Figurative Language 1 by a2302339

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									Figurative Language 1
By: Andrea Marshall
Figurative Language
Figurative Language is language that uses figures of speech. A figure
of speech is language that cannot or should not be taken literally.
Figure of speech provide another way of adding extra dimensions to
language.
Similes and Metaphors
Similes and metaphors are figures of speech that often appear in figurative language. Both similes
and metaphors are used as means of comparing things that are essentially unlike. The difference
between them is that in similes the comparison is expressed by the use of some word or phrase, such
as like, as, than, similar, to, resembles, or seems; in metaphors, the comparison is not expressed but is
created when a figurative term is substituted for or identified with the literal term.

There are four forms of metaphors, depending on whether the literal and figurative terms are named
and implied.

•First Form (simile)-both the literal and figurative terms are named
Example (“The Widow’s Lament in Springtime”( pg. 693 in Perrine) sorrow and yard are both)
named)

•Second Form- the literal term is named and the figurative term is implied
Example (“Bereft” (pg. 706 in Perrine) leaves are named and [snake] hissed is implied)

•Third Form- the literal term is implied and the figurative term is named
Example (“It sifts from Leaden Sieves” (pg. 707 in Perrine) it [snow] is implied and wool is named)

•Fourth Form- both the literal and figurative terms are implied (RARE)
Example (“It sifts from Leaden Sieves” (pg. 707 in Perrine) it [snow] is implied and [flour] sifts is
implied)
   Bereft
 By: Robert Frost
(Pg. 706 in Perrine)
         Bereft
Where had I heard this wind before
Change like this to a deeper roar?
What would it take my standing there for,
Holding open a restive door,
Looking down hill to a frothy shore?
Summer was past and day was past.
Somber clouds in the west were massed.
Out in the porch’s sagging floor,
Leaves got up in a coil and hissed,
Blindly struck at my knee and missed.
Something sinister in the tone
Told me my secret must be known:
Word I was in the house alone
Somehow must have gotten abroad,
Word I was in my life alone,
Word I had no one left but God
                       Robert Frost
“Bereft” by Robert Frost
Title: Bereft- to be in a state where something vital has been taken away from you
Setting: Fall, evening, outside, next to an ocean
Central Purpose: To provide a strong image or illustration of someone who is
bereaving.
Tone: Disquieting, mournful
Vocabulary: restive- impatient of control, restraint, or delay
Rhyme Scheme: AAAAABBACCDDDEDE

Imagery:
“What would it take my standing there for, Holding open a restive door…” Lines 3 and 4
“Looking down hill to a frothy shore?” Line 5
“Somber clouds in the west were massed.” Line 7
“Leaves got up in a coil and hissed…” Line 9

Figurative Language:
“Change like this to a deeper roar…” –personification because the wind is roaring like a
lion
“Leaves got up in a coil and hissed…”- metaphor (form 2) because it is comparing leaves
to a snake, it is also an example of personification because the leaves are behaving like a
snake would
Repetition of the word “Word”
 Personification, synecdoche, and metonymy
Personification is when you give an object, animal, or concept human
attributes.

A synecdoche is the use of a part for the whole.

Metonymy is the use of something closely related for the thing actually meant.
  To a Wasp
By: Janice Townley Moore
    (Pg. 782 in Meyers)
  To a Wasp
You must have chortled
finding that tiny hole
in the kitchen screen. Right
into my cheese cake batter
you dived,
no chance to swim ashore,
no saving spoon,
the mixer whirring
your legs, wings, stinger,
churning you into such
delicious death.
Never mind the bright April day.
Did you not see
rising out of cumulus clouds
That fist aimed at both of us?
                    Janice Townley Moore
      “To a Wasp” by Janice Townley Moore
Setting: A kitchen, Spring

Central Purpose: To tell a story about a lady killing a wasp.

Tone: pity

Style: Free Verse

Vocabulary:
chortled-to chuckle or snort
cumulus clouds- puffy, pillow like clouds

Imagery:
“Right into my cheese cake batter you dived…” line 3-5
“rising out of cumulus clouds…” line 14
“the mixer whirring your legs, wings, stinger, churning you…” line 7-10

Figurative Language:
“You must have chortled…” –personification because a wasp cannot chortled
“no chance to swim ashore…” –metaphor because it is comparing the batter to an ocean or
lake
“delicious death,” “cumulus clouds…”- Alliteration
Schizophrenia
    By: Jim Stevens
  (Pg. 788 in Perrine)
Schizophrenia
It was that house that suffered the most.

It had begun with slamming doors, angry feet scuffing the carpets,
dishes slammed onto the table,
grassy stains spreading on the cloth.

Certain doors were locked at night,
feet stood for hours outside them,
dishes were left unwashed, the cloth
disappeared under a hardened crust.

The house came to miss the shouting voices,
the threats, the half-apologies, noisy
reconciliations, the sobbing that followed.

Then lines were drawn, borders established,
some rooms declared their loyalties,
keeping to themselves, keeping out the other.
The house divided against itself.

Seeing cracking paint, broken windows,
the front door banging in the wind,
the roof tiles flying off, one by one,
the neighbors said it was a madhouse.

It was the house that suffered most.
        “Schizophrenia” by Jim Stevens
Title: Schizophrenia- a disorder where you have auditory and visual
hallucinations. The title is significant because the poem is about
Setting: An urban neighborhood
Central Purpose: To illustrate the speakers emotion about becoming
schizophrenic
Tone: sad, mournful over the life he’ll never have
Style: Free Verse
Imagery:
“slamming doors,” “scuffing the carpets…” line 2
“the cloth disappeared under a hardened crust…”lines 7-8
“Seeing cracking paint, broken windows, the front door banging in the
wind, the roof tiles flying off, one by one, the neighbors said it was a
madhouse.” Lines 16-19
Figurative Language:
The poem is a metaphor comparing a house to the speaker’s mind/personality.
“angry feet…”-personification because the speaker is giving feet human
qualities line 2
“The house came to miss the shouting voices…”- personification because a
house can’t miss something line 9
“The house divided against itself.” –personification because a house cannot divide
against itself line 15
The End

								
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