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Labelling of Jams and Preserves

Selling preserves direct to the final consumer from the place of the production.

If you are selling preserves to the actual people who will eat it, at the place where the food
was produced (e.g. farm gate, croft shop) or from your own vehicle / market stall (e.g.
delivered vegetable boxes, farmers markets), then the only things you need to label the food
with is:
          A product name (see required „reserve descriptions‟ given below)
          An indication of any additives such as antioxidants, colours, flavours, flavour
            enhancers, preservatives (e.g. sulphur dioxide in dried fruits) or sweeteners.
          An indication of any irradiated ingredients.

If the product is not pre-packed for this type of direct sale, then the information can just be
displayed by / near the product (e.g. blackboard, shelf tags, delivery note). If the product is
pre-packed for the above type of direct sale, the information should be on / attached to the
pack.


Selling pre-packed preserves to other retailers who will sell it to the final consumer.

If you are selling pre-packed foods to others to sell on (e.g. local shops), the following
information must be included on any product label (or be capable of being provided in the
case of an catering outlet).

1. The name of the food
   As per the „reserve description‟ given in The Jam and Similar Products Regulations 2003:

       Jam or Jelly
       1000g / 1kg of the finished product must contain no less than:
              250g red or blackcurrants, rosehips, rowans, sea buckthorns or quinces or,
              150g ginger or,
              160g cashew apples or,
              60g passion fruit or,
              350g of any other fruit
       Where the fruits used are a mix of above, minimum quantities need to be adjusted
       proportionally.
       Extra Jam or Extra Jelly
       1000g / 1kg of the finished product must contain no less than:
              350g red or blackcurrants, rosehips, rowans, sea buckthorns or quinces or,
              250g ginger or,
              230g cashew apples or,
              80g passion fruit or,
              450g of any other fruit; but apples, pears, clingstone plums, melons, grapes,
              pumpkins, cucumbers or tomatoes can not be counted in any mix of fruit.
       Where the fruits used are a mix of above, minimum quantities need to be adjusted
       proportionally.
       Marmalade or Jelly Marmalade
       1000g / 1kg of the finished product must contain no less than:
              200g of citrus fruit, of which at least 75g needs to have come from the peel.
       ‘X’ Curd or Lemon Cheese
       1000g / 1kg of the finished product must contain no less than:
       40g of fat / oil, and,
       6.5g egg yolk, and,
       the quantity of fruit is sufficient to characterise the finished product (lemon in the case
       of lemon cheese)
       Where „X‟= name of particular type of fruit, or the words „mixed fruit‟ or „number
       fruit‟.
       ‘Y’ Flavour Curd
       1000g / 1kg of the finished product must contain no less than:
       40g of fat / oil, and,
       6.5g egg yolk, and,
       the quantity of flavouring material is sufficient to characterise the finished product
       (lemon in the case of lemon cheese)
       Where „Y‟= name of particular type of fruit, or the words „mixed fruit‟.
       Mincemeat
       1000g / 1kg of the finished product must contain no less than:
       300g of vine fruits and citrus peel, of which at least 200g needs to be vine fruits and,
       25g of suet / equivalent fat
       The sweetening agents can include sugar, brown sugar, cane molasses or honey.

   The words „preserve‟ and „conserve‟ no longer have a legal definition, but can still be
   used, as long as accompanied by the relevant above reserve description. E.g.
                                 Strawberry Conserve
                                         extra jam

   All other preserves (e.g. chutneys, pickles, sauces, marinades, mustards etc) have no legal
   defined composition or names.

   See also guidance from the Food Standards Agency: www.food.gov.uk for „Criteria for
   the use of the terms fresh, pure, natural etc in food labelling‟.

   You may also want to put a short description under the name if thought necessary.

2. List of ingredients, including potential allergens & quantity of certain ingredients as
   a % (QUID)
   In descending order by weight at the „mixing bowl stage‟. The type of fruit should be
   named, unless more than two, in which case „mixed fruit‟ is allowable alternative
   wording.
   Where there are several ingredients used in the same proportions, then it is acceptable to
   list such ingredients one after the other.

   Care must also be taken to list potential allergens present in any ingredients. These are
   listed by the FSA as being:
    - cereals containing gluten (wheat, barley, oats, rye, spelt and their hybrids)
    - eggs
    - nuts (peanuts, almond, hazel, walnut, cashew, pecan, Brazil, pistachio, macademia).
        Chestnut and pinenuts can cause an allergenic reactions so it is also considered good
        practise to include them in this list.
    - sesame seeds
    - soya or derivatives
    - cows milk
    - fish
    - shelfish / molluscs / crustacea
    - celery
    - mustard
    - sulphite (where over 10mg/kg)
    Allergens should be clearly identified by the ingredient name, or adjoining description, in
    the ingredient list or in a separate statement / box beside the main ingredient listing.
    Further guidance is available at
    www.food.gov.uk/multimedia/pdfs/labelamendguid21nov05.pdf
   There is no legal requirement to include „may contain‟ or „traces‟ warnings to indicate
   possible allergen cross contamination, but producers can include this voluntarily if
   wanted.

   Additives, along with associated warnings, must be listed (e.g. preservatives such as
   sulphur dioxide present in many dried fruits, sweeteners).

   Give % where ingredients appear in the name of the food / are usually associated with it /
   are emphasised in words, pictures or graphics / to characterise or distinguish a food (e.g.
   „butter shortbread‟ – ingredients: flour, sugar, butter (35%), eggs….. Where a flavouring
   such as, vanilla etc is included in the product name but makes up less than 2% by weight
   of the finished product, the % does not need to be given.

   For preserves, except curds and mincemeat:
                             - The total sugar content in the form „total sugar content: Yg
                                 per 100g‟ also needs to be given. The sugar content is
                                 determined by use of refractometer at 20oC.
                             - The total fruit content (amount of fruit from which derived)
                                 in the form „prepared with Xg of fruit per 100g‟ needs to be
                                 given.
   Both these declarations need to appear in the same field of vision as the name of the
   product. *

3. Indication of durability* and storage conditions / lot mark
   Durability will be “Best Before” or “Use By” depending on type of food [perishable or
   not]. For most preserves „best before‟ will apply, for curds, possibly „use by‟. Other
   marks such as “sell by” and “display until” have no legal basis and are more for the
   retailers own purposes.
   May also need to include special storage conditions and conditions of use e.g. „once
   opened keep refrigerated‟, „use within 1 week‟ etc, that ensure the stated shelf life is
   achieved.
   Shelf life is generally displayed as date, month & year. However „best before‟ dates (not
   „use by‟ ones) can also be expressed as:
                               - day and month, only if shelf life is 3 months or less
                               - end of month and year, if greater than 3 months but less
                                   than 18 months
                               - as above, or end of year only is more than 18 months.
   The shelf life of jam is typically 30 months.

   Product traceability needs to now to be assured by law, that means being able to identify
   the ingredients that went into an end product. Durability and lot marks may be same or
   different, often smaller manufacturers will change the durability date for each batch they
   make and therefore the date mark on the product can be used to trace it back. The
   producer decides on the size of „batch‟ (e.g. one day / one week / one month of
   production) or „lot‟ and numbering system.

4. Your name & address /some means of identification.

5. Place of origin
   If possibility purchaser may be mislead (e.g. product made in the area but from berries
   imported from Eastern Europe). This can also be used for marketing purposes e.g. Grown
   and made in Skye.

6. Instructions for use
   Only required where it would be difficult for purchaser to use product without such
   instructions.

7. Quantity mark*
   The size of typeface for this depends on the weight of the product. Text on labels which
   states the weight needs to be minimum of 2mm high up to 50g, 3mm high 50g to up to
   200g, 4mm for 200g – 1kg. Some foods can only be sold in certain weights:
   Jam, Jellies & Marmalade 2oz, 4oz, 8oz, 12oz, 1lb, 1.5lb or multiple of 1lb unless below
   50g
   See also the HILFN „Jam & Preserve Packing‟ Factsheet for further information.

8. Nutritional Information –
   Currently optional unless any claims are made (e.g. low sugar, high in fibre), in which
   case compulsory to back up those claims; further advice should be sought as this is quite
   complex.

    Other Notes
*The name, date mark, fruit and sugar declarations and quantity mark must all appear
in the same ‘field of vision’; i.e. on the same face of the product.



Further Information

The Jam and Similar Products Regulations 2003 Guidance Notes from the Food
Standards Agency:
                   6th Floor
                   St Magnus House,
                   25 Guild Street,
                   Aberdeen, AB11 6NJ
                   Tel:01224 285100
                   E-mail: scotland@foodstandards.gsi.gov.uk

Or see online at: www.food.gov.uk/multimedia/pdfs/jamregguid_rev.pdf

				
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