Representative examples of declarative programming languages

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					Representative examples of declarative programming languages include Prolog, Lisp Lisp is a family of functional programming languages with a long history. Developed first as an abstract notation for recursive functions, it later became the favored language of artificial intelligence research during the field's heyday in the 1970s and , and Haskell. Other examples include Miranda Miranda is a non-strict purely functional programming language developed by Professor David Turner as a successor to his earlier programming languages Sasl and KRC, using some concepts from ML and Hope. Marketed by Research Software Ltd. of England, of wh , and SQL

Procedural programming should not be confused with the orthogonal concept of imperative programming. An example of a non-imperative yet procedural programming language is Logo, which specifies sequences of steps to perform but does not have an internal state. The canonical example of a procedural programming language is ALGOL. Others include PL/I, Modula-2, and Ada.

1 See also
An event driven programming language is a programming language in which events ( mouse clicks, key presses) cause portions of the code to execute Procedural programming is a programming paradigm based upon the concept of the modularity and scope of program code (i.e., the data viewing range of an executable code statement). A main procedural program is composed of one or more modules (also called package s or unit s), either coded by the same programmer or precoded by someone else and provided in a code library. Each module is composed of one or more subprograms (which may consist of procedures, functions, subroutines or methods, depending on programming language). It is possible for a procedural program to have multiple levels or scopes, with subprograms defined inside other subprograms. Each scope can contain names which cannot be seen in outer scopes. Procedural programming offers many benefits over simple sequential programming since procedural code:

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is easier to read and more maintainable is more flexible facilitates the practice of good program design

Procedural programming languages facilitate the programmer's task in following a procedural programming approach. Procedural programming should not be confused with the orthogonal concept of imperative programming. An example of a non-imperative yet procedural programming language is Logo, which specifies sequences of steps to perform but does not have an internal state. The canonical example of a procedural programming language is ALGOL. Others include PL/I, Modula-2, and Ada.


				
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