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Edexcel-Modular-Foundation-Scheme-of-Work

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					Foundation Scheme of Work
Chapter/ Topic Chapter 1 1.1 Collecting data by observation and by experiment Mymaths ICT Links 1-17 1 Edexcel Modular Foundation Specification Reference Ma4.3a – Design and use data-collection sheets for grouped discrete and continuous data. Target Grade E, D, C Learning Objectives Additional Notes Homework

  

1.2 Questionnaires

5

M

Ma4.3a – Collect data using various methods, including observation, controlled experiment, data logging, questionnaires and surveys.

D, C



 1.3 Sampling 8 D, C   1.4 Databases 9 M Ma4.3b – Gather data from secondary sources, including printed tables and lists from ICT-based sources. Ma2.1e – Interpret and discuss numerical information presented in a variety of forms. Ma2.1g – Use a range of strategies to Ma4.4a – Draw and produce pictograms. E  

Know how to record data on a data collection sheet, from observation and from experiment. Understand how to design a suitable data collection sheet to record data from observation and experiment. Be able to use the 5-bar method for recording tallies. Be able to design questions for inclusion in a questionnaire, which are clear, avoid bias and include response boxes. Know the difference between discrete and continuous data. Understand that when conducting a survey a sample of the ‘population’ is required. Know the meaning of ‘random’ in relation to the selection of a sample. Understand the meaning of and be able to interrogate a database. Know the difference between primary and secondary data.

Chapter 2

18-45

2.1 Pictograms

18

G



Know how to draw pictograms.

EXAM MARCH 2007 OF YEAR 10

 2.2 Bar charts 21 Ma4.4a – Draw and produce bar charts. F, G    2.3 Pie charts 2.4 Using pie charts 2.5 Time series 24 27 31 Ma4.4a – Draw and produce, using paper and ICT, line graphs for time series. Ma4.5k – Interpret social statistics including index numbers and time series, for example the General Index of Retail Prices. Ma4.4a – Draw and produce, diagrams for continuous data, frequency diagrams.(include histograms with equal class intervals and frequency diagrams for grouped discrete data) Ma4.4b – Identify the modal class for grouped data. Ma4.4a – Draw and produce diagrams for continuous data, frequency diagrams, including frequency polygons. Ma4.4a - Draw and produce, using paper and ICT pie charts for categorical data. E E E    

Be able to interpret and use pictograms. Know how to draw a bar chart. Be able to interpret and use a bar chart. Be able to draw and interpret dual bar charts and vertical line graphs. Be able to draw a pie chart. Be able to interpret a pie chart. Know how to compare categories of data. Be able to draw and use line graphs and time series.

2.6 Grouping data

33

S M

C, D

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Know how to group discrete data and continuous data. Be able to draw frequency diagrams and histograms with equal class intervals.

2.7 Frequency polygons Chapter 3 3.1 Mean, mode,

35

M

C

    

Know how to draw a frequency polygon. Be able to use a frequency polygon. Be able to criticize misleading graphs. Be able to find the mean, median,

46-65 46

S

Ma4.4b – Calculate mean, range and

F, G

EXAM MARCH 2007 OF YEAR 10

median and range 3.2 Using frequency tables to find averages 50

median of small data sets with discrete then continuous data. Ma4.4b – Calculate mean, range and median of small data sets with discrete then continuous data. Identify the modal class for a group. Ma4.4g – Find the median for large data sets and calculate an estimate for the mean for large data sets with grouped data. Ma4.4a – Draw and produce, using paper and ICT, stem-and-leaf diagrams. D, E, F

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mode and range of small data sets. Know how to use the relevant statistical functions on a calculator to find the mean. Be able to calculate Σf and Σ fx in order to find totals. Know how to find the mean, mode, median and range from a frequency table.

3.3 Stem and leaf diagrams

53

S M

C, D

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3.4 Data logging and comparing distributions

55

Ma4.5d – Compare distributions and make inferences, using the shape of distributions and measures of average and range.

D, E, F

 

3.5 Estimating the mean of grouped data

59

Ma4.4g – Calculate an estimate for the mean for large data sets with grouped data.

C

  

be able to interpret and design a stem and leaf diagram, ensuring that all leaves are ordered and that there is a key. Understand data logging as a means of collecting and storing data at regular intervals. Be able to compare distributions and make inferences, using shapes of distributions and measures of average and range. Be able to find the middle value of a class interval. Be able to find the class interval, which contains the median of grouped data. Know how to calculate an estimate for the mean of grouped data. Be able to use the probability scale, from impossible (0) to certain (1) to

Chapter 4 4.1 The probability scale

66-86 66

S M

Ma4.4c – Understand and use the probability scale.

F, G

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EXAM MARCH 2007 OF YEAR 10

4.2 Writing probability as numbers

68

Ma4.4d – Understand estimates or measures of probability from theoretical models (including equally likely outcomes). Ma4.4e – List all outcomes for single events in a systematic way. S Ma4.3c – Design and use two way tables for discrete and grouped data

E, F

4.3 Two-way tables

71

E

4.4 Sample space diagrams 4.5 Mutually exclusive outcomes and the probability that the outcome of an event will not happen 4.6 Estimating probability from

74

Ma4.3e – List all outcomes for single events and two successive events, in a systematic way. Ma4.3f – Identify different mutually exclusive outcomes and know that the sum of the probabilities of all these outcomes is 1.

F

determine the likelihood of an outcome of an event happening.  Be able to list all the outcomes from a single event.  Be able to write the probability of an outcome from a single event as a number using the formula; Probability = number of successful outcomes ÷ number of possible outcomes.  Be able to display information in a two-way table.  Be able to interpret information in a two-way table.  be able to complete a two-way table given some information.  Be able to use a two-way table to write down probabilities of given outcomes.  be able to list all outcomes for two or more successive events showing them in a sample space diagram.    Understand the meaning of mutually exclusive outcomes of an event. Know that the sum of the probabilities of all mutually exclusive outcomes of an event is equal to one. Work out the probability of something not happening when the probability of that thing happening is known. Be able to estimate the probability of the outcome of an event by

76

D, E

78

Ma4.4d – Understand estimates or measures of probability from relative

C, D



EXAM MARCH 2007 OF YEAR 10

relative frequency Chapter 5 5.1 Scatter graphs and relationships 87-99 87

frequency.    

experiment. Understand that estimated probability can be equated to relative frequency. be able to plot scatter graphs. Be able to use scatter graphs to describe a relationship, if any between two quantities

5.2 Lines of best fit and correlation

91

Ma2.6c - Discuss and interpret graphs modelling real situations Ma4.5a - interpret a wide range of graphs and diagrams and draw conclusions. Ma2.6c - Draw a line of best fit through a set of linearly related points and find its equation. Ma4.1i – Explore connections in mathematics and look for relationships between variables when analysing data. Ma4.4h – Draw lines of best fit by eye, understanding what these represent Ma4.5f - Appreciate that correlation is a measure of the strength of the association between two variables. Distinguish between positive, negative and zero correlation using lines of best fit. Appreciate that zero correlation does not necessarily imply ‘no relationship’ but merely ‘no linear relationship’. Ma4.1e – identify exceptional or unexpected cases when solving statistical problems Ma4.4h – Draw lines of best fit by eye, understanding what these represent Ma4.5c - Look at data to find patterns and exceptions

D



5.3 Using lines of best fit

92

D

   

Be able to draw a line of best fit. Understand the meaning of correlation. know that, if a line of best fit can be drawn, then there may be a correlation between the quantities, Know that the correlation can be

EXAM MARCH 2007 OF YEAR 10

Ma4.5f - Appreciate that correlation is a measure of the strength of the association between two variables. Distinguish between positive, negative and zero correlation using lines of best fit. Appreciate that zero correlation does not necessarily imply ‘no relationship’ but merely ‘no linear relationship’. Ma4.5g - Use the vocabulary of probability to interpret results involving uncertainty and prediction.

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positive or negative. Know that correlation can be high (or strong) or low (or weak) Know that, if its not possible to draw a line of best fit, then there is no correlation(zero correlation) between the quantities. Be able to use lines of best fit to find missing values, when this is appropriate.

EXAM MARCH 2007 OF YEAR 10


				
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