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Bathroom Briefs Beverages in a healthy diet by t3293888

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									    Bathroom Briefs
                 Your line to good health!
     Developed by: Health Promotion & Disease Prevention
     Section, Forsyth County Department of Public Health
                                                                               January 2008


             Beverages din bae healthy pdiet
             What role   o     verages   lay?


    M
            ost people like to drink beverages with meals,                     By about age 20, the
            when exercising or playing sports, and for                   average woman has acquired
            refreshment. The calorie and nutritional value of            98 percent of her skeletal mass.
beverages varies greatly depending on what you choose to                 Building strong bones during
drink and the size cup or bottle your drink is in. Glasses and           childhood and adolescence can
cups are bigger nowadays than ever before. You even have                 be the best defense against
an incentive to buy the bigger size cup or bottle because it             developing osteoporosis later in
may only cost you a few pennies more than the smaller size.              life. Key things you can do to
Most restaurants even offer free refills. Given the expanse of           protect your bone health is to eat
beverage choices - what role do beverages play in a healthy              a balanced diet rich in calcium
diet?                                                                    and vitamin D and do weight-
     As you can see in the table below, calories and nutritional         bearing and resistance-training
value vary widely based on the beverage you choose to drink.             exercises. Skim and 1% milk are
Many beverages are high in sugar, a form of carbohydrate,                good low fat sources of calcium
but offer very little in the way of nutritional value. These are         and vitamin D.
commonly known as “empty calorie” drinks. You may be                          Beverages play a key role
surprised to learn that some drinks that sound healthy may be            in good health – just be sure to
so only in name.                                                         choose your beverages wisely!




      Product             Calories        Sugar        Carbohydrate         Protein        Fat          Calcium         Caffeine
    (16 ounces)                          (grams)         (grams)            (grams)      (grams)        (grams)       (milligrams)
 Pepsi® or
 carbonated soft             200            54                54                0             0               0              50
 drink
 Tropicana®
 Strawberry                  220           54                 56                0            0                0              0
 Melon
 SoBe® Power                 240            60                62                0             0               0              64
 Propel® Black
                              20             4                   6              0             0               0              0
 Cherry
 Lipton Iced
 Tea® with                   120            32                32                0             0               0              40
 Lemon
 1% milk                     200            22                24               16             5             600              0
 McDonald’s
 Vanilla Triple                                                                                                           Not
                             550            72                96               13            13             430
 Thick ®                                                                                                                available
 milkshake

     Note: Water has 0 calories, sugar, carbohydrates, protein, fat, calcium, or caffeine. The majority of bottled water does not contain
the recommended amount of Fluoride. Tap water is fluoridated and is endorsed by the American Dental Association as a safe and
effective measure for preventing tooth decay

								
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