency are identified, and
goals are accomplished.
      In terms of student achievement and the next three years, we will
begin the Lexile process during the 2007-2008 year and implement a
reading invertention during the 2008-20009 school year.


Summary of School Committee Meetings



The school personnel members of the MHS School Improvement
Committee meet weekly, on Thursday at 6:45 a.m. Throughout the year,
different sub-committees, parents, and community members meet to
address the committee and get updates on on-going issues. The SIP
committee also holds school wide in-service opportunities at least twice a
year to update the staff and train on initiatives.




                                     39
Professional Development



       Mooresville plans to utilize the promised $3,000 per school plus the
$8.50 per student to fund professional development opportunities for our
staff.




                                     40
                                    FORM A

 INDIANA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM


             March 5, 2008



        Mooresville High School
             Grades 9-12


            School #: 6369

        550 North Indiana Street
       Mooresville, Indiana 46158

        Phone: (317) 831-9203

          Fax: (317) 831-9206

        Chuck Muston, Principal

        cmuston@mcsc.k12.in.us




                   41
                                                                                               FORM B

I, Chuck Muston as the exclusive representative, by signing this document, demonstrate my support for
the Professional Development Program submitted by the above-mentioned school.

_________________________________________                _____________________
           Chuck Muston                                            Date

Committee responsible for this plan.

                                 Group you are
         Name                    representing:                 Signature                Date
Chuck Muston                Principal
Tricia Ferguson             Assistant Principal
Tim VanWanzeele             Assistant Principal
Mike Mossbrucker            Director of Athletics
Debra Page                  Director Guidance
Cindy Bond                  SIP co-chair
Maureen Wehmeier            SIP co-chair
Jeff Franklin               Teacher
Wendy Dollarhide            Teacher
Kelly Crawford              Teacher
Christen Owens              Teacher
Elizabeth Breidinger        Teacher
Sophie Davis                Student
Zachary Rothenberger        Student
Rev. Jeff Newton            Parent
Mrs. Judy Quyle             Parent
Mrs. Mary Beth Branson      Parent


                                                    42
                                                                              FORM C




                               Mooresville High School
                               Vision Statement/Motto



Mooresville High School students will learn to their highest potential, lead by
example and leave a positive legacy behind.




                                         43
                                                                                                    FORM C (cont’d)

The goals for our Professional Development Program are:

 to build the foundation of a professional learning community,
 to enhance the professional library
 to have teachers implement content area strategies for improved reading comprehension and writing ability.

and to have teachers:

   explore and identify student needs.
   continue with the establishment of a bank of writing prompts/assessments to be used as benchmarks.
   familiarized with the concept and use of the rubric as it relates to problem solving.
   continue a school-wide rubric to measure improvement of problem solving skills.
   create a school-wide reading initiative.

How will all staff members be involved in continuous learning? How will continuous learning be embedded in practice?

 All teachers are required to attend building-level in-services that focus on developing student achievement through
  identification of student strengths and weaknesses, developing strategies and interventions to improve student
  achievement, and identifying and developing assessments to measure whether or not student improvement
  occurred.
 Department teams will meet on a regular basis to share information regarding teaching strategies, progress of
  students, alignment of curriculum with state standards, common authentic assessments, and cross-curriculum
  teaching and learning.
 Corporation Professional Development Academy encourages and supports professional development and growth
  to enhance student learning through the incorporation of “best teaching practices” as identified by education
  experts.
 Building–level Professional Development Committee encourages growth in specific curricular areas for MHS staff
  members to ensure that MHS stays current with “best practices” in the curricular areas.
 School Improvement process will continuously assess student achievement as well as teaching strategies used to
  develop student learning. Because the process is data-driven, it is continuous and fluid, and it is on-going: as
  improvement is met, other target areas and teaching strategies are developed.



                                                        44
                                                                                                                                                     FORM D


                                                                             Action Plan
                                                                              2007-2008
School Goal # 1: To increase each student’s reading Lexile score by one level.

Professional Development Goals: to build the foundation of a professional learning community, to enhance the
professional library and to have teachers implement content area strategies for improved reading comprehension and
writing ability.

Research: Douglas Fisher, et al, 50 Content Area Strategies for Adolescent Literacy
                                                                                                         Time Line                     Resources
       Activity*           Intended Audience            Person                 Collaborative              (Include               (People, materials, time)
                           (Stakeholders)             Responsible             Partners Needed         completion date)
                                                                                                                                                 Need        Have
Professional Library       MHS staff               Professional Dev          MHS staff members       ongoing             books                   X
                                                   Committee

Workshop:                  Varied MHS staff        Professional Dev          MHS staff members       1-08                Wendy Walter-Bailey,                X
Improving Adolescent       members                 Committee                                                             Indiana University
Literacy                                                                                                                 professor, Materials                X

In-service:                MHS staff               Professional Dev          MHS staff members       3-08                Materials                           X
Improving Adolescent                               Committee
Literacy
Presentation:              Professional Dev. And   Allen, Principal Intern   Professional Dev. And   3-08                Read 180 professional               X
Read 180                   School Improvement                                School Improvement                          Read 180 materials      X
                           Committees                                        Committees
In-Service: book study/    MHS staff               Principal                 PL221 Committee         On-going            books                               X
Improving Adolescent
Literacy by Douglas
Fields
On-line training:          MHS math department     MHS math department       Owens, Bond             12-07               Software                            X
Geometer’s Sketchpad                                                                                                     On-line training                    X


In-Service: Content Area   MHS staff               Professional Dev.         MHS staff               4-08                books                               X
Strategies                                         Committee

Peer Coaching              MHS staff               Principal                 Mentors                 On-going




                                                                                    45
Student advisees         MHS staff             Guidance                Student Activities      On-going                 Time to meet with           X
                                                                                                                        advisees on a regular
                                                                                                                        basis

Professional             MHS staff             MHS staff               PDA committee           On-going                 Instruction on completing
Development Academy                                                                                                     application
Masters of Education     MHS staff             MHS staff               Colleges and            On-going                 Presentations by recent
programs                                                               universities with MED                            MED graduates
                                                                       programs

Career Academies         MHS staff, students   Principal, Guidance     MHS staff               Careers class on-going
                                                                                               Career Academies on-
                                                                                               going
Small Group In-Service   MHS staff             Principal               MHS staff
                                               Professional Dev
                                               Committee
Common Plan Time         MHS staff             Principal               MHS staff
                                               Professional Dev
                                               Committee

Cultural Competency      MHS staff             Ward, Wehmeier,                                 On-going                 Preparation of ILP’s for
                                               Corp. ESL coordinator                                                    ELL’s, discussion of
                                                                                                                        culture of ELL’s

Service Learning         MHS staff             Lindsey, Wehmeier,      Susan Haynes            On-going                 Grant writing, project
                                               Goddard, Marine,                                                         completion, community
                                               Weiss, Skaggs,                                                           connections
                                               Eickhoff,




                                                                               46
                                                                                 FORM E


                                    EVALUATION

All Students will demonstrate a strengthened knowledge base for developing problem
solving skills across the curriculum.

I.     Summary of data and evidence upon which this school goal was based.

       Primarily, the goal is based on ISTEP scores and historical ISTEP data.
       School-wide problem solving assessments.
       NWEA scores are also used to measure student progress.

       Teachers will benefit from the Professional Development Program in many ways
including:
        the ability to identify a weakness
        the ability to development interventions to address the weakness and to more
           quickly assess whether students are improving.




II.    What new knowledge, skills, and attitudes toward learning will result from your
       Professional Development Program?

       Teachers will demonstrate enhanced knowledge of problem solving skills in a
       variety of curricular areas. Due to enhanced success in problem solving,
       students will more readily embrace the problem solving dynamic.

       Teachers will be teaching their peers as experts in areas such as differentiated
       instruction, classroom management, and multiple intelligences.


III.   What data and evidence related to new knowledge, skills and attitudes toward
       learning will you collect to evaluate the Professional Development Program’s
       impact on progress toward this school goal? (NOTE: If the data or evidence are
       quantitative, state the numerical goal you hope to achieve.)

      We will collect ISTEP data and NWEA data. We will collect data from our school-
wide assessments.




                                           47
                                                                                  FORM E


                                    EVALUATION*

All Students will demonstrate improved performance skills in reading and writing across
the curriculum.

I.     Summary of data and evidence upon which this school goal was based.

       The goal is based on evidence supported by the ISTEP test and the NWEA.
       Writing assessments are also used to measure student progress.




II.    What new knowledge, skills, and attitudes toward learning will result from your
       Professional Development Program?

       Teachers will develop better writing habits. Students will add journal writing to
       the curriculum. A school-wide reading initiative will be introduced. Students will
       develop positive attitudes toward their writing as a result of more exposure to
       writing in a variety of subject areas. Teachers will teach their colleagues in areas
       such as differentiated instruction, classroom management, and multiple
       intelligences.




III.   What data and evidence related to new knowledge, skills and attitudes toward
       learning will you collect to evaluate the Professional Development Program’s
       impact on progress toward this school goal? (NOTE: If the data or evidence are
       quantitative, state the numerical goal you hope to achieve.)

       We will collect ISTEP data and we will collect data from our global assessments.
       We will also use NWEA data and information gleaned from the writing
       assessment.




                                            48
                                                                                                FORM F

            Total Funds Available for Professional Development: Grants, Gifts,
                                    and Appropriation


Federal     Amount      State        Amount     School Corp.    Amount     School Sources       Amount    Total
Sources                Sources                    Sources                  Include grants and             Amount
                                                                           partnerships                   of Each
                                                                                                          Row

                                               Local Fund: #    $11, 250   Career Academies     $25,000   $26,250
                                               of Mooresville              Grant
                                               High School
                                               Teachers at
                                               $150

                     State           $26,000                                                              $26,000
                     Professional
                     Development
                     Appropriation


Total                                $26,000                    $11,250                         $25,000   $62,250
each
“Amount”
column

Amount                               $26,000                    $11,250                         $25,000   $62,250
Allocated
to Prof
Dev




                                                        49
                         SURVEY INFORMATION


1. Will time be organized differently in your school to accommodate professional
   development? If so, how?

   We will allow time in the day for reading. We will allow time for common
   planning, as well as time for small group presentations and interactions on topics
   of interest.

2. How will technology be used in your professional development? (This refers to
   technology used as a delivery system for professional development and/or
   helping staff use technology in instruction.

          We believe that adequate training and support are key factors in the
   implementation of a successful technology program. In order for training to be
   adequate, it must be delivered as needed and relate to technology that is readily
   available. Support and encouragement are vital, as teachers and staff continue
   to integrate technology into daily activities. As teachers experience success with
   technology, they model enthusiasm for lifelong learning.
          Professional development focuses teachers’ learning skills in the context
   of applying technology to curriculum and instruction. Professional development
   requests are determined by a biannual training needs analysis and by teacher
   responses to evaluation questionnaires administered at the end of training
   sessions.
          To reach professional development goals, the school corporation has
   created three Instructional Technology Specialists (ITS) positions. The ITS are
   classroom teachers who have a knowledge of curriculum, a relationship with staff
   members, and an enthusiasm for using the tools of technology in the classroom.
   They are available daily to provide instruction, guidance, support,
   encouragement, and curriculum ideas. One ITS has responsibility for staff
   development at the high school.
          Staff development is also accomplished with the help of teacher and
   student leaders who serve as mentors and guides on an as needed basis. Staff
   members are encouraged to attend conferences and workshops. Teachers will
   be paid a stipend for attending summer training sessions provided by the
   technology department. Summer training is also planned for administrators and
   secretaries.




                                       50