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					Sulphur Springs ISD Curriculum Subject Grade 6-Weeks rd Social 3 1st Studies TEKS / Student Expectations 3.2AIdentify reasons people have formed communities, including a need for security, law, and material well-being; and 3.2B Compare ways in which people in the local community and communities around the world meet their needs for government, education, communication, transportation, and recreation, over time and in the present.
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Examples/Specifications
First Settlers - Pilgrims (Colonization), Pioneers, New land Communities - Law and Order, Rules and Regulations, Security (city walls, fort) Growth and Change - Location (water, mining towns, trading, farming), Education Freedom and Independence – Slaves, Religious Freedom (Christianity) Consequences of laws

Local
Government Education Commmunication Transportation Recreation

Texas

USA

Canada

Mexico

3.16E Interpret and create visuals including graphs, charts, tables, timelines, illustrations, and maps; and 3.3C Describe historical times in terms of years, decades, and centuries.

3.3B Create and interpret timelines; and

Correlates with 8.1B, US.1B Tested at 8 Exit Objective 1 1  Timeline: chronological listing of events. Arranging events in order can help clarify the sequence in which events occurred, and can indicate cause-and-effect relationships.  Create Example: Building of City Hall: First Meeting; Political Appointments, Current use, Greatest Meeting of all time, Most recent meeting.  Interpret Examples: African American History Timeline, US Terrorist Attacks Timeline, 20th Century Timeline, Greatest movies of all time Timeline. Correlates with 8.1B, US.1B Tested at 8 Exit Objective 1 1  Year = 12 months  Decade = 10 years  Century = 100 years Use with SS Skill 3.16 - (A) obtain information, including historical and geographic data about the

John A. Crain, Ed.D., 2005

community, using a variety of print, oral, visual, and computer sources and 3.16 (B) sequence and categorize information

3.3A Use vocabulary related to chronology, including ancient and modern times and past, present, and future times;

3.10A Identify characteristics of good citizenship including a belief in justice, truth, equality, and responsibility for the common good;

3.10B Identify historic figures including Helen Keller, and Harriet Tubman who have exemplified good citizenship

3.10C Identify and explain the importance of acts of civic responsibility, including obeying

Correlates with 8.1B, US.1B Tested at 8 10 Exit Objective 1 1 1  Ancient times: (AD 476)  Modern times: (last 100 years to present)  Colonial times: (1607-1763)  Past: Having existed or occurred in an earlier time  Present: now  Future: Something that will happen in time to come Use SS Skill 3.16 - The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of sources including electronic technology.  Justice = doing what is right like following the rules and laws that have been put in place in your school, community, and home.  Truth = Being honest and doing what is right or taking responsibility for your actions in the event you did something wrong.  Equality = being fair and having to follow the same rules as everyone else. Giving everyone equal respect, trust and justice.  Common Good = the good of a community. A "good citizen" supports his or her government, obeys the law, and functions in the best interest of all the citizens. The term "citizen" can have broader meanings. Students can be citizens of their classroom entitled to protection by their student government. Citizens can be natural born or naturalized. In most cases, when naturalized, they vow their allegiance to their adopted country and cease being legal citizens of their homeland. Correlates with 8.23B, 8.24E, US.21D Tested at 8 Exit Objective 3 3  Adams: first woman to win Nobel Peace Prize (1931), known for establishing Hull House and the Settlement House movement offering medical care, legal aid, language classes, music and drama to needy. Activist who supported poor, immigrants and women, active in the women‟s suffrage movement, helped found American Civil Liberties Union  Keller: Recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom (1964). A symbol of courage and capability to the world. An active suffragette and supporter of the American Foundation for the Blind.  Tubman: Born a slave, escaped to freedom in 1849, led more than 300 slaves to freedom. Owned property in New York, was a spy and scout for Union troops during Civil War. Honored by the Black Heritage series of postage stamps (1978) as “a woman who risked everything to liberate slaves.”  Martin Luther King: Civil Rights Activist  Thurgood Marshall: 1st African American appointed Supreme Court Justice in 1967 Acts of civic responsibility:  Active, peaceful, loyal and supportive of the community  Obey laws

John A. Crain, Ed.D., 2005

laws and voting; and

3.10D Identify ordinary people who exemplify good citizenship. 3.11A Give examples of community changes that result from individual or group decisions; 3.11B Identify examples of actions individuals and groups can take to improve the community; and 3.11C Identify examples of nonprofit and/or civic organizations including the United Way and explain how they serve the common good

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Be knowledgeable about public issues Pay taxes Vote Participate in the community Respect public and private property Community People: • Mayor • Namesakes of schools and streets • Athletes • Teachers • Local artist Guiding Question: What can you do to be a good citizen? Democracy: form of government in which political control is exercised by all the people either directly or through their elected representatives. Individual or Group Decisions: writing letters of support of complaint to officials, protesting, participation in town meetings to better community, participating in government by running for office, proposing changes to buildings or add highways, tear down houses or build malls. Individual or Group Actions: cleaned-up a park, built a new playground, began recycling program, volunteering, conservation projects, running for office, donating time and money.

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Red Cross: volunteers who care for health and welfare of community members in emergency (flood, fire) United Way: umbrella organization that collects donations and distributes to non-profit organizations who provide service to community Community Food Pantry: collect food and other dry goods in order to feed the homeless and those that are unable to meet their basic needs. Civic Organizations: Lion‟s Club, Rotary Club, Kiwanis, Men‟s and Women‟s Associations, Church Associations; provide charitable contributions to elderly, youth, and those that need additional support, resources, or just friends.

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Subject Grade 6-Weeks rd Social 3 2nd Studies TEKS / Student Expectations 3.1A Describe how individuals, events, and ideas have changed communities over time;
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Examples/Specifications
Individuals: Ben Franklin (1700‟s - Inventions), also Founding Fathers: Jefferson, Hamilton, Madison, Washington, Lewis&Clark (1800‟s-Explorers who opened the door for Westward Expansion). Brought with them cultures and ways to use the land and natural resources for human needs. Henry Ford (1900‟s – Automobile), Oprah Winfrey (2000‟s – journalism) Events: WWI, WWII, internet is introduced, 9/11, Hurricanes and other natural disasters Ideas: Declaration of Independence, Civil Rights, Exploration of a New World, communication with technology, wireless communication. Pierre Charles L’Enfant (1754-1825) Born in France, Pierre L‟Enfant applied French architectural styles to U.S. government buildings during the era of the early republic. When Washington, D.C. was chosen as the new site of the federal capital, George Washington asked L‟Enfant to design the city. L‟Enfant was dismissed in 1792 because he did not listen to directions, overspent the budget, and ignored the claims of previous owners. Columbus: navigator and explorer who in 1492 reached the West Indies on a voyage west to find East. “Opened” European trade to North America with its rich natural resources and colonization potential. Columbus Day is a federal holiday the second Monday of October. Lewis: In 1801, President T. Jefferson asked Lewis to mount an expedition west to explore the Missouri River, secure fur trade of tribes living in the west and to increase scientific and geographic understanding of the continent. The journey (18041806) was the first time white men crossed the North American continent. “Blazed the trail” and “opened” the West. Clark: Assisted Lewis on the successful expedition (1804-1806). Had been Lewis‟s

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3.1B Identify individuals including Thomas Edison and Alexander G. Bell who have helped to shape communities; and 3.1C Describe how individuals including Christopher Columbus and Meriwether Lewis and William Clark have contributed to the expansion of existing communities or to the creation of new communities.

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3.4A Describe and explain variations in the physical environment including climate, landforms, natural resources, and natural hazards;

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3.4B Compare how people in different communities adapt to or modify he physical environment;

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commanding officer while in the Army. After expedition was named Indian agent of the Louisiana Territory and negotiated treaties with the Indians of the upper Mississippi and Missouri rivers for the next 30 years. Climate: A weather term, including temperature, precipitation and wind, that is a general patter particular to a region. Landforms: One of the features that make up the earth's surface, such as a plain, mountain, or valley Natural resources: Natural resources are items provided by nature from which people produce goods and provide services. Some examples of natural resources include water, soil, and vegetation as well as minerals and metals such as gold and iron ore. Even an abundance of fish can be a natural resource. Natural hazard: not caused by people (earthquake, tornado, volcano, hurricane, insect infestation). Physical Environment: The physical environment is the combination of a place's physical characteristics. Everything in and on Earth's surface and its atmosphere within which organisms, communities, or objects exist is the environment. Adapt: To make suitable or fit for a particular situation Modify: To change of make different.
Adapt Wear thin clothes and sunscreen Bathing suits and sunscreen Wear boots and use lumber Use 4-wheel drive vehicles and play winter sports Use umbrellas and waterproof protection Modify Desert landscape and dry crops Storm doors and homes on stilts Log cabins and warm fireplaces Rocks salt and snow blowing machines Build bridges and reservoirs

Desert Community Ocean-Side Community Forest Community Snowy Community Rainy Community

3.4C Describe the effects of physical and human processes in shaping the landscape; and

3.4D Identify and compare the human characteristics of selected regions.

Physical: rivers flooding, wind eroding, earthquakes Human: clear land, build roads and houses, channel water with dams, plant nonnative plants and remove native plants, control fires, bring in non-native animal species (cattle and the rise of prickly pear)  Study landform maps of the community to see how many houses, buildings, factories have been added in the last 50 years. Correlates with 8.11B Tested at 8 Objective 2  Human characteristics: Human characteristics of places include the types of houses people build, the ways they earn a living, the games children play, the languages people speak, their religious beliefs, their ethnicity, the daily schedules they follow, the foods they eat, and how they govern themselves.  Regions: Regions are areas of the earth's surface which have similar physical or

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John A. Crain, Ed.D., 2005

human characteristics distinctive from the characteristics of neighboring areas.

3.9A Describe the basic structure of government in the local community;

3.9B Identify services commonly provided by local governments

The local government assumes responsibility for most services provided to citizens. The judicial branch of local government, the municipal court, handles most civil disputes and legal infractions. Local officials may include the mayor, members of city council, members of the board of education, the sheriff, and others. They are either elected or appointed to their positions.  Local officials often speak to students and to civic organizations, and most meetings of local agencies are open to the public so people can participate in their government. Services:  Emergency - Police, Fire and Medical  Cultural Arts Department  Community Development Office  Health and Environmental Office  Convention and Visitors Center  Public Library  Municipal Court  Mayor‟s Office  Parks and Recreation  Zoo

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3.9C Identify local government officials and explain how they are chosen;

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3.9D Explain how local government services are financed; and

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3.9E Explain the importance of the consent of the governed to the functions of local government.

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Local government: assumes responsibility for most services provided to citizens. The judicial branch of local government, the municipal court, handles most civil disputes and legal infractions. Local officials: mayor, members of city council, members of the board of education, the sheriff, and others. They are either elected or appointed to their positions. Services provided by the local government include public services such as police, fire, and street lights; public utilities such as water, gas, and electricity; transportation services including road maintenance and construction, bus or subway systems, airports, and harbors; and education and recreation services such as schools, libraries, museums, parks, and sports facilities. Local governments generate revenue to pay for these from property and sales taxes and grants from state and national governments. People living, working or shopping in the local community pay the property and sales taxes When people agree to establish and abide by a government, they consent to be governed. The philosophy of natural rights articulated in the Declaration of Independence, set the standards for the U.S. government, that the only legitimate

John A. Crain, Ed.D., 2005

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government is one based on the consent of the governed. Local government provides public services to all of the citizens of the community and must also adhere to the consent of the governed.

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John A. Crain, Ed.D., 2005

Subject Grade 6-Weeks Social 3rd 3rd Studies TEKS / Student Expectations 3.5A Use cardinal and intermediate directions to locate places including the Mississippi River, Rocky Mountains, New York City, Austin, Texas, and Washington D.C. on maps and globes; 3.5B Use a scale to determine the distance between places on maps and globes;

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Examples/Specifications

Maps:

Community Map City Map State Map USA Map World Map Lewis and Clark Map Columbus Map 3.5C Identify and use the compass rose, grid, and Correlates with 1.1a; 2.4a; 8.11a Tested at 8 Objective 2  Compass rose: a circle or similar design which includes graduated degrees or symbols to locate places on maps and globes; and quarter points (intermediate directions), printed on a chart or map for reference. The compass rose usually shows both magnetic and true directions. A compass rose shows the orientation of a map on Earth. Geographers use a compass rose or the north arrow when drawing their own maps.

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3.5D Draw maps of places and regions that contain map elements including a title, compass rose, legend, scale, and grid system. 3.6A Identify ways of earning, spending, and saving money; and

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Money is earned, spent, and saved by a family to satisfy their basic needs for food, clothing, and shelter and other things that they may want. Earned: completed a paying job; provided a charged service; celebrations or holiday gift; allowance for chores and household duties

John A. Crain, Ed.D., 2005

3.6B Analyze a simple budget that allocates money for spending and saving

3.7A Define and identify examples of scarcity;

3.7B Explain the impact of scarcity on the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services

Spent: purchase goods; payment for services; satisfy a basic need; purchase items that make life easier  Saved: open a savings bank account; store in a piggy bank; hide under your mattress; use coupons or discount cards; shop at sales or clearance pricing; only buy basic needs. Simple Budgets:  Class trip: expenses and student collections  Grocery Shopping: list of items needed and price for each at quantity.  Bicycle Account: student wants a new bike. How much they can earn by doing chores and the total cost of the bike  Items are scarce when the supply of a good or service does not satisfy the demand. Scarcity exists because human wants for goods and services exceed the quantity of goods and services that can be produced using all available resources.  Examples: Water; seasonal fruits and vegetables; gasoline/oil Items are scarce when the supply of a good or service does not satisfy the demand. Scarcity exists because human wants for goods and services exceed the quantity of goods and services that can be produced using all available resources.  Production: when the demand for a good or service is high, the production has to increase. With scarce quantities, the production has to be modified to meet the demand. Modification = more cost.  Distribution: Distribution will be limited with scarce products as their may not be enough for everyone. The highest most consistent payers will receive the limited goods.  Consumption: Those who need a scarce item may be forced to limit their intake of an item. Those that do not need a scarce item may purchase it anyway leaving those that really need with limited amounts.

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3.7C Explain the impact of scarcity on interdependence within and among communities; and

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3.7D Explain the concept of a free market

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Few communities are self-sufficient. Residents in communities in areas with rich farm land may devote their time to market gardening. Down the road in an industrialized area, residents may not have land to raise gardens. As a result, they depend on each other for goods and services. A system of interdependence results, based in free exchange. When one crop is scarce, residents may grow more of another crop to satisfy the demand. If one community increases prices, the other community may counter with the same strategy to maintain a balance between the mutual dependency which exists between the two. A free enterprise economy or system is the same as a market economy. In a market economy, individuals depend on supply, demand, and prices to determine the answers to the four economic questions of "what to produce," "how to produce," "how much to produce," and "for whom to produce." The

John A. Crain, Ed.D., 2005

system has four characteristics: economic freedom, voluntary exchange, private property and the profit motive.

3.8A Give examples of how a simple business operates;

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Find a need; find a way to meet the need; sell a good or service for profit; as demand increases, increase supply for more profit; as demand decreases, decrease supply to maintain profit Examples: Girlscout cookies; bubblegum, pencils

3.8B Explain how supply and demand affect the price of a good or service;

Economic systems are organized sets of procedures used within communities or between communities to govern the production and distribution of goods and services.  Market: individuals control production and distribution of resources and make decisions based on the market in which they function.  High supply, low demand = lower prices (have to get rid of the product before it goes bad)  Low supply, high demand = higher prices (people want the product before it can be made so the production has to increase (more people have to work)
Hershey Kisses Bag of 50 Pieces Production per Kiss Chocolate Silver Wrapping Hershey Flag Molding and Packaging Total Production Per Kiss Cost of 50 kisses per bag (.05x50) $.01 $.01 $.01 $.02 $.05 $2.50 Profit per bag $.50

3.8C Explain how the cost of production and selling price affect profits; and

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What can we do to make more money? 3.8D Identify historic figures, including, Henry Ford, and other ordinary people in the community who have started new businesses.
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Henry Ford (1863-1947): helped create a mobile society by mass producing and marketing the Model T automobile, making it an indispensable part of American life. He drove his first home-built automobile in 1896. The Ford Motor Company was founded in 1903 and he developed the Model T by 1908. Ford used mass production to reduce the price of the Model T, and he worked to perfect the assembly line. Community People: Bo Pilgrim, Henrietta Chamberlain King, others from students‟ community.

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John A. Crain, Ed.D., 2005

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John A. Crain, Ed.D., 2005

Subject Grade 6-Weeks Social 3rd 4th Studies TEKS / Student Expectations 3.14A Identify selected individual writers and artists and their stories, poems, statues, paintings, and other examples of cultural heritage from communities around the world; and
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Cultural Borrowing: Cultural borrowing is the process by which a culture group adopts patterns of speech, actions, and artifacts which are characteristic of another culture group. Worldwide, about 10% of each culture is considered unique and 90% is borrowed from other cultures.  The specifics for this particular TEK are extensive to say the least. Whatever literature, stories, art, poetry, statues should be at the 3rd grade level for student comprehension. Literature  Alexander, Sue. AMERICA‟S OWN HOLIDAYS/DÍAS DE FIESTA DE LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS.  Bryan, Ashley. ABC OF AFRICAN AMERICAN POETRY. Atheneum, 1997.  Carrier, Roch. A HAPPY NEW YEAR‟S DAY. Illustrated by Gilles Pelletier. Tundra, 1991.  Coulter, Laurie. SECRETS IN THE STONE: ALL ABOUT MAYA HIEROGLYPHICS.  Hudson, Wade, edited by. PASS IT ON: AFRICAN-AMERICAN POETRY FOR CHILDREN.  Micklethwait, Lucy. A CHILD‟S BOOK OF PLAY IN ART: GREAT PICTURES, GREAT FUN. DK, 1996. Explain significance of items listed in (A)

3.14B Explain the significance of selected individual writers and artists and their stories, poems, statues, paintings, and other examples of cultural heritage to communities around the world. 3.16A Obtain information, including historical and geographic data about the community, using a variety of print, oral, visual, and computer

John A. Crain, Ed.D., 2005

sources; 3.16B Sequence and categorize information; 3.16D Use various parts of a source, including the table of contents, glossary, and index, as well as keyword computer searches, to locate information; 3.16C Interpret oral, visual, and print material by identifying the main idea, identifying cause and effect, and comparing and contrasting; 3.16F Use appropriate mathematical skills to interpret social studies information such as maps and graphs. 3.12A Explain the significance of selected ethnic and/or cultural celebrations in Texas, the United States, and other nations including St. Patrick’s Day, Cinco De Mayo, Kwanzaa, Christmas.

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St. Patrick's Day: Saint Patrick's Day is celebrated worldwide by Irish people and increasingly by many of non-Irish descent. Celebrations are generally themed around all things green and Irish; both Christians and non-Christians celebrate the holiday by wearing green, eating Irish food and attending parades. Cinco de Mayo: El Cinco de Mayo ("The Fifth of May" in Spanish) is a national celebration in Mexico and widely celebrated in the United States. It commemorates the victory of Mexican forces led by General Ignacio Zaragoza over the French occupational forces in the Battle of Puebla on May 5, 1862. It is a common misconception that Cinco de Mayo is Mexico's Independence Day, which is celebrated on the 16th of September, but actually it is a celebration of a legendary battle. Kwanzaa: Kwanzaa is a unique African American celebration with focus on the traditional African values of family, community responsibility, commerce, and self-improvement. Kwanzaa is neither political nor religious and despite some misconceptions, is not a substitute for Christmas. It is simply a time of reaffirming African-American people, their ancestors and culture. Kwanzaa, means "first fruits of the harvest" in the African language Kiswahili. It is based on 7 guiding principles. Christmas: Christmas (literally, the Mass of Christ) is a traditional Christian holiday meant to celebrate the birth of Jesus with both religious and secular aspects, commonly observed on 25 December

John A. Crain, Ed.D., 2005

3.12B Compare ethnic and/or cultural celebrations in Texas, the United States, and other nations.

Ethnic and/or cultural celebrations:  Quinceañera: 15th Birthday Party  Emancipation Day  Three Kings' Day  Chinese Lunar New Year  Black History Month  St. Patrick‟s Day

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John A. Crain, Ed.D., 2005

Subject Grade 6-Weeks Social 3rd 5th Studies TEKS / Student Expectations 3.15A Identify scientists and inventors including Louis Daguerre, Cyrus McCormick, Louis Pasteur, and Jonas Salk who have created or invented new technology; and
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Daguerre: invented the process of photography McCormick: mechanical reaper (patented 1834), which revolutionized grain cultivation  Pasteur: discovered that heat kills bacteria, introduced the field of microbiology,. Applied the process of heating liquids to kill bacteria (pasteurization) to products such as milk. Invented vaccine to counter rabies.  Salk: invented vaccine to prevent polio  Differentiates between science and technology  Identifies and explains how scientific discoveries have led to technological innovations (e.g., NASA discoveries leading to Velcro) Correlates with 8.28A,C; 8.29C; US.22C; US.23A Tested at 8 Exit Objective 3 3 3.15B Identify the impact of new technology in  Photography: box camera, Polaroid camera, throw-away camera, digital camera, photography, farm equipment, pasteurization, computer-generated or edited and medical vaccines on communities around the  Farm equipment: tractor, McCormick reaper, cotton gin Pasteurization: safe food world. supply  Medical vaccines: polio, smallpox, childhood diseases, (predictions using HIV or cancer)  everyday life in Texas and in two countries on two different continents (Bejing, China,Asia; Timbuktu, Mali, Africa,), including ways people meet their needs and the technology available in each country (over time and in the present)

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John A. Crain, Ed.D., 2005

External Assessment

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John A. Crain, Ed.D., 2005

Subject Grade 6-Weeks Social 3rd 6th Studies TEKS / Student Expectations 3.17A Express ideas orally based on knowledge and experiences; 3.17B Create written and visual material including stories, poems, pictures, maps, and graphic organizers to express ideas; and 3.17C Use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation 3.18AUse a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and 3.18B Use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision 3.13A Identify the heroic deeds of state and national heroes including Daniel Boone and Davy Crockett

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Boone: opened the Wilderness Road, thereby opening the Kentucky frontier to settlement. His life„s adventures and accomplishments symbolized the changes in America form an independent, rugged frontier to a modern, mechanized nation. Became a folk hero through exaggeration of his abilities and exploits Crockett: Tennessee-born hero of the Alamo (1836). Disagreed with Jackson‟s Indian Removal policy and land reform. Holds place in American folklore as model of independence and virtue in a frontier setting

John A. Crain, Ed.D., 2005

3.13B Retell the heroic deeds of characters from American folktales and legends including Pecos Bill and Paul Bunyan 3.13C Retell the heroic deeds of characters of Greek and Roman myths; and

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Pecos Bill Paul Bunyan Mike Fink Reflect American value of independence, self-sufficiency, inventiveness Amphitrite: Sea goddess; wife of Poseidon. Aphrodite (Venus): Goddess of love and beauty; daughter of Zeus and Dione; mother of Eros. Atlas: Titan; held world on his shoulders as punishment for warring against Zeus; son of Iapetus. Cepheus: King of Ethiopia; father of Andromeda Cronus (Saturn): Titan; god of harvests; son of Uranus and Gaea; dethroned by his son Zeus Echo: Nymph who fell hopelessly in love with Narcissus; faded away except for her voice Hercules: Hero and strong man; son of Zeus and Alcmene Robinson Crusoe Robinson Crusoe is the leading character in a novel by Daniel Defoe, published in 1719:Lived Eight and Twenty Years, All Alone in an Uninhabited Island on the Coast of America, Near the Mouth of the Great River of Oroonoque.

3.13D Identify how selected fictional characters including Robinson Crusoe created new communities. Language of Instruction

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John A. Crain, Ed.D., 2005

John A. Crain, Ed.D., 2005

John A. Crain, Ed.D., 2005


				
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