CREW MANUAL

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					“Antipodes” Pre-Trip Information
1. Purpose
The purpose of this document is to help you understand what to expect while traveling on the Motor Yacht, “Antipodes”. Reading this manual is very important.  It will help you determine if the trip is right for you!  It will let you know what to expect the trip to be like.  It will give you important safety information. This manual will describe: 1. Purpose................................................................................................................................. 1 2. What to expect on the trip .................................................................................................... 2 3. Safety Concerns. .................................................................................................................. 4 4. Weather ................................................................................................................................ 6 5. Sea Communications ........................................................................................................... 7 6. Harbor Communications ...................................................................................................... 8 7. Work Effort .......................................................................................................................... 9 8. Watch Standing .................................................................................................................... 9 9. Entertainment ..................................................................................................................... 11 10. Comforts .......................................................................................................................... 12 11. Seasickness ...................................................................................................................... 13 12. What to Bring. .................................................................................................................. 14 13. Clothing and Personal Gear Checklist ............................................................................. 15 14. Rules ................................................................................................................................ 16 15. Conclusion ....................................................................................................................... 17 Appendix A: Our Route and VERY rough itinerary for this trip ............................................. 19 Appendix B: Weather Reports .................................................................................................. 19 Appendix C: Food Planning...................................................................................................... 20 A general understanding of the trip, equipment, and responsibilities will make the trip more enjoyable for everyone. This document is an overview. For details on specific equipment and activities, ask the Captain or First Mate.

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2.

What to expect on the trip
The first thing to remember is that life aboard “Antipodes” involves a lot of work. Visitors on the boat generally fall into two categories – Passage Crew and Coastal Crew. Even though you will have “duties” while aboard, this is intended to be a different, interesting and exciting adventure/vacation. Each boating trip is different. We have trips where we remain in a general geographic area (Coastal Cruising) and trips where we are making passages or ocean crossings (Passagemaking). This document covers many topics, including an ocean crossing. Unless you are crossing an ocean with us, this manual covers issues that will not apply to your trip, but you will probably find it interesting to read anyway! When you read or hear about people crossing the ocean you normally hear about the limited electricity, limited fresh water, lack of hot water, refrigeration, air conditioning, and long periods without communication with land. Those limitations normally apply to smaller sailboats. “Antipodes” is a large motoryacht and generally has lots of electricity, water, refrigerator/freezer, numerous safety systems (including satellite communication) and all the comforts of home – with a few other things thrown in! At the same time the trip is a learning experience for the entire crew. You will learn what it is like to operate an ocean going vessel. You will be involved with actually operating the vessel. Your involvement will enhance the enjoyment of your experience and will insure that you will not become bored! We do not operate the vessel like a Navy ship, but to have a safe passage, each crew member must know what's going on, and what they are required to do. Each person will have tasks to perform on board. In addition to learning how to operate the vessel you will learn emergency procedures. Whenever the vessel is underway, everyone will have to stand watch – the watch schedule will be determined by the Captain. Typically, a watch consists of 3-4 hours at the helm. The exception is operation in restricted or congested waters where the Captain will always be at the helm. Standing watch is basically:  Looking out for other vessels, watching the radar.  Monitoring the autopilot, and engine gauges.  Listening to the radio.  Notifying the Captain of any problems. These are not hard tasks, and you will be taught how to perform each one. We will talk more about watch standing later in this manual. In addition to standing watch there is meal cooking and cleanup. Your help would be appreciated in these areas.

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We should be in contact with land or other vessels at all times via VHF radio or Satellite phone. If we are close to shore, you may find that your cell phones also work although you may need a specific SIM card or access plan in some foreign countries. Let us know what you want to eat, snack on and what you like to drink. However, for safety reasons, drinking alcohol is limited.

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3.

Safety Concerns.
All crewmembers should be in good health. Your biggest safety risk is falling overboard when underway. Your safety will be greatly enhanced if you follow a few simple rules:  Always hold on to something on the boat.  Always let the person on watch know you are going on deck.  Always go on deck with someone else.  Always wear your vessel shoes when on deck.  Always wear your life vest, and light when working on deck, or on deck at night.  Do not go on deck in bad weather. It is easy to fall on a moving vessel.  Any time you are standing or walking hold on to the boat with one hand. Another risk is getting burned on a moving vessel.  Whenever the stove, or oven is on always make sure you are not in a position to fall onto the stove.  Always be mindful of hot items from the stove and avoid being in a position to have these fall onto you.  Whenever taking anything out of the oven use oven mittens.  When underway, do not enter the engine room without permission from the Captain. Biggest risk to the vessel is collision – Avoidance is the key!  Preventing collisions is the primary duty of the person on watch.  We have binoculars at all watch stations. Know where they are and how to use them.  We also have radar for tracking other vessels. Taking on water, springing a leak-this is extremely rare.  We would most likely take water on from a hose leaking. All hoses which are connected to a thru hull opening will have a valve that allows water to be turned off in case of a leak. If a hose leaks we just turn off the thru hull valve.  The vessel has three permanent bilge pumps (including a huge engine driven pump) and numerous spare pumps. Worst Case-Abandon Ship  The vessel is equipped with a tender and a life raft that will be used in the unlikely event that we have to abandon ship.  The vessel has a pre-packed “ditch bag” with survival and communication gear.  I plan to call for help on the satellite phone and the VHF radio before we get on the raft!  We have an automatic EPIRB. This device broadcasts our location to rescue satellites.

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The areas we are traveling generally have substantial commercial traffic, so it is unlikely that help would be far away.

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4.

Weather
Concern: It is not the wind that bothers us; it is the waves. More importantly it is how steep the waves are. The height and steepness of the waves are a function of wind and current. It is the big steep waves that cause the boat to pitch and roll, making the trip less comfortable. The commonly quoted odds for dangerous weather are 1 day in 300 days at sea. While the vessel can safely handle extreme seas, they are uncomfortable for the crew. So we try to avoid the weather or change course to take the seas at a better angle. For example, waves from the side produce the rolling motion that people find uncomfortable, so we would turn into the waves to take them at an angle. How big waves get. According to “Oceanography and Seamanship” published by Cornell Maritime Press:  A gale (42 mph winds) blowing for 5 hours would produce 12-foot waves. If we stay in the storm for 3 days (a really long time to be in a storm--we would leave the area long before that) we could get 25-foot waves.  It is not recommended to venture into seas that are bigger then your vessel; our vessel is 55 feet long. This would take 81 mph winds 10 hours, or 58 mph winds 3 days to create waves that big. We will NOT go out in those kinds of conditions! The problem with large waves (and the reason we avoid them) is the potential for the vessel to roll over:  This could occur if a REALLY big wave were to hit broadside. This should not happen if you keep the front of the boat pointed generally into the waves and maintain a sharp watch for unusual seas.  If the doors and windows are closed, our vessel will self-right. However, everything (especially the inside of the refrigerator) will be a mess! How we handle storms. We will not depart expecting to find a storm. If we receive a storm forecast for our route while underway, we will typically alter course to avoid it. Only if we could not escape would we go in one. For coastal cruising, this is almost never an issue. As a normal precaution while underway, we make sure that everything is held in place. We shut all windows and doors and hatches. If we anticipate being caught in a storm (remember we can’t go very fast!), we will precook soups, sandwiches, pasta, and hot drinks. How we avoid storms: We plan the trip to take place in good weather. We subscribe to a professional weather forecasting and trip routing service. We monitor weather reports via radio. We can detect weather on the radar.

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5.

Sea Communications
We should always have at least two different ways to contact someone on land, the Coast Guard, and other ships.

Coastal communications (within 10-20 miles of shore)
Cellular Phone: We have a cell phone booster antenna that can provide cell phone access within 20-50 miles of a cell tower. The availability and cost may vary depending on the country. We will be using an “unlocked” phone with various SIM cards based on the area of the world. This is useful for outgoing calls but the incoming phone number may change. email address: JimYork81@gmail.com This is the general access email address for routine communications. I will check this email address anytime I have decent WiFi connections.

Offshore communications (works anywhere in the world)
Voice Satellite communications: Phone number: Unlisted (generally used for outgoing calls only). This service allows SMS Text messages to be sent to the phone in case someone on land needs to get in touch with us. Before you come on board, I will notify you of the SMS messaging process. Cost: About $1.25/minute plus any long distance charges. OCENS Satellite email: Our OCENS Satellite email address will be provided to you when you travel on Antipodes. This email address should only be used in emergencies. It runs through the satellite phone and is very slow - the speed is about 2.4kbps (about 100 times SLOWER than a cable modem). We will generally only use this email address for weather updates and emergencies.

CONTACT COAST GUARD AND OTHER BOATS
VHF: When we are within about 15-50 miles of other ships we can contact them via the Very High Frequency radio. We also use the VHF to contact the coast guard when we are about 25-50 miles from land. The VHF radio looks almost like a telephone with a strange base unit. You simply turn the channel knob to Channel 16 (the emergency channel) and then use the handset to talk. You do need to push the transmit button when talking and release it when listening. We will give you a demonstration during the orientation to the boat. EPIRB: This emergency device broadcasts your exact GPS location to US and Russian Satellites, which forward this to the appropriate rescue services. SATELLITE PHONE: Contacts the Coast Guard or other emergency services from anywhere.

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6.

Harbor Communications
Mail: This is unlikely to apply. In the event this is necessary, First Class works best for mail coming to Antipodes. Use envelopes with distinctive colors/shapes (ask me for details and make sure who ever picks up the mail knows what is distinctive about it.) Address to: James York, M/V Antipodes Write hold for pickup, number envelopes. Place an attention name on the bottom of the envelope. Forward mail to a specific yacht club or marina (we will let you know which one), not general delivery. For mail from Antipodes, use pressure sensitive stamps, the ones you have to lick are destroyed by humidly. Part & Overnight delivery services (If you need to ship something to Antipodes) Overnight delivery takes twice as long as promised. Check on what is necessary when shipping to get item returned duty free. You will need to include 3 copies of our cruising permit (we will fax or email you a copy) - one with waybill, one outside and one inside. Write on cartoon “CRUISING PERMIT INCLUDED” with arrows to it. Include invoice listing the lowest credible value. Use private customs broker if needed. On all paperwork state: For Foreign Marine Vessel in Transit. State “Replaces defective item previously returned”. Track all waybill numbers, both International and Local on same package! E-Mail: We have a single line WiFi booster antenna on board that can access HotSpots from up to 2 miles away (if you want to install the computer driver on your laptop). This will have to be a free HotSpot or you will obviously have to have the login information to use that. You can retrieve your email from Internet Café’s or WiFi Hot Spots (with your own computer or one of our computers). Ask your ISP how to do this. Some let you use a www interface, others will give you the POP server name, POP user name, POP password. You can also forward your email to Gmail, Yahoo mail or Hot Mail, etc. We generally use our computers to only get email for our vessel (ask for our current email address). When underway on passages, you should plan on no email access except in emergencies. Cellular Phone: Your cellular phone may work, check with your carrier. You may need to have it turned on for the area we are cruising. Our cellular phone communications may be active. We do this when doing extended cruising in one area. We will let you know the current phone number if applicable. Note that this may involve significant roaming charges outside of the US coastal waters. VHF: Our boat is a licensed radio station. The Captain will provide any necessary information on the proper use of the VHF radio. In addition, we have several FRS (walkie-talkie) radios for use as necessary.

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7.

Work Effort
The trip will require the efforts of everyone. Working is part of the shared adventure. We do not want any one person to do too much work and become fatigued, and keeping busy prevents boredom and helps with seasickness. Depending on when you are crewing on Antipodes, you may be involved in a sustained passage or in coastal cruising. When underway, you can expect to stand watch once or twice a day (depending on how many people are aboard). If the boat is underway for 24 hours at a time, a typical watch schedule would involve 3-4 hours on watch and then 6-8 hours off watch. When you’re off watch, however, you might have other duties as assigned by the Captain. You can expect to spend 1-2 hours a day in assisting with cooking, cleaning or other duties. This leaves plenty of time for conversations, reading, watching a movie, reflection etc. You should have more than enough time for sleeping – but the hours might be a little different than when you are at home! If you have a particular skill or interest, let us know! Watch Standing You can talk or read or listen to music (as long as it’s not too loud) while on watch. Duties:  Prevent collision  Make sure autopilot is working  Monitor all alarms  Monitor gauges  Check engine room (by looking through the door)  Monitor Radio  Immediately notify the Captain of any unusual occurrences! Cooking: Lara will typically manage cooking and meal prep, unless a watch schedule interrupts her duties as the Cook. Typically breakfast is self-initiated. Lunch and Dinner will be per the posted menu. Snacks are available and will be posted on the menu. We have all the modern conveniences Stove (Gas – electric solenoid to turn on propane and then light the stove) Oven (Gas – electric solenoid to turn on propane and then light the oven) Microwave oven (which also can act as a convection oven) Refrigerator (Latched when underway – ask the Captain or First Mate for assistance) Freezer (Latched when underway – ask the Captain or First Mate for assistance)

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Blender (ask the First Mate for assistance) Toaster Coffee (Instant or coffee press) Icemaker Breadmaker Captain’s Duties:  Checking the weather forecasts and adjusting the route.  Helps person on watch.  Checks in with watch standers.  Checks engine.  Primary maintenance person.

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8.

Entertainment
You will be surprised at how fast time will pass on our voyage, and how quickly you will settle into the routine of life at sea. When you are not on watch you will probably spend your time reading, chatting or sleeping. READING: You should bring along a few books to read. We have a large selection of our favorite books on board. Feel free to browse the “library.” We also have quite a few books on boating, weather, etc. Donations to the “library” are always welcome! At many ports of call, you will find book exchanges. TV: The vessel has a TV but reception is generally very limited. The vessel also has a DVD/VCR player and library of many DVD’s and some VCR’s. Feel free to browse. We also carry a small video recorder to record notable events on our journey. Donations to the video library are always welcome (you might wish to check the list beforehand to avoid duplicates). NEWS: We can receive AM/FM broadcasts. MUSIC: The main stereo system has AM/FM/CD and an MP3 input. You may want to bring your own MP3 player or portable CD player, so you can also listen to your particular music favorites in private, but remember to bring extra sets of batteries. Note: Music can only be listened to at low volume when on watch; otherwise it interferes with listening to the radio, fog horns and alarms. Games: We have a few board games and decks of cards (and poker chips!) on board. Exercise: Standing on a moving vessel is a lot of exercise. In harbor or at anchor we can go snorkeling, swimming, kayaking and hiking. Computers: We have normal electrical outlets on the boat and you are welcome to bring your laptop with you. We also carry a digital camera, which you can use to send pictures to friends (from port when we have WiFi access). Snorkel gear: We have several sets of mask, fins, and snorkels. You are also welcome to bring your own. We have SCUBA gear on board but this is usually reserved for emergencies (diving the hull or anchor).

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9.

Comforts
Food: The Kitchen is fully equipped with a stove, oven, microwave, refrigerator, freezer, trash compactor etc. Lara typically provides a menu for each trip and will oversee kitchen activities. Beverages: Since we are limited to the amount of liquor countries allow us to import, we usually carry somewhat limited amounts of liquor. Nonetheless, Cocktail Hour is observed whenever possible. Be sure to let Lara know if you have any particular drink requests! Privacy: You have your own bathroom and shower. You have your own room with bunk beds, closets and a desk. Space: While “Antipodes” is fairly large, all of the spaces are small in comparison to your home. There are five main areas inside. Pilot house – where we drive the boat. This has a table, and a bench seat. Galley (kitchen) – This is open to the family room (salon). Salon – main living and dining room, it has a couch (settee) and a couple of chairs Guest Stateroom – your bedroom and bathroom. Master Stateroom – our bedroom and bathroom. There are three outside areas that may be usable depending on weather. Cockpit – rear deck. This location has outdoor seating and an overhang. Upper deck - this area is for sun tanning, etc. You can also drive the boat from here. The bow. This area is great for standing, walking and sitting when not moving. On calm days it is also a great place to watch dolphins playing in our bow wave! You can sit or lay down in the salon, Pilot House or in your room. If the weather and seas are good you may also sit or lie down on the deck or flybridge. Stowage: The area available to store what you packed will handle 2 regular size duffle bags. It will NOT handle rigid luggage (such as roller bags!). Lights: We have lights throughout the vessel, but keep salon lights low to protect the watch stander’s night vision. Rolling: The vessel does not have a stabilization system. As a result, it has what can be termed a “lively” ride while underway. This is not unsafe but may require you to be proactive in terms of motion sickness prevention. If you have any concerns in this regard, please ask Lara or Jim for recommendations.

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10.

Seasickness

Seasickness can strike anyone, and is not something to be embarrassed about. Because many cases of seasickness are actually food poisoning, we need to be careful in preparing our meals, and washing our dishes. The motion of your inner ears not matching what your eyes see induces seasickness. Your body may not be accustomed to this, and this is what causes seasickness. You need to build up a tolerance to this motion/vision disconnect. You can work on this by reading a little in the car each day (not if you’re the driver!) to build up this tolerance. Seasickness is aggravated by a sensitive stomach, so avoid high concentrations of sodium, fat, acid, protein or calories in the stomach. For the 24 hr period before the trip it is advisable to cut down on foods that cause acid and might upset your stomach. DO NOT have a large meal and alcoholic drinks the night before the trip; you will pay for it at sea. Try to get to bed early and be well rested on the day of our departure. Remember, seasickness starts with what you did 24 hrs BEFORE departure. So take the appropriate steps early and if you are accustomed to taking medication, start to do so before boating. Different seasickness medications work for different people. You should try various medicines at home to see which cause side effects. Try both the patch and Dramamine. We carry various medications. If you do not have experience with motion sickness, buy chewable Dramamine. Seasickness medicines work best if absorbed in the month. When you are feeling seasick your pyloric valve prevents the drug from entering the small intestines where the drug is normally absorbed! Learn to detect the body's natural early warning signals. These may be yawning, tiredness, clamminess, sweating, headache - all signs that will precede any feelings of nausea. At the onset of these symptoms, head for fresh air and watch the horizon. This allows the eyes to match the motion felt by the ears. If you think you are getting seasick immediately tell the Captain or First Mate. Driving the vessel helps with seasickness, both because of watching the horizon and the activity. Either stand looking at the horizon, or lay down with your eyes shut. Do not sit! You should vomit into a bucket or wastebasket or (CAREFULLY) over the side and NOT into the heads or sinks below - this will only make you feel worse and the smell may induce others to be sick as well. You will soon get your sea legs, however, and I promise you that this brief period of discomfort does and will pass. If you are feeling seasick, do NOT go out on the deck alone. If you have to vomit over the side – CHECK THE WIND DIRECTION FIRST! Once the fresh air has had a chance to work, you will want to fill your stomach with some crackers and a carbonated drink - it is IMPERATIVE YOU DRINK FLUIDS. The most serious effect of seasickness is dehydration, which can cause further complications, turning a natural short-lived period of discomfort into a medical emergency. Do not take any further medication once having been seasick and keep up a flow of liquids, either bottled water or light carbonated beverages. Find a quiet spot toward the rear of the boat, curl up and get some sleep.

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11.

What to Bring.

Bring any medication you normally take, with prescriptions and Doctor's instructions - especially any allergy medication. There are no drug stores at sea. Legal “Must Haves” if traveling internationally. Passport and Driver's License (as a second form of identification) Bring a color copy of your passport and any other documents as a back up. Visa (if needed) Passport Pictures (if Visa’s are needed when entering). Return Airplane Ticket if not going back with us. Current inoculations, including tetanus Inoculation record (not actually required, but nice to have in the event of a medical emergency) Prescriptions for legal drugs. You must have a ticket to fly home at the end of the passage or in case you have to leave earlier. This must be shown to the Captain before departure, who may have to certify this to the local officials. Dress code is very informal. The trip will be in generally warm weather. While a rain jacket or lightweight windbreaker might be useful, complete foul weather gear is not really needed. Remember to pack light! Money: You are our guests on board; you are not expected to pay for the fuel, moorage, etc. Foreign ports can be expensive so bring cash, or traveler's checks. While we will not be spending extended periods in port, a minimum of $500 per week per couple while in port is prudent. You should plan your budget based on your normal spending patterns while traveling. Please make sure your credit cards are not going to expire when away and be sure to notify the issuer that you will be using it out of the country (otherwise they may freeze your account!). No Illegal Drugs or Firearms. IF THE AUTHORITIES FIND ILLEGAL DRUGS OR FIREARMS ON A VESSEL –THEY WILL KEEP THE BOAT THAT YOU JUST BOUGHT FROM US! There is absolutely zero tolerance on this topic. VESSEL ALREADY HAS:  Hair dryer  Towels  Bedding Special Notes: Let us know beforehand what you want to eat, drink and snack on.

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Please do not give us “house warming gifts” for the vessel (unless it can be watched, read or consumed). There is limited space on board. Music CDs, DVDs and books are always welcome additions to the library. Eat a light, non-greasy, meal the night before, and limit alcohol consumption. Please do not bring anything in cardboard boxes. Cardboard attracts cockroaches! Please do not use any perfumes or cologne!

12.

Clothing and Personal Gear Checklist

IMPORTANT Use only SOFT Luggage (luggage that folds up) as there is no place to store hard luggage. Examples are duffel bags, backpacks without frames. Please pack efficiently since there is limited storage space (2 duffle bags per couple). The biggest mistake that people make is bringing more than they need. You will be astonished at how little you really need to bring! We generally pack what we think we need and then take half that amount. If we are in areas other than the tropics, you might want to bring a lightweight windbreaker or light sweatshirt. A hat for sun protection is also a good idea. All clothes must be washable, easy to dry (think layering). Don’t bring anything requiring drycleaning. SHOES (PLEASE HAVE TWO PAIRS OF BOAT SHOES)  Inside boat - new or very clean boat/deck shoes-rubber soled, slippers etc.  Deck/cleaning/dinghy shoes – like Tevas or aqua socks they WILL get wet.  Comfortable walking shoes (for several miles) for shore--might get sandy or dirty.  Do NOT bring shoes with black rubber soles as these will mar the deck. CLOTHING ideas  Polo shirts and/or T-shirts.  Sweater /sweatshirt (not wool which stinks when it gets wet!).  1-2 long pants (no more than one pair of jeans - they hold water!). Boat pants that have zip-off legs to convert to shorts are a great choice.  Shorts.  Most countries are more conservative dressers and we try to “fit” in. (Women usually wear dresses/long skirts in these countries but you should also remember that we may have to use the dinghy to get ashore! Consult Lara for advice.)  No more than one “Restaurant Outfit” (slacks, collared shirt, etc. – just remember that getting to the restaurant may involve a dinghy ride!).  We have a full sized washer and dryer on the boat so remember to pack light and we can just launder clothes as needed. MISCELLANEOUS  Shaving gear/toiletries, feminine products.  Sun block, Chap Stick and sun burn treatment.  Spare eye glasses/NECK STRAP. (if you have contacts, bring glasses as a backup).

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     

Sunglasses-Please have at least one pair of polarized glasses. This is a big help. You may lose your first pair overboard on the first day, bring back up sunglasses. If you want to go outside while underway a Cap or Hat (with a strap). Books, DVD’s; while we have a number of both already on board, fresh material is always welcome! Personal favorite remedies for indigestion, colds, headaches, seasickness. Make sure credit cards do not expire while out of the country. List of credit card numbers and the number to call if your card is lost or stolen.

WATER  Bathing Suits and a large deck towel (if you plan to lay out)  To walk around shore - Aqua socks/reef runners.  If you want to go snorkeling -- Snorkeling gear & mesh bag to carry it (or you can use our gear).

13.

Rules

SAFTEY:  For safety’s sake please report anything unusual to Captain or First Mate at any time.  Always hold on to something when standing or moving on a boat.  Everything on a boat is different from home please ask how to use it first. Do not force anything! If it doesn’t immediately open or close or operate, ask the Captain.  Any time you are tired or sick please tell us - we can help with seasickness.  Because everyone is standing watch please limit alcohol usage.  No smoking, no candles, no open flames.  No going on deck while underway without telling the Watch Stander and having someone watch you.  To prevent water entering the boat, all ports below the weather deck are closed when underway. Upper deck doors and ports MAY be open at the Captain’s discretion, depending on sea state.  When done with something put it back. Especially open beverages. Please plan to keep drinks in your hand (while underway) or in the sink. Loose items fly in heavy seas and drinks can topple over in the lightest of seas.  To protect everyone’s night vision, use lights sparingly - only red lights in the pilothouse.  To help watch stander-leave pilothouse gear (i.e. binoculars) in the pilothouse at all times. GALLEY (kitchen): Refrigerator & Freezer usage  You have to release the lock to open to door.  Open slowly to check if anything has moved and will fall and dent the floor.  Place items so they will not fall when the vessel moves.  Always relock the door when done.  Limit the amount of time the door is open to save electricity. The stove gas solenoid switch must be turned on, before the burner is opened and lit. Turn off gas supply and wait till the flames self extinguish - THEN turn off the burner. Pre-trip Information Page 16 of 20 11/28/2009

To prevent breakage, all dishes are washed and put away right after every meal. All waste to be disposed of per Waste Management Plan (Federally required document). HEAD (bathroom): Don't put anything in the heads unless you have eaten it first (this includes toilet paper). All waste goes into the trash bin, this includes toilet paper and feminine products. We subscribe to a “yellow - let it mellow” and “brown - flush it down” system. Typically we flush the “mellow yellow” once or twice a day (unless underway in rough seas). For safety (especially for men) and cleaning reasons everyone uses toilet sitting down when underway. If the toilet cover is left up it will fall possible breaking the toilet, so leave it down. Since we need to provide hot water and manage the gray water tank for waste shower water please check with us before showering. Don’t leave the water running while showering. Turn on show to wet down your hair and body. Shut off water. Soap up. Rinse off. Think in terms of using 1 gallon ONLY for a shower. Consult the Captain or First Mate for instructions on how to operate the systems in the head. MISC: We have a washer / dryer but it needs lots of water and power so we try to limit its use. Dockside shoes pick up tar and grit and can mar the deck on the boat. Please check your shoes before coming aboard and remove them as necessary. PERSONAL: We all need to get along well in a small space.  No loud music, please use your headsets.  To prevent injuries and broken gear, please put away all items when not in use, including personal gear like sunglasses, camera’s, books, magazines and CELL PHONES (Note: Lara is a compulsive “put-er away-er” – she is not so good about remembering WHERE she put your stuff).  Very little should be stored on a tabletop. If it can slide and fall down, please put it down/away. This especially applies to electronics, which tend not to work when they have flown off the desk top onto the floor.  If people are standing watch at night please respect their need to sleep during the day.

14.

Conclusion

This trip is not for everyone. A trip like this is not a common activity. It is likely that no one else you know will ever do this. This trip is designed to be an adventure of a lifetime. It will not be perfect! If you don’t want new experiences, take a plane. Since you will be involved with actually operating the vessel you will need to do your share of the work. If you are not willing to help, please stay home or only visit us when we are in port for an extended stay.

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This trip is for people who want to grow. You must be willing to learn new skills. We do not expect people to know these skills before they come on the boat. Part of the fun is teaching and learning new skills. Due to weather our travel times have to be somewhat flexible. If we plan on a 10 day passage, we like to allow for a couple of extra days. Hurrying is stressful and potentially unsafe. If you need to follow a rigid time schedule, take a tour. For everyone to have fun we all need to get along. If just one person is cranky the trip will be miserable for everyone. We have a gangplank and are willing to use it. In short: this trip is not for boring, lazy, inflexible or grumpy people. (Note: The Captain is allowed 30 minutes of grumpiness per day if something breaks.)

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Appendix A: Our Route and VERY rough itinerary for this trip
Leg 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 From San Diego Panama Canal Antigua Gibralter Egypt Oman Thailand Indonesia French Polynesia Galapagos To Panama Canal Antigua Gibralter Egypt Oman Thailand Indonesia French Polynesia Galapagos San Diego NM 2950 1600 3200 2800 2200 3000 4200 4900 3400 2600 Leave Nov 2009 December 2009 May 2010 June 2010 Arrive December 2009 April 2010 May 2010 September 2010

September 2010 October 2010 October 2010 January 2011 January 2011 April 2011 October 2011 November 2011 April 2011 October 2011 November 2011 December 2011

Bear in mind that these are long distances and the boat only travels at about 7 knots so “detours” are extremely time consuming.

Appendix B: Weather Reports
Weather planning for the trip is acquired from www.Buoyweather.com , www.MacWX.com and the NOAA website. You can also use Weatherunderground to get an idea of the expected weather if we’re going to be close to shore.

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Appendix C: Food Planning
For food planning, please fill out and return the following questionnaire. We will try to accommodate your preferences in provisioning the boat and planning the menus. Please, feel free to comment on the menu. The trip will be more enjoyable for everyone if we all like the meals. The questionnaire: 1. List all allergies, especially food. _________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ 2. Foods you dislike: _____________________________________________________ 3. Foods you like: ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ 4. Favorite dinner is: _____________________________________________________ 5. Favorite lunch: ________________________________________________________ 6. Favorite Breakfast:_____________________________________________________ 7. Favorite soft drink (ex. bottled water, diet pepsi, etc.):______________________ 8. How many cans/bottles a day do you drink:________________________________________ 9. Favorite cold drink made from powder (e.g. iced tea, lemonade):_________________ 10. Favorite hot drink (e.g. coffee, hot chocolate, spice tea):________________________ 11. Favorite snacks:_______________________________________________________ 12. Special meals you want to make:__________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________

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