NOVEMBER 2006 CCML MEETING MEDICINE_ AND HISTORY SAVE THE DATE

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NOVEMBER 2006 CCML MEETING MEDICINE_ AND HISTORY SAVE THE DATE Powered By Docstoc
					November 2006

Volume 29 Number 4

NOVEMBER 2006 CCML MEETING:
Denison Memorial Library, Humphrey’s Lounge

4200 E. Ninth Avenue Denver, Colorado 80262
"MAUVE:

A COLOR THAT CHANGED FASHION, SCIENCE, MEDICINE, AND HISTORY"
SUBMITTED BY GENE GARDNER

If you remember Joe Gal’s riveting talk on chirality a few years ago, then you will surely want to attend the November membership meeting of CCML on November 15th. This time Joe is talking about "Mauve: a color that changed fashion, science, medicine, and history." Joe’s synopsis: "In 1856 William Perkin, an 18-year-old chemistry student in London, attempted a chemical synthesis of quinine, a natural product and the only effective drug against malaria at the time. The reaction gave no quinine but led to the invention of mauve, a synthetic, "aniline", dye. The invention made a great impact in the world of dyes and colors, revolutionized science and medicine, and changed the world." The meeting will begin at 8:00 A.M. when the Education Committee presents conference reports from the Evidenced Based HealthCare conference held last August and MCMLA held in October. Refreshments and networking will follow at 9:00 with special EBSCO guests available for questions and conversation. The main program will be from 9:30-10:30. Please plan to stay for the business meeting from 10:45-11:45.CQ

SAVE THE DATE
SUBMITTED BY DANA ABBEY
The next CCHILL meeting will be Friday, December 1, 2006 (9A.M.-11A.M.). Our guest speaker will be Kate Elder, Library Services, Colorado Mental Health Institute at Fort Logan Location: 3520 W. Oxford Ave. Questions? Contact Dana Abbey at dana.abbey@uchsc.edu, or 303-315-4875.CQ

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INTERLIBRARY LOAN TIPS
SUBMITTED BY SARA KATSH
TIPS #5 revised (25 SEPT 2006) Alternate Delivery Methods on DOCLINE There seems to be some confusion about the new Alternate Delivery Methods on DOCLINE, from both the borrowing and lending sides. A few important things to keep in mind: a. be sure your institutional record is updated both as a borrower and lender for the delivery methods you accept and those that you offer. b. If you provide alternate delivery methods as a borrower, be prepared to receive items in ways other than your preferred method. Feel free not to include all options (for example, we've completely eliminated MAIL as a borrowing option). Some libraries add a comment about wanting articles with photographs mailed. You can always change your preference on an individual request if you occasionally must have an item delivered in a certain way. If you consistently find that you are receiving items via your second or third choice, think about changing your routing table. c. As a lender, be sure to read the borrower's request and respect the preferred delivery method. If you cannot fill by a certain method on a regular basis, do not include that method in your institutional record. We have a few libraries that seem to be sending exclusively by mail/courier even when that is not a borrower option. d. Also as a lender, be mindful of the quality of a PDF or fax. If there are graphics or photographs that do not reproduce well, it's a good idea to add a note indicating willingness to mail an item. (If you're willing, of course.) e. If, as a lender, you are filling a request by an alternate delivery method, change the method of delivery when you update the request in "Lend." For example, if PDF is the borrower's first choice and you fill by mail without changing the method to MAIL, the borrower may wonder why the PDF has not been received. f. All requests go through each routing table cell, first by the preferred method, then by the alternate methods, before going on to the next cell. For a refresher on the new routing algorithms, visit http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/ma06/ma06_docline.html. For routing FAQs, see http://www.nlm.nih.gov/services/doc_new_routing.html.

CQ

CCML ADVOCACY COMMITTEE DEVELOPES RESOURCES
SUBMITTED BY STEPHANIE WELDON
The CCML advocacy committee has created a suite of resources that medical librarians can use to communicate the value of medical libraries with their institutional leaders. These Myths and Truths Resources are highlighted on the “MLA Vital Pathways for Hospital Librarians” website. Feel free to download and use these resources to advocate for your library. http://www.mlanet.org/resources/vital/index.htm l Karen Wells, Exempla Lutheran Medical Center, Wheat Ridge, CO was the impetus for this collection of work, starting us off with the White Paper. The compilation of resources is a result of a great group effort and will be of tremendous use to medical librarians. We were also very pleased that MLA developed an interactive form where librarians can Report a Change in Status of a Hospital Library (http://www.mlanet.org/resources/vital/status_fo rm.html) CQ

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NOMINATIONS NEEDED FOR THE 2007 MARLA GRABER AWARD
SUBMITTED BY CATHERINE REITER Nominate a Deserving CCML Member! This is your opportunity to nominate a deserving CCML colleague for the 2007 Marla Graber Award for Excellence and Achievement. Established in 2002, the award recognizes CCML members who have made outstanding contributions to CCML and health sciences librarianship at the local level. The award is given annually to one or two individuals. All current and retired CCML members are eligible for nomination. More information including nomination guidelines, criteria, and forms are available on the CCML website at http://www.ccmlnet.org/Marla_Graber/index.html. Nominations should be submitted to Linda Van Wert, linda.vanwert@gambrobct.com, by January 12, 2007. The recipient(s) will be announced at the CCML Annual Meeting in April 2007. Questions? Contact a member of the 2006-2007 Award Jury: Linda Van Wert (Chair). linda.vanwert@gambrobct.com Pat Nelson, pat.nelson@uchsc.edu Catherine Reiter, catherine.reiter@uchsc.edu CQ

MUSINGS BY MAXWELL
SUBMITTED BY DICK MAXWELL In a season which offers an onslaught of both campaign advertising and ever-earlier reminders of the stress-inducing holidays, it’s hard to maintain focus. At least that’s a handy excuse for the random nature of what follows. File under “Idiots, Men Are (see also: What’s Your Point?).” A study reported at the American College of Emergency Physicians Research Forum in New Orleans in October 2006 shows itself to be of questionable value by reporting the painfully obvious fact that men will frequently choose to ignore a variety of physical symptoms while remaining rooted to the spot in front of live or televised sports. The results: about 50% more men registered at emergency rooms after a football game than during it, while for baseball the numbers were 30-40%. Included in the symptoms held at arm’s length were chest and abdominal pain, headaches, and “various injuries.” Among the latter category might be some which are food-related, such as “choked on a pretzel,” a football injury from which even an ex-cheerleader president is not immune.
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The men studied were in the state of Maryland, but it would be folly to think that similar studies would show lower numbers elsewhere. In fact, in locations such as Lincoln, Nebraska or Columbus, Ohio, it would be reasonable to expect percentages in the high nineties. A more subtle message from the study is that what used to be our National Pastime is apparently now less worth risking your life for than football. Where have you gone, Joe DiMaggio? Next: what is the Right Height? With our focus on our own parochial problems, such as the ER study just noted, we sometimes overlook medical news from the rest of the world. It’s comforting to be reminded that we have no clear monopoly on jaw-dropping cluelessness. In China, Reuters News Service reports, there has been a recent upsurge in the use of a very special surgery to meet the growing (yes, I said it) need for those few extra inches which can make the difference between an ordinary, run-of-the-mill citizen, and one who, by the force of his or her stature, can literally rise above the crowd. The evidence is incomplete, but it may be the fault of Yao Ming, who left China and brought his 7’ 4” (a great many inches more than his allotment) to the U.S., acceding to the National Basketball Association’s demand that he accept millions of dollars to toss a basketball around and stuff it through a metal hoop. At any rate, the Xinhua news agency tells us that, in addition to more standard and also very popular cosmetic surgery options, such as breast augmentation, both men and women are flocking to for-profit hospital-like facilities where one’s legs are broken and then the breakee is placed on a rack for some vigorous stretching. The Health Ministry is putting out strongly worded statements, not unlike those issued by diplomats, to point out the sometimes disfiguring complications that have resulted. In the universal spirit of “it can’t happen to me,” the warnings are being ignored far and wide. The report says that a minimum height is often listed as a requirement for both jobs and schools in China, with 1.65 meters (5’ 5”, if you must know) the baseline for women, and 1.70 meters (5’ 7”) for men. And we worry about SAT scores. The same guidelines apply, in the view of many, when looking at spousal qualifications, topping “dreamy smile,” “healthy bank account,” and “great personality.” For those less eager for time on the rack, or who can’t afford the procedure in one of the world’s most capitalistic health care systems, “calcium supplements and other ‘height-enhancing’ medicines are always among the best sellers at Chinese pharmacies.” The Only Thing We Have to Fear is Food Itself. A new book by Stanford professor of Marketing and professional killjoy Brian Wansink, Mindless Eating: Why We Eat More Than We Think, is based on research in which he observed people in zoo-like settings as they confronted an array of tasty snacks in the presence of absolute boredom. In one particularly sinister experiment, he provided Chicago moviegoers with medium or large tubs of five-day old, obnoxiously stale popcorn. Those given the larger tubs ate 53% more than those with the medium, but apparently no one simply refused to eat the stuff (“free
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popcorn” plus movie, remember). Don’t you love it when you are given food in something that can be called a “tub”? Still, shouldn’t we be embarrassed as a species that Pavlov was so clearly on target that we…popcorn…popcorn…I’ll be right back. CQ

CCML CANDIDATES FOR OFFICE
SUBMITTED BY LYNNE FOX PRESIDENT: LILIAN HOFFECKER Lilian Hoffecker has been a librarian since 2003 when she received her MLS from Emporia State University. Lilian says that, “In those few years since I became a librarian, I’ve found a meaningful career with camaraderie that I’ve not experienced in any other profession.” She continues, “I’ve been lucky in the institution that has given me my first and only library job – Denison Library - and in the professional organization – CCML -- that’s allowed me to learn from the experts and grow (up) as a health information professional.” Lilian believes that to be asked to serve as CCML’s President-elect is an honor. Like many of her colleagues, Lilian’s path to librarianship was convoluted because she didn’t figure out until late that she should be a librarian. Lilian grew up in Japan (and went to American schools there), then moved to California, Oregon, Illinois, and finally Colorado. She has been an educator and researcher in biological anthropology, teaching both anthropology and medical students gross anatomy. Lilian reports that life is actually quite hard for a researcher, and two researchers (her husband is also a researcher) in a family along with kids is difficult. So Lilian spent years mostly being a mom, but also working as a free-lance university instructor, and a free-lance writer. Lilian is delighted to have found her calling and to have a chance to again serve CCML. Lilian has previously been our Secretary and has served on many CCML committees. If elected Lilian will serve as President-Elect from April 2007 until April 2008. She will serve as President from April 2008 until April 2009. SECRETARY: STEPHANIE WIEGAND Stephanie Wiegand, a health sciences librarian at the University of Northern Colorado, has been nominated to run for CCML Secretary. Stephanie is relatively new in many ways – new to CCML, to medical librarianship and to professional librarianship. Stephanie has worked in academic and public libraries for thirteen years now, but only the last three in a professional position. Stephanie graduated with an M.A. from the University of Missouri-Columbia in the Spring of 2003. She completed her undergraduate work at the University of Wyoming in 1997. She came to work with the University of Northern Colorado right after graduation from MU and loves working with the health science faculty and students. She is eager to work with CCML – she already knows a few of the people in the organization, but is anxious to meet more and to be of service. Hopefully, she believes that being secretary for CCML in the next year will allow her to do just this – and learn more about the libraries and librarians that her students will be working
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with in the future, so that she can be an effective advocate for medical librarians and an advocate for the continuing education of all of her current students. If elected, Stephanie will serve as Secretary from April 2007 until April 2008. TREASURER: ADELAIDE FLETCHER Adelaide Fletcher received her MLIS from Louisiana State University in May. Before library school she worked in a branch library in Saratoga, Wyoming, and since December 2005 at Ochsner Clinic Foundation Medical Library & Archives in New Orleans. She currently works at the Denver Medical Library at Presbyterian/St. Luke’s Hospital. Addie was a Graduate Assistant to Michelynn McKnight, Ph.D., AHIP for three semesters at LSU. She also taught an undergraduate class at LSU on Information Technology for two semesters. Since coming to Denver, she has become a member of CCML and of MLA. Previously she was a member of the Health Science Library Association of Louisiana (HSLAL), the South Central Chapter of MLA, ALA, and SLA. She attended the ALA-Annual Conference in Chicago (2005) and the SCC-MLA Meeting in Little Rock (2005) on student travel scholarships. She is looking forward to being part of CCML and in addition to running for treasurer has also volunteered to serve on the Advocacy Committee. Addie says, “Serving as treasurer will be a good way to get my feet wet and see how the organization works and to meet local Health Science Librarians. I think it will also be helpful to be working in the same library as the current treasurer, Sharon Martin, who recruited me to the position.” If elected, Addie will serve for two years, from April 2007 until April 2009. CQ

♫ GETTING TO KNOW YOU ♫ RUTH GILBERT
SUBMITTED BY BETH TWEED The very interesting Ruth Gilbert has been a member of CCML since 1966. She has been President and Treasurer of CCML and has served on many committees. A Denver native, Ruth received her B.S in Chemistry from the University of Denver and then worked as a research chemist for Phillips Oil in Oklahoma. Gates Rubber Company was Ruth’s next employer where she accepted a position in research product applications and drew cross sections of fan belts. She married Ralph Gilbert and they lived in Phoenix, Salt Lake City and Boise as he pursued career opportunities with Mountain Bell (U.S. West). Returning to Denver in 1961, Ruth enjoyed serving as a lay reader in the Denver Public Schools. Librarian friends thought she would be a perfect librarian and she entered
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DU’s library school, attending part-time while meeting family responsibilities. She received her MA in 1966. For 21 years she was the librarian at the Denver Veterans Hospital, receiving many outstanding employee awards. She initiated the MEDLINE service and developed a clinical librarian program in addition to many other accomplishments. Ruth has been volunteering weekly at the reference desk at Denison Library since she retired from the VA, and continues to be a caring, thorough librarian.

When asked what she likes the most about working at Denison, she answered: “reference questions and Denison people.” Her son and two daughters live in Idaho, Kansas and North Carolina, and every now and then Ruth takes some time to visit with them. Ruth’s intelligence and wit are obvious in her life goals: • Work toward a single-payer national health care plan to include everyone in the U.S. and help the 47 million uninsured. • Make people laugh! CQ

ROZ DUDDEN
WRITTEN BY DEBRA L.TAYLOR Rosalind Dudden is Roz to all who know her. Earning her Masters in Library Science from the University of Denver in 1970, Roz joined CCML in 1971. Employed with Mercy Medical Center as Director of Library Services, Roz remembers attending her first CCML meeting at St. Luke’s. In 1986, Roz went to work as Health Science Librarian at National Jewish’s Tucker Memorial Medical Library. In 1995, she started the first hospital website in Denver for National Jewish and was librarian and website administrator for five years. She recently celebrated 20 years of service with National Jewish. Roz’s resume reads like a Who’s Who of librarians. She was the principal investigator on two grants from NLM. She has published, or co-published, numerous articles. This year, Roz has published three articles and worked to complete a book about library evaluation. This fall she is running for president of the Medical Library Association. As a librarian, Roz likes to look for information and then organize it in a useful manner. Her knowledge of information technology is evident in watching her work. She moves easily from writing queries to extracting data, then to tweaking HTML on another site. What she loves most about the library world is that something new always comes up, and that librarians “are some of the most interesting people in the world!” Well, so is she! Her hobbies are not limited to just this or that; she does ceramics (they are beautiful!), photography, gardening, hiking, biking, and skiing. Roz and her partner, Jim Mills, live in a beautiful Victorian, and travel as often as possible. She and Jim and her daughter, Laura, traveled to New Zealand in 2004. Check out her pictures, other interests and CV at http://roz.dudden.com. Roz has lived in Capitol Hill for 35 years and loves it! She has brothers and sisters back east whom she sees as often as possible. She also has many nieces and nephews and grand nieces and nephews. CQ

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REPORT ON THE ANCC 10TH NATIONAL MAGNET CONFERENCE
SUBMITTED BY MARGARET BANDY The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) 10th National Magnet Conference was held in Denver, Colorado, on October 4-6, 2006. My attendance at the conference was sponsored by the Hospital Libraries Section as part of the joint MLA/HLS/NAHRS initiative to advance the recognition by ANCC of the role of hospital librarians in the Magnet program. The HLS Standards Committee has also discussed the possibility of trying to have the standards referenced in the Magnet Recognition Manual. To date, many of our members have reported on their magnet activities, and the MLA Program in Phoenix highlighted many of their contributions. One of the sessions co-sponsored by NAHRS and HLS was “Get Magnetized: Magnet Recognition, Libraries, and Excellence.” In addition to the librarian speakers, Dr. Christina Joy, Senior Magnet Program Specialist from the ANCC was an invited speaker. Her attendance provided an opportunity for NAHRS and HLS members to explore with her areas of mutual interest. Dr. Joy was impressed with the work of the librarians, and encouraged our attendance at the Magnet Conference. This report will give some highlights of the conference and suggest ideas for the future. I was delighted to discover that our colleague Nancy Goodwin from Middlesex Hospital in Middletown, Connecticut, was a co-presenter at a concurrent session at this conference. I attended a pre-conference seminar on “Data Driven Decisions for Evidence-Based Practice.” Five hundred people were registered for this session. The theme of evidence-based practice (EBP) was apparent throughout the conference. In the pre-conference, much of the focus was on data that is created in nursing information systems. Speakers addressed the importance of standardized nursing terminologies in the creation and later use of the data to foster the development of nursing knowledge. Other speakers discussed various technologies, especially mobile computing, to support nurses in their patient care activities. The studies published in 2005 by Pavikoff, Pierce, and Tanner that examined nursing readiness for EBP was discussed not only in the pre-conference but in other sessions as well. The citations will be given at the end of this report. Another pre-conference event was called “Director’s Message and Open Public Comment Meeting.” I decided to attend this session in hopes I would have an opportunity to address the Magnet Program Director, Commissioners, and conference attendees. After a few minutes of updates, the floor was opened for comments. I introduced myself as a hospital librarian, and said that the Hospital Libraries Section of the Medical Library Association had sponsored my attendance at the conference. I said that many of our members had contributed to their own hospital’s journey to magnet recognition, and that librarians were eager to be involved as partners. I encouraged attendees to seek their hospital librarian’s assistance in EBP, research, training, and publication. I mentioned Dr. Joy’s speech at the MLA meeting in Phoenix, and said
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that MLA members looked forward to additional opportunities for linkages between MLA and ANCC. As I sat down, the audience applauded and the meeting facilitator said that our involvement was an important part of the 13th force of magnetism, interdisciplinary relationships. At the end of the session, Dr. Joy greeted me and told me that she had shared her MLA experience with the rest of the magnet program officials. The following two days included concurrent sessions, poster sessions, and exhibits. Over 3,000 people were registered for the conference. The concurrent sessions were labeled as being relevant to current or future magnets, or for health care executives and nursing leaders. Most of the sessions I attended were for future magnets, and I concentrated on sessions addressing EBP and nursing research. It was gratifying to note how many speakers spoke about their librarians. Dr. Alyce Schultz, formerly of Maine Medical Center and now from the Arizona State College of Nursing Center for the Advancement of Evidence-based Practice had a slide that said, “Make your librarian one of your best friends.” A presentation by Dr. Christine Hedges from the Ann May Center for Nursing, Meridian Health in Neptune, NJ, was on “Culture of Inquiry: Incorporating Evidence-based Nursing.” Dr. Hedges said that it was important to get librarians involved in your EBP activities; librarians are “the key to success.”

“Make your librarian one of your best friends.”
Sharon McLane and Geri LoBiando-Wood from M.D. Anderson provided a presentation on their support infrastructure for EBP. Components included an intranet site that provides tools, examples, and project registration. They mentioned the “fabulous librarians” who understand the EBP literature and contributed their skills to the EBP activities. Many speakers mentioned the work of Bernadette Melnyk and Ellen Fineout-Overholt from ASU. Dr. Fineout-Overholt was also a speaker at the Phoenix MLA meeting. Their book, Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing & Healthcare (LWW 2004; ISBN 0-7817-4477-6), is a valuable tool for EBP. I had an opportunity to speak with Dr. Fineout-Overholt at the exhibits, and she told me how important our colleague Sheila Hofstetter was to their work. Sheila’s photo was part of the exhibit that displayed the work of the ASU Center for the Advancement of Evidence-based Practice. Poster sessions were another feature of the conference, but they were so popular that it was difficult to get close enough to see them! The posters covered a variety of topics, including strategies to develop an evidence-based culture, ideas for journal clubs and new graduate programs, and posters on specific challenges such as restrains, rapid response teams, and fall prevention. A highlight of the conference was the presentation by MLA member Nancy Goodwin and Liz Lemiska, BSN. Entitled “PICO’s Peak: A Program for Staff Nurse Research,” the talk illustrated their programs that were designed to demystify research for staff nurses. Nancy had many ingenious ideas for teaching the nurses how to conduct a literature search, select the best evidence, and critique the articles. After the session an attendee talked with us about her efforts to have her organization hire a librarian, and she was hopeful that the session had been a positive
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influence on her supervisor, who was also in attendance. Nancy and I also attended a session together toward the end of the conference, and the facilitator of the session told us that her awareness of librarians in EBP and magnet had definitely been raised by our presence. Because of the work of our colleagues, there appears to be a great deal of good will towards librarians already present among current and aspiring magnets. As I talked to people at the conference, many said to me “I heard a librarian was here and spoke the first day—that’s great!” While it was wonderful to hear all the praise of librarians, Nancy and I agreed that more work needs to be done. I encourage MLA members to submit abstracts for the 2007 Magnet Conference in Atlanta, October 3-5. Co-presenting with a nursing colleague seems essential; collaboration was a very important aspect of all the presentations. The MLA Board and sections will also explore additional avenues to promote linkages. The next update of the Magnet Accreditation Manual will be in 2008. The draft version is scheduled for 2007 with a public comment period in October 2007. I am grateful to the Hospital Library Standards Committee who encouraged my attendance and to the Hospital Libraries Section for sponsoring me. This was a wonderful opportunity to become immersed in the concerns of one of our most important constituencies and to connect on a personal basis with magnet program officials. Margaret Bandy, AHIP Denver, Colorado

References: 1: Pravikoff DS, Tanner AB, Pierce ST. Readiness of U.S. nurses for evidence-based practice. Am J Nurs. 2005 Sep;105(9):40-51; quiz 52. PMID: 16138038 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] 2: Pravikoff DS, Pierce ST, Tanner A. Evidence-based practice readiness study supported by academy nursing informatics expert panel. Nurs Outlook. 2005 Jan-Feb;53(1):49-50. No abstract available. PMID: 15761401 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] 3: Pravikoff DS, Pierce S, Tanner A. Are nurses ready for evidence-based practice? Am J Nurs. 2003 May;103(5):95-6. No abstract available. PMID: 12759614 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] CQ

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CALENDAR
2006 Nov. 2007 Jan. 11 15 22 23 30 21 8 12 19 20 30 Exec Committee Meeting Council Quotes Deadline Mailing Deadline Mailing Renewal Notices Mailing Meeting Exec Committee Meeting Council Quotes Deadline Mailing Deadline Mailing Renewal Notices Return Deadline Annual Meeting 15 Meeting
COLORADO COUNCIL OF MEDICAL LIBRARIANS OFFICERS AND COMMITTEE CHAIRS 2005 /2006

Elected Officers
President President-Elect Secretary Treasurer Past-President Amanda Enyeart Gene Gardner Elaine Connell Sharon Martin Joyce Condon Deb Weaver Kate Elder Bettye Snipe Stephanie Weldon Jerry Carlson Jeff Kuntzman

Appointed Officers

Feb. Mar.

Newsletter Editor & Assoc. Editor Mailing Coordinator Membership Database Coordinator Parliamentarian Discussion List Owner

Apr.

18

Standing Committee Chairs
Advocacy Education Journal Locator Membership Internet Nominating Marla Graber Award Stephanie Weldon Deb Weaver Gene Gardner Daphne Hyatt Shandra Protzko Lynne Fox Linda Van Wert

PUBLICATION STATEMENT
Council Quotes is a publication of the Colorado Council of Medical Librarians (CCML). CCML / P.O. Box 101058 / Denver, CO 80210-1058. Subscription is a benefit of membership. Editor, Deb Weaver; Associate Editor, Kate Elder; Contributors, CCML members. Web version is available at: http://www.ccmlnet.org/

Ad Hoc Appointments/Chairs
Colleague Connection Representative CAL Marketing Committee Representative Colorado Library Political Action Committee Library Cooperation SIG Conveners: Consumer Health EBM Medical Paralibrarians Unfilled

Nov/Dec Health Observances November: National Hospice Month National Adoption Month Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month Lung Cancer Awareness Month National Healthy Skin Month December: Safe Toys and Gifts Month World AIDS Day December 1 National Handwashing Awareness Week (December 3-9)

Ellen Graves

Suspended Sara Katsh

Dana Abbey Suspended James Honour

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