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					Kinloch Travel Services

Day Trips
1) Edinburgh Castle - Holyrood Palace
 Edinburgh Castle dominates the city of Edinburgh like no other castle in Scotland, and Edinburgh Castle is unequalled in the whole of the British Isles. Over one thousand years of history sit on top of the famous Edinburgh rock, and when you see Edinburgh Castle you will understand why over a million visitors a year visit Edinburgh Castle. Founded as a monastery in 1128, the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh is The Queen's official residence in Scotland. Situated at the end of the Royal Mile, the Palace of Holyroodhouse is closely associated with Scotland's turbulent past, including Mary, Queen of Scots, who lived here between 1561 and 1567. Successive kings and queens have made the Palace of Holyroodhouse the premier royal residence in Scotland. Today, the Palace is the setting for State ceremonies and official entertaining.

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2)

Stirling Castle – Wallace Monument
 Stirling Castle is the grandest of Scotland's castles and one of the most popular visitor attractions in the country. 250 feet above the plain on an extinct volcano, Stirling became the strategic military key to the kingdom during the 13th and 14th century Wars of Independence and was the favourite royal residence of many of the Stuart Monarchs. Many important events from Scotland's past took place at Stirling Castle, including the violent murder of the eighth Earl of Douglas by James II in 1452. Stirling Castle played an important role in the life of Mary Queen of Scots. She spent her childhood in the castle and Mary's coronation took place in the Chapel Royal in 1543. There are excellent historical displays, a recreation of the 16th century kitchens with sensory and interactive exhibits and the Regimental Museum of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders which details their eventful history from 1794 to the present. Completed in 1869 after eight years' construction, the 220 feet high Wallace Monument sits prominently on the Abbey Craig two miles north of the city of Stirling itself. It was from this prominent hilltop in 1297 that William Wallace watched the English army approach across Stirling Bridge before leading the Scots into the battle of the same name, and victory. A fitting, and striking, location for the national monument to a national hero. In the entrance foyer of the Monument itself there is a display about Sir William Wallace and about the construction of the Monument. If you pause here you learn that it cost in excess of £10,000: all funded by subscriptions. But you will probably want to head straight for the magnificent views awaiting at the top of the Monument, a mere 220 feet and 246 steps above you. The Monument has four levels above the ground floor, with Level 4 being The Crown or the top.

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Proprietor: Graham Barclay, 34 Broomwell Gardens, Monikie, Dundee, DD5 3QP 24 Hour Answering Service - Telephone: 01382 370611 Mobile: 07759 972128 Fax: 01382 370611 E-mail: kinlochtravel@hotmail.com

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3)

Balmoral Castle
 Set amongst the magnificent scenery of Royal Deeside, in the shadows of Lochnagar is the Balmoral Estate. Purchased by Queen Victoria in 1848, the Estate has been the Scottish Home of the British Royal Family ever since. The Estate extends to just over 50,000 acres of heather clad hills, ancient Caledonian woodland, policies and of course the beautiful River Dee is nearby. Over the past 150 years careful stewardship by the owners, The Royal Family, has preserved the wildlife, scenery and architecture which is available for all generations to enjoy. In her journals Queen Victoria described Balmoral as "my dear paradise in the Highlands". We hope you will feel the same way about Balmoral once you have visited this most special place.

4)

Loch Lomond & The Trossachs
 Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park embraces diverse landscapes from the high country of Breadalbane to the sea lochs of Argyll. The Highland Boundary Fault cuts through the Park, dividing the gentle Lowlands from the rugged terrain of the Highlands. The Park is divided into four distinct areas: Loch Lomond Ben Lomond stands guard over Loch Lomond, the largest expanse of freshwater in Great Britain and the romantic centrepiece of the National Park. In the north the loch is deep and narrow, bound by steep-sided mountains. Further south it spills into an island studded panorama. Argyll Forest The ‘Arrochar Alps’ survey the Argyll Forest to the south. The view from the top of Glen Croe is just reward for the long drive up through this mountain pass. From here the road descends past Hell’s Glen down to Lochgoilhead and the wooded shores of Argyll. The Trossachs The Trossachs the wild glens and sparkling lochs between Callander and Aberfoyle – are often regarded as the ‘Highlands in miniature’. Here the contrast between Highlands and Lowlands is stark as you leave Aberfoyle to climb up through the twisting Duke’s Pass to Loch Katrine. Breadalbane Breadalbane is a land of giants. Ben Lui, Ben Challum, Ben More and Ben Vorlich, some of Scotland’s finest Munro peaks, line the route from Tyndrum to Killin and down through Glen Ogle.

Proprietor: Graham Barclay, 34 Broomwell Gardens, Monikie, Dundee, DD5 3QP 24 Hour Answering Service - Telephone: 01382 370611 Mobile: 07759 972128 Fax: 01382 370611 E-mail: kinlochtravel@hotmail.com

Kinloch Travel Services

5)

Inverness – Fort William – Glencoe
 Inverness is the capital city of the highlands where you’ll always find the warmest of welcomes – whether you choose to visit, explore, shop, relax – or really ‘live’ Inverness. Inverness is a busy, modern, vibrant city with a real buzz. Discover Culloden, Loch Ness and the monster Nessie, fantastic scenery and Highland glens, lochs and mountains. Enjoy Loch Ness cruises and tours, dolphin spotting trips, visitor attractions, restaurants and shops. Fort William is the largest town in the west Highlands of Scotland and is the commercial centre of Lochaber, an area renowned for magnificent scenery with an important history. We have the highest mountain in the UK - Ben Nevis, and Loch Morar - the deepest loch, with beautiful glens, forests and beaches in between. Glencoe is unquestionably one of Scotland’s most historic and scenic glens. Visitors from all ove the world flock here year after year, inspired by the sheer scale and gradeur of its surrounding mountains and fascinated by the intrigue of its turbulent past.

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6)

Dunkeld – Pitlochry – Blair Castle – House of Bruar 
Dunkeld lies beside the River Tay surrounded by wooded hills and crags. The centre of the village comprises neat late 17thC houses alongside the ancient cathedral. The oldest part of the mostly ruined cathedral dates from the late 13thC but there has been a monastery here since around 600, founded by either St Columba or Adamnan. Pitlochry is a popular tourist destination and an excellent base from which to explore a large part of the Central Highlands. The town is set on the eastern side of the River Tummel. It is surrounded by hills, with the most striking being Ben Vrackie, to the north east. Beyond Ben Vrackie is a vast area of wilderness rising to the Cairngorms. For much of the year the streets of Pitlochry are decorated with flowers; and the striking set pieces mark the town's success in the Britain in Bloom competition. Pitlochry is home to two distilleries. The Edradour is Scotland's smallest, producing only twelve barrels per week, and can be found just to the east of the town. Bell's Blair Atholl Distillery, at the southern end of the town, is a very much larger operation. Both have visitor centres. Blair Castle is the ancient seat of the Dukes and Earls of Atholl. The castle enjoys one of Scotland’s finest settings in the heart of Highland Perthshire. With its roots in the 13th century, Blair Castle’s history extends over some 740 years, during which time it has welcomed countless generations of visitors. At the gateway to the Grampian Mountains on the route north to Inverness, the location was highly strategic. Today we can enjoy the wild beauty of the surrounding landscape but centuries ago it was a threatening and dangerous place. One of the first private homes to open to the public in Scotland, Blair welcomes more visitors than any other.

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Proprietor: Graham Barclay, 34 Broomwell Gardens, Monikie, Dundee, DD5 3QP 24 Hour Answering Service - Telephone: 01382 370611 Mobile: 07759 972128 Fax: 01382 370611 E-mail: kinlochtravel@hotmail.com

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 The House of Bruar is Scotland’s most prestigious country store and for many, no trip to Scotland is complete without visiting ‘The Home of Country Clothing’.Within its unique environment nestling at the side of the famous Bruar Falls, The House of Bruar offers a variety of shopping opportunities rolled into one. 

7)

St. Andrews – Fife Coastal Tour
 St Andrews holds a special place in Scotland's history. It takes its name from the Apostle whose relics, legend tells us, were brought to this place in antiquity by St Rule. Scotland later adopted St Andrew as her patron saint and took his saltire cross for her flag. Before the Reformation, the town was the centre of religious life in medieval Scotland, with the bishops wielding great influence over both church and state. St Andrews is also famous as a place of learning. The university, founded in 1410-11, is the third oldest in Britain. For many visitors, though, it's a game that draws them here, for St Andrews is the home of golf, the sport having been played here for some 600 years. The Old Course is arguably the most famous golf course in the world, and the Royal and Ancient Golf Club is still the ruling body for the rules of golf. Fittingly, the Old Course hosted the Open during the millennium year and did so again in 2005. St Andrews is a town meant for exploring. The medieval layout of the town centre remains intact, with the main shopping areas concentrated in Market Street and South Street, with Bell Street and Church Street connecting the two principal streets. This tour also includes much of the coast of Fife, including the fascinating and extremely attractive fishing villages of the East Neuk of Fife.

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8)

Glamis Castle – Angus Folk Museum
 Glamis is a small village in Central Angus and grew up to serve the needs of Glamis Castle. This 17th century castle was the childhood home of the late Queen Mother and the birth place of Princess Margaret. Looking like something straight out of a fairy tale book with its towers, turrets and spires, Glamis Castle is said to be the most haunted in Scotland. No visit to Glamis is complete without stopping at the Angus Folk Museum. An absolute delight to see, the collection is housed in a row of 18th century stone cottages. Exhibits detail the former day-to-day lives of people who lived in Glamis and the surrounding countryside. See the implements and tools people here once used to weave, make butter, spin wool, plough and harvest the fields.

9)

Distillery Tours
 Tours undertaken of Tayside and Perthshire distilleries, by arrangement.

Any specific requests for trips outwith the above can be made by arrangement

Minimum Charge £250 (does not include meals, beverages, or entrance fees)

Proprietor: Graham Barclay, 34 Broomwell Gardens, Monikie, Dundee, DD5 3QP 24 Hour Answering Service - Telephone: 01382 370611 Mobile: 07759 972128 Fax: 01382 370611 E-mail: kinlochtravel@hotmail.com

Kinloch Travel Services

Proprietor: Graham Barclay, 34 Broomwell Gardens, Monikie, Dundee, DD5 3QP 24 Hour Answering Service - Telephone: 01382 370611 Mobile: 07759 972128 Fax: 01382 370611 E-mail: kinlochtravel@hotmail.com


				
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