Docstoc

Research-Questionnaire-Template

Document Sample
Research-Questionnaire-Template Powered By Docstoc
					How to design a questionnaire for research When you design a questionnaire to help you carry out research you need to think about what you are looking to find out. You are probably going to write a report to tell people your findings so you need think carefully about the questions you are going to ask first! There are a few things you need to decide before you start. What is it you want to find out? You need to know the topic you are researching before you start. Once you know this you can think about the questions you are going to ask. What is it you want to know about that topic? For example if you want to know about people living in their own homes you might want to ask questions like: Q. Do you live in your own home? Yes No Q. What kind of home is it? A flat A house Q. How long have you lived there? 0 – 4 years 5 – 9 years 10 – 14 years over 15 years When thinking about what you want to find out you also need to think about who you‟re going to send your questionnaire out to. You will get better results to your study if you think about who the best people are to answer the questions and send the questionnaire out to them. For example, if you‟re asking about people‟s homes you should try to send it out to people who actually have their own home. There‟s no point in sending it out to just anybody, they might not have anything to tell you about your topic and you‟ll end up with lots of questionnaires that don‟t have any useful information!

Is your study anonymous? A lot of research studies are anonymous - this means that you cannot tell who answered the questions. If you want to carry out an anonymous study you shouldn‟t ask people personal information like their names or addresses. How are you going to make the information you collect make sense? When you use a questionnaire to collect information you might need to have some way to organise all the information you get. You can do this by asking people questions that are more general and not about your topic. We would call this background information. These questions could ask people‟s age, the area they live in or whether they are a man or a woman. This would still allow the study to be anonymous and would look like this: Q. Are you a man? a woman? Q. How old are you? 16 – 24 25 – 34 35 – 44 45 – 54 55 – 64 over 65

Q. Do you live in Scotland? England? Ireland? Wales? This means that when everyone has sent back their questionnaires you will be able to look at the information you have collected and organise it. You will be able to find out more from your results by asking these questions because you will be able to compare the information you get. For example, when you write your report you might be able to say things like “Most people who live in their own

home are over 65. Hardly anyone who is under 24 has their own home.” Including a question like this really depends on the information you are looking for. Does it matter if the questions are answered by a man or a woman? If it doesn‟t you don‟t need to ask that question. If you want to be able to tell people your findings for different age groups you would need to ask a question about age in the questionnaire. If you are just looking to find out how many people live in their own home and it doesn‟t matter their age or where they live then you don‟t have to ask these questions. Only ask questions that you need to know the answer to or you‟ll end up with lots of information you won‟t use! What kind of information are you looking for? When you design a questionnaire it is better to have what we call closed questions. This means they are questions which give people a choice of answers and they have to pick one. This is an example of a closed question: Q. Do you live in Scotland? England? Ireland? Wales? If you ask questions like this it is easier to compare the answers everyone gives because there will only be a small number of answers that people can give. This makes it easier to compare the information that you might get. Sometimes when we ask this type of question we might put possible answers in groups, like the age groups in the example we looked at before. We do this to make the number of possible answers smaller so that it is easier to compare them. We call the information these questions give us quantitative information because it gives us numbers of people who gave the same answers to each question.

Sometimes the answers that are in a closed question will not be the right answer for some people. You might need to add another option so that people can give a different answer. An example of this is: Q. Do you live in Scotland? England? Ireland? Wales? Somewhere else?

…………………………..

The dots after the „Somewhere else?‟ mean people can write down their answer. There is another kind of question you can use. It is called an open question because people can give any answer they want. This kind of question would look like this: Q. What do you think about the area you live in? ……………………… The dots give a space for people to answer the question. We call the information this question gives us qualitative information because it tells us what people think. It is harder to compare the answers everyone gives because they will probably all be different. You would need to read all the answers and see if there are any patterns. The answers you get to these questions would be useful to quote in your report or to tell someone‟s story. Standard parts of a questionnaire There are some things which should be included in every questionnaire. These are:  A title. You need to give your questionnaire a name. It should be quite a simple name that helps people understand what the questionnaire is all about. For example, you could call a questionnaire which is asking questions about people‟s homes “Where do you live?” You might also need to put a short paragraph explaining why you want to find out this information so people know why they are being asked to fill in the questionnaire.

 A paragraph telling people what to do once they have completed a questionnaire. Where should they send it and who should it be addressed to? What date does it have to be filled in by? It‟s sometimes a good idea to put this information at the start and the end of the questionnaire. You should also put your contact details so people can contact you if they need help to answer the questions.  A paragraph explaining what you are going to do with the results. If people are going to fill in your questionnaire they should know what you are going to do with the information they give you. You could say something like “All of the questionnaires we receive will be collected and used to write a report about the kinds of houses people with learning disabilities live in.”  At the very end of the questionnaire you should have a sentence thanking people for filling it in. Once you have decided what you are trying to find out and the kinds of questions you are going to ask you can start designing your questionnaire. Say you were looking to find out about people living in their own homes and  You have decided your study has to be anonymous  You would like to be able to write in your report about people of different ages.  You‟ve decided you want to use mostly closed questions to make the information you get easier to compare but you would quite like to know what people like about living in their own homes as well. When we put all the decisions you have made together with the standard parts of a questionnaire, your questionnaire would look a bit like this:

Where do you live? This is a questionnaire all about where you live. We are trying to find out about the different kinds of houses people live in and what they think about living there. When you have completed this questionnaire please return it by the 10th of January to: Mr John Smith 25 Long Street Glasgow G12 345 If you need some help to fill it in you can contact John on 0141 123 4567 or john@internet.com All of the questionnaires we receive will be collected and used to write a report about the kinds of houses people with learning disabilities live in. Q. How old are you? 16 – 24 25 – 34 35 – 44 45 – 54 55 – 64 over 65

Q. Do you live in your own home? Yes No Q. What kind of home is it? A flat A house Another kind of home

………………

Q. How long have you lived there? 0 – 4 years 5 – 9 years 10 – 14 years over 15 years

Q. What do you like about living in your home?.................................... Thank you for taking the time to fill in this questionnaire. Please return it by the 10th of January to: Mr John Smith 25 Long Street Glasgow G12 345 When you get all your questionnaires back you will be able to work out:  how many people live in their own home  how many people live in different kinds of homes  how many people have lived in their home for each time period  what people like about living there For every question about people‟s homes you will be able to say how many people in each age group gave each answer. You will also have people‟s stories about what they like about living in their own home. What if you were just looking to find out basic information about how many people lived in their own homes? You‟ve decided this is all the information you would like to know and you don‟t want it to be anonymous. Your questionnaire would look like this:

Where do you live? This is a questionnaire all about where you live. We are trying to find out about the different kinds of houses people live in and what they think about living there. When you have completed this questionnaire please return it by the 10th of January to: Mr John Smith 25 Long Street Glasgow G12 345 If you need some help to fill it in you can contact John on 0141 123 4567 or john@internet.com All of the questionnaires we receive will be collected and used to write a report about the kinds of houses people with learning disabilities live in. Q. What is your name?........................................ Q. Do you live in your own home? Yes No Q. What kind of home is it? A flat A house Another kind of home

………………

Thank you for taking the time to fill in this questionnaire. Please return it by the 10th of January to: Mr John Smith 25 Long Street Glasgow G12 345

The answers you get to this questionnaire would tell you:  who answered your questionnaire  how many people live in their own home  how many people live in each kind of home You have asked for people‟s names so for each question you will be able to tell who answered. You will get less information from this questionnaire because you have not asked as many questions. So there are some important points to remember when you design a questionnaire:  You must always keep in mind what you are looking to find out. There is no point in asking lots of questions that you don‟t need to know the answer to.  Your questionnaire must be easy for people to understand or they won‟t fill it out. Keep your questions simple and easy to follow. You can also add in pictures if you think it‟ll help people to understand.  You should also try to keep the number of possible answers you put next to each question as low as possible. Only put the answers which people are most likely to give and group the answers where you need to. If you put lots of answers it will make it harder to compare all the information people give.  Try to keep the questions as closed as you can. If you want to know someone‟s opinion on something then it is OK to use open questions, but remember that the information they give you is harder to compare.  Remember to include the standard parts of the questionnaire. It makes it look more professional.  It is always a good idea to send your questionnaire to as many relevant people as you possibly can. This way you are more likely to receive more completed questionnaires. The more questionnaires people fill in and send back the better your results will be. It is still important to send it to the people that you think can give you the answers you are looking for though and not just anyone!


				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Tags: Resea, rch-Q
Stats:
views:14383
posted:11/29/2009
language:English
pages:9
Description: Research-Questionnaire-Template