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Adjectives-&-Adverbs

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					Adjectives & Adverbs


     The Brenham Writing Room
       Created by D. Herring
             Adjective vs. Adverb
 An adjective describes or modifies a noun or a
  pronoun.
      Adds info about what kind, which one, or how many
      Describes how things look, smell, feel, taste, sound
 An adverb describes or modifies a verb, an adjective,
  or another adverb.
      Adds info about how, how much, when, where, or to
       what extent.
      Often ends in –ly.
             Which one do I use?
 It is critical to identify which word is being
  modified in order to determine whether to use
  an adjective or an adverb as the modifier.

      I: She runs slow.
      C: She runs slowly.

      I: He is real tall.
      C: He is really tall.
   Adj. & Adv. With Same Form
 Some adjectives and adverbs have the same
  form.
     early, far, fast, hard, high, late, often, past,
      right, soon
 The only way to distinguish them is to identify
  what they modify.
     Adj: The fast car drove around the curve.
     Adv: The car drove fast around the curve.
               Comparative Form
 When comparing two nouns, use the
 comparative form of an adjective or adverb.
     If adjective or adverb is one syllable, add –er
      to form the comparative.
          I am taller than my mother.
          She is smarter than me.
     Use this same pattern for adjectives that end in
      –y, but change the –y to –i before adding –er.
          She is happier than he is.
          That show is funnier than the other one.
         Comparative Form cont.
   If adjective or adverb is more than one syllable,
    add the word more to form the comparative.
        I am more impressed with your skills than he is.
        She is even more beautiful than she used to be.


   Follow the guideline and use –er or more, but
    never use both!
        I am more taller than my mother.
        That show is more funnier than the other one.
        She is so much more happier than she used to be.
                 Superlative Form
 When comparing three or more nouns, use
 the superlative form of an adjective or adverb.
     If adjective or adverb is one syllable, add –est
      to form the superlative.
          I am the tallest person in my family .
          She is the smartest person in the class.
     Use this same pattern for adjectives that end
      in –y, but change the –y to –i before adding –
      est.
          She is the happiest person I’ve ever met.
          That show is the funniest sitcom on TV.
          Superlative Form cont.
   If adjective or adverb is more than one
    syllable, add the word most to form the
    superlative.
        He is the most selfish person in our company.
        She is the most beautiful actress on television.

   Follow the guideline and use –est or most, but
    never use both!
        He is the most luckiest person I know.
        That is the most funniest show I have ever seen!
        She is the most happiest person I have ever met!
                   Fewer vs. Less
 In the comparative form
    Use less to compare non-count nouns (nouns
     that cannot be divided).
          They play less music and more commercials on
           the radio than ever before.
          I have less money in my bank account than my
           sister has in hers.
     Use fewer to compare count nouns.
          There are fewer students in our class than when
           the semester began.
          I have fewer pennies in my jar than my brother
           has in his.
   Irregular Adjectives & Adverbs
 Four common adjectives & adverbs have irregular
  forms: good, well, bad, badly.
 Good vs. Well
      Good is an adjective, so use it to describe a noun or
       pronoun.
         She has a good job.

      Well is an adverb, so use it to describe a verb or an
       adjective.
         She writes well.

      (Well can also be used as an adjective when it is
       describing someone’s health.)
         I am not well today. (adjective)

         She does not feel well. (adverb)
  Irregular Adjectives & Adverbs
 Bad vs. Badly
     Bad is an adjective, so use it to describe a
      noun or pronoun.
          She has a bad reputation.
     Badly is an adverb, so use it to describe a
      verb or an adjective.
          He behaved badly in school today.
  Irregular Adjectives & Adverbs
 Comparative and Superlative forms of the
  irregular adjectives and adverbs are also
  irregular.
     Good & Well have the same comparative &
      superlative forms:
          Better (comparative)
             I have a better car than she does. (adjective)
             I feel better today than I did yesterday. (adverb)
          Best (superlative)
             He is the best teacher at Blinn. (adjective)
             I write best when I’m not under pressure. (adverb)
Irregular Adjectives & Adverbs
   Bad & Badly have the same comparative &
    superlative forms:
        Worse (comparative)
           She has a worse cold than I do. (adjective)
           She feels worse than I do. (adverb)
        Worst (superlative)
           He had the worst grade in the class. (adjective)
           She feels the worst she has ever felt. (adverb)

				
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