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					Course Syllabus

Speech 120: Fundamentals of Speech –On-line
Diablo Valley College COMMUNICATIONS: Paul Phalen
Course Site: www.dvcspeech.com or www.luckydogcommunications.com 685-1230 ext: 2501 Email: pphalen@dvc.edu

COURSE DESCRIPTION This course is intended to develop people who are aware, confident and effective as communicators, as well as curious and motivated critical thinkers. Fundamentals of speech will include theories of communication, rhetoric, psychology and criticism as they apply to public speaking. Emphasis will be on discovery of self and others, as well as the requirements imposed by small and large groups of listeners. A variety of opportunities are provided to help prepare you for narrative, impromptu, informative, and persuasive presentations. COURSE FOCUS AREAS:
Developing Speech Content Improving/Enhancing Delivery Speech Organization Story Telling Techniques Strategies for Informing Strategies for Persuading Ethics Self-Awareness Audience Analysis

COURSE MATERIALS: Required: 1) Internet Access 2) Recommended Text METHODS OF INSTRUCTION
Self-study – Text and on-line materials, Performance

CLASS EXPECTATIONS
This class develops each person’s intellectual and emotional skills as expressed in their verbal and nonverbal communication. This class has an equal number of teachers and students, with one teacher who happens to be paid. As such, all are expected to pr epare for class activities so that each of us is able to help others better understand and internalize the topics being covered. If one will be absent, (s)he will contact a classmate to get any required work turned in on time as well as plan to receive information / no tes delivered during the missed class. Before each graded presentation (except the final), a typed outline, carefully proofread, will be submitted to the (paid) tea cher at the beginning of class. If you need a copy for speaking, please make an extra copy for your use. Attach a bibliography for Informative, Persuasive and Philosophical speeches. Note-cards may be used, although effective extemporaneous delivery (with or without notes) will be the goal for this course.

CLASS ATTENDANCE POLICY
ALL CLASS SESSIONS ARE MANDATORY FOR ON-Line Courses If miss class due to a documented emergency, the highest grade a student can receive is a B in the class. Undocumented emergencies the highest grade you can get is a C. (This only applies when all other work is completed) Leaving early or coming late twice = 1 absence

GRADING SCALE
The value of each presentation, along with the time requirements, is described below. Adding all of your points and dividing by the total of 1000 determines your final percentage, which in turn determines your final grade. Please keep ALL grades until the end of class. Speech Title / Other Time Limits Introduction (1-2 min.) Personal Narrative (2-3 min.) Informative (4-6 min.) Persuasive (6-8 min.) Test Interview Activity (25 pts. & 50 pts.) Speaker Evaluation Paper Participation Total Points Final Percentages and grades: Point Value 20 75 100 150 80 75 100 50 650 80-89.99% = B 70-79.99% = C 60-69.99% = D 0-59.99%=F

90-100% = A

PRESENTATION POLICY
Speaking on the days you select, within the time assigned for each presentation, allows you to opportunity to earn up to the maximize points available. Not presenting on a day you select, which is allowed only once, results in a 20% deduction for the make-up speech. Speaking outside the time assigned results in a deduction of up to 10% (1% per 6 seconds up to 1 minute), and may eliminate time for feedback.

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CRITERIA FOR GRADING SPEECHES
For specific elements evaluated for each assignment, please go to the checklists on the following pages. The average speech (“C, C+, C-“) should meet the following criteria: 1. Conform to the speech assigned. 2. Be presented on the date assigned (recommend completion of content 1-2 days before you speak so you’ll have time to edit content, clean up organization and rehearse delivery at least 3-5 times). 3. Completed within the described time limits. 4. Fulfill requirements of the assignment: e.g. typed outline, visual aid, first-person dialog, ethos/pathos/logos, etc. 5. Display a clear introduction as well as organization of the main points and support these points with evidence that meets the test of accuracy, relevance, objectivity, and sufficiency. 6. Show reasonable directness and communicativeness in delivery. 7. Does not detract from message through errors in grammar, pronunciation, articulation and/or word usage. 8. Elimination of fillers (“um,” “ah,” “and,” “you know,” “like,” “ok”). The above average speech (“B, B+, B-“) should meet all of the preceding criteria and also: 1. Deal with a challenging (not well known, controversial, highly significant) topic. 2. Fulfill all of the major functions of a speech introduction and conclusion. 3. Exhibit proficient use of connectives, transitions, internal previews, internal summaries, and signposts. 4. Be delivered skillfully enough so as not to distract attention from the speaker’s message. 5. Evidence logical, critical, and/or artistic thinking. The exemplary speech (“A, A-“) should meet all of the preceding criteria and also: 1. Constitute a genuine contribution by the speaker to the knowledge or beliefs of the audience. 2. Sustain positive interest, feeling, and/or commitment among the audience. 3. Contain elements of vividness and special interest in the creative use of language (metaphor, parallel lang., etc.). 4. Be delivered in a polished manner that strengthens the impact of the speaker’s message. 5. Evidence superior levels of logical, critical, and/or artistic thinking. The below average speech (“D, D+, D-“) evidences deficiencies in some of the criteria required for the average speech. The vastly below average speech (“F“) evidences deficiencies in most of the criteria required for the average speech.

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Steps to prepare for a speech:
         

As soon as presentation is assigned, select topic (IMPORTANT – BE PASSIONATE & CURIOUS ABOUT IT!!!!) Write a thesis (see courseware for guidance) List reason(s) thesis is important/beneficial for the audience Identify main points (see courseware for guidance) Support main points – adapt for your audience (see courseware for guidance) Develop opening attention getting device(s) (see courseware for guidance) Develop full-circle conclusion (see courseware for guidance) Two days prior to presentation, practice the entire speech, making adjustments as necessary Final rehearsals: 3-5 times the day before you present Day of presentation, warm-up with one presentation before class

Organizational outlines (Speech 120) (everything in parenthesis does not appear on your outline):
Narrative:
I. Introduction (create context, set mood, and verbally/nonverbally paint a still picture in audience’s mind), A. (Insert opening sentence here) B. (Insert sentence that creates curiosity in audience’s mind) II. Story A. (First sentence of story – identified when action begins in the still picture created in Introduction) B. (Sentence that contains climax – answers question raised in audience’s mind) III. Conclusion A. (Universal point)

Informative:
I. Introduction A. (Insert attention getting device(s) (AGD)) B. (Insert thesis) C. (Insert overview/preview) D. (Insert significance for audience/how presentation will benefit audience/develop goodwill) II. Body A. (Insert main point #1) 1. (Insert support #1) 2. (Insert support #2, etc.) 3. (Insert transition) B. (Insert main point #2) 1. (Insert support #1) 2. (Insert support #2, etc.) 3. (Insert transition) C. (Insert main point #3) 1. (Insert support #1) 2. (Insert support #2, etc.) III. Conclusion A. (Insert summary = past tense of overview (I.C.), highlighting key point from each main point above) B. (Insert concluding remarks - look to I.B. and I.D. for message, as well as I.A. for full-circle conclusion (FCC) opportunities)

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Persuasive (Monroe’s Motivational Sequence):
I. Attention Step A. (Insert attention getting device(s) (AGD)) II. Need Step A. (Insert need #1) 1. (support/demonstrate need) B. (Insert need #2 – optional) 1. (support/demonstrate need) C. (Insert need #3, etc. – optional) 1. (support/demonstrate need) III. Satisfaction Step A. (Explain/Demonstrate the product/service/idea that will satisfy need(s)) 1. (Explain/demonstrate how need #1 is satisfied) 2. (Explain/demonstrate how need #2 is satisfied) 3. (Explain/demonstrate how need #3 is satisfied) IV. Visualization Step A. (Have audience experience the benefits of using your product/service/idea using visuals/audio/volunteer/etc.) (and/or) B. (Have audience experience the harms of not using your product/service/idea using visuals/audio/volunteer/etc.) V. Action step A. (Identify product (packaging, logo, etc.), service (logo, sign, etc.), or idea (wallet card, magnet, etc.), along with where/how/when to purchase/adopt/etc. it.)

Persuasive (Problem - Solution):
I. Introduction A. (Insert attention getting device(s) (AGD)) B. (Insert thesis – if audience is supportive or neutral*) C. (Insert overview/preview) D. (Insert significance for audience/how presentation will benefit audience) II. Body - Problem A. (Insert problem #1) 1. (Insert support #1 – define/describe) 2. (Insert support #2 – provide scope) 3. (Insert support #3 – provide indirect and direct impact on audience) 4. (Insert support #4 – provide example(s)) 5. (Insert transition) B. (Insert problem #2, etc. – optional) 1. (Insert support #1 – define/describe) 2. (Insert support #2 – provide scope) 3. (Insert support #3 – provide indirect and direct impact on audience) 4. (Insert support #4 – provide example(s)) 1. (Insert transition) III. Body - Solution A. (Insert proposed solution – *this is where your thesis is inserted for a hostile audience) 1. (Insert support #1 – provide historical context, recognizing those before you) 2. (Insert support #2 – succinctly present your solution, providing definition(s) for any vague term(s)) 3. (Insert support #3 – demonstrate how your solution solves problem #1 with expert quotes, case study(ies), reasoning, visuals, analogy, and/or example) 4. (Insert support #4 – demonstrate how your solution solves problem #2, etc. with expert quotes, case study(ies), reasoning, visuals, analogy, and/or example) 5. (Insert support #5 – if required, provide financial impact of solution – short-term (all change has costs) and longterm (some solutions save money while some cost money – breakeven, return-on-investment(ROI))) 6. (Insert support #6 – list any other advantages your solution provides beyond the direct problems for which it was intended to solve: e.g. “in addition to providing cleaner water for the bay, this solution is likely to encourage investment along the waterfront, revitalizing an area currently depressed.”) IV. Conclusion A. (Insert summary = past tense of overview (I.C.), highlighting key point from each main point in II. and III.) B. (Insert concluding remarks - look to I.B. and I.D. for content of message, as well as I.A. for FCC opportunities)

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Persuasive (Effect-Cause-Solution):
I. Introduction A. (Insert attention getting device(s) (AGD)) B. (Insert thesis – if audience is supportive or neutral) C. (Insert overview/preview) D. (Insert significance for audience/how presentation will benefit audience) II. Body - Effect A. (Insert negative effect #1) 1. (Insert support #1 – define/describe) 2. (Insert support #2 – provide scope of effect) 3. (Insert support #3 – provide indirect and direct impact on audience) 4. (Insert support #4 – provide example(s)) 5. (Insert transition) III. Body – Cause A. (Insert cause #1) 1. (Insert support #1 – define/describe) 2. (Insert support #2 – provide evidence of link between cause and effect) 3. (Insert support #3 – if available, provide evidence of the % contribution this cause contributed towards the effect) 4. (Insert support #4 – provide example(s)) 5. (Insert transition) B. (Insert cause #2, etc. if appropriate) 1. (Insert support #1 – define/describe) 2. (Insert support #2 – provide evidence of link between cause and effect) 3. (Insert support #3 – if available, provide evidence of the % contribution this cause contributed towards the effect) 4. (Insert support #4 – provide example(s)) 5. (Insert transition) IV. Body – Solution A. (Insert proposed solution – this is where your thesis is inserted for hostile audiences) 1. (Insert support #1 – provide historical context, recognizing those before you) 2. (Insert support #2 – succinctly present your solution, providing definition(s) for any vague term(s)) 3. (Insert support #3 – demonstrate how your solution eliminates/lessens cause #1 with expert quotes, case study(ies), reasoning, visuals, analogy, and/or example, along with the impact on the effect (e.g. “eliminates it,” “lessens it 60%”)) 4. (Insert support #4 – demonstrate how your solution eliminates/lessens cause #2, etc. with expert quotes, case study(ies), reasoning, visuals, analogy, and/or example, along with the impact on the effect (e.g. “eliminates it,” “lessens it 60%”)) 5. (Insert support #5 – if required, provide financial impact of solution – short-term (all change has costs) and longterm (some solutions save money while some cost money – breakeven, return-on-investment(ROI))) 6. (Insert support #6 – list any other advantages your solution provides beyond the direct cause(s) and effect(s) for which it was intended to solve: e.g. “in addition to providing cleaner water for the bay by eliminating trash from the creek, this solution is likely to encourage investment along the waterfront, revitalizing an area currently depressed.”) V. Conclusion A. (Insert summary = past tense of overview (I.C.), highlighting key point from each main point in II., III., and IV.) B. (Insert concluding remarks - look to I.B. and I.D. for content of message, as well as I.A. for FCC opportunities)

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Outside Speaker Evaluation (Speech 120)
Field trips provide you an opportunity to personally experience, as a member of a live audience, other students applying the critical thinking, emotional evoking and communication skills covered in this class. Write a brief 3 page paper evaluating the presentation. Some questions you may wish to answer are as follows: 1. What elements did the speaker use that created a positive experience for me that I want to be able to create for my future audiences? 2. What element(s) did the speaker forget to use that created a negative experience for me that I want to avoid for my future audiences? 3. How strong was the organization within the presentation? 4. Did the speaker use attention gaining steps? 5. Was a need =created for the audience? 6. What forms of supportive material did the speaker use? 7. Describe the speaker’s vocal and non-verbal delivery? 8. Was there an action step? Call t action? Definite conclusion? 9. How did the spear handle questions and answers? 10. Did the audience have a positive reaction to the presentation?

Examples: “ I clearly knew what the speaker was going to talk about in their presentation (elements I.B. & I.C.) “Speaker did not grab me because I never knew how this presentation would benefit me, or why it was significant for me (element I.D.)” “Speaker touched my emotions with her example of the child being saved from the Tsunami (use of example).” “Speaker was clearly prepared as they only occasionally looked at their notes, focusing on us most of the time (rehearsal of delivery).” “Speaker really sounded professional with their very creative full-circle conclusion, starting the story in the introduction, and finishing it in the conclusion with insights gained from the speech (element FCC).”

Speaker Evaluation Opportunities at DVC:
DVC Speech Night Local Speech Tournament

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