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Letter of intent_ Post-Master's Nurse Practitioner certificate program

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Letter of intent_ Post-Master's Nurse Practitioner certificate program Powered By Docstoc
					The University of British Columbia School of Nursing T201-2211 Wesbrook Mall Vancouver, BC V6T 2B5 To: Peter Marshall Senate Curriculum Committee Bill McKee FGS Curriculum Committee Paul Harrison Senate Academic Policy Committee cc. Chris Eaton Senate Secretariat From: Sally Thorne, Director School of Nursing Tel: 2-7748 fax: 2-7423 e-mail: thorne@nursing.ubc.ca

RE:

PROPOSAL FOR A “NEW” NURSING MASTER’S PROGRAM (Master of Nursing- Nurse Practitioner)

I hereby submit a proposal for a “new” master’s program in nursing, which represents the conversion of an approved “stream” within an existing master’s program into a distinct program with a separate degree designation. The required forms have been completed as attached. This cover memo is intended to request the endorsement by your respective committees to the proposal set out below and your transmittal of the corresponding recommendation to Senate for its approval. I would be pleased to meet with your committees, or otherwise respond to or modify the proposal if you feel that this is needed. We understand that the FGS and Senate Curriculum Committees approve programs and the information about them that will be set out in the UBC calendar. We also understand that the Senate Academic Policy Committee makes recommendations on the program proposal with respect to its degree and parchment requirements. In that the existing courses and program have already been approved (within the Master of Science in Nursing program) and are in full operation, and the admission criteria will not be changed by this proposal, we have not at this time submitted the proposal to the Senate Admissions Committee. Please advise us if you believe that this would be necessary. We would very much appreciate a timely consideration of this matter, since we wish to modify the degree that will be granted for the students who entered the program in September of 2006. Thank you for considering this. PROPOSAL I am requesting the transmittal of the following recommendation to Senate:

That Senate approves the degree name and associated calendar statement for the new degree program Master of Nursing (Nurse Practitioner) as circulated.

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SUMMARY OF PROPOSED PROGRAM The purpose of this proposal is to articulate and explain two changes for which the School of Nursing seeks Senate approval: 1) Transfer of one stream within an existing graduate program to a new program with professional designation, and 2) Creation of a new credential name for this professional master’s degree. Background The University of British Columbia School of Nursing currently offers a Nurse Practitioner (NP) stream within its Master of Science in Nursing program. Several new courses associated with delivery of this particular curricular “stream” were approved by Senate in November 2003 and, combined with a specified set of existing courses including clinical learning opportunities, have been configured to correspond to what have become, as of August 2005, the provincial and national regulatory standards for a new form of nursing practice. This form of practice requires a hybrid between academic graduate level learning and advanced clinical training. In contrast to our basic Master’s (MSN) Program, which requires 33 credits, the professional requirements for this stream currently necessitate 56 credits of combined clinical training and coursework. The current NP option within UBC’s existing MSN program has received formal recognition by the College of Registered Nurses of British Columbia, which holds regulatory authority for recognition of Schools and for eligibility to practice in this context. The Special Case of Post-Master’s Learners A number of the potential applicants for training in this new form of nursing practice already hold the MSN degree. At present, although they can take a limited number of “courses” as unclassified students, there is no second degree program into which they can gain entry. Therefore they are currently prevented from taking sufficient courses to complete eligibility requirements for professional practice in this new role. We therefore have two options if we are to serve this group of learners: 1) to create a post-master’s diploma program, or 2) to deliver programming toward a distinct master’s degree. The distinct degree option – Master of Nursing (Nurse Practitioner) – is the preferred option in that most regulatory bodies favour NP training within the context of a graduate degree program for the purposes of eligibility to practice across jurisdictions. Professional Master’s The university clearly lays out the intended distinction between a thesis-based master’s degree and a professional degree. Historically, all UBC master’s degrees in Nursing have been the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN). However, over time, there has been an increa sing distinction between learners seeking research training toward thesis completion and those whose preferred degree-completion options include focussed learning in relation to professional streams (nursing education, nursing leadership, health policy, advanced nursing practice) culminating in a major essay project. When the Nurse Practitioner Program was launched in 2003, for reasons of expediency it was created to “fit” into the formal structures of the existing MSN program (including making use of both directed study and clinical practicum course designations).

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However, Senate has now approved course and structure modifications to more accurately reflect the professional training aspects of the evolving program. In configuring a new professional master’s program, we also recognize that there may in future be a number of “streams” of nursing professional practice for which a professional master’s may also be appropriate. Over time, we envision the possibility of a nursing administration/leadership stream and, potentially, streams in nursing education and advanced nursing practice. Thus, we propose the development of this professional master’s program as a framework within which the Family Nurse Practitioner program can be most effectively delivered, and as a core structure within which we may eventually accommodate other learning streams. Budget & Resource Requirements In that the School of Nursing currently delivers all of the programming that will be contained within this new professional degree program, we anticipate no new resource requirements. In recognition of its intensive clinical training component, the NP program seats already received targeted funding by the Ministry of Advanced Education through its “New Growth” program, and therefore the current NP students are internally tracked for accountability purposes. Library resources already exist, and interdepartmental consultation has already occurred in relation to the approval process for the new courses required for this program. In an initial phase, four “new” courses were approved in the fall of 2003; in a second phase, several additional courses were subsequently developed and approved in 2006 to reflect the unique content required by this cohort of learners. The separation of the two master’s programs will have no additional resource implications for the School, since core courses will continue to be available to students from both programs, and no duplication of teaching need occur. Library and laboratory materials are already in place. Because students are already selectively admitted on the basis of availability of space within existing Nurse Practitioner courses, this program will not require faculty, space, clinical laboratory, or library resources beyond those required for the implementation of the current MSN program. Although the School of Nursing suffers from chronic physical space shortages, it is anticipated that this will be addressed over the coming years in the context of the larger School facilities planning process.

Degree and Parchment Designation Our current master’s degree designation (MSN) is ideally suited to a thesis or major paper-based academic graduate program in our discipline. As an alternative degree designation within our discipline, the Master of Nursing (MN) is a clearly recognized and accepted professional degree across North America and internationally. We believe it more appropriately reflects the nature and scope of the Nurse Practitioner program. Because graduates of this program do have highly specialized training that is distinct from other MN graduates, we further propose that the degree designation for this program recognize that specialty. The preferred degree designation is: Master of Nursing (Nurse Practitioner).

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Consultations & Collaborations In the context of Nurse Practitioner program curriculum, the School of Nursing enjoys excellent collaborations with the Faculty of Medicine (in particular, the Department of Family Medicine), with the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, with the Faculty of Science (Department of Zoology), and with numerous partners within the various Health Authorities. The program has been formally reviewed twice within its short existence by the College of Registered Nurses of BC (formerly the Registered Nurses Association of BC), and has been granted “recognition” status through 2008. Developments within the program have been regularly reported to both the Ministry of Advanced Education and the Ministry of Health (Nursing Directorate), with whom the School has worked on the interrelated processes of regulation, legislation and education in relation to this innovation in British Columbia’s process of primary health care reform. Graduates are employed by the Health Authorities, and the School has worked closely with all of the province’s Chief Nursing Officers to develop employment standards and conditions suitable to the enactment of this form of nursing practice. Admissions Although our general admissions process remains unchanged, we are proposing a specific recommendation in relation to the admission of candidates who have advanced standing by virtue of holding the MSN degree or who have obtained nurse practitioner training in another jurisdiction outside of the graduate degree context. Although program students will normally require 56 credits to meet the professional practice requirements set by the College of Registered Nurses of BC, those with evidence of advanced standing may, on the advice of the Admissions Committee, be granted exemption for up to 18 credits.

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Appendix I: Original Joint Ministry Announcement, May 2003

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Appendix II: Program Overview and Credit Requirements MN[NP]: 56 credits  Core courses: NURS 511 (3): Theoretical Foundations of Nursing Practice NURS 504 (3): Research and Evidence-based Practice NURS 505 (3): Statistical Literacy in Nursing [9 credits] Specialized knowledge for NP practice in primary care: NURS 506 (3): Health Promotion in Practice NURS 507 (3): Pharmacology and Therapeutics in Primary Care NURS 508 (3): Pathophysiological Processes for Nurse Practitioners NURS 509 (2): Clinical Procedures in Primary Care Settings NURS 510 (6): Advanced Health Assessment Across the Life Span NURS 591 (3): Professional and Ethical Issues in NP Practice [20 credits] Primary care practica: NURS 570 (6): Primary Care I NURS 571 (6): Primary Care II NURS 572 (6): Primary Care III  

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[18 credits]

Consolidated practicum: NURS 578 (6): Family Nurse Practitioner Consolidated Practicum [6 credits] Primary care project: NURS 596 (3): Primary Care Project [3 credits]

Anticipated Advanced Standing Variations 1. Students holding a previous Master’s degree in Nursing without NP Component Because this group would qualify for advanced standing for the 9 credits of core courses, the required program total would be 47 credits (comprised of specialized knowledge components, primary care practica, consolidated practicum and primary care project, as above).

2. Students entering with selected course requirement equivalence established by the College of Registered Nurses of British Columbia. Students who have undergone a practice portfolio review by the CRNBC may qualify for advanced standing if the equivalency to primary care I & II practice and health assessment equivalency is documented (potentially an equivalence of 18 credits). Under these circumstances, the required program total would be 38 credits, comprised of core, specialized knowledge components, primary care III and consolidated practica, and the primary care project.

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Appendix III: UBC Consultation Process


Consultation with faculty, students, and other interested bodies, as appropriate, e.g. professional and accrediting bodies. Extensive consultation has been done within the School of Nursing faculty, with current and prospective students, and with professional leaders involved in implementation of the new Family Nurse Practitioner initiative. The School of Nursing approved the program plan in principle on Oct 18, 2005 and, following full consultation, approved the final proposal on January 22, 2007. Discussion between the Vice President, Academic and Provost and the Faculty or Faculties involved. Preliminary consultation with Associate VP Anna Kindler and the (former) VP Academic and Provost Lorne Whitehead has occurred. Consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. Draft proposal and delivery options relative to the placement of the program were discussed with Dean Pro-tem Ann Rose and Associate Dean Jim Thompson. As a result of that consultation, it was concluded that the program should remain within the Faculty of Graduate Studies. Consultation by the Senate Academic Policy Committee. Degree designation approval process and conditions have been discussed with Paul Harrison. Consultation by the Senate Curriculum Committee. An appropriate sequence of steps in the approval procedure has been approved by Peter Marshall.

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UBC Curriculum Proposal Form Change to Course or Program
Category: 1 Faculty: Applied Science Department: Nursing Faculty Approval Date: January 22/07 Effective Year 2007 for Change URL: http://students.ubc.ca/calendar/index.cfm?tr ee=12,204,828,1205 Present Calendar Entry: Date: Contact Person: Carol Jillings Phone: 2-7479 Email: jillings@nursing.ubc.ca

Proposed Calendar Entry:

The School of Nursing offers three graduate degrees: a Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.), a Master of Nursing (M.N.), and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). These graduate degree programs provide advanced professional leadership, clinical scholarship, and research training beyond the bachelor’s degree in nursing. ……….

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The School of Nursing offers two graduate degrees: a Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.), and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). These graduate degree programs provide advanced professional leadership, clinical scholarship, and research training beyond the baccalaureate degree in nursing. ……….

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

Master of Science in Nursing
The M.S.N. program is designed to prepare graduates to function as leaders in a range of roles such as education, advanced practice, policy implementation, health care management, and nursing knowledge development. Admission Requirements Applicants must be registered nurses with a bachelor’s degree, normally in nursing, who meet the admission requirements of the UBC Faculty of Graduate Studies. Successful applicants will be drawn from the top-ranked candidates who have a minimum overall average of 76% at the third- and fourth-year levels, with a First class standing (80% or above) in 12 credits or more of nursing courses in their baccalaureate program. GRE scores are required. In order to be included among the topranked candidates, there must be clear evidence that the applicant is competent to pursue studies in the English language. Completion of a satisfactory TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language), with a minimum score of 600, may be required before any offer of admission can be made. Program Requirements

Master of Science in Nursing
The M.S.N. program is designed to prepare graduates to function as leaders in a range of roles such as education, advanced practice, policy implementation, health care management, and nursing knowledge development. The program provides a basis for leadership in professional nursing practice and also creates a foundation for doctoral studies. Within the 33credit program, the student may do a major essay (3 credits) or a thesis (6 credits). Applicants must be registered nurses with a baccalaureate degree, normally in nursing, who meet the admission requirements of the UBC Faculty of Graduate Studies. Successful applicants will be drawn from the top-ranked candidates who have a minimum overall average of 76% at the third- and fourth-year levels, with a First class standing (80% or above) in 12 credits or more of nursing courses in their baccalaureate program. GRE scores are required by the School of Nursing. In order to be included among the top-ranked candidates, there must be clear evidence that the applicant is competent to pursue studies in the English language. Completion of a satisfactory TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language), with a

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The program provides basis for leadership in professional nursing practice and also creates a foundation for doctoral studies. Students complete a total of 33 credits, comprising core, focus and elective courses. The student may complete a major essay (3 credits) or a thesis (6 credits).

minimum score of 600, may be required before any offer of admission can be made. .

Master of Nursing
The M.N. degree is designed to prepare graduates in a specialized area of nursing practice within the context of a professional graduate education. Nurse Practitioner The M.N.( Nurse Practitioner) program prepares nurse practitioners who will work in primary care settings. Graduates will be prepared to assess, diagnose and treat common and predictable conditions across the lifespan, and will be eligible to apply for registration as Nurse Practitioner (Family) in British Columbia. Admission Requirements Applicants must meet general requirements of the UBC Faculty of Graduate Studies for admission, including a minimum overall average of 76% at the third- and fourthyear levels, with a First class standing (80% or above) in 12 credits or more of nursing courses in their bachelor’s program. In addition, they must hold current registration as a Registered Nurse in British Columbia and have completed a minimum of three years of clinical practice as a registered nurse, demonstrate clinical excellence, and provide evidence of their ability to work autonomously. Applicants with previous graduate level preparation in nursing or course equivalence established by the College of Registered Nurses of BC may be considered for advanced standing in the MN-NP program or for exemptions from specified coursework. Exemptions will be determined on an individual basis by the MN-NP Program Admissions Committee. Program Requirements In accordance with the professional and regulatory requirements associated with this form of advanced nursing practice, this option normally comprises 56 credits of coursework, combining 9 credits of graduate level theory courses in common with the M.S.N. program core requirements, up to 44 credits of primary

Type of Action:

New degree. Transfer of Specialization.

Rationale: The professional Master’s degree – M.N. – designation is appropriate to the Nurse Practitioner program and distinguishes the degree from the M.S.N. The distinction from the M.S.N. is also important for prospective students who already hold an M.S.N. but desire the Nurse Practitioner specialization.

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health care theory and practice training, and a 3 credit culminating scholarly project.

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