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Jaimie Jay

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By Richard Chamberlain
JAIMIE JAY WENT TO POST AS THE HEAVY

Revenge, it’s said, is a dish best served cold.

favorite in the 1980 All American Derby. And her backers didn’t salute her with 6-5 odds because she was in against a bunch of no-name slouches – this was a field including champion and All American Futurity winner Pie In The Sky; champion Native Gambler; Pea Jay Jet and Sages Belle Star, both of whom earned more than a quarter-million dollars; and six-figure earners Chicks Charger Bar and Afternoon Surprise. So much for salutes. Jaimie Jay didn’t win – or even run. Indeed, the sorrel sophomore by Jim J. (TB) didn’t get out of the gate, at least not until her handlers calmed her enough to relax the tension on the flipping halter that locked her in when she set back just as the starter kicked it and sent the rest of the field on their way. Avenging her self-imposed defeat 25 years later, her grandson Teller Cartel on September 5 won the All American Futurity (G1). “That made me feel good, kinda proud,” says Bob Gilbert, who trained Jaimie Jay and most of her family. “It’s a little bit of revenge for the Derby.” Racing for her breeder, W.E. Mueller of Colorado Springs, Jaimie Jay was out of Top Sugar Moon, a Top Moon mare who retired a maiden after six attempts. Jaimie Jay, too, was still a maiden after repeated trips to post, including a fourth to Denim N Diamonds in her 10th race, a trial to the 1979 All American Futurity. “Denim” went to the final. Jaimie Jay went to the barn. The mare finally reached the winner’s circle on her 11th start. That was a trial to the Oklahoma Futurity at La Mesa Park in Raton, New Mexico – she ran fifth in Chick In Command’s final. Gilbert then took her to Centennial Racetrack to win another trial, and she got a little closer in the October 28 final, finishing second to Jet Dance in the Denver Futurity. Jaimie Jay again went back

to the barn, to cool her heels until the following spring. She came back at Ruidoso Downs to win three in a row under Jacky Martin, her trial and the final of the Kansas Derby and her trial to the Rainbow Derby. Coming up short in the Rainbow final, she finished second, half of a length behind Rocket Jet Bug but a length in front of Denim N Diamonds and Native Gambler. Next up was a 3-length score in her trial to the All American Derby, then the Derby final and then – well, ’nuff said about that. Four months and four days later at Los Alamitos, Jaimie Jay again faced the starter, to finish fourth in Lady Juno’s 1980 Champion of Champions. The champion sophomore that year, she started twice more after that, running seventh behind Vespero and Town Policy in the January 10 Doc Severinsen Handicap and then, under Steve Treasure, won over a field including Winning Copy, Fishers Favorite and Lady Juno in the
BILL PITT

Jaimie Jay (9) defeats Denim N Diamonds in the Kansas Derby.

January 24 Las Damas ’Cap. Eleven days later, Jaimie Jay faced the greatest test of her life. “I went to feed her that morning, and she just wasn’t herself,” Gilbert recalls. “She was standing with her head down in the corner of her stall, wasn’t moving, didn’t even look up. I went and got the vet, told him she just wasn’t right. He came in and looked at her, and decided to pull blood. He was going to send off the sample, so I asked him how long it’d be before the report came back. He said it’d be a few days or a week, so I asked him if I could take it to the lab myself. He said sure, so I took it down there and picked it up the next day and took it back to him. He took one look at the report and said ‘Ohmygawd!!!’ He ran to his truck [CONTINUED ON PAGE 126]

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with the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Veterinary Services. Her term expires at the end of 2008. • The Association of Racing Commissioners International has named equine drug-testing expert Dr. Richard Sams of Ohio State University as chairman of its pharmacologists committee. The committee helps RCI determine the formal classification of drugs, and pharmacologists from equine testing labs sit on the panel. Sams directs the Analytical Toxicology Laboratory for Ohio State and teaches graduate level courses in the school’s veterinary program. “Dr. Sams brings a tremendous amount of experience and talent to this position as well as a thorough understanding of racing’s equine athletes and the effect various substances can have on their ability to compete in a race,” said RCI chairman Tim Connors. “Unlike others who are new to this, there is no learning curve for Dr. Sams and his colleagues on this committee.”

Advertising rates on request. Contact: Jim Persinger The American Quarter Horse Racing Journal at (806) 378-4386.
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and got bottles of some kind of fluid, and we gave her a bottle every 10 minutes for the next two or three days.” Jaimie Jay had colitis X, which kills almost all of its victims. Gilbert, his grooms and a team of veterinarians were on round-the-clock crisis mode. As luck would have it, Jaimie Jay’s half-brother Bold Chieftain also was at Los Alamitos (where he was trying to break his maiden, and never did), but his blood matched closely enough to begin transfusions – two gallons worth. “After a couple of weeks, Jaimie Jay started to get a little better, at least to where we could get her out of her stall and she could walk a little,” Gilbert remembers. “Well, that morning, I happened to run into Brad McKinzie, who worked in the pressbox. Brad asked how Jaimie Jay was doing, and I told him I sure wish I could graze her on grass. He said, ‘Well, hold on just a minute,’ he’d be right back. He came back in five minutes with the key to the fence, said (track owner) Millie Vessels gave it to him and told him to tell me I could take Jaimie Jay and graze her on the golf course.” Jaimie Jay finally recovered from her near-death experience but never raced again. Which is just as well. The classy mare went back to Mueller’s Quarter Circle M Ranch, [CONTINUED ON PAGE 128}

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where she produced five-time Grade 1 winner Teller Queen, Grade 1-placed Teller Cash, six-figure earner Teller Belle, and Rio Del Norte, a winner of 12 of 36 races (check out his Air Force Academy story on page 14). And for Mark Allen, she also produced three more starters, including Teller Cartel’s dam, Jet Along Jamie. “All her babies were a little highstrung, kind of temperamental and nervous on the track,” says Gilbert (who lives in Nocona, Texas, where county commissioners last year renamed the rural route by his place Gilbert Road). “But at the barn, they were just as good as gold. They were great.” Kind of like their mama. “Jaimie Jay was a real nice mare, but she was a little bit high-strung,” says Gilbert. “When you pointed her down the track, she’d just grab the bit and run off. So me and Jacky, when we’d take her in the mornings at Ruidoso, we’d backtrack her with a pony, and that’s how we’d gallop her.” And how about that All American Derby debacle? “I bought a fifth of Jack Daniels on the way home that night,” Gilbert said a few days after the race. “Then I threw the cap out the window, because I knew I wouldn’t need it.”

Who were the stake winners this past weekend? Who’s the current leading sire of money earners? What’s the latest news in the racing industry? Where can I find a race in my area? You can find the answer to these questions and many more online in the subscriber’s area at www.aqharacing.com
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SPORTS MEDICINE
[CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12]

horses at the University of Guelph in Canada. The technique of intracardiac electrical conversion of common arrhythmia has been successfully performed in more than 50 horses. Most of these horses returned to their previous performance level. The two-hour procedure involves putting the horse under anesthesia and threading two catheters through veins in the horse’s neck into the right atrium and the pulmonary artery. This procedure is guided with ultrasonography. A quick shock, using a biphasic defribrillator, is sent through the catheters once they are in place. This resets the rhythm of the impulses to the atria. This type of arrhythmia occurs in 1-2 percent of all racehorses. Dr. Kim McGurrin, who brought the technique to the veterinarians at the University of Florida, says, “Most horses with atrial fibrillation do not have underlying heart disease, so if you can restore their normal sinus rhythm, they usually return to their previous level of performance.”


				
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